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  • 851.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Peters, Ellen
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Slovic, Paul
    Decis Research, OR USA; University of Oregon, OR 97403 USA.
    The affect heuristic, mortality salience, and risk: Domain-specific effects of a natural disaster on risk-benefit perception2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 527-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine how affect and accessible thoughts following a major natural disaster influence everyday risk perception. A survey was conducted in the months following the 2004 south Asian Tsunami in a representative sample of the Swedish population (N = 733). Respondents rated their experienced affect as well as the perceived risk and benefits of various everyday decision domains. Affect influenced risk and benefit perception in a way that could be predicted from both the affect-congruency and affect heuristic literatures (increased risk perception and stronger risk-benefit correlations). However, in some decision domains, self-regulation goals primed by the natural disaster predicted risk and benefit ratings. Together, these results show that affect, accessible thoughts and motivational states influence perceptions of risks and benefits.

  • 852.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Decis Research, OR USA.
    Slovic, Paul
    Decis Research, OR USA; University of Oregon, OR 97403 USA.
    Mayorga, Marcus
    Decis Research, OR USA; University of Oregon, OR 97403 USA.
    Pseudoinefficacy: negative feelings from children who cannot be helped reduce warm glow for children who can be helped2015In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, no 616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a great many situations where we are asked to aid persons whose lives are endangered, we are not able to help everyone. What are the emotional and motivational consequences of not helping all? In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that negative affect arising from children that could not be helped decreases the warm glow of positive feeling associated with aiding the children who can be helped. This demotivation from the children outside of our reach may be a form of pseudoinefficacy that is non-rational. We should not be deterred from helping whomever we can because there are others we are not able to help.

  • 853.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Decision Research, Eugene, Oregon, USA.
    Slovic, Paul
    Decision Research, Eugene, Oregon, USA.
    Mayorga, Marcus
    Decision Research, Eugene, Oregon, USA.
    Peters, Ellen
    Ohio State University, Columbus, USA .
    Compassion Fade: Affect and Charity Are Greatest for a Single Child in Need2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 6, p. e0100115-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Charitable giving in 2013 exceeded $300 billion, but why do we respond to some life-saving causes while ignoring others? In our first two studies, we demonstrated that valuation of lives is associated with affective feelings (self-reported and psychophysiological) and that a decline in compassion may begin with the second endangered life. In Study 3, this fading of compassion was reversed by describing multiple lives in a more unitary fashion. Study 4 extended our findings to loss-frame scenarios. Our capacity to feel sympathy for people in need appears limited, and this form of compassion fatigue can lead to apathy and inaction, consistent with what is seen repeatedly in response to many large-scale human and environmental catastrophes.

  • 854.
    Wade, Tracey D.
    et al.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Australia.
    Kay, Enola
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Australia.
    de Valle, Madelaine K.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Australia.
    Egan, Sarah J.
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Shafran, Roz
    UCL, England.
    Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism: More is better but no need to be prescriptive2019In: Clinical Psychologist, ISSN 1328-4207, E-ISSN 1742-9552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The current study explored whether higher‐ (up to 8 modules) versus lower‐dose (3 or less modules) unguided internet Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for perfectionism (ICBT‐P) was more effective, and the best method to promote higher dosage.

    Methods

    Two sequential randomised ICBT‐P studies were conducted with participants who self‐identified as having difficulties with perfectionism; in the first participants (N = 51) received 3‐module ICBT‐P or wait‐list, and in the second participants (N = 55) received fixed (asked to complete all 8 modules two per week over 4‐weeks) or flexible format (after completing the first psychoeducational module, participants decided how many/in what order they completed the modules). We examined impact on our primary variables, perfectionistic concerns and standards, and secondary outcomes of negative affect, body image flexibility, and self‐efficacy.

    Results

    More modules were completed in the higher‐ (M modules = 4.36, SD = 3.29) versus lower‐dose (M = 1.96, SD = 1.23) ICBT‐P, d = 0.86 (95% confidence interval: 0.39, 1.34). The latter impacted perfectionism but not secondary outcomes; the former impacted all outcomes (except for self‐efficacy), and within‐group effect size improvements were double in the high‐ compared to low‐dose ICBT‐P. There was no difference between the fixed and flexible formats in terms of the number of modules completed or impact.

    Conclusions

    We can offer a patient‐centred approach to ICBT‐P that is effective, while suggesting completion of more modules can result in larger, more pervasive improvements.

  • 855.
    Waller, Rosalind
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    "You will have these ones!": Six women's experiences of being pressured to make a contraceptive choice that did not feel right2017In: Social Sciences, ISSN 2076-0760, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 6, no 4, article id 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to contribute to an understanding of women’s experiences of contraceptive counselling, and of being pressured to make a contraceptive choice that did not feel right. Six women in Sweden participated insemi-structured interviews, which were analysed through interpretative phenomenological analysis. The results were organised into three themes: (1)The normalisation process, i.e., the ways in which the women experienced using the contraceptive were being promoted as a natural part of womanhood; (2)Drawing the shortest straw, i.e., the women’s experiences of encountering insensitive caregivers; and (3) Feeling like a guinea pig,i.e., the women’s sense of not being allowed to control the situation and make their own choices. In conclusion, the experience of not being respected in the healthcare system could lead to consequences not only for women’s sense ofself-efficacy with regard to contraceptives, but also for their willingness to engage in renewed counselling. The caregivers’ communicative skills are, therefore, of prime importance.

  • 856.
    Warmerdam, Lisanne
    et al.
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Riper, Heleen
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Klein, Michel
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    van den Ven, Pepijn
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Rocha, Artur
    INESCP, Porto, Portugal.
    Ricardo Henriques, Mario
    INESCP, Porto, Portugal.
    Tousset, Eric
    AARDEX, Liege, Belgium.
    Silva, Hugo
    PLUX, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Innovative ICT Solutions to Improve Treatment Outcomes for Depression: The ICT4Depression Project2012In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 181, p. 339-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression is expected to be the disorder with the highest disease burden in high-income countries by the year 2030. ICT4Depression (ICT4D) is a European FP7 project, which aims to contribute to the alleviation of this burden by making use of depression treatment and ICT innovations. In this project we developed an ICT-based system for use in primary care that aims to improve access as well as actual care delivery for depressed adults. Innovative technologies within the ICT4D system include 1) flexible self-help treatments for depression, 2) automatic assessment of the patient using mobile phone and web-based communication 3) wearable biomedical sensor devices for monitoring activities and electrophysiological indicators, 4) computational methods for reasoning about the state of a patient and the risk of relapse (reasoning engine) and 5) a flexible system architecture for monitoring and supporting people using continuous observations and feedback via mobile phone and the web. The general objective of the ICT4D project is to test the feasibility and acceptability of the ICT4D system within a pilot study in the Netherlands and in Sweden during 2012 and 2013.

