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  • 951.
    Weise, Cornelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kleinstäuber, Maria
    University of Mainz, Germany.
    Hiller, Wolfgang
    University of Mainz, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Internetbasierte kognitiv-behaviorale Behandlung des chronischen Tinnitus – Ergebnisse einer randomisierten- kontrollierten Studie: [Internet-based cognitive behavioural treatment of chronic tinnitus - results of a randomized controlled trial]2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 952.
    Weise, Cornelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kroymann, Reiner
    Klinik für Psychotherapie und Verhaltensmedizin, Dresden, Germany.
    Zittlau, Horst
    Goebel, Gerhard
    Schön Klinik Roseneck, Prien, Germany.
    Chronischer Tinnitus [Chronic tinnitus]2011In: Biofeedback: Grundlagen, Indikationen, Kommunikation, Vorgehen ; mit 48 Tabellen, Stuttgart: Schattauer , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 953.
    Wendt, Dorothea
    et al.
    Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Hietkamp, Renskje K.
    Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Impact of Noise and Noise Reduction on Processing Effort: A Pupillometry Study2017In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 690-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Speech perception in adverse listening situations can be exhausting. Hearing loss particularly affects processing demands, as it requires increased effort for successful speech perception in background noise. Signal processing in hearing aids and noise reduction (NR) schemes aim to counteract the effect of noise and reduce the effort required for speech recognition in adverse listening situations. The present study examined the benefit of NR schemes, applying a combination of a digital NR and directional microphones, for reducing the processing effort during speech recognition. Design: The effect of noise (intelligibility level) and different NR schemes on effort were evaluated by measuring the pupil dilation of listeners. In 2 different experiments, performance accuracy and peak pupil dilation (PPD) were measured in 24 listeners with hearing impairment while they performed a speech recognition task. The listeners were tested at 2 different signal to noise ratios corresponding to either the individual 50% correct (L50) or the 95% correct (L95) performance level in a 4-talker babble condition with and without the use of a NR scheme. Results: In experiment 1, the PPD differed in response to both changes in the speech intelligibility level (L50 versus L95) and NR scheme. The PPD increased with decreasing intelligibility, indicating higher processing effort under the L50 condition compared with the L95 condition. Moreover, the PPD decreased when the NR scheme was applied, suggesting that the processing effort was reduced. In experiment 2, 2 hearing aids using different NR schemes (fast-acting and slow-acting) were compared. Processing effort changed as indicated by the PPD depending on the hearing aids and therefore on the NR scheme. Larger PPDs were measured for the slow-acting NR scheme. Conclusions: The benefit of applying an NR scheme was demonstrated for both L50 and L95, that is, a situation at which the performance level was at a ceiling. This opens the opportunity for new means of evaluating hearing aids in situations in which traditional speech reception measures are shown not to be sensitive.

  • 954.
    Wendt, Dorothea
    et al.
    Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Ksiazek, Patrycja
    Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Netherlands.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Res Ctr, Denmark; Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Toward a more comprehensive understanding of the impact of masker type and signal-to-noise ratio on the pupillary response while performing a speech-in-noise test2018In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 369, p. 67-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Difficulties arising in everyday speech communication often result from the acoustical environment, which may contain interfering background noise or competing speakers. Thus, listening and understanding speech in noise can be exhausting. Two experiments are presented in the current study that further explored the impact of masker type and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) on listening effort by means of pupillometry. In both studies, pupillary responses of participants were measured while performing the Danish Hearing in Noise Test (HINT; Nielsen and Dau, 2011). The first experiment aimed to replicate and extend earlier observed effects of noise type and semantic interference on listening effort (Koelewijn et al., 2012). The impact of three different masker types, i.e. a fluctuating noise, a 1-talker masker and a 4-talker masker on listening effort was examined at a fixed speech intelligibility. In a second experiment, effects of SNR on listening effort were examined while presenting the HINT sentences across a broad range of fixed SNRs corresponding to intelligibility scores ranging from 100% to 0% correct performance. A peak pupil dilation (PPD) was calculated and a Growth Curve Analysis (GCA) was performed to examine listening effort involved in speech recognition as a function of SNR. The results of two experiments showed that the pupil dilation response is highly affected by both masker type and SNR when performing the HINT. The PPD was highest, suggesting the highest level of effort, for speech recognition in the presence of the 1-talker masker in comparison to the 4-talker babble and the fluctuating noise masker. However, the disrupting effect of one competing talker disappeared for intelligibly levels around 50%. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the pupillary response strongly varied as a function of SNRs. Listening effort was highest for intermediate SNRs with performance accuracies ranging between 30% and 70% correct. GCA revealed time-dependent effects of the SNR on the pupillary response that were not reflected in the PPD. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 955.
    Wendt, Dorothea
    et al.
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    VU University Medical Center, ENT/audiology.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. VU University Medical Center, ENT/audiology.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Investigating the effect of competing talkers on speech processing load as shown by task invoked pupil-dilation2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 956.
    Westin, Vendela
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Schulin, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Stalby, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wisung, Gisela
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, M
    Olofsson, U
    Ermedahl-Bydairk, Ulrika
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Randomized Controlled trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for tinnitus distress2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 957.
    Wijk, Ulrika
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Brandsma, J. Wim
    Independent leprosy- and hand rehabilitation consultant, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    The concurrent validity of the Amharic version of Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA) in persons affected by leprosy2013In: Leprosy Review, ISSN 0305-7518, E-ISSN 2162-8807, Vol. 84, no 1, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Leprosy is endemic in many countries and results in activity limitations.There is a need for assessment tools to guide professionals in their evaluationand choice of intervention in order to improve conditions for leprosy-affected people.The purpose of our study was to evaluate the concurrent validity of the Amharicversion of Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA-am) scalewith Amharic version of Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH-am)questionnaire.Design: Thirty-eight individuals with nerve damage due to leprosy completed theSALSA-am and DASH-am questionnaires. Spearman’s rank correlation was used todetermine relationships between SALSA and DASH scores. Specificity, sensitivityand accuracy were calculated.Results: There was a good correlation 0·87 (P , 0·001) between SALSA-amand DASH-am scores. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated withacceptable results.Conclusions: SALSA-am is considered a useful questionnaire for determiningactivity limitations in persons affected by leprosy, and showed good correlation withDASH-am. The concurrent validity was considered good.

