liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1987198819891990199119921993 99451 - 99500 of 101936
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 99451.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology.
    Ledin, H
    Lidman, Disa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Are mechanical microvascular anastomoses easier to learn than suture anastomoses?2005In: Microsurgery, ISSN 0738-1085, E-ISSN 1098-2752, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 596-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sutured anastomoses of small vessels are considered difficult to learn. Mechanical anastomosis systems allow a more rapidly performed anastomosis. In order to compare the process of learning to perform sutured and mechanical microvascular anastomoses, two surgeons, with limited microvascular experience, performed 30 aortic and 30 femoral vein anastomoses in 30 Wistar rats. The methods compared were conventional suture, vascular closure system (VCS), and microvascular anastomotic coupler system (MAC). There were no intersurgeon differences regarding patency or time to perform anastomoses. The average time to perform a suture anastomosis was 39 min (patency 80%). Anastomoses with the VCS system took 24 min (patency 25%), whereas the MAC couplers took 13 min to perform (patency 95%). There was a significant learning effect with sutures, but no obvious reduction in time to perform MAC coupler or VCS clip anastomoses was seen. MAC couplers were easiest to use, and allowed us to perform rapid anastomoses with high patency. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 99452.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Morrison, Wayne A
    O'Brien Institute, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
    Dingle, Aaron M
    O'Brien Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
    Palmer, Jason A
    O'Brien Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
    Penington, Anthony J
    O'Brien Institute, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
    Mitchell, Geraldine Margaret
    O'Brien Institute, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
    An "off the shelf" vascular allograft supports angiogenic growth in three-dimensional tissue engineering2011In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, ISSN 0741-5214, E-ISSN 1097-6809, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 435-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives! Dense angiogenic sprouting occurs from arteriovenous loops (AVLs) incorporating autologous vein grafts inserted into empty plastic chambers in vivo. The purpose of this study was to determine if angiogenesis from the AVL was limited by substituting an "off the shelf" cold-stored allograft vein instead of an autologous vein. Methods: Four Sprague Dawley rat groups (two AVL configurations x two chamber types) were established for both 2-week and 6-week harvest. Control AVLs were autologous femoral vein grafts harvested from the left femoral vein that were surgically inserted between the cut femoral artery and vein on the right side. Experimental "allograft" AVLs were rat femoral veins cold stored (4 degrees C, sterile) for 4 to 7 weeks and then microsurgically interposed between the right femoral artery and vein of an unrelated rat. The two AVL types were inserted in one of two plastic chamber types smooth or perforated. At harvest, the AVL constructs were checked for patency, weighed, their volume determined, and histology undertaken. Morphometric assessment of percent and absolute volume of major tissue components (including blood vessels) at 6 weeks was completed. Results: There were no significant differences between autograft and allograft groups in construct weight, volume, or morphology at 2 or 6 weeks. No statistical differences occurred in the percent or absolute vascular volume of AVLs incorporating a cold-stored allograft vs autologous vein grafts at 6 weeks regardless of the chamber type. However, perforated chambers caused significant increases in construct weight (P = .015), volume (P = .006), and percent and absolute connective tissue volt tine at 6 weeks (P = .001) compared to smooth chamber constructs, regardless of the graft type. Conclusion: Cold-stored small-caliber allografts interposed in AVLs do not inhibit microcirculatory development and can be used in composite tissue engineering.

  • 99453.
    Zdolsek, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Hahn, R. G.
    Sodertalje Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Recruitment of extravascular fluid by hyperoncotic albumin2018In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 62, no 9, p. 1255-1260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAlthough hyperoncotic albumin may be used to recruit oedema, its effectiveness remains unclear. Therefore, this issue was studied during infusion experiments in healthy volunteers. MethodFifteen healthy volunteers (mean age 31years) received an infusion of 3mL/kg of 20% albumin over 30minutes. Their urinary excretion was recorded, and venous blood samples were taken to measure blood haemoglobin (Hb), haematocrit, colloid osmotic pressure as well as plasma albumin and sodium concentrations on 15 occasions over a period of 300minutes. Plasma volume expansion was taken as the inverse of the fluid-induced dilution of venous plasma, as given by the blood Hb concentration. Mass balance calculations were used to estimate the mobilisation of fluid from the tissues. ResultsMaximum plasma volume expansion was reached 20minutes after completing an infusion of 20% albumin. Urinary excretion was effectively increased, and the mobilised fluid from the tissues at 300minutes amounted to 3.41.2mL for each infused mL of 20% albumin, of which 19% was of intracellular origin. The urinary excretion correlated strongly with the amount of recruited fluid (R-2=0.87) and inversely with the plasma volume expansion (R-2=0.53). ConclusionThe infusion of 20% albumin significantly increases the plasma volume by recruiting interstitial fluid. After completing the infusion, there is a delay of 20minutes until maximum plasma dilution is reached, and the duration of the plasma volume expansion lasts far beyond 5hours.

  • 99454.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Hottinger, Anna-Lena
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Schuster, Frederick
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University of Bern, Inselspital, Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jackowski, Christian
    Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Post-mortem 1.5T MR quantification of regular anatomical brain structures2016In: International journal of legal medicine (Print), ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 130, no 4, p. 1071-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, post-mortem MR quantification has been introduced to the field of post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging. By usage of a particular MR quantification sequence, T1 and T2 relaxation times and proton density (PD) of tissues and organs can be quantified simultaneously. The aim of the present basic research study was to assess the quantitative T1, T2, and PD values of regular anatomical brain structures for a 1.5T application and to correlate the assessed values with corpse temperatures. In a prospective study, 30 forensic cases were MR-scanned with a quantification sequence prior to autopsy. Body temperature was assessed during MR scans. In synthetically calculated T1, T2, and PD-weighted images, quantitative T1, T2 (both in ms) and PD (in %) values of anatomical structures of cerebrum (Group 1: frontal gray matter, frontal white matter, thalamus, internal capsule, caudate nucleus, putamen, and globus pallidus) and brainstem/cerebellum (Group 2: cerebral crus, substantia nigra, red nucleus, pons, cerebellar hemisphere, and superior cerebellar peduncle) were assessed. The investigated brain structures of cerebrum and brainstem/cerebellum could be characterized and differentiated based on a combination of their quantitative T1, T2, and PD values. MANOVA testing verified significant differences between the investigated anatomical brain structures among each other in Group 1 and Group 2 based on their quantitative values. Temperature dependence was observed mainly for T1 values, which were slightly increasing with rising temperature in the investigated brain structures in both groups. The results provide a base for future computer-aided diagnosis of brain pathologies and lesions in post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging.

  • 99455.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Bertus Warntjes, Marcel, Jan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Jackowski, Christian
    Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Bern Switzerland.
    Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination2015In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 2381-2389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Material and methods Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. Results In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 °C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Conclusion Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoracoabdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided.

  • 99456.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Jackowski, Christian
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Postmortem MR quantification of the heart for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions2015In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 2067-2073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, an MRI quantification sequence has been developed which can be used to acquire T1- and T2-relaxation times as well as proton density (PD) values. Those three quantitative values can be used to describe soft tissue in an objective manner. The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of quantitative cardiac MRI for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions of different age. Fifty post-mortem short axis cardiac 3 T MR examinations have been quantified using a quantification sequence. Myocardial lesions were identified according to histology and appearance in MRI images. Ischaemic lesions were assessed for mean T1-, T2- and proton density values. Quantitative values were plotted in a 3D-coordinate system to investigate the clustering of ischaemic myocardial lesions. A total of 16 myocardial lesions detected in MRI images were histologically characterized as acute lesions (n = 8) with perifocal oedema (n = 8), subacute lesions (n = 6) and chronic lesions (n = 2). In a 3D plot comprising the combined quantitative values of T1, T2 and PD, the clusters of all investigated lesions could be well differentiated from each other. Post-mortem quantitative cardiac MRI is feasible for characterization and discrimination of different age stages of myocardial infarction. aEuro cent MR quantification is feasible for characterization of different stages of myocardial infarction. aEuro cent The results provide the base for computer-aided MRI cardiac infarction diagnosis. aEuro cent Diagnostic criteria may also be applied for living patients.

  • 99457.
    Zech, Wolf-Dieter
    et al.
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schwendener, Nicole
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Warntjes, Marcel Jan Bertus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Riva, Fabiano
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Schuster, Frederick
    University of Bern, Switzerland; Hospital and University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Jackowski, Christian
    University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Postmortem quantitative 1.5-T MRI for the differentiation and characterization of serous fluids, blood, CSF, and putrefied CSF2015In: International journal of legal medicine (Print), ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 129, no 5, p. 1127-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether serous fluids, blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and putrefied CSF can be characterized and differentiated in synthetically calculated magnetic resonance (MR) images based on their quantitative T (1), T (2), and proton density (PD) values. Images from 55 postmortem short axis cardiac and 31 axial brain 1.5-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF were analyzed for their mean T (1), T (2), and PD values. Body core temperature was measured during the MRI scans. The fluid-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot as well as in statistical analysis, the quantitative T (1), T (2) and PD values of serous fluids, fluid blood, sedimented blood, blood clots, CSF, and putrefied CSF could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative T (1) and T (2) values were temperature-dependent. Correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 A degrees C resulted in significantly better discrimination between all investigated fluid mediums. We conclude that postmortem 1.5-T MR quantification is feasible to discriminate between blood, serous fluids, CSF, and putrefied CSF. This finding provides a basis for the computer-aided diagnosis and detection of fluids and hemorrhages.

  • 99458.
    Zechel, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV).
    Lärares uppfattningar om lärande i skolan: Intervjuer med åtta grundskollärare2002Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree)Student thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta arbete bygger på intervjuer med åtta lärare som alla jobbar i år 4-9. Syftet med studien innebar att beskriva hur ett antal lärare uppfattar lärande i skolan. Uppsatsen beskriver olika teoretiska tankar i anknytning till just området lärande samt hur de kan knytas an till lärarnas uppfattningar. I de teoretiska utgångspunkterna finns ett stycke som allmänt behandlar begreppet lärande. Fyra lärteorier har också belysts, nämligen det behavioristiska, det kognitiva, det fenomenografiska samt det kontextuella synsättet.

    Arbetssättet som använts är kvalitativt, empiriskt grundat samt bygger på den fenomenografiska analysmetoden. De kategorier analysen ledde till beskrivs i tre delar utefter uppsatsens tre frågeställningar: Hur uppfattar lärare begreppet lärande?, Uppfattar lärarna olika aspekter av lärande?, Vad ser lärarna som meningen med lärande?

    Undersökningen visar att lärarna jag intervjuade hade uppfattningar kring begreppet lärande som att det är en livslång process som oftast sker i skolan och som innebär att man skapar förståelse för något och lär sig behärska något. Vidare fann jag att lärarna hade många olika aspekter på lärande som handlade om allt från förkunskaper/motivation och känslors påverkan till hur man lär sig bl.a. specifika kunskaper på olika platser med hjälp av sinnen och olika typer av hjälpmedel samt hur man kan bevisa att man har kunskap. Den mening med lärande som lärarna såg var främst att man behöver kunskaper för framtiden och för att må bra samt att omgivningen/samhället ställer krav på att vi ska kunna vissa saker.

    I diskussionen kommenterar jag resultaten från mina intervjuer med utgångspunkt i teorierna. Jag delger även mina personliga tankar och kommentarer. Sista kapitlet i uppsatsen innehåller en avslutning där jag även tar upp förslag på vidare forskning.

  • 99459.
    Zedén Yverås, Felix
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Ström, Filip
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    DNS Performance: A study of free, public and popular DNS servers in 20192019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Domain Name System (DNS) is an integral part of making the internet a more human-friendly place. However, it comes with the cost of an added abstraction layer that introduces extra latency in many aspects of the modern computing experience - a great selling point for many DNS services. In this thesis we look at the performance of DNS services and servers through the scope of 51 unique free, public and popular DNS servers. We use a specifically designed tool, DNSHoarder, to collect 714,000 datapoints of 250 different hostnames of varying popularity over seven days. From this data we find most DNS servers to exhibit a similar relative distribution of response times and performance differences between IPv4 and IPv6 to be minor or nonexistent. We also find network distance and quality to have a big effect on the performance of DNS as well as network latency to be a major limiting factor in further DNS performance improvements.

  • 99460.
    Zeedyk, M Suzanne
    et al.
    Dept of psychology Univ of Dundee, Scotland.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Imitation and socio-emotional processes2006In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 219-221Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 99461.
    Zeedyk, M Suzanne
    et al.
    Dept. of psychology University of Dundee, Scotland.
    Heimann, MikaelLinköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Imitation and socio-emotional processes: Implications for commmunicative development and interventions2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Imitation is a phenomenon that seems to have engaged developmental psychologists throughout their century-long history. In 1906, Baldwin argued, in his seminal text, that the development of self and other was so interconnected that humans are essentially ‘imitative creations’ (Baldwin, 1906). By the 1960s, Piaget’s theory about the development of memory and representation, and imitation’s role within that, had begun to fundamentally re-shape the field’s conception of infant development (e.g. Piaget, 1962). In the 1970s, the discovery that neonates could imitate adults’ facial expressions when only minutes old sparked heated debate about humans’ innate social endowment (e.g. Maratos, 1973; Meltzoff & Moore, 1977). The beginning of the 21st century finds the field turning to questions about robotic and computer-generated imitation (e.g. Bailenson & Yee, 2005; Nadel, Revel, Andry, & Gaussier, 2004). What can a special issue on imitation add to this extensive history?

    The aim of this volume is to extend current conceptions of imitation by bringing together two domains that are generally confined to separate literatures: those relating to infancy and to communicative interventions. All the contributors are interested in the role that imitation plays in socio-emotional processes, and they seek to better understand how knowledge about infants and interventions can be mutually informative. Such connections are expected to yield insights that will be helpful to the field at both theoretical and applied levels.

    The origins of this special issue lie in a series of three specialist seminars, held during 2003 (Dundee, Scotland) and 2004 (Bergen, Norway and Leeds, England), which brought together researchers and practitioners whose work focuses on socio-emotional aspects of imitation. Participants were 13 in number, drawn from the UK, Norway, and Sweden, all of whom feature as authors in this issue (Astell, Braarud, Caldwell, Ellis, Hart, Heimann, Laberg, Nagy, Nord en, O’Neill, Stormark, Strid, Zeedyk). We hoped that this group would be able to find common ground, even within the diversity in their approaches (experimental designs, naturalistic observations, case studies, practice) and their domains of expertise (infancy, autism, global delay, deafblindness, dementia). We were more than successful, for we found that the outcomes of our discussions were compelling enough to cause us to reflect anew on the very bases of human intersubjectivity.

  • 99462.
    Zeedyk, Suzanne M
    et al.
    University of Dundee, UK.
    Heimann, Mikael
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Imitation and socio-emotional processes: Implications for communicative development and interventions2006In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 219-222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99463.
    Zeeshan, Jafer
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    U.S. Governmental incentives and policies for investment in electric vehicles and infrastructure2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of study is to research the development of electric vehicle technology in the United States. This study describes the United States public policies towards electric vehicle technology and system of innovation approaches. The government roles with the help of national system of innovation have been also covered in this study.

    The point of departure was the study of available literature and U.S energy policy acts which illustrates that the break-through in electric vehicles still not only depended on better battery technology and infrastructure for charging stations but also on social, economic and political factors. The important actors involved in the process are both at local and international level are private firms, governmental departments, research and development (R&D) institutes, nongovernment organizations (NGO’s) and environmental organizations etc. The arguments which are put forward in the background of development of such technologies are to reduce dependence on foreign oil and to reduce emissions of harmful gasses.

  • 99464.
    Zeffer, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Salomonsson, Stina
    Karolinska Institute.
    Dzikaite, Vijole
    Karolinska Institute.
    Eliasson, Hakan
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ambrosi, Aurelie
    Karolinska Institute.
    Bergman, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute.
    Fernlund, Eva
    Skane University Hospital.
    Theander, Elke
    Skane University Hospital.
    Ohman, Annika
    Uppsala University.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umea University Hospital.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umea University Hospital.
    Elfving, Ase
    Karolinska Institute.
    Fored, Michael
    Karolinska Institute.
    Blomqvist, Paul
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lindstrom, Ulla
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Melander, Mats
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Karolinska Institute.
    Sonesson, Sven-Erik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Gadler, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Jonzon, Anders
    Uppsala University.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Institute.
    A Population-Based Investigation of the Autoantibody Profile in Mothers of Children with Atrioventricular Block in SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY, vol 72, issue 3, pp 274-2752010In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY, Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 2010, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 274-275Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 99465.
    Zeglio, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-doped Conjugated Polyelectrolytes for Bioelectronics Applications2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) are a class of conducting polymers constituted of a π-conjugated backbone and charged side groups. The ionic groups provide the counterions needed to balance the charged species formed in the CPEs backbones upon oxidation. As a result, addition of external counterions is not required, and the CPEs can be defined as selfdoped. The combination of their unique optical and electrical properties render them the perfect candidates for optoelectronic applications. Additionally, their “soft” nature provide for the mechanical compatibility necessary to interface with biological systems, rendering them promising materials for bioelectronics applications. CPEs solubility, aggregation state, and optoelectronic properties can be easily tuned by different means, such as blending or interaction with oppositely charged species (such as surfactants), in order to produce materials with the desired properties. In this thesis both the strategies have been explored to produce new functional materials that can be deposited to form a thin film and,  therefore, used as an active layer in organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs). Microstructure formation of the films as well as influence on devices operation and performance have been investigated. We also show that these methods can be exploited to produce materials whose uniquecombination of self-doping ability and hydrophobicity allows incorporation into the phospholipid double layer of biomembranes, while retaining their properties. As a result, self-doped CPEs can be used both as sensing elements to probe the physical state of biomembranes, and as functional ones providing them with new functionalities, such as electrical conductivity. Integration of conductive electronic biomembranes into OECTs devices has brought us one step forward on the interface of manmade technologies with biological systems.

    List of papers
    1. Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 18, p. 6385-6393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Two self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes, having semiconducting and metallic behaviors, respectively, have been blended from aqueous solutions in order to produce materials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. The intimate blend of two anionic conjugated polyelectrolytes combine the electrical and optical properties of these, and can be tuned by blend stoichiometry. In situ conductance measurements have been done during doping of the blends, while UV vis and EPR spectroelectrochemistry allowed the study of the nature of the involved redox species. We have constructed an accumulation/depletion mode organic electrochemical transistor whose characteristics can be tuned by balancing the stoichiometry of the active material.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2015
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122212 (URN)10.1021/acs.chemmater.5b02501 (DOI)000361935000028 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Marie Curie network "Renaissance"; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation through Wallenberg Scholar grant; Swedish Research Council [VR-2014-3079, D0556101]; Carl Trygger Foundation [CTS 12:206]

    Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-01
    2. Electronic polymers in lipid membranes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electronic polymers in lipid membranes
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 11242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium: lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Nature Publishing Group, 2015
    National Category
    Biophysics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120045 (URN)10.1038/srep11242 (DOI)000356090400002 ()26059023 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Research Council

    Available from: 2015-07-06 Created: 2015-07-06 Last updated: 2018-01-25
    3. Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blend as Photonic Probe of Biomembrane Organization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blend as Photonic Probe of Biomembrane Organization
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: ChemistrySelect, ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 1, no 14, p. 4340-4344Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the following report, a conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) blend has been introduced for the first time as a fluorescent probe of membrane organization. Insertion of the blend into the lipid double layer has been rendered possible through formation of a hydrophobic complex by counterion exchange. Changes in membrane physical state from liquid-disordered (Ldis) to liquid-ordered (Lord), and to solid-ordered (Sord) result in red shifts of blend excitation (up to Δλex=+90 nm) and emission (up to Δλnm=+37 nm) maxima attributable to backbone planarization of CPEs. We found that blend stoichiometry can be adjusted to attain the best interplay among single polyelectrolytes properties, such as sensitivity and luminescence. The resulting probes therefore allow a bimodal detection of membrane physical state: changes in absorption permit a direct visualization of membrane organization, while variations in emission spectra demonstrate that CPE-blends are a promising probes that can be used for imaging applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2016
    Keywords
    Conjugated Polyelectrolytes, Fluorescent Probes, Liposomes, Membrane Probes, Polyelectrolytes blend
    National Category
    Biomaterials Science Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132729 (URN)10.1002/slct.201600920 (DOI)000395422000028 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: Marie Curie network "Renaissance"; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation; DFG [GRK 1640]; Elite Study programme, Macromolecular Science at the University of Bayreuth

    Available from: 2016-11-21 Created: 2016-11-21 Last updated: 2017-04-20Bibliographically approved
  • 99466.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Highly Stable Conjugated Polyelectrolytes for Water-Based Hybrid Mode Electrochemical Transistors2017In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 29, no 19, article id 1605787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrophobic, self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) are introduced as highly stable active materials for organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs). The hydrophobicity of CPEs renders films very stable in aqueous solutions. The devices operate at gate voltages around zero and show no signs of degradation when operated for 10(4) cycles under ambient conditions. These properties make the produced OECTs ideal devices for applications in bioelectronics.

  • 99467.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Univ Wollongong, Australia.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Active Materials for Organic Electrochemical Transistors2018In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 30, no 44, article id 1800941Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) is a device capable of simultaneously controlling the flow of electronic and ionic currents. This unique feature renders the OECT the perfect technology to interface man-made electronics, where signals are conveyed by electrons, with the world of the living, where information exchange relies on chemical signals. The function of the OECT is controlled by the properties of its core component, an organic conductor. Its chemical structure and interactions with electrolyte molecules at the nanoscale play a key role in regulating OECT operation and performance. Herein, the latest research progress in the design of active materials for OECTs is reviewed. Particular focus is given on the conducting polymers whose properties lead to advances in understanding the OECT working mechanism and improving the interface with biological systems for bioelectronics. The methods and device models that are developed to elucidate key relations between the structure of conducting polymer films and OECT function are discussed. Finally, the requirements of OECT design for in vivo applications are briefly outlined. The outcomes represent an important step toward the integration of organic electronic components with biological systems to record and modulate their functions.

  • 99468.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Martina M.
    Chemistry I—Applied Functional Polymers University of Bayreuth Bayreuth, Germany.
    Thelakkat, Mukundan
    Chemistry I—Applied Functional Polymers University of Bayreuth Bayreuth, Germany.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blend as Photonic Probe of Biomembrane Organization2016In: ChemistrySelect, ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 1, no 14, p. 4340-4344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the following report, a conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) blend has been introduced for the first time as a fluorescent probe of membrane organization. Insertion of the blend into the lipid double layer has been rendered possible through formation of a hydrophobic complex by counterion exchange. Changes in membrane physical state from liquid-disordered (Ldis) to liquid-ordered (Lord), and to solid-ordered (Sord) result in red shifts of blend excitation (up to Δλex=+90 nm) and emission (up to Δλnm=+37 nm) maxima attributable to backbone planarization of CPEs. We found that blend stoichiometry can be adjusted to attain the best interplay among single polyelectrolytes properties, such as sensitivity and luminescence. The resulting probes therefore allow a bimodal detection of membrane physical state: changes in absorption permit a direct visualization of membrane organization, while variations in emission spectra demonstrate that CPE-blends are a promising probes that can be used for imaging applications.

  • 99469.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Martina M.
    University of Bayreuth, Germany.
    Thelakkat, Mukundan
    University of Bayreuth, Germany.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Soling, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Highly Stable Accumulation Mode Electrochemical Transistors2017In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 4293-4300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Counterion exchange has been introduced as a method to modify properties of anionic conjugated poly electrolyte (CPE) blends. Blending of two self-doped CPEs having metallic and semiconducting behavior has been achieved from two different solvents, by exchanging the counterion of the metallic component. Different blending conditions lead to films exhibiting different optical properties, depending on the aggregation states of the CPEs. Conductance responses for the blends showed the opportunity to tune threshold voltage of the films both by blending and counterion exchange. Therefore, the blends have been exploited for the fabrication of accumulation mode organic electrochemical transistors. These devices exhibit short switching times and high transconductance, up to 15.3 rnS, as well as high stability upon fast pulsed cycles, retaining 88% of the drain currents after 2 x 10(3) cycles.

  • 99470.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Trinh, Xuan thang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nguyen, Son Tien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 18, p. 6385-6393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes, having semiconducting and metallic behaviors, respectively, have been blended from aqueous solutions in order to produce materials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. The intimate blend of two anionic conjugated polyelectrolytes combine the electrical and optical properties of these, and can be tuned by blend stoichiometry. In situ conductance measurements have been done during doping of the blends, while UV vis and EPR spectroelectrochemistry allowed the study of the nature of the involved redox species. We have constructed an accumulation/depletion mode organic electrochemical transistor whose characteristics can be tuned by balancing the stoichiometry of the active material.

  • 99471.
    Zeidan, Youssef H.
    et al.
    Amer Univ Beirut, Lebanon.
    Habib, Joyce G.
    Fouad Khoury and Makassed Gen Hosp, Lebanon; Univ Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Ameye, Lieveke
    Universite´Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
    Paesmans, Marianne
    Universite´Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
    de Azambuja, Evandro
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Gelber, Richard D.
    Harvard Med Sch, MA USA; Frontier Sci and Technol Res Fdn Inc, MA USA.
    Campbell, Ian
    Univ Auckland, New Zealand.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Gutierez, Jorge
    Clin Los Condes, Chile.
    Anderson, Michael
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark; Danish Breast Canc Cooperat Grp, Denmark.
    Lluch, Ana
    Univ Valencia, Spain.
    Gnant, Michael
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria; Austrian Breast and Colorectal Canc Study Grp, Austria.
    Goldhirsch, Aron
    European Inst Oncol, Italy; Int Breast Canc Study Grp, Switzerland.
    Di Leo, Angelo
    Hosp Prato, Italy.
    Joseph, David J.
    Univ Western Australia, Australia; Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Breast Canc Trials Australia and New Zealand, Australia.
    Crown, John
    St Vincents Univ Hosp, Ireland.
    Piccart-Gebhart, Martine
    Univ Libre Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Francis, Prudence A.
    Int Breast Canc Study Grp, Switzerland; Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Australia; Univ Melbourne, Australia; Univ Newcastle, Australia.
    Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Women with T1-T2 Tumors and 1 to 3 Positive Lymph Nodes: Analysis of the Breast International Group 02-98 Trial2018In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 316-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To analyze the impact of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) for patients with T1-T2 tumors and 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes enrolled on the Breast International Group (BIG) 02-98 trial. Methods and Materials: The BIG 02-98 trial randomized patients to receive adjuvant anthracycline with or without taxane chemotherapy. Delivery of PMRT was nonrandomized and performed according to institutional preferences. The present analysis was performed on participants with T1-T2 breast cancer and 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes who had undergone mastectomy and axillary nodal dissection. The primary objective of the present study was to examine the effect of PMRT on risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR), breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival. Results: We identified 684 patients who met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis, of whom 337 (49%) had received PMRT. At 10 years, LRR risk was 2.5% in the PMRT group and 6.5% in the no-PMRT group (hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.73; P=.005). Lower LRR after PMRT was noted for patients randomized to receive adjuvant chemotherapy with no taxane (10-year LRR: 3.4% vs 9.1%; P=.02). No significant differences in breast cancer-specific survival (84.3% vs 83.9%) or overall survival (81.7% vs 78.3%) were observed according to receipt of PMRT. Conclusion: Our analysis of the BIG02-98 trial shows excellent outcomes in women with T1-T2 tumors and 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes found in axillary dissection. Although PMRT improved LRR in this cohort, the number of events remained low at 10 years. In all groups, 10-year rates of LRR were relatively low compared with historical studies. As such, the use of PMRT in women with 1 to 3 positive nodes should be tailored to individual patient risks. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 99472.
    Zeidlitz, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Improving compression ratio in backup2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes a master thesis performed at Degoo Backup AB in Stockholm, Sweden in the spring of 2012. The purpose was to design a compression suite in Java which aims to improve the compression ratio for file types assumed to be commonly used in a backup software. A tradeoff between compression ratio and compression speed has been made in order to meet the requirement that the compression suite has to be able to compress the data fast enough. A study of the best performing existing compression algorithms has been made in order to be able to choose the best suitable compression algorithm for every possible scenario and file type specific compression algorithms have been developed in order to further improve the compression ratio for files considered needing improved compression. The resulting compression performance is presented for file types assumed to be common in a backup software and the overall performance is good. The final conclusion is that the compression suite fulfills all requirements set of this thesis.

  • 99473.
    Zeijlon, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Winqvist, Olivia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Spel som utvecklar taluppfattning i matematikundervisningen: Utformningen av digitala spel och brädspel samt undervisningens organisation kring dessa – en litteraturstudie2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie är en litteraturstudie med syftet att analysera och studera vad forskning visar gällande hur digitala spel och brädspel i undervisningen kan bidra till utvecklingen av elevers taluppfattning. Studien undersöker spelens konstruktion och undervisningens organisation kring dessa. Insamlingen av data gjordes genom databassökning och manuell sökning. Detta område är väsentligt då taluppfattning är grunden till matematikämnet och att undervisningen bör vara varierad och inte begränsad till läroböcker. Resultatet visar att digitala spel bör ha en anpassbar progression och att eleverna bör få pröva sig fram till rätt svar. Brädspel bör vara talbrädspel där talen är linjärt ordnade och grupperade enligt tiobassystemet. Resultatet visar också att reglerna är väsentliga för elevernas lärande. Båda typen av spel bör åtföljas med scaffolding från en lärare så att eleverna kan befinna sig i den proximala utvecklingszonen. Slutligen visade det sig att både digitala spel och brädspel kan vara motiverande för eleverna, men läraren bör undersöka spelens konstruktion och ge eleverna scaffolding för att spelen ska bli väl integrerade i undervisningen.

  • 99474.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A phenomenological analysis of bodily self-awareness in the experience of pain and pleasure: on dys-appearance and eu-appearance2010In: MEDICINE HEALTH CARE AND PHILOSOPHY, ISSN 1386-7423, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 333-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore nuances within the field of bodily self-awareness. My starting-point is phenomenological. I focus on how the subject experiences her or his body, i.e. how the body stands forth to the subject. I build on the phenomenologist Drew Leders distinction between bodily dis-appearance and dys-appearance. In bodily dis-appearance, I am only prereflectively aware of my body. My body is not a thematic object of my experience. Bodily dys-appearance takes place when the body appears to me as "ill" or "bad." This is often the case when I experience pain or illness. Here, I will examine three versions of bodily dys-appearance. Whereas many phenomenological studies have explored cases of bodily dys-appearance, few studies have focused on the opposite of bodily dys-appearance, i.e. on bodily modes of being where the body appears to the subject as something good, easy or well. This is done in this article. When the body stands forth as good, easy or well to the subject, I suggest that the body eu-appears to this person. The analysis of eu-appearance shows that the subject can attend to her or his body as something positive and that this attention need not result in discomfort or alienation. Eu-appearance can take place in physical exercise, in sexual pleasure and in some cases of wanted pregnancies. I also discuss, briefly, the case of masochism.

  • 99475.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A phenomenological approach to the ethics of transplantation medicine: sociality and sharing when living-with and dying-with others2014In: Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, ISSN 1386-7415, E-ISSN 1573-0980, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 369-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a rise in the number of sociological, anthropological, and ethnological works on the gift metaphor in organ donation contexts, as well as in the number of philosophical and theological analyses of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in the ethical debate on organ donation. In order to capture the breadth of this field, four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine have been distinguished: property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. Unfortunately, they all run into difficulties in terms of both making sense of the relational dimensions of postmortem and live organ donations and being normatively adequate in the sense of shedding light and providing guidance on ethical concerns when body parts are donated. For this reason, this article presents a phenomenological framework of giving-through-sharing, based on Maurice Merleau-Pontys philosophy. This framework makes sense of relational dimensions of postmortem and live organ donation. It also sheds light on three highly debated concerns in organ donation ethics: indebtedness on the part of recipients, the fact that some live donors do not experience donation as a matter of choice, and the potentially painful experience of donors relatives, who need to make decisions about postmortem organ donation at a time of bereavement. It can indirectly support what may be called a normalization of bodily exchanges in medicine.

  • 99476.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A phenomenology of excorporation, bodily alienation and resistance: rethinking sexed and racialized embodiment2013In: Hypatia, ISSN 0887-5367, E-ISSN 1527-2001, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 69-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines how some culturally shared and corporeally enacted beliefs and norms about sexed and racialized embodiment can form embodied agency, and this with the aid of the concepts of incorporation and excorporation. It discusses how the phenomenological concept of excorporation can help us examine painful experiences of how one's lived body breaks in the encounter with others. The article also examines how a continuous excorporation can result in bodily alienation, and what embodied resistance can mean when one has undergone or undergoes excorporation. Elaborating on the work of, among others, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Martin Heidegger, Drew Leder, and Sarah Ahmed, I discuss incorporation and excorporation of beliefs and norms regarding sexual difference, such as beliefs and norms regarding female and male embodiment, through a reading of Jeffrey Eugenides' novel Middlesex. I also suggest that it is useful to understand the postcolonial scholar Frantz Fanon's narrative of how he could not but attend to his own skin color while living in France in the 1940s and 1950s, in terms of excorporation. Whereas these are different narratives in many ways, I regard them as helpful for clarifying what excorporation implies and what analytic work this concept can enable.

  • 99477.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    A philosophical defense of the idea that we can hold each other in personhood: intercorporeal personhood in dementia care2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 131-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since John Locke, regnant conceptions of personhood in Western philosophy have focused onindividual capabilities for complex forms of consciousness that involve cognition such as thecapability to remember past events and one’s own past actions, to think about and identify oneself asoneself, and/or to reason. Conceptions of personhood such as this one qualify as cognition-oriented,and they often fail to acknowledge the role of embodiment for personhood. This article offers analternative conception of personhood from within the tradition of phenomenology of the body. Thearticle presents a phenomenological analysis of joint musical activity in dementia care and outlines anintercorporeal conception of personhood based on this analysis. It also provides a philosophical basisfor the idea that others can hold us in personhood and it questions a strict one-body-one-person logicthat has pertained in much personhood debate.

  • 99478.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bringing the lived body to medical ethics education: Learning to See the Suffering Other2012In: Reconceiving Medical Ethics / [ed] Christopher Cowley, London: Continuum, 2012, p. 44-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume of original work comprises a modest challenge, sometimes direct, sometimes implicit, to the mainstream Anglo-American conception of the discipline of medical ethics.  It does so not by trying to fill the gaps with exotic minority interest topics, but by re-examining some of the fundamental assumptions of the familiar philosophical arguments, and some of the basic situations that generate the issues. The most important such situation is the encounter between the doctor and the suffering patient, which forms one of the themes of the book. The authors show that concepts such as the body, suffering and consent - and the role such concepts play within patients' lives - are much more complicated than the Anglo-American mainstream appreciates. Some of these concepts have been discussed with subtlety by Continental philosophers (like Heidegger, Ricoeur), and a secondary purpose of the volume is to apply their ideas to medical ethics. Designed for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students with some philosophical background in ethics, Reconceiving Medical Ethics opens up new avenues for discussion in this ever-developing field.   

  • 99479.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Case. Parental living kidney donation2010In: Teaching Ethics in Organ Transplantation and Tissue Donation - Cases and Movies / [ed] Eds. S. Schicktanz, C. Wieseman, S. Wöhlke, in cooperation with A Carmi UNESCO Chair in Bioethics, Göttingen: Göttingen University Press , 2010, p. 19-21Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 99480.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Chosen Children?: An empirical study and a philosophical analysis of moral aspects of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis and germ-line gene therapy2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), genetic testing and selective transfer of embryos is possible. In the future, germ-line gene therapy (GLGT) applied to embryos before implantation, in order to introduce missing genes or replace mutant ones, may be possible. The objective of this dissertation is to analyse moral aspects of these technologies, as described by eighteen British, Italian and Swedish gynaecologists and geneticists. The objective is systematised into three parts: research interviews and qualitative analysis, philosophical analysis, and elaboration of a framework that supports the combination of analytic methods.

    PGD was described as positive since it enabled some couples at risk for a genetic disease to have a child without the disease. PGD was described as in different senses ‘better’ than methods for prenatal diagnosis and selective termination of pregnancy. It was also described as positive since it provided couples at risk with one more option, even if it did not result in the birth of a healthy child. However, interviewees were concerned about the difficulty of defining and evaluating genetic disease. They were also concerned about patients’ choices, and about exaggerated use or misuse. Whereas PGD gave rise to ambivalence in terms of how to understand, describe and evaluate it, GLGT was often described as unrealistic or undesirable.

    The results of the qualitative analysis are used in a philosophical analysis of the concepts of choice, autonomous choice, ambivalence, trust and ambivalence in trust relations. A set of distinct characteristics of each concept are elaborated. The results of the philosophical analysis are used in the discussion of the results of the qualitative analysis.

    The study shows that the technologies imply both ‘new’ ways to perform ‘old’ medical practices and ‘new’ practices. Old moral questions are reformulated. New moral questions are added. Against the background of this, the concept of genetic identity is discussed.

    Key words: empirical ethics, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, germ-line gene therapy, qualitative research, philosophical analysis, medical progress, genetic disease, choice, autonomous choice, ambivalence, trust, genetic identity.

  • 99481.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Complexities in Reproductive Choice: Medical Professionals' Attitudes to and Experiences of Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis2007In: Human Fertility, ISSN 1464-7273, E-ISSN 1742-8149, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 165-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have been made on attitudes to and experiences of women and men who have undergone pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), or who are regarded as potential users of this diagnostic method. Few studies have been conducted regarding the attitudes to and experiences of medical professionals as regards PGD. This paper reports on findings from such a qualitative study in which 18 semi-structured interviews were performed with geneticists and gynaecologists in Italy, Sweden and the UK. Interviewees emphasized, among other things, the importance of choice provision. Interviewees also told stories that indicated the many ways through which choice was feared to be hampered - or was hampered. A similar emphasis on the importance of PGD as one more alternative to choose between, for 'high-risk' couples, is not found in studies on the experiences, attitudes and views of potential, or actual, users of PGD.

  • 99482.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Correction: Neither property right nor heroic gift, neither sacrifice nor aporia: the benefit of the theoretical lens of sharing in donation ethics (vol 13, pg 225, 2010) in MEDICINE HEALTH CARE AND PHILOSOPHY vol 17, Issue 2, pg 3212014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 1p. 321-321Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 99483.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deadly Pluralism? Why Death-Concept, Death-Definition, Death-Criterion and Death-Test Pluralism Should Be Allowed, Even Though It Creates Some Problems2009In: BIOETHICS, ISSN 0269-9702, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 450-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Death concept, death definition, death criterion and death test pluralism has been described by some as a problematic approach. Others have claimed it to be a promising way forward within modern pluralistic societies. This article describes the New Jersey Death Definition Law and the Japanese Transplantation Law. Both of these laws allow for more than one death concept within a single legal system. The article discusses a philosophical basis for these laws starting from John Rawls understanding of comprehensive doctrines, reasonable pluralism and overlapping consensus. It argues for the view that a certain legal pluralism in areas of disputed metaphysical, philosophical and/or religious questions should be allowed, as long as the disputed questions concern the individual and the resulting policy, law or acts based on the policy/law, do not harm the lives of other individuals to an intolerable extent. However, while this death concept, death definition, death criterion and death test pluralism solves some problems, it creates others.

  • 99484.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ethics and Organ Transfer: A Merleau-Pontean Perspective2009In: HEALTH CARE ANALYSIS, ISSN 1065-3058, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 110-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The articles aim is to explore human hand allograft recipients postoperative experience of disownership and their gradual experience of their new hand as theirs, with the aid of the work of the French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Many have used a Merleau-Pontinian perspective in the analysis of embodiment. Far fewer have used it in medico-ethical analysis. Drew Leders phenomenologically based ethics of organ donation and organ sale is an exception to this tendency. The articles second aim is to examine Leders phenomenologically based ethics of organ donation and organ sale. Though I find parts of Leders approach promising, I also elaborate a line of reasoning that draws on Merleau-Ponty, that does allow us to argue for certain kinds of organ donation and against organ sale-and that avoids some of the problems with Leders approach. This alternative route builds on the concept of the integrity of the body-subject.

  • 99485.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Gender and medical technologies: the case of living organ donation2007In: Dynamics of health and welfare: texts and contexts, Lisboa: Edicoes Colibri , 2007, p. 159-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This part briefly reviews the most important contributions made to the wide issue of Gender and Health in Europe and Latin America over the past 12 years. Particular attention is paid to historiographic production focused on the contemporary world, identifying the main research lines and taking account of the constant interactions and exchanges among different disciplines, notably sociology, anthropology and history. Relevant non-European literature in the English language has been included when new topics are developed, theoretical contributions are advanced or European and/or Latin American realities are addressed. The following types of studies are reviewed: those that incorporate feminist perspectives, specifically a gender approach, to the study of health, medicine and healthcare practices; those that study the ways in which medicine and science have explained the feminine body and the sexual difference; those that make women the subject of investigation, addressing their health, work and role in social-cultural systems of health; and those that investigate the part played by male- -female relationships in healthcare organization and in the production of ideas, norms and values related to health and disease. First, we summarize the concepts of gender and androcentrism and their interest for the history of medicine and health, proposing some methodological points for a gender approach. Second, we outline the main contributions and research lines on these issues. Finally, the results of research into gender and health are illustrated by 15 collaborations that gather documentary sources and case studies.

  • 99486.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Gynaecologists and Geneticists as Storytellers: Disease, Choice and Normality as the Fabric of Narratives on Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis2006In: Medical Technologies and the Life-world.: The Social Construction of Normality / [ed] Sonja Olin Lauritzen and Lars-Christer Hydén, London: Routledge , 2006, 1, p. 69-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people’s lives and understandings of health and illness. This ground-breaking book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the 'natural' body.

    Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, the body and identity, Medical Technologies and the Life World explores:

    • how new health technologies are understood by lay people and patients
    • how the outcomes of these technologies are communicated in various clinical settings
    • how these technologies can alter our notions of health and illness and create ‘new illness’.

    Written by authors with differing backgrounds in phenomenology, social psychology, social anthropology, communication studies and the nursing sciences, this sensational text is essential reading for students and academics of medical sociology, health and allied studies, and anyone with an interest in new health technologies.

  • 99487.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Just love in live organ donation2009In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotionally-related live organ donation is different from almost all other medical treatments in that a family member or, in some countries, a friend contributes with an organ or parts of an organ to the recipient. Furthermore, there is a long-acknowledged but not well-understood gender-imbalance in emotionally-related live kidney donation. This article argues for the benefit of the concept of just love as an analytic tool in the analysis of emotionally-related live organ donation where the potential donor(s) and the recipient are engaged in a love relation. The concept of just love is helpful in the analysis of these live organ donations even if no statistical gender-imbalance prevails. It is particularly helpful, however, in the analysis of the gender-imbalance in live kidney donations if these donations are seen as a specific kind of care-work, if care-work is experienced as a labour one should perform out of love and if women still experience stronger pressures to engage in care-work than do men. The aim of the article is to present arguments for the need of just love as an analytic tool in the analysis of emotionally-related live organ donation where the potential donor(s) and the recipient are engaged in a love relation. The aim is also to elaborate two criteria that need to be met in order for love to qualify as just and to highlight certain clinical implications.

  • 99488.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Levinas och det kroppsliga givandets etik2011In: Människan sedd: genom olika vetenskapliga prismor / [ed] Matz Hammarström, Elisabeth Gerle och Peter Gärdenfors, Nora: Bokförlaget Nya Doxa, 2011, p. 153-172Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur ser vetenskapen på människan 150 år efter Darwins Om arternas ursprung?Är hon fortfarande skapelsens krona, eller bara ett djur som styrs av själviska gener?Och hur är det med hennes förnuft? Är det dags att nedgradera dess betydelse?Slår evolutionsläran undan benen för all form av gudstro eller finns det en möjlighet till fredlig samexistens mellan religion och darwinism? Kan idén om det "naturliga urvalet" hjälpa oss att förstå förändringsprocesser i samhället lika väl som i naturen? Går det att förena en humanistisk och en biologistisk syn på människan?I boken, som är en del i det samtal mellan olika positioner som blir allt viktigare, hävdas att evolutionsläran åtminstone är glasklar på enpunkt: den ger inget utrymme för rasistiska spekulationer om olika etniska gruppers olika värde.Möt den mångfasetterade människan, sedd genom ett antal olika vetenskapliga prismor.Människan sedd genom olika vetenskapliga prismor

  • 99489.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Medical identity ant trust - in Lars von Trier's film the Kingdom2005In: Medical identity, public trust and professional identity,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99490.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neither property right nor heroic gift, neither sacrifice nor aporia: the benefit of the theoretical lens of sharing in donation ethics2014In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two ethical frameworks have dominated the discussion of organ donation for long: that of property rights and that of gift-giving. However, recent years have seen a drastic rise in the number of philosophical analyses of the meaning of giving and generosity, which has been mirrored in ethical debates on organ donation and in critical sociological, anthropological and ethnological work on the gift metaphor in this context. In order to capture the flourishing of this field, this article distinguishes between four frameworks for thinking about bodily exchanges in medicine: those of property rights, heroic gift-giving, sacrifice, and gift-giving as aporia. These frameworks represent four different ways of making sense of donation of organs as well as tissue, gametes and blood, draw on different conceptions of the relations between the self and the other, and bring out different ethical issues as core ones. The article presents these frameworks, argues that all of them run into difficulties when trying to make sense of reciprocity and relational interdependence in donation, and shows how the three gift-giving frameworks (of heroism, sacrifice and aporia) hang together in a critical discussion about what is at stake in organ donation. It also presents and argues in favour of an alternative intercorporeal framework of giving-through-sharing that more thoroughly explicates the gift metaphor in the context of donation, and offers tools for making sense of relational dimensions of live and post mortem donations.

  • 99491.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the Autós of Autonomous Decision Making: Intercorporeality, Temporality, and Enacted Normativities in Transplantation Medicine2018In: Existential Medicine: Essays on Health and Illness / [ed] Kevin Aho, London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2018, p. 81-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter brings phenomenological philosophy to bioethics debates about decision-making in transplantation medicine in general and parental live kidney donation in specific. It clarifies why both discussions of parental live kidney donation in terms of coercion (Kärrfelt et al 2004) and as “indicative” of parents’ autonomy (if it expresses what they want or who they want to be, see Crouch and Elliot 1999) fail to make sense of the complexity of the situation. Noting that the rich literature that explores relational aspects of subjectivity and conceptualises autonomous individuals as making decisions situated within and dependent on particular social contexts (see Freeman 2011; Donchin 2001; Mackenzie and Stoljars 2000; Christman 1998; Friedman 1997) still rarely addresses the role of the body, the chapter also addresses the role of embodiment for perception and choice. It argues for the need to think-through what may be labelled as the autós of autonomy and, more precisely, the focus on one’s own, the same/sameness, oneself or one’s self that has come to characterise much autonomy discussions, via phenomenological philosophy.

    The chapter is divided into three parts. First, I make use of the phenomenological understanding of the intercorporeal self as being-in-the-world, in a discussion of how pain, fear or bodily symptoms of ESRD that unfolds in the shared space of child and parent can shape both of them in relation to each other (c.f. Käll 2013; Zeiler 2014a), feed into their bodily style of being-together, and help form parents’ perception of actions ‘within’ reach for them. Second, I shift the focus from the parent–child dyad to the larger semiotic–material context of haemodialysis and kidney transplantation in Sweden. This allows for an examination of embodied and enacted normativities, through an engagement with what Martin Gunnarson (2016: 128) has identified as a ‘dominant […] orientation towards transplantation’ in Sweden and Latvia. This second part also combines the discussion of an orientation towards transplantation with that of how norms about parenthood may be incorporated and excorporated into parents’ lived bodies,4 thereby making it possible to show why the no-choice theme in previous empirical work is understandable but more disconcerting than may first be assumed. Third, I argue that the acknowledgement of intercorporeal dimensions of bodily existence (argued for in Part I) and the role of orientation (argued for in Part II) demonstrates the need for a thinking-through of the autós of autonomous decision making, i.e. the understanding of the ‘ownness’ of this decision making, in ways other than those argued for in much of the bioethical autonomy and relational autonomy literature.

  • 99492.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Relational ontology and ethics in online organ solicitation: the problem of sharing one's body when being touched online2016In: Bodily exchanges, bioethics and border crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist and Kristin Zeiler, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 119-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 99493.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Reproductive Autonomous Choice - A Cherished Illusion?2004In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 7, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99494.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reproductive autonomous choice--a cherished illusion? Reproductive autonomy examined in the context of preimplantation genetic diagnosis.2004In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancement of autonomous choice may be considered as an important reason for facilitating the use of genetic tests such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The principle of respect for autonomy is a crucial component not only of Western liberal traditions but also of Western bioethics. This is especially so in bioethical discussions and analyses of clinical encounters within medicine. On the basis of an analysis of qualitative research interviews performed with British, Italian and Swedish geneticists and gynaecologists on ethical aspects of preimplantation genetic diagnosis, the plausibility of the notion of autonomy within reproductive medicine is discussed. The analysis of interviews indicates not only that there is a gap between theoretical discussions and concrete practice, but also that an increase in choice--paradoxically--can hamper couples' choice.

  • 99495.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Reproduktionsteknologisk etik - ett ekumeniskt minfält?2001In: Svensk kyrkotidning, ISSN 0346-2153, no no 52Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 99496.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Rättrådig kärlek. En etik för intima relationer2008In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 127-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99497.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self and other in global bioethics: Critical hermeneutics and the example of different death concepts2009In: Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our approach to global bioethics will depend, among other things, on how we answer the questions whether global bioethics is possible and whether it, if it is possible, is desirable. Our approach to global bioethics will also vary depending on whether we believe that the required bioethical deliberation should take as its principal point of departure that which we have in common or that which we have in common and that on which we differ. The aim of this article is to elaborate a theoretical underpinning for a bioethics that acknowledges the diversity of traditions and experiences without leading to relativism. The theoretical underpinning will be elaborated through an exploration of the concepts of sameness, otherness, self and other, and through a discussion of the conditions for understanding and critical reflection. Furthermore, the article discusses whether the principle of respect for the other as both the same and different can function as the normative core of this global bioethics. The article also discusses the New Jersey Death Definition Law and the Japanese Transplantation Law. These laws are helpful in order to highlight possible implications of the principle of respect for the other as both the same and different. Both of these laws open the door to more than one concept of death within one and the same legal system. Both of them relate preference for a particular concept of death to religious and/or cultural beliefs.

  • 99498.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Self, Identities and Medicine: in HEALTH CARE ANALYSIS, vol 17, no. 22009Other (Other academic)
  • 99499.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Shared decision-making, gender and new technologies.2007In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 279-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much discussion of decision-making processes in medicine has been patient-centred. It has been assumed that there is, most often, one patient. Less attention has been given to shared decision-making processes where two or more patients are involved. This article aims to contribute to this special area. What conditions need to be met if decision-making can be said to be shared? What is a shared decision-making process and what is a shared autonomous decision-making process? Why make the distinction? Examples are drawn from the area of new reproductive medicine and clinical genetics. Possible gender-differences in shared decision-making are discussed.

  • 99500.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Short Literature Notice. On Hottois, G: Essais de philosophie bioéthique et biopolitique2002In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 318-318Article in journal (Other academic)
1987198819891990199119921993 99451 - 99500 of 101936
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf