liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1993199419951996199719981999 99751 - 99800 of 100555
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 99751.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    The natural chlorine cycle - fitting the scattered pieces2002In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 565-581Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlorine is one of the most abundant elements on the surface of the earth. Until recently, it was widely believed that all chlorinated organic compounds were xenobiotic, that chlorine does not participate in biological processes and that it is present in the environment only as chloride. However, over the years, research has revealed that chlorine takes part in a complex biogeochemical cycle, that it is one of the major elements of soil organic matter and that the amount of naturally formed organic chlorine present in the environment can be counted in tons per km(2). Interestingly enough, some of the pieces of the chlorine puzzle have actually been known for decades, but the information has been scattered among a number of different disciplines with little or no exchange of information. The lack of communication appears to be due to the fact that the points of departure in the various fields have not corresponded, a number of paradoxes are actually revealed when the known pieces of the chlorine puzzle are fit together. It appears as if a number of generally agreed statements or tacit understandings have guided perceptions, and that these have obstructed the understanding of the chlorine-cycle as a whole. The present review enlightens four paradoxes that spring up when some persistent tacit understandings are viewed in the light of recent work as well as earlier findings in other areas. The paradoxes illuminated in this paper are that it is generally agreed that: (1) chlorinated organic compounds are xenobiotic even though more than 1,000 naturally produced chlorinated compounds have been identified, (2) only a few, rather specialised, organisms are able to convert chloride to organic chlorine even though it appears as if the ability among organisms to transform chloride to organic chlorine is more the rule than the exception,, (3) all chlorinated organic compounds are persistent and toxic even though the vast majority of naturally produced organic chlorine is neither persistent nor toxic, (4) chlorine is mainly found in its ionic form in the environment even though organic chlorine is as abundant or even more abundant than chloride in soil. Furthermore, the contours of the terrestrial chlorine cycle are outlined and put in a concrete form by constructing a rough chlorine budget over a small forested catchment. Finally, possible ecological roles of the turnover of chlorine are discussed.

  • 99752.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies.
    Grøn, C.
    Sources of Organic Halogens in Spruce Forest Soil1998In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 1086-931X, E-ISSN 1520-6912, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1573-1579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99753.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    Holm, Mats
    Skogsvårdsstyrelsen Norrköpings distrikt.
    Sandén, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    Svensson, Teresia
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Parikka, Matti
    Institutionen för bioenergi Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Chlorine budget of a small catchment2004In: European Geosciences Union 1st Assembly,2004, 2004, p. 180-180Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99754.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holm, Mats
    Local Forest Administration, Östergötland, Sweden.
    Sandén, Per
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svensson, Teresia
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Parikka, Matti
    Department of Bioenergy, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The role of organic matter bound chlorine in the chlorine cycle: a case study of the Stubbetorp catchment, Sweden2005In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 241-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to construct a balanced chlorine budget for a small forested catchment, focusing on the interaction between chloride (Clinorg) and organic-matter-bound chlorine (Clorg). Data from the actual catchment are combined with secondary data from other sites to elucidate more clearly which parts of the cycle are fairly well known and which are more or less unknown. The budget calculations show that the principal input and output fluxes of Cl in the catchment are inorganic but that the main pool is Clorg in the soil. In addition, the budget calculations suggest that a considerable portion of Clinorg in soil is transformed to Clorg and subsequently leached to deeper soil layers, that net mineralization of Clorg takes place in soil, preferably in deeper soil layers, and that degrading organic matter is a major source of Clinorg in runoff. The loss of Clorg through runoff is small to negligible in relation to other fluxes. It appears as if dry deposition of Clinorg is at risk of being underestimated if Clinorg is assumed to be conservative in soil. The pool of organic-matter-bound chlorine in soil is considerably larger than the annual flux of chloride through the system. The estimates suggest that the amount of Clorg in the upper 40 cm of the soil at the investigated site is approximately twice as large as the Clinorg. Furthermore, the amount of Clorg biomass is small in relation to the occurrence of Clorg in soil. Finally, the estimates indicate that the transport of volatile Clorg from the soil to the atmosphere may influence the chlorine cycle.