  • 857.
    Weineland, Sandra
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Horselskadades Riksforbund, Sweden.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Bridging the Gap Between Hearing Screening and Successful Rehabilitation: Research Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Motivational Interviewing via Internet2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 302-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Studies point to low help-seeking after a failed hearing screening. This research forum article presents the research protocol for a randomized controlled trial of motivational interviewing via the Internet to promote help-seeking in people who have failed an online hearing screening. Method: Adults who fail a Swedish online hearing screening, including a speech-in-noise recognition test, will be randomized to either an intervention group (participating in motivational interviewing) or an active control group (reading a book on history of hearing aids). Both of the conditions will be delivered via the Internet. The primary outcome is experience with seeking health care and using hearing aids 9 months after the intervention. Secondary outcomes are changes in before and after measures of self-reported hearing difficulties, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Stages of change and self-efficacy in hearing help-seeking are measured immediately after intervention and at a 9-month follow-up for the purpose of mediation analysis. Results: The results of this randomized controlled trial may help bridge the gap between hearing screening and successful hearing rehabilitation. Conclusion: Although no large instantaneous benefits are expected, a slow change toward healthy behaviors-seeking health care and using hearing aids-would shed light on how to use the Internet to assist people with hearing impairment.

  • 858.
    Weineland, Sandra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Närhälsan, Sweden.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andersson, Hedvig
    Linköping University.
    Parmskog, Nicole
    Linköping University.
    Hjort, Emelie
    Linköping University.
    Svanberg Wärn, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Jannert, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of Tailored and ACT-Influenced Internet-Based CBT for Eating Disorders and the Relation Between Knowledge Acquisition and Outcome: A Randomized Controlled Trial2017In: Behavior Therapy, ISSN 0005-7894, E-ISSN 1878-1888, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 624-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first trial to investigate the outcome of tailored and ACT-influenced, cognitive behavioral Internet treatment for eating disorder psychopathology, and the relation between knowledge acquisition and outcome. This study utilized a randomized controlled design, with computer-based allocation to treatment or waiting list control group. Participants were recruited via advertisements in social media and newspapers in Sweden. Participants fulfilling the criteria for bulimia nervosa (BN), orEating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS), with a BMI above 17.5, were enrolled in the study (N = 92). The treatment group received an Internet-based, ACT-influenced CBT intervention, developed by the authors, for eating disorders. The treatment lasted 8 weeks, and was adapted to the participants individual needs. A clinician provided support. The main outcome measures were eating disorder symptoms and body shape dissatisfaction. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that the treatment group (n = 46) improved significantly on eating disorder symptoms and body dissatisfaction, compared with the waiting list control group (n = 46), with small to moderate effect sizes (between group effects, d = 0.35-0.64). More than a third of the participants in the treatment group (36.6%), compared to 7.1% in the waiting list control condition, made clinically significant improvements. Results showed a significant increase in knowledge in the treatment group compared to the waiting list control group (between group effect, d = 1.12), but we found no significant correlations between knowledge acquisition and outcome (r = -0.27 to -r = 0.23). The results provide preliminary support for Internet-based, tailored, and ACT-influenced treatment, based on CBT for participants with eating disorder psychopathology.

  • 859.
    Weise, Cornelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nyenhuis, Nele
    University of Gottingen, Germany .
    Zastrutzki, Sarah
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany .
    Kroener-Herwig, Birgit
    University of Gottingen, Germany .
    Jaeger, Burkard
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany .
    The role of catastrophizing in recent onset tinnitus: Its nature and association with tinnitus distress and medical utilization2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 177-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Persistent tinnitus affects 10 to 15% of adults. Little is understood about why only a small percentage of patients become severely affected. Catastrophic thinking has been suggested as one potentially relevant factor that might influence a patients coping behavior, and thus tinnitus habituation. The current study investigates the concept of tinnitus catastrophizing and its relation with distress and medical utilization in recent onset tinnitus. Design: Participants were administered a survey assessing catastrophizing, tinnitus distress, medical utilization, coping, and mood disturbance. Regression analyses investigated the nature of tinnitus catastrophizing and its contributions to distress and health care utilization. Study sample: 278 subjects with tinnitus for less than six months were recruited from Ear-Nose-Throat units, through the internet, and newspaper articles. Results: Controlling for background variables, high subjective tinnitus loudness, low behavioral coping, and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with tinnitus catastrophizing. Furthermore, greater tinnitus catastrophizing was related to higher distress and more frequent medical visits. Conclusions: Tinnitus catastrophizing appears to be pivotal already at an early stage of tinnitus experience. Addressing catastrophizing by specific prevention and intervention programs might reduce the development of distress and medical utilization in the long term. Longitudinal studies are required to clarify cause-effect relations.

  • 860.
    Weise, Cornelia
    et al.
    Philipps Univ Marburg, Germany.
    Kaiser, Gudrun
    Philipps Univ Marburg, Germany.
    Janda, Carolyn
    Philipps Univ Marburg, Germany.
    Kues, Johanna N.
    Charite Campus Benjamin Franklin, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Strahler, Jana
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Germany.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    Univ Otago, New Zealand.
    Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention for Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, ISSN 0033-3190, E-ISSN 1423-0348, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 16-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Given the high prevalence of clinically relevant premenstrual symptoms and the associated impairment, there is a need for effective treatments. Initial evidence suggests cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) as an effective treatment for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). The aim of the current randomized clinical trial was to evaluate an Internet-based CBT (iCBT) to reduce the burden of PMDD. Methods: In all, 174 women with PMDD were recruited via newspaper articles, flyers, and social media. They were randomized to a treatment group (TG; n = 86) or waitlist control group (CG; n = 88). Women of the TG received an 8-week therapist-guided iCBT. Data were assessed before and after treatment/waiting, and 6 months after intervention with prospective symptom diaries and questionnaires in the pre-menstrual phase. Treatment effects and moderators were analysed using hierarchical linear modelling. Results: Significant time x group interaction effects on functional impairment and psychological impairment, impact on everyday life, symptom intensity, and symptom disability in favour of the TG indicated the efficacy of the treatment. Follow-up assessments demonstrated treatment effects to be stable until 6 months after treatment. Additionally, significant interactions with moderator variables were found. In the TG, higher levels of active coping and lower levels of support-seeking coping were associated with stronger improvement in interference in everyday life and symptom intensity. In addition, lower levels of perceived stress were associated with stronger improvement in functional impairment. Conclusion: The iCBT was highly effective in reducing the burden of PMDD. It appears to be particularly important to address coping styles and stress management in the treatment. (C) 2019 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 861.
    Weise, Cornelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    University of Mainz, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Internet-based cognitive-behavioural treatment of chronic tinnitus2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Tinnitus is a considerable problem for about 2-4% of the adult population. Cognitive behavioural treatments (CBT) have been shown to be effective in reducing tinnitus distress, however, the availability of individual counselling is limited. Therefore Internet-based CBT-approaches (iCBT) have been developed and showed promising results. The aim of our study was to investigate the efficacy of an iCBT to reduce tinnitus distress. Methods: 124 patients with distressing chronic tinnitus were randomly assigned to either an Internet-based CBT (n 0 62) or an online discussion group (n 0 62), both lasting for 10 weeks. The iCBT group works on a self-help program including different tools to improve tinnitus coping. Patients receive individual weekly e-mail feedback. In the online discussion group, patients discuss different topics related to tinnitus, however not to tinnitus coping. Primary and secondary out- come were assessed pre and post treatment and 6 months after the end of the treatment. Results: Significant interactions (time x group) in favour of the iCBT were found. Medium to large between-group effect sizes (Hedges' g) support these findings. After the end of the treatment, patients of the iCBT group reported significantly reduced tinnitus distress (F(1,117)043.28, p<.001; g0.88), increased tinnitus acceptance (F(1,117) 0 37.83, p < .001; g 0 .80) and fewer depres- sive symptoms (F(1,117) 0 22.92, p < .001; g 0 .43). Results of patients participating in the online discussion group were also improved, however significantly less articulated than in the iCBT group. Follow-up results indicated the stability of the improve- ments over 6 months. Conclusion: The guided iCBT was highly accepted and led to significant and long-term stable improvements in tinnitus dis- tress and associated variables. The efficacy of the iCBT was superior to the efficacy of the discussion group. Due to the use of an Internet-based approach, the treatment was available for patients situated all over the country. Thus, implementing Internet-based treatments might partially compensate for the lack of face-to-face treatments to reduce tinnitus distress. Further research is needed to investigate which factors influ- ence the efficacy of Internet-based treatments. Keywords: e-health, CBT, chronic disease, treatment