  • 958.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lind, Johanna
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Nilbrink, Therese
    Umeå University.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University.
    Sleegers, Kristel
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Broeckhoven, Christine
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University and Stockholm Brain Institute.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University.
    Longer Leukocyte Telomere Length Is Associated with Smaller Hippocampal Volume among Non-Demented APOE epsilon 3/epsilon 3 Subjects2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Telomere length shortens with cellular division, and leukocyte telomere length is used as a marker for systemic telomere length. The hippocampus hosts adult neurogenesis and is an important structure for episodic memory, and carriers of the apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele exhibit higher hippocampal atrophy rates and differing telomere dynamics compared with non-carriers. The authors investigated whether leukocyte telomere length was associated with hippocampal volume in 57 cognitively intact subjects (29 epsilon 3/epsilon 3 carriers; 28 epsilon 4 carriers) aged 49-79 yr. Leukocyte telomere length correlated inversely with left (r(s) = -0.465; p = 0.011), right (r(s) = -0.414; p = 0.025), and total hippocampus volume (r(s) = -0.519; p = 0.004) among APOE epsilon 3/epsilon 3 carriers, but not among epsilon 4 carriers. However, the epsilon 4 carriers fit with the general correlation pattern exhibited by the epsilon 3/epsilon 3 carriers, as epsilon 4 carriers on average had longer telomeres and smaller hippocampi compared with epsilon 3/epsilon 3 carriers. The relationship observed can be interpreted as long telomeres representing a history of relatively low cellular proliferation, reflected in smaller hippocampal volumes. The results support the potential of leukocyte telomere length being used as a biomarker for tapping functional and structural processes of the aging brain.

  • 959.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordin, Annelie
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Shorter telomere length is linked to brain atrophy and white matter hyperintensities.2014In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 212-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: leukocyte telomere length (TL) is considered a marker of biological aging. Several studies have investigated the link between leukocyte TL and aging-associated functional attributes of the brain, but no prior study has investigated whether TL can be linked to brain atrophy and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs); two prominent structural manifestations of brain aging.

    Methods: we investigated whether leukocyte TL was related to brain atrophy and WMHs in a sample of 102 non-demented individuals aged 64–75 years.

    Results: shorter TL was related to greater degree of subcortical atrophy (β = −0.217, P = 0.034), but not to cortical atrophy. Furthermore, TL was 371 bp shorter (P = 0.041) in participants exhibiting subcortical WMHs, and 552 bp shorter (P = 0.009) in older participants exhibiting periventricular WMHs.

    Conclusion: this study provides the first evidence of leukocyte TL being associated with cerebral subcortical atrophy and WMHs, lending further support to the concept of TL as a marker of biological aging, and in particular that of the aging brain.

  • 960.
    Wild, Conor J.
    et al.
    Queen's University, Kingston ON Canada.
    Davis, Matthew H.
    Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Human auditory cortex is sensitive to the perceived clarity of speech2012In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 1490-1502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feedback connections among auditory cortical regions may play an important functional role in processing naturalistic speech, which is typically considered a problem solved through serial feed-forward processing stages. Here, we used fMRI to investigate whether activity within primary auditory cortex (PAC) is sensitive to the perceived clarity of degraded sentences. A region-of-interest analysis using probabilistic cytoarchitectonic maps of PAC revealed a modulation of activity, in the most primary-like subregion (area Te1.0). related to the intelligibility of naturalistic speech stimuli that cannot be driven by stimulus differences. Importantly, this effect was unique to those conditions accompanied by a perceptual increase in clarity. Connectivity analyses suggested sources of input to PAC are higher-order temporal, frontal and motor regions. These findings are incompatible with feed-forward models of speech perception, and suggest that this problem belongs amongst modern perceptual frameworks in which the brain actively predicts sensory input, rather than just passively receiving it.