  • 99755.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science Kalmar University.
    Towards reflexive scientization of environmental policy2005In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 195-197Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99756.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Niedan, Volker
    Pavasars, Ivars
    Chloroperoxidase-mediated chlorination of aromatic groups in fulvic acid2000In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 779-785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to investigate whether exo-enzymatically mediated chlorination of fulvic acid (FA) results in the formation of chlorinated groups within the macromolecules which correspond to those which were previously detected in soil and surface water samples. The chlorination was carried out by exposing FA to a commercial chloroperoxidase (CPO) in the presence of chloride and hydrogen-peroxide. The exposed FA was then chemically degraded using an oxidative technique and finally analysed for four different aromatic groups and their chlorinated analogues. The particular aromatic groups included were the methyl esters of 4-ethoxybenzoic acid, 3-methoxy-4-ethoxybenzoic acid, 3,4-diethoxybenzoic acid, and 3,5- dimethoxy-4-ethoxybenzoic acid, along with their mono-and dichlorinated analogues. Prior to the chemical degradation procedure, the FA was analysed for AOX (adsorbable organic halogens) and chlorinated acetic acids. The original FA contained 1.4 mg Cl(org) g-1 and detectable amounts of two chlorinated aromatic groups. After exposure to the enzyme, the concentration of AOX increased to 44.3 mg Cl(org) g-1 and detectable amounts of four chlorinated aromatic groups as well as di- and trichloroacetic acid were found. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  • 99757.
    Öberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Science.
    Sandén, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Retention of chloride in soil and cycling of organic matter-bound chlorine2005In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 2123-2136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chloride (Cl-inorg) is generally considered to be a hydrologically and chemically inert substance. Past research suggests that Cl-inorg participates in a complex biogeochemical cycle involving the formation of organically bound chlorine (Cl-org). The present study examines whether Cl-org cycling is sufficiently extensive as to influence the geochemical cycling Of Cl-inorg- Undisturbed soil cores were collected in a coniferous forest soil in SE Sweden. The cores were stored in climate chambers for three months, irrigated with artificial rain, and the leachate was collected and analysed. The water balance of the lysimeters could be well described, and we found that 20-50% of the chlorine leached from the lysimeters was organically bound and that the amounts lost did not decrease with time. This strongly suggests that a substantial amount of Cl-inorg forms in topsoil, and that subsequent leaching to deeper layers causes a considerable withdrawal of Cl-inorg. The concentration of both organic carbon and Cl-inorg in the leachate was considerably higher than concentrations observed in the runoff in the actual catchment, suggesting that organic matter precipitates or is mineralized on its way through the soil. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 99758.
    Öberg, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture.
    Johansson, Emily
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture.
    ”Mannen talade svenska med brytning”: En studie i hur brott och etnicitet framställs i TV-programmet Efterlyst2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 points / 15 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A study of the popular Swedish TV-show "Efterlyst". In this discourseanalytic essay we've choosen to look at how the program portrais the people involved in the crimes and we are especially interested in how people with non-swedish background are described.

  • 99759.
    Öberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uteluftventilerad krypgrund-En sedan länge välkänd riskkonstruktion som fortsätter byggas2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor air-ventilated crawlspaces often get affected by moisture-related problems and the knowledge of why has been known since long. Yet the construction is built on a larger scale in the performance that will give its users future problems with health and/or costs to attend the problems. This report describes how an outdoor air-ventilated crawlspace functions technically with moist, shows parallels to the older model and investigates why the constructions still are built despite of the shortcomings that have been proven.

    To get an understanding for the complex problems that can occur in an outdoor air-ventilated crawlspace there is an own chapter with different kinds of mould and fungus where signs and characters are defined. There is also a chapter with suggestions to different solutions that can be applied when problems are revealed in a crawlspace.

    Småhusskadenämden is a government authority that gives contributions to attend moist- and mould damages in one- and two-family houses and they have noticed a clear increase of reports with crawlspaces.

    Fuktcentrum in Lund has a long experience of and have researched around crawlspaces and classifies the construction as a high-risk construction that shouldn’t be performed in it’s original form with un-isolated walls and plastic-foil on the ground.

    Boverket have realized the width of the problems and will change their building-regulations to the next revision so that the directives are clearer.

    Telephone-interviews with ten different, bigger house-suppliers have been done to investigate their attitude towards outdoor air-ventilated crawlspaces. The results show that the majority of them see the construction as a risk and no longer use it but there are a few of the companies that aim at bigger production with house-modules that only can be assembled on to a outdoor air-ventilated crawlspace.

  • 99760.
    Öberg, Kim
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    HORN - Hank and OpenDRIVE Road Networks: An editor for creating HANK scenarios while working with OpenDRIVE2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    HORN is a solution to the problem of how to implement scenarios in a more efficient way than was previously possible allowing researchers who wish to create scenarios for HANK the ability to quicker implement larger scenarios than was previously possible.

    OpenDRIVE is an open standard for road networks that is believed to be the way forward and Horn is an attempt at unifying OpenDRIVE scenarios with HANK - the driving simulator currently in use at Link\"{o}pings Universitet, thus futureproofing all work done to implement scenarios.

    Before HORN HANK scenarios were laboriously constructed with a really bad program or by hand and HORN tries to make the process far less painful.

    This thesis describes how to work with the Road Network Editor program HORN ("Hank and OpenDRIVE Road Networks") that was developed for working with HANK's scenarios as well as my experience implementing it and some of the fascinating rules for how to draw some exotic two dimensional geometries I found out about as I worked on HORN.

  • 99761.
    Öberg, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Efficient Flooding Protocols and Energy Models for Wireless Sensor Networks2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless sensor networks are emerging from the mobile ad hoc network concept and as such they share many similarities. However, it is not the similarities that differentiates sensor networks from their ad hoc counterparts, it is the differences. One of the most important difference is that they should operate unattended for long periods of time. This is especially important since they usually rely on a finite energy source to function. To get this into a perspective, a sensor network constitutes of a sensor field where a number of sensor nodes are deployed. The sensor nodes relay the gathered information to a base station from which the data are forwarded either through a network or directly to the enduser. The communication between sensor nodes are conducted in an ad hoc manner, which means that paths toward the base station are dynamically constructed based on current network conditions. The network conditions changes and examples of this includes node failure, deactivated nodes, variations in the radio channel characteristics, etc.

    As mentioned above, the sensor nodes are energy constrained and one of the more important design criteria is the life time of a sensor node or network. To be able to evaluate this criteria an energy dissipation model is needed. Most of the energy dissipation models developed for wireless sensor networks are not based on the basic sensor node architecture and as such they where not accurate enough for our needs. Thus, an energy dissipation model was developed. This model utilises the basic sensor node architecture to obtain the operation states available and their corresponding state transitions.