  • 862.
    Weise, Cornelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Marburg, Germany.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Internet-Delivered Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Tinnitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial2016In: Psychosomatic Medicine, ISSN 0033-3174, E-ISSN 1534-7796, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 501-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Tinnitus has a substantially negative impact on quality of life in up to 5% of the general population. Internet-based cognitive-behavioral treatment (iCBT) has been shown to be effective in a few trials. The aim of our study was to investigate iCBT for tinnitus by using a randomized controlled trial. Methods Patients with severe tinnitus-related distress were randomly assigned to therapist-guided iCBT (n = 62) or to a moderated online discussion forum (n = 62). Standardized self-report measures for tinnitus-related distress (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire) and associated symptoms (tinnitus acceptance, anxiety, depression, and insomnia) were assessed at pretreatment and posttreatment, 6-month-, and 1-year follow-up. Clinical significance was assessed with the Reliable Change Index. Results Multivariate analyses of variance revealed significant main effects for time, group, and interaction in favor of the iCBT group. With regard to tinnitus-related distress, the significant univariate interaction effects (time by group) were supported by large effect sizes (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory: g = 0.83, 95% confidence interval = 0.47-1.20; Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire: g = 1.08, 95% confidence interval = 0.71-1.64). For the secondary outcomes, significant interactions with small to medium effect sizes were found. Within-group effects for the iCBT, from pretreatment to follow-up, were substantial in regard to tinnitus-related distress (1.38 d 1.81) and small to large for secondary outcomes (0.39 d 1.04). Conclusions Using a randomized controlled trial design, we replicated prior findings regarding positive effects of Internet-delivered CBT on tinnitus-related distress and associated symptoms. Implementing iCBT for tinnitus into regular health care will be an important next step to increase access to treatment for patients with tinnitus. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT01205919.

  • 863.
    Weise, Cornelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kleinstäuber, Maria
    University of Mainz, Germany.
    Hiller, Wolfgang
    University of Mainz, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Internetbasierte kognitiv-behaviorale Behandlung des chronischen Tinnitus – Ergebnisse einer randomisierten- kontrollierten Studie: [Internet-based cognitive behavioural treatment of chronic tinnitus - results of a randomized controlled trial]2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 864.
    Wennberg, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Philips, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    de Jong, Kim
    Leiden University, The Netherlands.
    The Swedish version of the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45): reliability and factor structure in a substance abuse sample2010In: Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, ISSN 1476-0835, E-ISSN 2044-8341, Vol. 83, no 3, p. 325-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study described the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45.2) in a substance abuse sample (N=227). The test properties were satisfactory except for somewhat low internal consistency in the social role subscale. The results were similar to those obtained in other countries but systematic international comparisons are still lacking.

  • 865.
    Wessbo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Forsell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Martín-Bylund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Vestergren, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Editorial: Open issue2017In: Confero: Essays on Education, Philosophy and Politics, ISSN 2001-4562, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 5-10Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This open issue of Confero presents four essays that all relate to questions of education and power. Laila Nielsen and Ralph Leighton compare how conditions of citizenship regarding ethnicity, gender, and social class are understood, based on interviews with teachers and students in upper secondary schools in England and Sweden. The second essay is written by Rasoul Nejadmehr who gives a thorough account of the "scientific education" as the dominant educational paradigm of the present. Through a historical analysis, Nejadmehr shows how this paradigm is deeply embedded with racial, colonial, and Eurocentric biases. The third essay by Marcus Samuelsson analyzes offical and unofficial inspections of the classroom that takes place when authorities conduct audits, but also when pupils post videos on social media. In the fourth essay of this issue, Tomas Wedin discusses changes in the Swedish school during the period of 1946-2000. 

  • 866.
    Westerlind, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    Nilsson, Kenny
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    Datorspelande hos svenska gymnasieungdomar: Vanor, drivkrafter och konsekvenser för psykosocial funktion2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 300 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    En enkätundersökning utfördes om spelvanor hos svenska gymnasieungdomar. Enkäten innehöll frågor om hur mycket ungdomarna spelade och deras drivkrafter till spelande uppdelat på fyra olika skalor. En skala för om man spelar för att få prestera, en skala för att spela för social interaktion online, en skala för emotionsdrivet spelande och en skala för ungdomens grad av medveten kontroll över sitt spelande.

    Drivkrafter och speltid jämfördes med frågor om sömn, skolgång, mående och umgänge med vänner offline för att se om det fanns associationer med negativa konsekvenser för övriga livet.

    Studien hade 466 deltagare, varav 65% var män och 33.5% var kvinnor. Totalt spelade 83.5% av deltagarna spel i någon utsträckning. För män var denna siffra 93.7% och för kvinnor 64.1%.

    De huvudsakliga fynden var att speltid, emotionsdrivet spelande och spelande med låg grad av medveten kontroll var svagt till måttligt associerade med högre skattade symptom på nedstämdhet och ångest, mindre sömn och att göra sina läxor mer sällan. Resultaten antyder att ökad förståelse av drivkrafter är en möjlig ingång för att vidare utforska bakomliggande faktorer för problematiskt spelande.