  • 961.
    Wild, Conor J
    et al.
    Queen's University, Canada.
    Yusuf, Afiqah
    Queen's University, Canada.
    Wilson, Daryl E
    Queen's University, Canada.
    Peelle, Jonathan E
    MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, United Kingdom.
    Davis, Matthew H
    MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, United Kingdom.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid S
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effortful listening: the processing of degraded speech depends critically on attention.2012In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 32, no 40, p. 14010-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conditions of everyday life are such that people often hear speech that has been degraded (e.g., by background noise or electronic transmission) or when they are distracted by other tasks. However, it remains unclear what role attention plays in processing speech that is difficult to understand. In the current study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the degree to which spoken sentences were processed under distraction, and whether this depended on the acoustic quality (intelligibility) of the speech. On every trial, adult human participants attended to one of three simultaneously presented stimuli: a sentence (at one of four acoustic clarity levels), an auditory distracter, or a visual distracter. A postscan recognition test showed that clear speech was processed even when not attended, but that attention greatly enhanced the processing of degraded speech. Furthermore, speech-sensitive cortex could be parcellated according to how speech-evoked responses were modulated by attention. Responses in auditory cortex and areas along the superior temporal sulcus (STS) took the same form regardless of attention, although responses to distorted speech in portions of both posterior and anterior STS were enhanced under directed attention. In contrast, frontal regions, including left inferior frontal gyrus, were only engaged when listeners were attending to speech and these regions exhibited elevated responses to degraded, compared with clear, speech. We suggest this response is a neural marker of effortful listening. Together, our results suggest that attention enhances the processing of degraded speech by engaging higher-order mechanisms that modulate perceptual auditory processing.

  • 962.
    Witt, Suzanne T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Drissi, Natasha Morales
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Wretman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Szakács, Attila
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Tove
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Evidence for cognitive resource imbalance in adolescents with narcolepsy2018In: Brain Imaging and Behavior, ISSN 1931-7557, E-ISSN 1931-7565, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 411-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigated brain activity changes during performance of a verbal working memory task in a population of adolescents with narcolepsy. Seventeen narcolepsy patients and twenty healthy controls performed a verbal working memory task during simultaneous fMRI and EEG acquisition. All subjects also underwent MRS to measure GABA and Glutamate concentrations in the medial prefrontal cortex. Activation levels in the default mode network and left middle frontal gyrus were examined to investigate whether narcolepsy is characterized by an imbalance in cognitive resources. Significantly increased deactivation within the default mode network during task performance was observed for the narcolepsy patients for both the encoding and recognition phases of the task. No evidence for task performance deficits or reduced activation within the left middle frontal gyrus was noted for the narcolepsy patients. Correlation analyses between the spectroscopy and fMRI data indicated that deactivation of the anterior aspect of the default mode in narcolepsy patients correlated more with increased concentrations of Glutamate and decreased concentrations of GABA. In contrast, deactivation in the default mode was correlated with increased concentrations of GABA and decreased concentrations of Glutamate in controls. The results suggested that narcolepsy is not characterized by a deficit in working memory but rather an imbalance of cognitive resources in favor of monitoring and maintaining attention over actual task performance. This points towards dysregulation within the sustained attention system being the origin behind self-reported cognitive difficulties in narcolepsy.

  • 963.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rydberg, Emelie
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, School of Health and Medical Science, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Örebro University.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The psychological process from avoidance to acceptance in adults with acquired hearing impairment2014In: Hearing, Balance and Communication, ISSN 2169-5717, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study explored the psychological process from avoidance to acceptance in adults with acquired hearing impairment. Study design: A descriptive qualitative interview study was conducted in Sweden in 2010. Participants were 18 adults with an acquired sensorineural hearing impairment aged 50-70 years, who had recently obtained hearing aids at the Audiology Clinic of the Örebro University Hospital. The sample included both first-time hearing aid users (n = 10) and experienced hearing aid users (n = 8). Each participant took part in one semi-structured interview. Qualitative content analysis was performed on the manifest content of the interview transcripts. Results: Participants described the process from avoidance to acceptance as a slow and gradual process rooted in the awareness of the frequency and severity of hearing disability and of its psychological consequences. Facilitators included adaptive coping mechanisms, other peoples comments and positive experiences, accessibility of help-seeking and routine health assessments. In contrast, barriers included maladaptive coping mechanisms and stigma. Conclusions: Participants described the process of acceptance as a personal process that involved, to some extent, their social network of family, friends and colleagues. It was also a trade-off between the consequences of untreated hearing impairment and the threat to normal identity that, through stigma, hearing impairment carries. Further studies are needed to fully investigate the role of access to information on hearing impairment acceptance. How professionals and society can facilitate the process of acceptance should also be a focus of future research efforts. 

  • 964.
    Yumba, Wycliffe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    The effects of Hearing Aid Digital Signal Processing Settings and Cognitive Processing Speed on Speech Recognition performance tasks in Adverse listening conditions in Elderly hearing impaired listeners2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have demonstrated that speech recognition in noise is associated with hearing aid compression release settings and cognitive processing speed. This study investigated the effects of Cognitive processing speed and Digital Signal Processing settings (linear amplification without noise reduction, linear amplification with noise reduction and non-linear amplification with (fast-acting compression without noise reduction) on the performance of speech recognition task in noise in elderly hearing aid users. Two hundred elderly (mean age = 61 years) experienced hearing aid users with sensorineural hearing loss participated in the study. Individual measurements of Cognitive processing speed (rapid automatic naming test), Speech recognition in noise (Hagerman test) were obtained and used to predict a successful outcome. The results will be presented and the potential clinical implications in the rehabilitations of elderly hearing aid users discussed.