    Communication is the most energy consuming task a sensor node can undertake. As such, the contributed energy dissipation model is used to evaluate this aspect of the proposed controlled flooding protocols. Generally, the controlled flooding protocols tries to minimise the number of forwarding nodes and by doing this they lower the energy consumed in the network. Along with this, the communication overhead of a protocol also needs to be taken into account. Our idea is to utilise the received signal strength directly to make forwarding decisions based on a cost function. This idea has a number of key features, which are: no additional overhead in the message, no neighbour knowledge and no location information are needed. The results from the proposed flooding protocols are promising as they have a lower number of forwarding nodes and a longer lifetime than the

    others.

    List of papers
    1. Poster abstract: A Complete Energy Model for Wireless Sensor Networks
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Poster abstract: A Complete Energy Model for Wireless Sensor Networks
    2006 (English)In: Adjunct Proceedings of the 3rd European Workshop on Wireless Sensor Networks (EWSN 2006), Zürish, Switzerland, Feb 12-14, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12667 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-10-25 Created: 2007-10-25 Last updated: 2009-03-18
    2. Link Quality-Aided Flooding: A Simple Protocol for Efficient Flooding in Wireless Sensor Networks
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Link Quality-Aided Flooding: A Simple Protocol for Efficient Flooding in Wireless Sensor Networks
    2006 (English)In: Proceedings of the Swedish National Computer Networking Workshop, Luleå, Sweden, October 26-27, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12668 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-10-25 Created: 2007-10-25
    3. Prioritising Bad Link for Fast and Efficient Flooding in Wireless Sensor Networks
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prioritising Bad Link for Fast and Efficient Flooding in Wireless Sensor Networks
    2007 (English)In: in Proceedings of the International Conference on Sensor Technologies and Applications, Valencia, Spain, October 14-20, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12669 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-10-25 Created: 2007-10-25
    4. A Complete Energy Dissipation Model for Wireless Sensor Networks
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Complete Energy Dissipation Model for Wireless Sensor Networks
    2007 (English)In: In Proceedings of the International Conference on Sensor Technologies and Applications, Valencia, Spain, October 14-20, IEEE , 2007, p. 531-540Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in both microelectronics and wireless commu- nication technology have made it possible to develop and manufacture low cost and energy efficient sensor nodes. To compare different designs and protocols with respect to both energy and delay constraints an energy dissipation model is needed that takes these aspects into account. In this paper we propose a complete energy dissipation model for wire- less sensor networks that uses four operation states. These states are based on the basic sensor nodes architecture and actual working conditions of a sensor node. It also takes into account the transition between the operation states, such that a decision to change operation state can be more accurately determined. In this paper we also present mea- sured values for both the power consumed in each operation state and the time it takes to complete a transition between two operation states.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IEEE, 2007
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12670 (URN)10.1109/SENSORCOMM.2007.4394975 (DOI)0-7695-2988-7 (ISBN)978-0-7695-2988-2 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2007-10-25 Created: 2007-10-25 Last updated: 2013-09-20
  • 99762.
    Öberg, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Xu, Youzhi
    A Complete Energy Dissipation Model for Wireless Sensor Networks2007In: In Proceedings of the International Conference on Sensor Technologies and Applications, Valencia, Spain, October 14-20, IEEE , 2007, p. 531-540Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in both microelectronics and wireless commu- nication technology have made it possible to develop and manufacture low cost and energy efficient sensor nodes. To compare different designs and protocols with respect to both energy and delay constraints an energy dissipation model is needed that takes these aspects into account. In this paper we propose a complete energy dissipation model for wire- less sensor networks that uses four operation states. These states are based on the basic sensor nodes architecture and actual working conditions of a sensor node. It also takes into account the transition between the operation states, such that a decision to change operation state can be more accurately determined. In this paper we also present mea- sured values for both the power consumed in each operation state and the time it takes to complete a transition between two operation states.

  • 99763.
    Öberg, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Xu, Youzhi
    Computer and Electrical Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Link Quality-Aided Flooding: A Simple Protocol for Efficient Flooding in Wireless Sensor Networks2006In: Proceedings of the Swedish National Computer Networking Workshop, Luleå, Sweden, October 26-27, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99764.
    Öberg, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Xu, Youzhi
    Computer and Electrical Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Poster abstract: A Complete Energy Model for Wireless Sensor Networks2006In: Adjunct Proceedings of the 3rd European Workshop on Wireless Sensor Networks (EWSN 2006), Zürish, Switzerland, Feb 12-14, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99765.
    Öberg, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Xu, Youzhi
    Prioritising Bad Link for Fast and Efficient Flooding in Wireless Sensor Networks2007In: in Proceedings of the International Conference on Sensor Technologies and Applications, Valencia, Spain, October 14-20, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99766.
    Öberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Information Coding. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Distributed stream ciphers2003Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cryptographic operations are normally carried out by a single machine. Sometimes, however, this machine cannot be trusted completely. Threshold cryptography offers an alternative where the cryptographic operation is distributed to a group of machines in such a way that the key used in the cryptographic operation is not revealed to anyone. The tool used to achieve this is threshold secret sharing, by which a secret can be distributed among a group so that subsets (of the members of the group) that are larger than some threshold can cooperate to recover the secret, while subsets smaller than this threshold cannot.

    This thesis concerns distributed stream ciphers which is a generalisation of threshold cryptography in the sence that the suggested scheme is not restricted to the use of threshold secret sharing schemes. We describe how to do distributed decryption of a ciphertext encrypted by an additive stream cipher. The system works for any secret sharing scheme that is linear under addition.