  • 867.
    Wetterborg, Dan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Langstrom, Niklas
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Swedish Prison and Probat Serv RandD Unit, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Enebrink, Pia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Borderline personality disorder: Prevalence and psychiatric comorbidity among male offenders on probation in Sweden2015In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 62, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severely disabling condition, associated with substantially increased risk of deliberate self-harm and, particularly in men, also with interpersonal violence and other criminal behavior. Although BPD might be common among prison inmates, little is known about prevalence and psychiatric comorbidity in probationers and parolees. Method: In 2013, a consecutive sample of 109 newly admitted adult male offenders on probation or parole in all three probation offices of Stockholm, Sweden, completed self-report screening questionnaires for BPD and other psychiatric morbidity. Participants scoring over BPD cut-off participated in a psychiatric diagnostic interview. Results: We ascertained a final DSM-5 BPD prevalence rate of 19.8% (95% CI: 12.3-27.3%). The most common current comorbid disorders among subjects with BPD were antisocial personality disorder (91%), major depressive disorder (82%), substance dependence (73%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (70%), and alcohol dependence (64%). Individuals diagnosed with BPD had significantly more current psychiatric comorbidity (M = 6.2 disorders) than interviewed participants not fulfilling BPD criteria (M = 3.6). Participants with BPD also reported substantially more symptoms of ADHD, anxiety and depression compared to all subjects without BPD. Conclusions: BPD affected one fifth of probationers and was related to serious mental ill-health known to affect recidivism risk. The findings suggest further study of possible benefits of improved identification and treatment of BPD in offender populations. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 868.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    From Loughborough with love: How discursive psychology rocked the heart of psychology’s love affair with attitudes2016In: Discursive psychology: Classic and contemporary issues / [ed] Tileaga, C. & Stokoe, E., London: Routledge, 2016, p. 101-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 869.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Group interaction through a lens: A proposal for an evidence-based training tool for tutors of small group and problem-based learning2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 870.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    Producing infant food preferences during weaning: the role of language and gesture in parent-child interaction2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 871.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    The management of infants’ food preferences by parents during everyday weaning interactions.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 872.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The management of infants’ food preferences by parents during everyday weaning interactions.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 873.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    The social construction of food preference as a psychological construct: personal and micro-political implications in everyday family mealtimes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 874.
    Wiggins, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsson Torstensdotter, Gunvor
    Törnqvist, Tove
    Being a professional, or just being a student? A discursive analysis of video-recorded interprofessional learning tutorials in a medical faculty2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 875.
    Wiggins, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsson Torstensdotter, Gunvor
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Törnqvist, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    On doing ‘being a student amongst other kinds of students’: Managing academic identities in an interprofessional tutorial group2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 876.
    Wiggins, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Eriksson Barajas, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Diskursiv psykologi2019In: Handbok i kvalitativ analys / [ed] Andreas Fejes och Robert Thornberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2019, 3, p. 116-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Diskursiv psykologi (i fortsättningen DP) är en metodansats för att undersökahur psykologiska begrepp är konstruerade och görs relevanta i socialinteraktion. Ansatsen kan användas på video- och ljudinspelningar och på skriventext. Den är användbar när man har särskilda psykologiska spörsmål somman vill utforska i social interaktion. I det här kapitlet ger vi en kortfattad beskrivning av den teoretiska bakgrunden,med andra ord antagandena och idéerna bakom DP. Därefter beskriver vi de olika stegen i analysen så att du kan använda dem själv.Vi illustrerar analysen med ett exempel.

  • 877.
    Wiggins, Sally
    et al.
    School of Psychological Sciences and Health, University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsson Abbad, Gunvor
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pauli, Regina
    Department of Psychology, University of Roehampton, UK.
    Worell, Marcia
    School of Human and Social Sciences, University of West London, UK.
    Ask Not Only ‘What Can Problem-Based Learning Do For Psychology?’ But ‘What Can Psychology Do For Problem-Based Learning?’ A Review of The Relevance of Problem-Based Learning For Psychology Teaching and Research2016In: Psychology Learning & Teaching, ISSN 14757257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 136-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an internationally recognised pedagogical approach that is implemented within a number of disciplines. The relevance and uptake of PBL in psychology has to date, however,received very limited attention. The aim of this paper is therefore to review published accounts on how PBL is being used to deliver psychology curricula in higher education and to highlight psychological research that offers practical strategies for PBL theory and practice. The paper is divided into three sections. In the first, we discuss the principles of PBL and provide examples of how it can be used within psychology curricula, alongside a consideration of its advantages and disadvantages. In the second section,we outline the results of a systematic literature review of published examples of PBL used within psychology undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Finally, in the third section, we examine some of the ways in which psychological research can provide practical guidance for PBL teaching practice. We conclude this paper with some recommendations for future research across all these areas, and call forthe further development of PBL curricula in psychology higher education course provision.

  • 878.
    Wiggins, Sally
    et al.
    School of Psychological Sciences and Health, University of Strathclyde.
    Hammar Chiriac, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsson Abbad, Gunvor
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pauli, Regina
    Department of Psychology, Roehampton University.
    Worell, Marcia
    School of Human and Social Sciences, University of West London.
    PLAT 15(2) 2016: Introduction to the Special Issue on Problem-Based Learning and Psychology2016In: Psychology Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1475-7257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 133-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 879.
    Wiggins, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Potter, Jonathan
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Discursive psychology2017In: Sage handbook of qualitative research in psychology / [ed] Carla Willig & Wendy Stainton Rogers, Sage Publications, 2017, 2, p. 93-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 880.
    Wiggins Young, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Moments of Pleasure: A Preliminary Classification of Gustatory mmms and the Enactment of Enjoyment During Infant Mealtimes2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enjoyment of food and the sharing of mealtimes is a normative cultural and social practice. Empirical research on eating enjoyment has, however, been a rather neglected area across the social sciences, often marginalized in favor of health or focusing on individual preferences rather than shared enjoyment. Even with regards to children, their enjoyment of food is typically rated retrospectively via parental reports of mealtime behavior. What is missing is an understanding of how enjoyment becomes a normative, cultural practice during mealtimes. This paper examines this issue in the context of parents feeding their 5-8-month-old infants in the family home, since it is within this context that we can see the early emergence of such practices in often highly routinized situations. The enactment of eating as enjoyable, and of the food as appreciated or "liked" in some way, is a culturally normative practice that becomes recognizable through particular non-lexical ("mmm," "ooh") or lexical ("this is nice, isnt it?") utterances. The data comprise 66 infant mealtimes video-recorded over almost 19 h, from five families living in Scotland. The analysis uses discursive psychology and focuses on the sequential position of different types of parental gustatory mmms as produced during the infant meals. A classification of four types of mmm were identified in the corpus - announcement, receipting, modeling, and encouragement mmms -each associated with features of sequential and multimodal organization within the mealtime. In the majority of instances, mmms were uttered alone with no other assessment terms, and parents typically produced these as an orientation to the enjoyment of their infants, rather than their own, eating practices. The receipting mmms, for instance, occurred at the precise moment when the infants mouth closed around the food. It is argued that eating enjoyment can be considered as much an interactional practice as an individual sensation, and that non-lexical vocalizations around food are an essential part of sensory practices. The paper thus aims to bridge the gap between cultural and psychological studies of eating enjoyment and contribute to developmental studies of infant feeding in everyday interaction.