  • 965.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn Eriksson, Therese
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Dahl, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Multidisciplinary group information for patients with tinnitus: an open trial2018In: Hearing, Balance and Communication, ISSN 2169-5717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a multidisciplinary group information as a part of a Stepped Care tinnitus management model. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were administered before and after the group information to evaluate the effects.

    Method: In total, 627 patients participated in half-day tinnitus information meetings from 2004 to 2011 in our clinic. We retrieved 426 patients for analysis with complete scores on the THI, HADS, and a questionnaire covering background information. These three questionnaires were used before the information meeting, and the THI and HADS at a 1-month follow-up.

    Results: Significant decreases were found in scores on the THI (p < .001) and the HADS-A (p < .05), pre- and post-information session. However, no significant changes were observed on the HADS-D.

    Conclusion: An information meeting as a part of multidisciplinary Stepped Care model can be an effective initial approach to manage tinnitus, and serve as a filter for patients who need additional treatment.

  • 966.
    Zekveld, Adriana A.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Match & mismatch in the brain: Neural correlates of primed speech understanding in noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 967.
    Zekveld, Adriana A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands.
    Pronk, Marieke
    Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Reading Behind the Lines: The Factors Affecting the Text Reception Threshold in Hearing Aid Users.2018In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 762-775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The visual Text Reception Threshold (TRT) test (Zekveld et al., 2007) has been designed to assess modality-general factors relevant for speech perception in noise. In the last decade, the test has been adopted in audiology labs worldwide. The 1st aim of this study was to examine which factors best predict interindividual differences in the TRT. Second, we aimed to assess the relationships between the TRT and the speech reception thresholds (SRTs) estimated in various conditions.; Method: First, we reviewed studies reporting relationships between the TRT and the auditory and/or cognitive factors and formulated specific hypotheses regarding the TRT predictors. These hypotheses were tested using a prediction model applied to a rich data set of 180 hearing aid users. In separate association models, we tested the relationships between the TRT and the various SRTs and subjective hearing difficulties, while taking into account potential confounding variables.; Results: The results of the prediction model indicate that the TRT is predicted by the ability to fill in missing words in incomplete sentences, by lexical access speed, and by working memory capacity. Furthermore, in line with previous studies, a moderate association between higher age, poorer pure-tone hearing acuity, and poorer TRTs was observed. Better TRTs were associated with better SRTs for the correct perception of 50% of Hagerman matrix sentences in a 4-talker babble, as well as with better subjective ratings of speech perception. Age and pure-tone hearing thresholds significantly confounded these associations. The associations of the TRT with SRTs estimated in other conditions and with subjective qualities of hearing were not statistically significant when adjusting for age and pure-tone average.; Conclusions: We conclude that the abilities tapped into by the TRT test include processes relevant for speeded lexical decision making when completing partly masked sentences and that these processes require working memory capacity. Furthermore, the TRT is associated with the SRT of hearing aid users as estimated in a challenging condition that includes informational masking and with experienced difficulties with speech perception in daily-life conditions. The current results underline the value of using the TRT test in studies involving speech perception and aid in the interpretation of findings acquired using the test.

  • 968.
    Zekveld, Adriana A
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. ENT/audiology, VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Psychology, Queen’s University, Canada.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working memory capacity mediates the facilitative effect of semantically related cues on the intelligibilityof speech in noise2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed the influence of masker type, working memory capacity (reading span and size comparison span) and linguistic closure ability (text reception threshold) on the benefit obtained from semantically related text cues during perception of speech in noise. Sentences were masked by stationary noise, fluctuating noise, or an interfering talker. Each sentence was preceded by three text cues that were either words that were semantically related to the sentence or unpronounceable nonwords. Speech perception thresholds were adaptively measured and delayed sentence recognition was subsequently assessed. Word cues facilitated speech perception in noise. The amount of benefit did not depend on masker type, but benefit correlated with reading span when speech was masked by interfering speech. Cue benefit was not related to reading span when other maskers were used and did not correlate with the text reception threshold or size comparison span. Larger working-memory capacity was furthermore associated with enhanced delayed recall of sentences preceded by word cues relative to nonword cues. This suggests that working memory capacity may be associated with release from informational masking by semantically related information, with keeping the cues in mind while disambiguating the sentence and for encoding of speech content into long-term memory.

  • 969.
    Zekveld, Adriana A
    et al.
    Department of ENT/Audiology and the EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    S Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Department of ENT/Audiology and the EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The effects of working memory capacity and semantic cues on the intelligibility of speech in noise2013In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 134, no 3, p. 2225-2234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined how semantically related information facilitates the intelligibility of spoken sentences in the presence of masking sound, and how this facilitation is influenced by masker type and by individual differences in cognitive functioning. Dutch sentences were masked by stationary noise, fluctuating noise, or an interfering talker. Each sentence was preceded by a text cue; cues were either three words that were semantically related to the sentence or three unpronounceable nonwords. Speech reception thresholds were adaptively measured. Additional measures included working memory capacity (reading span and size comparison span), linguistic closure ability (text reception threshold), and delayed sentence recognition. Word cues facilitated speech perception in noise similarly for all masker types. Cue benefit was related to reading span performance when the masker was interfering speech, but not when other maskers were used, and it did not correlate with text reception threshold or size comparison span. Better reading span performance was furthermore associated with enhanced delayed recognition of sentences preceded by word relative to nonword cues, across masker types. The results suggest that working memory capacity is associated with release from informational masking by semantically related information, and additionally with the encoding, storage, or retrieval of speech content in memory.