    We present a modification of how secret sharing of sequences is done. Due to this modification we can generate shares locally using linear feedback shift registers instead of transmitting shares of each symbol in a sequence. A distributed decryption scheme where the keystream is distributed in this modified way is constructed.

  • 99767.
    Öberg, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Validation of a simulation model for an airport terminal2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    LFV Teknik is a part of the LFV Group. They work as internal consultants with competence in for example simulation techniques. When the company is preparing to build a simulation model for the study of passenger flows through an airport terminal, a large amount of information about the system is needed. Usually, the model is needed quickly, which means that the time for building it is short. Furthermore, some parts of the system may not be directly in line with the main purpose of the study, which might make it difficult to motivate data collection costs. This project will contribute in this area, by constructing general statistical distributions of the check-in time and the capacity for the security control. The distributions can then be used in other models. The project will also include a discussion about how and when a passenger arrive the airport terminal.

    A simulation model should be built and validated against an existing airport terminal. As a base for this project, Terminal 4 in Stockholm - Arlanda Airport has been used. The passenger’s arrival time to the terminal is collected from the LFV Group statistical database. Data collections for the check-in times and the capacity calculations of the security control are performed using a stopwatch. When the statistical distribution is calculated, a large amount of data is necessary. All data then have to be analysed and implemented in the simulation model.

    As one result of the project, statistical distributions for the check-in times are given. A capacity calculation of the security control is also discussed. Furthermore, the report includes theory of simulation techniques and methods to perform verification and validation.

  • 99768.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    A multicentre study evaluating the effects of the Swedish ACE programme2017In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 11, p. 876-886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study investigated the effects of a modified Swedish version of an interactive group education programme, the Active Communication Education (ACE) programme, in five Swedish regions. This study also explored whether the pre- and post-programme outcomes differed with regard to region, age, gender, hearing loss (HL) or the attendance of significant others (SOs). Design: An intervention study with between- and within-group measurements was applied. Study sample: Seventy-seven individuals with hearing impairments and a mean age of 73.9 years (SD = 9.8) from five different regions in Sweden participated in this study. Results: Statistically significant short- and long-term effects on communication strategy use, activity and participation were observed. The ACE programme was most effective for older individuals, women and participants with more severe HL. Individuals who attended with an SO tended to use better communication strategies. No regional differences were observed. The qualitative results indicated that the programme increased individuals ability to cope and restored their social identities. Conclusions: The ACE programme is effective, is recommended for implementation in clinical settings and is considered an alternative or additional treatment to hearing aid rehabilitation. Additional studies that include younger individuals and a control group are recommended.

  • 99769.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Aktiv kommunikation - 5 års erfarenhet av Aktiv kommunikation2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99770.
    Öberg, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Aktiv kommunikation-en rehabiliteringskurs för personer med hörselnedsättning2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99771.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Amulticenter study evaluating the effects of the Swedish ACE programme2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multicenter study evaluating the effects of the Swedish ACE programme

    Author  Öberg, Marie

    1. Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Centre, Region Östergötland, Sweden

    2. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden.

     Objective: This study investigated the effects of a modified Swedish version of an interactive group education programme: the Active Communication Education programme (ACE) in five  Swedish regions. This study also explored whether the pre- and post-programme outcomes differed with regard to region, age, gender, hearing loss (HL) or the attendance of significant others (SOs).

    Design: An intervention study with between- and within-group measurements was applied.

    Sample: A total of 77 individuals with hearing impairments and a mean age of 73.9 years (SD=9.8) from five different regions of Sweden participated.

    Results: Statistically significant short- and long-term effects were found with regard to communication strategy use, activity, and participation. The ACE programme was most effective for older individuals, women and participants with more severe HL. Individuals who attended with an SO showed a tendency towards better communication strategies. No regional differences were found. The qualitative results indicated that the programme increased individuals’ ability to cope and restored their social identities.

    Conclusion: The ACE programme is effective, and is suggested to be implemented in clinical settings and considered as an alternative or additional treatment to hearing aid rehabilitation. Additional studies that include younger individuals and a control group are recommended. 

     

  • 99772.
    Öberg, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Amulticenter study evaluating the effects of the Swedish ACE programme2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99773.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Approaches to Audiological Rehabilitation with Hearing Aids: studies on pre-fitting strategies and assessment of outcomes2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fourteen percent of the Swedish population report subjective hearing loss. The number of persons suffering from hearing loss is expected to increase in accordance with the increased length of the average life span, causing an associated increase in the demand for hearing health care services as new patient groups who expect a higher quality of life begin to request hearing care. The main goal of this thesis was to develop new approaches in audiological rehabilitation to meet these demands and achieve user satisfaction.

    Two randomized controlled trials including 39 and 38 subjects, respectively were performed that evaluated two interventions, user-controlled adjustment and sound awareness training, which were performed prior to a hearing aid fitting. The new approaches focused on increasing user participation and activity. To evaluate the goals of audiological rehabilitation, e.g., reducing auditory impairment, optimizing auditory activities and minimizing participation restrictions, several standardized self-reporting instruments were used to assess activity limitations, participation restriction, satisfaction and psychosocial well-being. Several of the instruments were validated for a Swedish population in a postal survey including 162 subjects. Furthermore, an interview instrument that was appropriate for telephone interviews and a categorization rating scale were developed for assessing the global clinical impression of the audiological rehabilitation.