  • 881.
    Wigren, Margareta
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Excessive picking in Prader-Willi Syndrome: A pilot study of phenomenological aspects and comorbid symptoms2001In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 129-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin picking constitutes a minor diagnostic criterion for Prader-Willi syndromeand is considered to be a syndrome speciŽ c behaviour and part of a behaviouralphenotype. This study surveyed different aspects and patterns of skin picking as well asrelated picking and pulling behaviours and compulsive and impulsive–aggressive symptoms.Parents of 37 individuals with PWS, aged 12 to 30 years, participated by completingquestionnaires specially designed for the purpose of capturing speciŽ c features relevant to theclinical PWS picture. Two-thirds of the sample displayed skin picking with a frequencyranging from chronic to transient, episodic symptoms. Many individuals with skin pickingalso exhibited comorbid picking behaviours and individuals with excessive skin picking alsohad additional problems with frequent tantrums and violent outbursts.

  • 882.
    Wiss, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Slovic, Paul
    Decis Res, Honolulu, HI USA; Univ Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 USA.
    Västfjäll, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Decis Res, Honolulu, HI USA.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The influence of identifiability and singularity in moral decision making2015In: Judgment and decision making, ISSN 1930-2975, E-ISSN 1930-2975, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 492-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increased willingness to help identified individuals rather than non-identified, and the effect of identifiability is mainly present when a single individual rather than a group is presented. However, identifiability and singularity effects have thus far not been manipulated orthogonally. The present research uses a joint evaluation approach to examine the relative contribution of identifiability and singularity in moral decision-making reflecting conflicting values between deontology and consequentialism. As in trolley dilemmas subjects could either choose to stay with the default option, i.e., giving a potentially life-saving vaccine to a single child, or to actively choose to deny the single child the vaccine in favor of five other children. Identifiability of the single child and the group of children was varied between-subjects in a 2x2 factorial design. In total 1,232 subjects from Sweden and the United States participated in three separate experiments. Across all treatments, in all three experiments, 32.6% of the subjects chose to stay with the deontological default option instead of actively choosing to maximize benefits. Results show that identifiability does not always have a positive effect on decisions in allocation dilemmas. For single targets, identifiability had a negative or no effect in two out of three experiments, while for the group of targets identifiability had a more stable positive effect on subjects’ willingness to allocate vaccines. When the effect of identifiability was negative, process data showed that this effect was mediated by emotional reactance. Hence, the results show that the influence of identifiability is more complex than it has been previously portrayed in the literature on charitable giving. 

  • 883.
    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich
    et al.
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany .
    Knappe, Susanne
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany .
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Araya, Ricardo
    University of Bristol, England .
    Banos Rivera, Rosa M.
    University of Valencia, Spain .
    Barkham, Michael
    University of Sheffield, England .
    Bech, Per
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Beckers, Tom
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Berger, Thomas
    University of Bern, Switzerland .
    Berking, Matthias
    University of Marburg, Germany .
    Berrocal, Carmen
    University of Malaga, Spain .
    Botella, Christina
    Jaume I University, Spain .
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Chouinard, Guy
    St Antoine Hospital, France .
    Colom, Francesc
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain .
    Csillag, Claudio
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Cujipers, Pim
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands Leuphana University, Germany .
    David, Daniel
    University of Babes Bolyai, Romania Department Oncology Science, NY USA .
    Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    A. Essau, Cecilia
    University of Roehampton, England .
    Fava, Giovanni A.
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    Goschke, Thomas
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany .
    Hermans, Dirk
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Hofmann, Stefan G.
    Boston University, MA 02215 USA .
    Lutz, Wolfgang
    University of Trier, Germany .
    Muris, Peter
    Maastricht University, Netherlands .
    Ollendick, Thomas H.
    Virginia Technical University, VA USA .
    Raes, Filip
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Rief, Winfried
    University of Marburg, Germany .
    Riper, Heleen
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands .
    Tossani, Eliana
    University of Bologna, Italy .
    van der Oord, Saskia
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Vervliet, Bram
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Haro, Josep M.
    CIBERSAM, Spain Fundacio St Joan de Deu, Spain University of Barcelona, Spain .
    Schumann, Gunter
    Kings Coll London, England Kings Coll London, England .
    The need for a behavioural science focus in research on mental health and mental disorders2014In: International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, ISSN 1049-8931, E-ISSN 1557-0657, Vol. 23, p. 28-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychology as a science offers an enormous diversity of theories, principles, and methodological approaches to understand mental health, abnormal functions and behaviours and mental disorders. A selected overview of the scope, current topics as well as strength and gaps in Psychological Science may help to depict the advances needed to inform future research agendas specifically on mental health and mental disorders. From an integrative psychological perspective, most maladaptive health behaviours and mental disorders can be conceptualized as the result of developmental dysfunctions of psychological functions and processes as well as neurobiological and genetic processes that interact with the environment. The paper presents and discusses an integrative translational model, linking basic and experimental research with clinical research as well as population-based prospective-longitudinal studies. This model provides a conceptual framework to identify how individual vulnerabilities interact with environment over time, and promote critical behaviours that might act as proximal risk factors for ill-health and mental disorders. Within the models framework, such improved knowledge is also expected to better delineate targeted preventive and therapeutic interventions that prevent further escalation in early stages before the full disorder and further complications thereof develop. In contrast to conventional personalized medicine that typically targets individual (genetic) variation of patients who already have developed a disease to improve medical treatment, the proposed framework model, linked to a concerted funding programme of the Science of Behaviour Change, carries the promise of improved diagnosis, treatment and prevention of health-risk behaviour constellations as well as mental disorders.

  • 884.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rydberg, Emelie
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, School of Health and Medical Science, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Örebro University.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The psychological process from avoidance to acceptance in adults with acquired hearing impairment2014In: Hearing, Balance and Communication, ISSN 2169-5717, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study explored the psychological process from avoidance to acceptance in adults with acquired hearing impairment. Study design: A descriptive qualitative interview study was conducted in Sweden in 2010. Participants were 18 adults with an acquired sensorineural hearing impairment aged 50-70 years, who had recently obtained hearing aids at the Audiology Clinic of the Örebro University Hospital. The sample included both first-time hearing aid users (n = 10) and experienced hearing aid users (n = 8). Each participant took part in one semi-structured interview. Qualitative content analysis was performed on the manifest content of the interview transcripts. Results: Participants described the process from avoidance to acceptance as a slow and gradual process rooted in the awareness of the frequency and severity of hearing disability and of its psychological consequences. Facilitators included adaptive coping mechanisms, other peoples comments and positive experiences, accessibility of help-seeking and routine health assessments. In contrast, barriers included maladaptive coping mechanisms and stigma. Conclusions: Participants described the process of acceptance as a personal process that involved, to some extent, their social network of family, friends and colleagues. It was also a trade-off between the consequences of untreated hearing impairment and the threat to normal identity that, through stigma, hearing impairment carries. Further studies are needed to fully investigate the role of access to information on hearing impairment acceptance. How professionals and society can facilitate the process of acceptance should also be a focus of future research efforts. 

  • 885.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn Eriksson, Therese
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Dahl, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Multidisciplinary group information for patients with tinnitus: an open trial2018In: Hearing, Balance and Communication, ISSN 2169-5717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a multidisciplinary group information as a part of a Stepped Care tinnitus management model. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were administered before and after the group information to evaluate the effects.

    Method: In total, 627 patients participated in half-day tinnitus information meetings from 2004 to 2011 in our clinic. We retrieved 426 patients for analysis with complete scores on the THI, HADS, and a questionnaire covering background information. These three questionnaires were used before the information meeting, and the THI and HADS at a 1-month follow-up.

    Results: Significant decreases were found in scores on the THI (p < .001) and the HADS-A (p < .05), pre- and post-information session. However, no significant changes were observed on the HADS-D.

    Conclusion: An information meeting as a part of multidisciplinary Stepped Care model can be an effective initial approach to manage tinnitus, and serve as a filter for patients who need additional treatment.

  • 886.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Working Memory, Sleep, and Hearing Problems in Patients with Tinnitus and Hearing Loss Fitted with Hearing Aids2017In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tinnitus is a common condition and there is a need to evaluate effects of tinnitus management in relation to moderating factors such as degree of hearing loss. As it is possible that tinnitus influences concentration, and thus is likely to disturb cognitive processing, the role of cognitive functioning also needs to be investigated.

    Purpose: To compare a group of patients with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus to a control group with only sensorineural hearing loss (and no tinnitus). To investigate working memory, sleep, and hearing problems measured before and after hearing rehabilitation.

    Research Design: A prospective study.

    Study Sample: The sample consisted of 100 patients, 50 with hearing loss and tinnitus, and 50 controls with hearing loss but no tinnitus. All patients were between 40 and 82 yr old and had a pure-tone average (PTA; average of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) ,70 dB HL.

    Intervention: Patients were tested before and after rehabilitation with hearing aids with regard to their working memory capacity, sleep quality, hearing problems, speech recognition, and tinnitus annoyance.

    Data Collection and Analysis: Eight patients dropped out of the study. Thus, a total of 92 patients were included for analysis, with 46 in each group. As a consequence of unplanned age and PTA differences between the groups, an age-matched subsample (n 5 30 1 30) was selected for further analysis. Tests including the Reading Span, Hearing-in-Noise Test (HINT), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were administered before and after hearing aid rehabilitation.

    Results: There were no between-group differences at baseline in the full sample (n 5 92), with the exception of the THI (p , 0.001) and the PSQI (p , 0.002), on which the hearing loss and tinnitus group had significantly higher scores. Pre/post changes were significant for both groups on the Reading Span, and HHIE. However, these improvements were significantly larger for the patients in the hearing loss and tinnitus group on the Reading Span test (p , 0.001) and the PSQI (p , 0.001). Patients with tinnitus and hearing loss also exhibited significantly improved THI scores at follow-up, compared to baseline ( p, 0.001). We conducted the same analyses for the age-matched subsample (n 5 30 1 30). For the baseline data, only the THI (p , 0.001) and the PSQI (p , 0.015) difference remained significant. With regard to the pre/post changes, we found the same differences in improvement in Reading Span ( p , 0.001) and the PSQI (p , 0.015) as in the full sample.

    Conclusions: Patients with tinnitus benefited from hearing aid rehabilitation. The observed differences in cognitive function were unexpected, and there were larger score improvements on the Reading Span test in the hearing loss and tinnitus group than in the hearing loss group. Patients with tinnitus and hearing loss may receive extra benefit in terms of cognitive function following hearing aid rehabilitation.

  • 887.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lindhe Söderlund, Lena
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Sweden..
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Motivational Interviewing as an Adjunct to Hearing Rehabilitation for Patients with Tinnitus: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.2016In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 2157-3107, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 669--676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To test the effects of a brief motivational interviewing (MI) program as an adjunct to hearing aid rehabilitation for patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss.

    RESEARCH DESIGN: This was a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    STUDY SAMPLE: The sample consisted of 50 patients aged between 40 and 82 yr with both tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss and a pure-tone average (0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) < 70 dB HL. All patients were first-time hearing aid users.

    INTERVENTION: A brief MI program was used during hearing aid fitting in 25 patients, whereas the remainder received standard practice (SP), with conventional hearing rehabilitation.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: A total of 46 patients (N = 23 + 23) with tinnitus were included for further analysis. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) were administered before and after rehabilitation. THI was used to investigate changes in tinnitus annoyance, and the IOI-HA was used to determine the effect of hearing aid treatment.

    RESULTS: Self-reported tinnitus disability (THI) decreased significantly in the MI group (p < 0.001) and in the SP group (p < 0.006). However, there was greater improvement in the MI group (p < 0.013). Furthermore, the findings showed a significant improvement in patients' satisfaction concerning the hearing aids (IOI-HA, within both groups; MI group, p < 0.038; and SP group, p < 0.026), with no difference between the groups (p < 0.99).

    CONCLUSION: Tinnitus handicap scores decrease to a greater extent following brief MI than following SP. Future research on the value of incorporating MI into audiological rehabilitation using randomized controlled designs is required.

  • 888.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Malmquist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lesbian Shared Biological Motherhood: The Ethics of IVF with Reception of Oocytes from Partner2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 347-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IVF with ROPA (Reception of Oocytes from Partners) allows lesbian mothers to share biological motherhood. The gestational mother receives an egg from her partner who becomes the genetic mother. This article examines the ethics of IVF with ROPA with a focus on the welfare of the woman and the resulting child, on whether ROPA qualifies as a "legitimate" medical therapy that falls within the goals of medicine, and on the meaning and value attributed to a biologically shared bond between parents and child. We also contrast IVF with ROPA with egg donor IVF for heterosexual couples and intrafamilial live uterus transplantation with IVF, and show how Swedish legislation makes certain ways of sharing biological bonds out of place. In Sweden, IVF with ROPA is illegal, egg donor IVF for heterosexual couples is allowed and practiced as is sperm donor IVF for lesbians, and live uterus transplantation is performed within a research project (though not allowed in regular health care). But is ROPA really ethically more problematic than these other cases? The article argues that IVF with ROPA gives rise to fewer ethical questions than does live uterus transplantation with IVF and, in some cases, egg donor IVF.

  • 889.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Malmquist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Assisterad befruktning för lesbiska par: Gayvänligt, heteronormativt eller både och?2011In: Föräldraskapets politik / [ed] Helena Bergman, Maria Eriksson & Roger Klinth, Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2011, p. 129-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under de senaste hundra åren har betydelsen av goda familjeförhållanden och gott föräldraskap betonats allt mer i debatt och politik. Men vad utgör ett gott föräldraskap, och hur skapas goda mödrar och fäder? Svaret på dessa frågor förändrats under det senaste seklet.

    Såväl föräldraskapet självt som försöken att påverka det genomgår ständiga förändringar. Adoptionsutredningar, assisterad befruktning för lesbiska par samt föräldrars engagemang i sina barns skolgång är några av de frågor som i boken får belysa samhällsutvecklingen. Att vara förälder till ett barn kan tyckas vara en naturlig och ursprunglig relation, men påverkas i högsta grad av tid, plats och sociala villkor.

    Bokens författare är historiker och samhällsvetare verksamma vid olika universitet och högskolor runt om i Sverige.

  • 890.
    Zetterqvist, Vendela
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Leva med tinnitus2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Har du ett klingande, ringande, tjutande, brusande, surrande, visslande ljud i huvudet eller öronen som påverkar ditt dagliga liv? Ett stort antal personer i Sverige upplever att tinnitus inverkar på deras mående, sömn, koncentrationsförmåga och livskvalitet.Ljudet kan uppfattas störande i ett flertal situationer och ljudmiljöer såsom i tystnad, vid restaurangbesök eller vid samtal. Vissa upplever inte längre samma glädje i aktiviteter som de tidigare uppskattade. Andra känner en oro och frågar sig om deras tinnitus kommer att bli värre, eller om den är tecken på något allvarligt fel.Leva med tinnitus är en självhjälpsbok som bygger på material som arbetats fram och prövats med goda resultat under flera år av forskning och som tillvaratar den senaste utvecklingen inom tinnitusbehandling. Metoderna i boken är hämtade från kognitiv beteendeterapi (KBT) och acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Läsaren får arbeta med olika beprövade tekniker och tillägnar sig nya förhållningssätt. Syftet är att tinnitus inte längre ska behöva ta lika stor plats i den enskildes liv.

  • 891.
    Zwerenz, Rüdiger
    et al.
    Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
    Becker, Jan
    Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Frederick, Ronald J
    Center for Courageous Living, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Beutel, Manfred E
    Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
    Transdiagnostic, Psychodynamic Web-Based Self-Help Intervention Following Inpatient Psychotherapy: Results of a Feasibility Study and Randomized Controlled Trial.2017In: JMIR mental health, ISSN 2368-7959, Vol. 4, no 4, article id e41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mental disorders have become a major health issue, and a substantial number of afflicted individuals do not get appropriate treatment. Web-based interventions are promising supplementary tools for improving health care for patients with mental disorders, as they can be delivered at low costs and used independently of time and location. Although psychodynamic treatments are used frequently in the face-to-face setting, there has been a paucity of studies on psychodynamic Web-based self-help interventions.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a transdiagnostic affect-focused psychodynamic Web-based self-help intervention designed to increase emotional competence of patients with mental disorders.

    METHODS: A total of 82 psychotherapy inpatients with mixed diagnoses were randomized into two groups. Following discharge, the intervention group (IG) got access to a guided version of the intervention for 10 weeks. After a waiting period of 10 weeks, the wait-list control group (WLCG) got access to an unguided version of the intervention. We reported the assessments at the beginning (T0) and at the end of the intervention, resp. the waiting period (T1). The primary outcome was satisfaction with the treatment at T1. Secondary outcome measures included emotional competence, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Statistical analyses were performed with descriptive statistics (primary outcome) and analysis of covariance; a repeated measurement analysis of variance was used for the secondary outcomes. Effect sizes were calculated using Cohen d and data were analyzed as per protocol, as well as intention-to-treat (ITT).

    RESULTS: Patients were chronically ill, diagnosed with multiple diagnoses, most frequently with depression (84%, 58/69), anxiety (68%, 47/69), personality disorder (38%, 26/69), and depersonalization-derealization disorder (22%, 15/69). A majority of the patients (86%, 36/42) logged into the program, of which 86% (31/36) completed the first unit. Satisfaction with the units mastered was rated as good (52%, 16/31) and very good (26%, 9/31). However, there was a steady decline of participation over the course of the program; only 36% of the participants (13/36) participated throughout the trial completing at least 50% of the sessions. According to the ITT analysis, participants improved statistically significantly and with moderate effect sizes (Cohen d) compared with the WLCG regarding depression (d=0.60), quality of life (d=0.53), and emotional competence (d=0.49). Effects were considerably stronger for the completers with respect to depression (d=1.33), quality of life (d=0.83), emotional competence (d=0.68), and general anxiety (d=0.62).

    CONCLUSIONS: Although overall program satisfaction and benefit of the program were favorable with respect to the indicators of emotional disorders, the rate of completion was low. Our findings point to the need to target the intervention more specifically to the needs and capabilities of participants and to the context of the intervention.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02671929; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02671929 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ntWg1yWb).

  • 892.
    Ängarne-Lindberg, Teresia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wadsby, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Psychosocial risk-mothers and their babies: Opinions about interaction treatment2013In: Child Care in Practice, ISSN 1357-5279, E-ISSN 1476-489X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 49-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies focusing on mothers' own reports of their experience with intervention programmes are rare, so very little has been known about their evaluations of the programmes and what they have learned. The aim of the present study was to use interviews to evaluate these aspects of an intervention programme. The interviews were designed to capture the mothers' memories and thoughts about their experiences and to learn about the knowledge they acquired in a short-term intervention programme. Forty-six mothers identified as being at psychosocial risk were interviewed. The interview materials were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Two categories were identified: emotional context, and knowledge. The material assigned to the second category was further divided into three sub-categories. The study results point to the equal importance of actual knowledge and to the emotional dimension.

  • 893.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Brännström, Jonas
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Laplante.Lévesque, Ariane
    Eriksholms Research Centre, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Hörselrehabilitering och Internet2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 894.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Behandlingsprocessens betydelse vid hörapparatanpassning2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 895.
    Östergren, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mathematical Learning Disability: Cognitive Conditions, Development and Predictions2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present thesis was to test and contrast hypotheses about the cognitive conditions that support the development of mathematical learning disability (MLD). Following hypotheses were tested in the thesis: a) domain general deficit, the deficit is primarily located in the domain general systems such as the working memory, b) number sense deficit, the deficit is located in the innate approximate number system (ANS), c) numerosity coding deficit, the deficit is located to a exact number representation system, d) access deficit, the deficit is in the mapping between symbols and the innate number representational system (e.g., ANS), e) multiple deficit hypothesis states that MLD could be related to more than one deficit.

    Three studies examined the connection between cognitive abilities and arithmetic. Study one and three compared different groups of children with or without MLD (or risk of MLD). Study two investigated the connection between early number knowledge, verbal working memory and the development of arithmetic ability.

    The results favoring the multiple deficit hypothesis, more specifically the result indicate that number sense deficit together with working memory functions constitutes risk-factors to the development of MLD in children. A simple developmental model that is based on von Asters and Shalev´s (2007) model and the present results is suggested, in order to understand the development of MLD in children.

    List of papers
    1. Number magnitude processing and basic cognitive functions in children with mathematical learning disabilities
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Number magnitude processing and basic cognitive functions in children with mathematical learning disabilities
    2012 (English)In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 701-714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The study sought out to extend our knowledge regarding the origin ofmathematical learning disabilities (MLD) in children by testing different hypotheses in the same samples of children. Different aspects of cognitive functions and number processing were assessed in fifth- and sixth-graders (1113 years old) withMLD and compared to controls. The MLD group displayed weaknesses withmost aspects of number processing (e.g., subitizing, symbolic number comparison, number-line estimation) and two cognitive functions (e.g., visualspatial working memory). These findings favor the defective approximate number system (ANS) hypothesis, but do not fit well with the access deficit hypothesis. Support is also provided for the defective object-tracking system (OTS) hypothesis, the domain general cognitive deficit hypothesis and to some extent the defective numerosity-coding hypothesis. The study suggests that MLD might be caused by multiple deficits and not a single core deficit.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2012
    Keywords
    Mathematical learning disabilities, Cognitive functions, Number processing, Subitizing, Enumeration
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77933 (URN)10.1016/j.lindif.2012.05.004 (DOI)000312683900007 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 421-2007-1881
    Available from: 2012-05-31 Created: 2012-05-31 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Early number knowledge and cognitive ability affect early arithmetic ability
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early number knowledge and cognitive ability affect early arithmetic ability
    2013 (English)In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 405-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Previous literature suggests that early number knowledge is important for the development of arithmetic calculation ability. The domain-general ability of verbal working memory also has an impact on arithmetic ability. This longitudinal study tested the impact of early number knowledge and verbal working memory on the arithmetic calculation ability of children in preschool (N = 315) and then later in Grade 1 using structural equation modeling. Three models were used to test hypotheses drawn from previous literature. The current study demonstrates that both early number knowledge and the domain-general ability of verbal working memory affect preschool and Grade 1 arithmetic ability. Early number knowledge had a direct impact on the growth of arithmetic ability, whereas verbal working memory had only an indirect effect via number knowledge and preschool arithmetic ability. These results fit well with von Aster and Shalevs developmental model of numerical cognition (Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 2007, Vol. 49, pp. 868-873) and highlight the importance of considering arithmetic ability as independent from early number knowledge. Results also emphasize the importance of training early number knowledge before school entry to promote the development of arithmetic ability.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2013
    Keywords
    Early number knowledge; Mental number line; Numerical knowledge; Arithmetic calculation; Verbal working memory; Arithmetic development
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96454 (URN)10.1016/j.jecp.2013.03.007 (DOI)000320740400002 ()
    Available from: 2013-08-23 Created: 2013-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    3. Cognitive conditions of children at risk of developing mathematical learning disabilities
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive conditions of children at risk of developing mathematical learning disabilities
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Various hypotheses have been advanced regarding the origin of mathematical learning disabilities (MLD). The present study set out to test a number of hypotheses regarding the underlying condition for the development of MLD, namely: the domain general hypothesis, number sense deficit, numerosity coding deficit, access deficit and multiple deficits. These hypotheses were tested on a sample of eight-year-old children that was divided into three groups: MLD (N = 13), typical achievers (TA, N = 57) and high achievers (HA, N = 25) based on a longitudinal approach of stability in performance on arithmetic tests. The development of the three groups was also assessed using data from preschool to grade two. The results revealed support for the hypothesis of multiple deficits that are primarily located in intraparietal sulci (IPS) and manifest themselves as both number sense deficits and deficits in spatial processing. This type of deficit is supported by less developed general abilities in the domains of both phonological ability and nonverbal intelligence, resulting in poorer number knowledge for those children at risk of MLD. The HA group displayed a superior early number knowledge in combination with superior domain general abilities, which support the development of number knowledge.

    Keywords
    Mathematical learning disability, development of arithmetic skills, number knowledge, spatial ability, number sense deficit
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96798 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-08-27 Created: 2013-08-27 Last updated: 2013-08-27Bibliographically approved
  • 896.
    Östergren, Rickard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Skagerlund, Kenny
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Träff, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive conditions of children at risk of developing mathematical learning disabilities2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Various hypotheses have been advanced regarding the origin of mathematical learning disabilities (MLD). The present study set out to test a number of hypotheses regarding the underlying condition for the development of MLD, namely: the domain general hypothesis, number sense deficit, numerosity coding deficit, access deficit and multiple deficits. These hypotheses were tested on a sample of eight-year-old children that was divided into three groups: MLD (N = 13), typical achievers (TA, N = 57) and high achievers (HA, N = 25) based on a longitudinal approach of stability in performance on arithmetic tests. The development of the three groups was also assessed using data from preschool to grade two. The results revealed support for the hypothesis of multiple deficits that are primarily located in intraparietal sulci (IPS) and manifest themselves as both number sense deficits and deficits in spatial processing. This type of deficit is supported by less developed general abilities in the domains of both phonological ability and nonverbal intelligence, resulting in poorer number knowledge for those children at risk of MLD. The HA group displayed a superior early number knowledge in combination with superior domain general abilities, which support the development of number knowledge.

  • 897.
    Östergren, Rickard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Träff, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Early number knowledge and cognitive ability affect early arithmetic ability2013In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 405-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous literature suggests that early number knowledge is important for the development of arithmetic calculation ability. The domain-general ability of verbal working memory also has an impact on arithmetic ability. This longitudinal study tested the impact of early number knowledge and verbal working memory on the arithmetic calculation ability of children in preschool (N = 315) and then later in Grade 1 using structural equation modeling. Three models were used to test hypotheses drawn from previous literature. The current study demonstrates that both early number knowledge and the domain-general ability of verbal working memory affect preschool and Grade 1 arithmetic ability. Early number knowledge had a direct impact on the growth of arithmetic ability, whereas verbal working memory had only an indirect effect via number knowledge and preschool arithmetic ability. These results fit well with von Aster and Shalevs developmental model of numerical cognition (Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 2007, Vol. 49, pp. 868-873) and highlight the importance of considering arithmetic ability as independent from early number knowledge. Results also emphasize the importance of training early number knowledge before school entry to promote the development of arithmetic ability.

  • 898.
    Östling, Ann-Katrine
    et al.
    Rehabiliteringsmedicinska klinkken, Sandvikens sjukhus, Landstinget i Gävleborg.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Behandling av beteendeproblem2014In: Klinisk neuropsykologi / [ed] Håkan Nyman och Aniko Bartfai, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2, p. 411-423Chapter in book (Other academic)
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