  • 970.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Section Audiology, Dept. of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Heslenfeld, D.J.
    Department of Psychology, VU University, BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada; The School of Communication Sciences and Disorders and The Brain and Mind Institute, Natural Sciences Centre, Western University, London, Canada .
    Versfeld, N.J.
    Section Audiology, Dept. of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University of Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kramer, S.E.
    Section Audiology, Dept. of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University of Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    The eye as a window to the listening brain: Neural correlates of pupil size as a measure of cognitive listening load2014In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 101, p. 76-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important aspect of hearing is the degree to which listeners have to deploy effort to understand speech. One promising measure of listening effort is task-evoked pupil dilation. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify the neural correlates of pupil dilation during comprehension of degraded spoken sentences in 17 normal-hearing listeners. Subjects listened to sentences degraded in three different ways: the target female speech was masked by fluctuating noise, by speech from a single male speaker, or the target speech was noise-vocoded. The degree of degradation was individually adapted such that 50% or 84% of the sentences were intelligible. Control conditions included clear speech in quiet, and silent trials.The peak pupil dilation was larger for the 50% compared to the 84% intelligibility condition, and largest for speech masked by the single-talker masker, followed by speech masked by fluctuating noise, and smallest for noise-vocoded speech. Activation in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG) showed the same pattern, with most extensive activation for speech masked by the single-talker masker. Larger peak pupil dilation was associated with more activation in the bilateral STG, bilateral ventral and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and several frontal brain areas. A subset of the temporal region sensitive to pupil dilation was also sensitive to speech intelligibility and degradation type. These results show that pupil dilation during speech perception in challenging conditions reflects both auditory and cognitive processes that are recruited to cope with degraded speech and the need to segregate target speech from interfering sounds. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  • 971.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Koelewijn, Thomas
    VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Mortier, Karen
    VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Festen, Joost
    VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Van Beek, Hans
    VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Kramer, Sophia
    VU University medical center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    The application of pupillometry to assess processing load during listening to speech in challenging conditions2012In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Noise Control Engineering: Inter-Noise ‘12, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of Audiology, a reliable measure of cognitive load while listening to speech is highly needed. A promising method is measurement of the pupil response. The reliability and validity of this application of pupillometry is discussed by combining and comparing the results of five studies assessing the influence of speech perception difficulty (speech-to-noise ratio) on cognitive load during listening. The results show consistently larger pupil responses in more difficult listening conditions. Furthermore, the data indicate that the pupil response provides information additional to speech recognition performance and subjective measures. Overall, the potential of pupillometry as a sensitive and valid cognitive load index is confirmed by the data.

  • 972.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. ENT/Audiology and the EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Cognitive processing load across a wide range of listening conditions: Insights from pupillometry2014In: Psychophysiology, ISSN 0048-5772, E-ISSN 1469-8986, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 277-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pupil response to speech masked by interfering speech was assessed across an intelligibility range from 0% to 99% correct. In total, 37 participants aged between 18 and 36 years and with normal hearing were included. Pupil dilation was largest at intermediate intelligibility levels, smaller at high intelligibility, and slightly smaller at very difficult levels. Participants who reported that they often gave up listening at low intelligibility levels had smaller pupil dilations in these conditions. Participants who were good at reading masked text had relatively large pupil dilation when intelligibility was low. We conclude that the pupil response is sensitive to processing load, and possibly reflects cognitive overload in difficult conditions. It seems affected by methodological aspects and individual abilities, but does not reflect subjective ratings.

  • 973.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Section Ear & Hearing, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Amsterdam Public Health research institute VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    In a Concurrent Memory and Auditory Perception Task, the Pupil Dilation Response Is More Sensitive to Memory Load Than to Auditory Stimulus Characteristics2019In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 272-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Speech understanding may be cognitively demanding, but it can be enhanced when semantically related text cues precede auditory sentences. The present study aimed to determine whether (a) providing text cues reduces pupil dilation, a measure of cognitive load, during listening to sentences, (b) repeating the sentences aloud affects recall accuracy and pupil dilation during recall of cue words, and (c) semantic relatedness between cues and sentences affects recall accuracy and pupil dilation during recall of cue words.

    Design: Sentence repetition following text cues and recall of the text cues were tested. Twenty-six participants (mean age, 22 years) with normal hearing listened to masked sentences. On each trial, a set of four-word cues was presented visually as text preceding the auditory presentation of a sentence whose meaning was either related or unrelated to the cues. On each trial, participants first read the cue words, then listened to a sentence. Following this they spoke aloud either the cue words or the sentence, according to instruction, and finally on all trials orally recalled the cues. Peak pupil dilation was measured throughout listening and recall on each trial. Additionally, participants completed a test measuring the ability to perceive degraded verbal text information and three working memory tests (a reading span test, a size-comparison span test, and a test of memory updating).

    Results: Cue words that were semantically related to the sentence facilitated sentence repetition but did not reduce pupil dilation. Recall was poorer and there were more intrusion errors when the cue words were related to the sentences. Recall was also poorer when sentences were repeated aloud. Both behavioral effects were associated with greater pupil dilation. Larger reading span capacity and smaller size-comparison span were associated with larger peak pupil dilation during listening. Furthermore, larger reading span and greater memory updating ability were both associated with better cue recall overall.

    Conclusions: Although sentence-related word cues facilitate sentence repetition, our results indicate that they do not reduce cognitive load during listening in noise with a concurrent memory load. As expected, higher working memory capacity was associated with better recall of the cues. Unexpectedly, however, semantic relatedness with the sentence reduced word cue recall accuracy and increased intrusion errors, suggesting an effect of semantic confusion. Further, speaking the sentence aloud also reduced word cue recall accuracy, probably due to articulatory suppression. Importantly, imposing a memory load during listening to sentences resulted in the absence of formerly established strong effects of speech intelligibility on the pupil dilation response. This nullified intelligibility effect demonstrates that the pupil dilation response to a cognitive (memory) task can completely overshadow the effect of perceptual factors on the pupil dilation response. This highlights the importance of taking cognitive task load into account during auditory testing.

  • 974.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Van Beek, Johannes H M
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The influence of semanically related and unrelated text cues on the intelligibility of sentences in noice2011In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 16-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: In two experiments with different subject groups, we explored the relationship between semantic context and intelligibility by examining the influence of visually presented, semantically related, and unrelated three-word text cues on perception of spoken sentences in stationary noise across a range of speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). In addition, in Experiment (Exp) 2, we explored the relationship between individual differences in cognitive factors and the effect of the cues on speech intelligibility.

    Design: In Exp 1, cues had been generated by participants themselves in a previous test session (own) or by someone else (alien). These cues were either appropriate for that sentence (match) or for a different sentence (mismatch). A condition with nonword cues, generated by the experimenter, served as a control. Experimental sentences were presented at three SNRs (dB SNR) corresponding to the entirely correct repetition of 29%, 50%, or 71% of sentences (speech reception thresholds; SRTs). In Exp 2, semantically matching or mismatching cues and nonword cues were presented before sentences at SNRs corresponding to SRTs of 16% and 29%. The participants in Exp 2 also performed tests of verbal working memory capacity and the ability to read partially masked text.

    Results: In Exp 1, matching cues improved perception relative to the nonword and mismatching cues, with largest benefits at the SNR corresponding to 29% performance in the SRT task. Mismatching cues did not impair speech perception relative to the nonword cue condition, and no difference in the effect of own and alien matching cues was observed. In Exp 2, matching cues improved speech perception as measured using both the percentage of correctly reported words and the percentage of entirely correctly reported sentences. Mismatching cues reduced the percentage of repeated words (but not the sentence-based scores) compared with the nonword cue condition. Working memory capacity and ability to read partly masked sentences were positively associated with the number of sentences repeated entirely correctly in the mismatch condition at the 29% SNR.

    Conclusions: In difficult listening conditions, both relevant and irrelevant semantic context can influence speech perception in noise. High working memory capacity and good linguistic skills are associated with a greater ability to inhibit irrelevant context when uncued sentence intelligibility is around 29% correct.

  • 975.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre.
    van Beek, Johannes H M
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Influence of Semantically Related and Unrelated Text Cues on the Intelligibility of Sentences in Noise2011In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, ISSN 0196-0202, Vol. 32, no 6, p. E16-E25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: In two experiments with different subject groups, we explored the relationship between semantic context and intelligibility by examining the influence of visually presented, semantically related, and unrelated three-word text cues on perception of spoken sentences in stationary noise across a range of speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). In addition, in Experiment (Exp) 2, we explored the relationship between individual differences in cognitive factors and the effect of the cues on speech intelligibility. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: In Exp 1, cues had been generated by participants themselves in a previous test session (own) or by someone else (alien). These cues were either appropriate for that sentence (match) or for a different sentence (mismatch). A condition with nonword cues, generated by the experimenter, served as a control. Experimental sentences were presented at three SNRs (dB SNR) corresponding to the entirely correct repetition of 29%, 50%, or 71% of sentences (speech reception thresholds; SRTs). In Exp 2, semantically matching or mismatching cues and nonword cues were presented before sentences at SNRs corresponding to SRTs of 16% and 29%. The participants in Exp 2 also performed tests of verbal working memory capacity and the ability to read partially masked text. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: In Exp 1, matching cues improved perception relative to the nonword and mismatching cues, with largest benefits at the SNR corresponding to 29% performance in the SRT task. Mismatching cues did not impair speech perception relative to the nonword cue condition, and no difference in the effect of own and alien matching cues was observed. In Exp 2, matching cues improved speech perception as measured using both the percentage of correctly reported words and the percentage of entirely correctly reported sentences. Mismatching cues reduced the percentage of repeated words (but not the sentence-based scores) compared with the nonword cue condition. Working memory capacity and ability to read partly masked sentences were positively associated with the number of sentences repeated entirely correctly in the mismatch condition at the 29% SNR. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: In difficult listening conditions, both relevant and irrelevant semantic context can influence speech perception in noise. High working memory capacity and good linguistic skills are associated with a greater ability to inhibit irrelevant context when uncued sentence intelligibility is around 29% correct.

  • 976.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    van Beek, Johannes H M
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The influence of semantically related and unrelated text cues on the intelligibility of sentences in noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 977.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Heslenfeld, D
    Festen, J
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    (Mis)match in the brain: Neural correlates of primed speech understanding in noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 978.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J.
    Vrije University Amstedam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    An fMRI study on the influence of semantically related and unrelated text cues on the intelligibility of sentences in noise2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 979.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Behavioral and fMRI evidence that cognitive ability modulates the effect of semantic context on speech intelligibility2012In: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, ISSN 0093-934X, Vol. 122, no 2, p. 103-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Text cues facilitate the perception of spoken sentences to which they are semantically related (Zekveld, Rudner, et al., 2011). In this study, semantically related and unrelated cues preceding sentences evoked more activation in middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) than nonword cues, regardless of acoustic quality (speech in noise or speech in quiet). Larger verbal working memory (WM) capacity (reading span) was associated with greater intelligibility benefit obtained from related cues, with less speech-related activation in the left superior temporal gyrus and left anterior IFG, and with more activation in right medial frontal cortex for related versus unrelated cues. Better ability to comprehend masked text was associated with greater ability to disregard unrelated cues, and with more activation in left angular gyrus (AG). We conclude that individual differences in cognitive abilities are related to activation in a speech-sensitive network including left MTG, IFG and AG during cued speech perception.

  • 980.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Heslenfeld, Dirk J
    VU University, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Corrigendum to “Behavioral and fMRI evidence that cognitive ability modulates the effect of semantic context on speech intelligibility” [Brain Lang. 122 (2012) 103–113]2012In: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 123, no 2, p. 143-143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 981.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lyzenga, Johannes
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cognitive processing load during listening is reduced more by decreasing voice similarity than by increasing spatial separation between target and masker speech2014In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 8, no 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated changes in speech recognition and cognitive processing load due to the masking release attributable to decreasing similarity between target and masker speech. This was achieved by using masker voices with either the same (female) gender as the target speech or different gender (male) and/or by spatially separating the target and masker speech using HRTFs. We assessed the relation between the signal-to-noise ratio required for 50% sentence intelligibility, the pupil response and cognitive abilities. We hypothesized that the pupil response, a measure of cognitive processing load, would be larger for co-located maskers and for same-gender compared to different-gender maskers. We further expected that better cognitive abilities would be associated with better speech perception and larger pupil responses as the allocation of larger capacity may result in more intense mental processing. In line with previous studies, the performance benefit from different-gender compared to same-gender maskers was larger for co-located masker signals. The performance benefit of spatially-separated maskers was larger for same-gender maskers. The pupil response was larger for same-gender than for different-gender maskers, but was not reduced by spatial separation. We observed associations between better perception performance and better working memory, better information updating, and better executive abilities when applying no corrections for multiple comparisons. The pupil response was not associated with cognitive abilities. Thus, although both gender and location differences between target and masker facilitate speech perception, only gender differences lower cognitive processing load. Presenting a more dissimilar masker may facilitate target-masker separation at a later (cognitive) processing stage than increasing the spatial separation between the target and masker. The pupil response provides information about speech perception that complements intelligibility data.

  • 982.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. VU University Medical Center, ENT/audiology.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center, ENT/audiology.
    Lyzenga, Johannes
    VU University Medical Center, ENT/audiology.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Cognitive processing load during listening is reduced more by decreasing voice similarity than by increasing spatial separation between target and masker speech2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated changes in speech recognition and cognitive processing load attributable to decreasing similarity between target and masker speech. We presented masker voices with either the same (female) gender or different gender (male) as the target speech, and/or spatially separated the target and masker speech using HRTFs. We assessed the relation between speech perception performance, the pupil response and cognitive abilities in 24 normal-hearing adults. We hypothesized that the pupil response, a measure of cognitive processing load, would be larger for co-located maskers and for same-gender compared to different-gender maskers. We further expected that better cognitive abilities would be associated with better speech perception and larger pupil responses, as the allocation of larger capacity may result in more intense mental processing.

    In line with previous studies, the performance benefit from different-gender compared to same-gender maskers was larger for co-located masker signals. The performance benefit of spatially-separated maskers was larger for same-gender maskers. The pupil response was larger for same-gender than for different-gender maskers, but was not reduced by spatial separation. We observed associations between better perception performance and better working memory, better information updating, and better executive abilities. The pupil response was not associated with cognitive abilities. Thus, although both gender and location differences between target and masker facilitate speech perception, only gender differences lower cognitive processing load. Increasing target-masker voice dissimilarity may facilitate target-speech perception at a later (cognitive) processing stage than increasing spatial separation. The pupil response provides information that complements speech intelligibility data.

  • 983.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mismatch in the brain: Behavioral and neural correlates of explicit, cognitive process during speech comprehension. (Round-table)2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 984.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundh, Lars-Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prevalence and Function of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) in a Community Sample of Adolescents, Using Suggested DSM-5 Criteria for a Potential NSSI Disorder2013In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 759-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous prevalence rates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents have varied considerably. In the present cross-sectional study, prevalence rates, characteristics and functions of NSSI were assessed in a large randomized community sample consisting of 3,060 (50.5 % female) Swedish adolescents aged 15-17 years. The suggested criteria for NSSI disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, (DSM-5) were used to assess prevalence rates with the aim of arriving at a more precise estimate. Out of the whole sample, 1,088 (35.6 %) adolescents (56.2 % female) reported at least one episode of NSSI during the last year, of which 205 (6.7 %) met suggested DSM-5 criteria for a potential NSSI disorder diagnosis. The NSSI disorder diagnosis was significantly more common in girls (11.1 % vs. 2.3 %, χ (2) (1, N = 3046) = 94.08, p < 0.001, cOR = 5.43, 95 % CI [3.73, 7.90]). The NSSI disorder group consisted of significantly more smokers and drug users compared to adolescents with NSSI that did not meet DSM-5 criteria for NSSI disorder, and also differed concerning demographic variables. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted on reported functions of NSSI, with the aim of validating Nock and Prinstein's (Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 72:885-890, 2004, Journal of Abnormal Psychology 114:140-146, 2005) four-factor model on a Swedish community sample, resulting in a close to acceptable fit. A two-factor model (social and automatic reinforcement) resulted in a slightly better fit. The most frequently reported factors were positive and negative automatic reinforcement. A majority of functions were significantly more often reported by girls than boys. The implications of the suggested DSM-5 criteria and reported functions are discussed.

  • 985.
    Zetterqvist, Vendela
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Leva med tinnitus2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Har du ett klingande, ringande, tjutande, brusande, surrande, visslande ljud i huvudet eller öronen som påverkar ditt dagliga liv? Ett stort antal personer i Sverige upplever att tinnitus inverkar på deras mående, sömn, koncentrationsförmåga och livskvalitet.Ljudet kan uppfattas störande i ett flertal situationer och ljudmiljöer såsom i tystnad, vid restaurangbesök eller vid samtal. Vissa upplever inte längre samma glädje i aktiviteter som de tidigare uppskattade. Andra känner en oro och frågar sig om deras tinnitus kommer att bli värre, eller om den är tecken på något allvarligt fel.Leva med tinnitus är en självhjälpsbok som bygger på material som arbetats fram och prövats med goda resultat under flera år av forskning och som tillvaratar den senaste utvecklingen inom tinnitusbehandling. Metoderna i boken är hämtade från kognitiv beteendeterapi (KBT) och acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Läsaren får arbeta med olika beprövade tekniker och tillägnar sig nya förhållningssätt. Syftet är att tinnitus inte längre ska behöva ta lika stor plats i den enskildes liv.

  • 986.
    Zhao, Fei
    et al.
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX, USA; Audiol India, India.
    St Claire, Lindsay
    University of Bristol, England.
    Danermark, Berth
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Jones, Lesley
    University of York, England.
    Brandreth, Marian
    University of Nottingham, England.
    Krishna, Rajalakshmi
    University of Bristol, England; University of Mysore, India.
    Goodwin, Robin
    Brunel University, England.
    Exploring the influence of culture on hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 435-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this paper was to highlight the importance of cultural influence in understanding hearing-help seeking and hearing-aid uptake. Design: Information on audiological services in different countries and theories related to cross-culture is presented, followed by a general discussion. Study sample: Twenty-seven relevant literature reviews on hearing impairment, cross-cultural studies, and the health psychology model and others as secondary resources. Results: Despite the adverse consequences of hearing impairment and the significant potential benefits of audiological rehabilitation, only a small number of those with hearing impairment seek professional help and take up appropriate rehabilitation. Therefore, hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake has recently become the hot topic for clinicians and researchers. Previous research has identified many contributing factors for hearing help-seeking with self-reported hearing disability being one of the main factors. Although significant differences in help-seeking and hearing-aid adoption rates have been reported across countries in population studies, limited literature on the influence of cross-cultural factors in this area calls for an immediate need for research. Conclusions: This paper highlights the importance of psychological models and cross-cultural research in the area of hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake, and consequently some directions for future research are proposed.

  • 987.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Amulticenter study evaluating the effects of the Swedish ACE programme2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multicenter study evaluating the effects of the Swedish ACE programme

    Author  Öberg, Marie

    1. Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Centre, Region Östergötland, Sweden

    2. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.

     Objective: This study investigated the effects of a modified Swedish version of an interactive group education programme: the Active Communication Education programme (ACE) in five  Swedish regions. This study also explored whether the pre- and post-programme outcomes differed with regard to region, age, gender, hearing loss (HL) or the attendance of significant others (SOs).

    Design: An intervention study with between- and within-group measurements was applied.

    Sample: A total of 77 individuals with hearing impairments and a mean age of 73.9 years (SD=9.8) from five different regions of Sweden participated.

    Results: Statistically significant short- and long-term effects were found with regard to communication strategy use, activity, and participation. The ACE programme was most effective for older individuals, women and participants with more severe HL. Individuals who attended with an SO showed a tendency towards better communication strategies. No regional differences were found. The qualitative results indicated that the programme increased individuals’ ability to cope and restored their social identities.

    Conclusion: The ACE programme is effective, and is suggested to be implemented in clinical settings and considered as an alternative or additional treatment to hearing aid rehabilitation. Additional studies that include younger individuals and a control group are recommended. 

     

  • 988.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingo, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On-line supportsystem för audionomer och förstagångsbrukare2017Conference paper (Other academic)
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