    Few significant differences in outcomes were found between the treatment and control groups in the short term, and the interventions did not achieve additional or more successful hearing aid users in the long term. Thus, it was concluded that the hearing aid rehabilitation was effective in and of itself, as both the treatment and control groups showed significant improvements in psychosocial well-being and reduced activity limitation and participation restriction. The self-report instruments were found to be valid, and a factor analysis indicated that the number of questionnaires could be reduced with a recommendation for further clinical use. The telephone interviews evaluating the clinical global impression of the audiological rehabilitation were found to be effective and showed success in a vast majority of the users. Advantages such as simpler administration and less time consumption warrant their continued use in additional audiological settings.

    The pre-interventions in these studies need to be further investigated before they could be recommended for clinical use also in a Swedish context. The international standardized self reports, however, can already be recommended for clinical use. A first attempt to evaluate global clinical impression by telephone interviews was found to be effective and further validations are suggested.

    List of papers
    1. Psychometric evaluation of hearing specific self-report measures and their associations with psychosocial and demographic variables
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric evaluation of hearing specific self-report measures and their associations with psychosocial and demographic variables
    2007 (English)In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study was to collect descriptive data and to evaluate the psychometric properties of a range of self-report questionnaires in a Swedish population. Other aims were to investigate the correlations between these measures and the higher order factorial structure of the included questionnaires. One hundred and sixty-two first-time hearing aid users completed four standardized hearing specific questionnaires: the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE); the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL); the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS); and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA). In addition, two psychosocial questionnaires were completed: the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC); and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). All measures were administered at one year post hearing aid fitting. Mean scores for the questionnaires were in agreement with previous studies. The questionnaires were found to be reliable and acceptable for further clinical use. Correlations were seen across different hearing specific questionnaires, and between hearing aid use and satisfaction. Psychosocial variables were more strongly associated with participation restriction and satisfaction than with the demographic variables, confirming the importance of subjective measures. The factor analysis extracted four factors: psychosocial well-being, hearing aid satisfaction, adaptive communications strategies, and residual participation restriction, and indicated that the number of questionnaires could be reduced. It is concluded that psychosocial factors are important to consider in hearing aid rehabilitation and their possible role should be further investigated in future studies.

    Keywords
    Hearing aids, satisfaction, participation restriction, sense of coherence
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12456 (URN)10.1080/16513860701560214 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-09-05 Created: 2008-09-05 Last updated: 2019-01-15
    2. The effects of a pre-fitting intervention on hearing aid benefit:a randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of a pre-fitting intervention on hearing aid benefit:a randomized controlled trial
    2009 (English)In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 211-215Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-nine first time hearing aid users with mild to moderate hearing losses were randomly assigned to a pre-fitting intervention group (N=19) or a control group (N=20). The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three weekly visits, where the user adjusted the amplification of an experimental hearing aid to preferred settings, and wore the aid between the visits. After the pre-fitting intervention phase, both groups received conventional hearing aid fitting. Standardized questionnaires (IOI-HA, HHIE, ECHO, SADL, HADS) were administered before and after pre-fitting intervention, after conventional hearing aid fitting, and at one-year follow-up. Hearing aid success was evaluated by an independent audiologist at the one- year follow-up appointment. The pre-fitting intervention phase showed positive effects for the intervention group but not for the control group on activity limitation and participation restriction, and expectations. However, the intervention in its current version had no lasting effects beyond the control group after conventional hearing aid fitting or after a year. Furthermore, both groups showed mostly successful hearing aid fittings, improved psychosocial well-being, quality of life, and reduced participation restriction.

    Keywords
    Pre-fitting intervention, user-controlled adjustment, randomized clinical trial, independent evaluation, hearing aid benefit, hearing aid use, satisfaction, activity limitation, participation restriction, psychosocial well-being, counselling
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12457 (URN)10.3109/16513860903309790 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-09-05 Created: 2008-09-05 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
    3. The effects of a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention: A randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention: A randomized controlled trial
    2008 (English)In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 129-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of an individual pre-fitting intervention for first-time hearing aid users. Thirty-eight hearing impaired adults were randomly assigned to a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention (n=19) or to a control group (n=19). The purpose of the sound awareness training was to facilitate the users' acclimatization to amplified sound. The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three visits and was followed by conventional hearing aid fitting that was identical for both groups. Standardized questionnaires were administered before and after the pre-fitting intervention, after the conventional hearing aid fitting, and at a one-year follow-up. The follow-up also included a clinical assessment by means of a telephone interview performed by an independent audiologist. The pre-intervention did not result in any major improvement over and above the control group. However, improvements were found for both groups following hearing aid fitting. In addition, most participants were considered as successful users in the interview. Future research should target individuals in need of extended hearing aid rehabilitation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2008
    Keywords
    Hearing aids, participation restrictions, one-year follow-up
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12455 (URN)10.1080/16513860802042062 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-09-11 Created: 2008-09-05 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
    4. Development and initial validation of the “Clinical Global Impression” to measure outcomes for audiological rehabilitation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and initial validation of the “Clinical Global Impression” to measure outcomes for audiological rehabilitation
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 17, p. 1409-1417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate an interview instrument for assessing outcome following hearing aid fitting based on clinical global impressions.

    Method: The Audiological Rehabilitation Clinical Global Impression (AR-CGI) was developed and used in a telephone interview in two separate samples. The first sample (N=69) consisted of hearing aid owners who had participated in two intervention studies and the second sample consisted of hearing aid owners receiving regular services from a hearing clinic (N=21). Following the structured telephone interview, participants were categorized into three categories: Successful, Successful with some limitations, or Unsuccessful.

    Results: A vast majority were categorized as Successful (80% of the intervention sample and 71% of the clinical sample). Those categorized as successful were found to differ from those categorized as less successful in terms of age and self-reported hearing aid use, depressed mood, and residual participation restriction, but they did not differ in terms of degree of hearing loss.

    Conclusion: It is suggested that the brevity and usefulness of the AR-CGI makes it a potential tool for further use in audiological settings.

    Keywords
    Validation, clinical global impression, telephone interview, audiological rehabilitation
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12527 (URN)10.1080/09638280802621408 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-09-11 Created: 2008-09-11 Last updated: 2019-01-15
  • 99774.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    ELSA 85: En kartläggning av 85-åringars subjektiva hörsel och hörapparatanvändande2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 99775.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    ELSA 85:: En kartläggning av  85-åringars subjektiva hörsel och hörapparatanvändning2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99776.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    ELSA 85: En kartläggning av 85-åringars subjektiva hörsel och hörappsratanvändning2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99777.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
     Ger självjustering och ljudmedvetenhetsträning som grund en nöjdare hörapparatkund?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99778.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hearing Care for Older Adults: Beyond the Audiology Clinic2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 104-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of hearing health care beyond the clinic for older people with impaired hearing. Method: This article emphasizes factors affecting the success of audiologic rehabilitation for older people and describes practical clinical and community-based strategies for promoting successful hearing health care. Results: Older people are not always aware of the extent of their hearing loss, may not always expect to benefit from using a hearing aid, and often have low self-efficacy for managing to learn to use hearing aids. Increased knowledge and support from other health professionals, family caregivers, and significant others could optimize older peoples participation in everyday activities. Conclusion: Further work is needed to develop new interventions for older people with impaired hearing and to increase collaboration with general practitioners as well as other health care professionals.

  • 99779.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hearing care of older adults beyond the audiology clinic2014In: Hearing care of older adults beyond the audiology clinic, 2014, p. 117-118Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether or not older adults are actively seeking hearing health care, they may be unaware of the extent of their audiometric hearing loss, they may not expect to benefit from using hearing aids, they may  hold  ageist  self-stereotypes, and/or  have  low  self-efficacy  for  managing  hearing-related problems. According to the Health Belief Model, such conditions are not conducive to action-taking or positive sustained rehabilitative outcomes. In addition to more traditional clinic-based audiology rehabilitation services, a community-based health-promoting approach to increasing information and providing a more positive outlook about hearing health care options could be useful in predisposing older adults to seek help and achieve better rehabilitative outcomes. Community-based strategies to promote successful hearing health may also be crucial in reinforcing the maintenance of hearing aid use  and  hearing-related  behavior  changes  after  rehabilitation  has  been  provided.  A  community-based  approach  would  involve  new  partnerships  between  audiologists  and  other  health professionals and service providers working with older adults in the community, including primary care  physicians  and  geriatricians.  Such  partners  could  help  to  promote  earlier  identification  and awareness of hearing-related problems, and reduce the stigma of hearing loss and wearing hearing aids.  For  older  people affected  by  multiple  physical  and/or  mental  health  issues  it  is  even  more important to determine the most appropriate rehabilitation options for each person. Decision-making and  rehabilitation  planning,  delivery  and  monitoring  for  these  cases  demands  increased collaboration  with  other  health  professionals,  family  caregivers  and  significant  others  so  that participation in everyday activities and quality of life can be optimized. This presentation will discuss different approaches based on the Health Belief Model that could be augment more traditional clinic-based hearing health care for the older in short and long-term.

  • 99780.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hearing difficulties, uptake and outcomes of hearing aids in people 85 years of age2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99781.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Nationell utvärdering av Aktiv Kommunikation2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99782.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Nationellutvärdering av Aktiv Kommunikation.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99783.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Overall health related to subjective hearing loss and hearing aid uptake in an 85 year old Swedish population2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99784.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Validation of the Swedish Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (Screening Version) and Evaluation of Its Effect in Hearing Aid Rehabilitation2016In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 20, no 2331216516639234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-reports of subjective hearing difficulties by people with hearing loss may be a useful complement to audiometry in hearing aid rehabilitation. To be useful, such self-reports need to be reliable. This study investigated the reliability and the validity of the Swedish Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (Screening Version; HHIE-S). Sixty-nine participants completed a questionnaire before hearing aid rehabilitation. Of these individuals, 49 completed hearing aid rehabilitation (aged between 23 and 94 years), and 41 of these 49 participants completed the questionnaire after completing the rehabilitation. The Swedish HHIE-S exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha coefficient of .77). The questionnaire was effective for evaluating hearing aid rehabilitation, and a statistically significant reduction in hearing difficulties was observed. The clinicians found the questionnaire easy to administer and effective in hearing aid rehabilitation. The findings from the study support the use of the HHIE-S in clinical practice.

  • 99785.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effects of a pre-fitting intervention on hearing aid benefit:a randomized controlled trial2009In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 211-215Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-nine first time hearing aid users with mild to moderate hearing losses were randomly assigned to a pre-fitting intervention group (N=19) or a control group (N=20). The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three weekly visits, where the user adjusted the amplification of an experimental hearing aid to preferred settings, and wore the aid between the visits. After the pre-fitting intervention phase, both groups received conventional hearing aid fitting. Standardized questionnaires (IOI-HA, HHIE, ECHO, SADL, HADS) were administered before and after pre-fitting intervention, after conventional hearing aid fitting, and at one-year follow-up. Hearing aid success was evaluated by an independent audiologist at the one- year follow-up appointment. The pre-fitting intervention phase showed positive effects for the intervention group but not for the control group on activity limitation and participation restriction, and expectations. However, the intervention in its current version had no lasting effects beyond the control group after conventional hearing aid fitting or after a year. Furthermore, both groups showed mostly successful hearing aid fittings, improved psychosocial well-being, quality of life, and reduced participation restriction.

  • 99786.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effects of a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention: A randomized controlled trial2008In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 129-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of an individual pre-fitting intervention for first-time hearing aid users. Thirty-eight hearing impaired adults were randomly assigned to a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention (n=19) or to a control group (n=19). The purpose of the sound awareness training was to facilitate the users' acclimatization to amplified sound. The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three visits and was followed by conventional hearing aid fitting that was identical for both groups. Standardized questionnaires were administered before and after the pre-fitting intervention, after the conventional hearing aid fitting, and at a one-year follow-up. The follow-up also included a clinical assessment by means of a telephone interview performed by an independent audiologist. The pre-intervention did not result in any major improvement over and above the control group. However, improvements were found for both groups following hearing aid fitting. In addition, most participants were considered as successful users in the interview. Future research should target individuals in need of extended hearing aid rehabilitation.

  • 99787.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utökad rådgivning före hörapparatanpassning- gör det någon nytta?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99788.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    3. Dept. of Speech, Music and Hearing School of Computer Science and Communication KTH - Royal Institute of.
    Swedish quality register of hearing aid rehabilitation – Results from a large data set2016In: Swedish quality register of hearing aid rehabilitation – Results from a large data set, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:

    Purpose

    The aim of the study is to present normative data of hearing aid rehabilitation for a Swedish population with regard to gender, age, return

    clients/first time user and bilateral/unilateral hearing aid use.

    Method

    Questionnaires with 19 items were sent by mail to clients 3-6 months after completed hearing aid rehabilitation. In addition to the seven IOI-HA

    items there were five items concerning satisfaction with reception, information and participation and seven items concerning functionality with the

    hearing aids.

    Results

    Approximately 60 000 hearing aid users returned the questionnaire during the period 2011-2014 (response rate 52.5%). Differences were found

    with regard to hearing aid experiences, gender and unilateral versus bilateral hearing aid fitting. Women compared to men and bilaterally fitted

    compared to unilaterally fitted, reported significantly higher scores for all seven items in IOI-HA. The largest differences in mean score were found

    for the item hearing aid use between experienced and first-time user where experienced users used the aids more. No correlation was found

    between mean IOI-HA score and average hearing threshold level.

    Conclusion

    When evaluating hearing aid rehabilitation differences between groups need to be considered.

  • 99789.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bohn, Therese
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Aktiv Kommunikation: En studie om effekterna av en kommunikationskurs för 87-åringar med hörselnedsättning2010Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 99790.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    County Council Östergotland, Hearing Clinic, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    County Council Östergotland, Hearing Clinic, Linköping, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Short- and Long-Term Effects of the Modified Swedish Version of the Active Communication Education (ACE) Program for Adults with Hearing Loss2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 848-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, there is a lack of evidence-based rehabilitation programs for hearing loss. The Active Communication Education program (ACE) has successfully been used in Australia and was translated and evaluated in a Swedish pilot study. The pilot study included 23 participants (age 87 yr). No statistically significant effects were found, but the qualitative assessments indicated that this population found the program to be beneficial. The participants requested more focus on the psychosocial consequences of hearing loss, and the modules in the original ACE program were modified. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effects of a modified Swedish version of the ACE program in a population aged 39-82 yr old. Research Design: Design was a between-group and within-group intervention study. Study Sample: The participants were recruited from the hearing health clinic in Linkoping during 2010 and 2012. A total of 73 participante agreed to undergo the ACE, and 67 (92%) completed three or more sessions. Intervention: The ACE program consists of five weekly 2 hr group sessions with 6 to 10 participants per group. Data Collection and Analysis: The outcomes were measured before initiation of the program, 3 wk after program completion, and 6 mo after program completion and included communication strategy use, activity and participation, health-related quality of life, and anxiety and depression. In addition, outcomes were measured after program completion using the International Outcome Inventory Alternative Interventions, a modified version of the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement, and qualitative feedback was obtained about the response to the program and actions taken as a result of participation. The treatment effects were examined using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results: Statistically significant effects were found for communication strategy use, activity and participation, and psychosocial well-being. Statistically significant effects were found for gender and degree of hearing loss, indicating that women and those with mild hearing loss significantly improved communication strategies. Conclusions: It is suggested that the program be implemented as part of regular audiological rehabilitation and offered in an early stage of rehabilitation.

  • 99791.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Australia .
    A Preliminary Evaluation of the Active Communication Education Program in a Sample of 87-Year-Old Hearing Impaired Individuals2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research suggests that audiological rehabilitation for older adults could include group communication programs in addition to hearing aid fitting or as an alternative to hearing aid fitting for those people who do not wish to proceed with hearing aids. This pilot study was a first attempt to evaluate a Swedish version of such a program, Active Communication Education (ACE), which had been developed and previously evaluated in Australia (Hickson et.al, 2007a). Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the use of the ACE program in an older-old population of people aged 87 yr in Sweden. Research Design: A within-subject intervention study. Study Sample: The participants were recruited from the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment (ELSA), a population-based study of the functional abilities of all inhabitants of the city of Linkoping aged 85 yr in 2007. Participants who responded to the hearing related items in the ELSA study were approached for this study; 29 people agreed to undertake ACE, and 23 (79%) completed three or more sessions. Intervention: The ACE program consists of five weekly 2 hr group sessions with six to ten participants per group. Data Collection and Analysis: Self-report measures of communication strategy use, activity and participation, health-related quality of life, and depression were obtained preprogram, 3 wk postprogram, and 6 mo postprogram. Within-group changes and effect sizes were calculated. In addition, outcomes were measured postprogram using the International Outcome Inventory Alternative Interventions (IOI-AI; Noble, 2002) and a modified version of the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement (COSI; Dillon et al, 1997; Hickson et al, 2007b), and qualitative feedback was obtained. Results: The effect size of ACE was small (0.03-0.27), and, in the sample of 23 included in this pilot study, differences in pre- and postprogram assessments were not statistically significant. Results from the IOI-Al and the modified COSI indicated that these elderly participants found the program to be beneficial, and 90% stated that the course had increased their ability to deal with hearing loss and the problems it creates. Conclusions: This preliminary investigation indicates the potential benefits of ACE for older adults, and further research is needed with larger numbers of participants in different age groups to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the ACE program for a general Swedish population.

  • 99792.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Active Communication Education program in two Swedish samples2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99793.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD,.
    Bohn, Therese
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    Communication Disability Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Evaluation of the Active Communication Education program in two Swedish samples2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99794.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane Australia.
    Evaluation of the Active Communication Education program in two Swedish samples2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99795.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Brännström, Jonas
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Laplante.Lévesque, Ariane
    Eriksholms Research Centre, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Hörselrehabilitering och Internet2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99796.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Elisabet, Sundewall Thorén
    Eriksholm Reserach Centre, Denmark.
    Hagejärd, Lena
    Avdelningen för logopedi, foniatri och audiologi, Lunds universitet, Lund Sverige.
    Teodorescu, Ina
    Avdelningen för logopedi, foniatri och audiologi, Lunds universitet, Lund Sverige.
    Online Individualized Active Communication Education- a Swedish pilot study2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99797.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elisabet, Sundewall Thorén
    Eriksholm Reserach Centre, Denmark.
    Teodorescu, Ina
    Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences Lund University, Sweden.
    Hagejärd, Lena
    Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences Lund University, Sweden.
    Online Individualized Active Communication Education- -a Swedish pilot study2015In: Online Individualized Active Communication Education- -a Swedish pilot study, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The group rehabilitation program Active Communication Education program (ACE), has been translated and evaluated in two Swedish studies. Statistically significant effects were found for activity and participation and communication strategies. The qualitative analyze showed that the participants found the structure and the content of the program to be beneficial and “learning from the group” was found to be the most pronounced advantage of the program. All individuals do not want to or do not have the possibility to participate in group activities and therefore are individual education programs requested. Could an individual educational program, administered via the internet, be beneficial even without the possibility to learn from the peers in a group? The aim with this study was to translate and, in a pilot study, evaluate the Individual Active Communication Education program (I-ACE) for a Swedish population.

    Method                                                                                                                                                                      

    The originally I-ACE program, developed in Australian, was translated and mixed with contents from the Swedish ACE program to a five week, online education program. Participants were recruited by advertisements in hearing health care centers and at social medium forums. Twenty-four individuals participated and received I-ACE material by mail every week. The effects were evaluated with standardized questionnaires and open ended items.

    Result

    Statistically significant effects were found for activity and participation and for communication strategies. The qualitative analyze showed that the participants were satisfied with the content of the program. Learning about communication strategies and own reflections about the hearing problems were the most pronounced advantages.

    Conclusion

    The Swedish version of the I-ACE with material administered by mail worked well and was found to increase participants’ activity and participation and communication strategies. Further research, including a control group, is needed to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the I-ACE program.

  • 99798.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ingo, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    On-line supportsystem för audionomer och förstagångsbrukare2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99799.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingo, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On-line supportsystem för audionomer och förstagångsbrukare2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99800.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Psychometric evaluation of hearing specific self-report measures and their associations with psychosocial and demographic variables2007In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study was to collect descriptive data and to evaluate the psychometric properties of a range of self-report questionnaires in a Swedish population. Other aims were to investigate the correlations between these measures and the higher order factorial structure of the included questionnaires. One hundred and sixty-two first-time hearing aid users completed four standardized hearing specific questionnaires: the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE); the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL); the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS); and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA). In addition, two psychosocial questionnaires were completed: the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC); and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). All measures were administered at one year post hearing aid fitting. Mean scores for the questionnaires were in agreement with previous studies. The questionnaires were found to be reliable and acceptable for further clinical use. Correlations were seen across different hearing specific questionnaires, and between hearing aid use and satisfaction. Psychosocial variables were more strongly associated with participation restriction and satisfaction than with the demographic variables, confirming the importance of subjective measures. The factor analysis extracted four factors: psychosocial well-being, hearing aid satisfaction, adaptive communications strategies, and residual participation restriction, and indicated that the number of questionnaires could be reduced. It is concluded that psychosocial factors are important to consider in hearing aid rehabilitation and their possible role should be further investigated in future studies.

1993199419951996199719981999 99751 - 99800 of 100555
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf