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  • 1.
    Store, Siri Jakobsson
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Norell-Clarke, Annika
    Kristianstad Univ, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    A robot intervention for adults with ADHD and insomnia-A mixed-method proof-of-concept study2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 9, article id e0290984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo investigate individual effects of a three-week sleep robot intervention in adults with ADHD and insomnia, and to explore participants experiences with the intervention.MethodsA proof-of-concept study with a mixed-methods design (n = 6, female = 4) where a repeated ABA single-case study was combined with interviews. Data were collected with the Consensus Sleep Diary, wrist actigraphy, questionnaires on symptoms of insomnia, arousal, emotional distress, and ADHD, and through individual interviews.ResultsVisual analysis of the sleep diary and actigraphy variables did not support any effects from the robot intervention. Half of participants reported clinically relevant reductions on the Insomnia Severity Index from pre- to post-intervention. No changes regarding ADHD or arousal. Thematic analysis of the interviews resulted in three themes: (1) A pleasant companion, (2) Too much/not enough, and (3) A new routine.ConclusionAdjustments of the intervention ought to be made to match the needs of patients with both ADHD and insomnia before the next trial is conducted.

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  • 2.
    Blixt, Cornelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Johansson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Forsner, Maria
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction in pediatric and neonatal care nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden2023In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 73, p. e646-e651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Quality of care and the mental and physical health of nurses are interlinked. The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed an extremely high burden on health care. This study aimed to: 1) describe professional quality of life of registered nurses (RN) working in the pediatric and neonatal care units during the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden, 2) compare professional quality of life between RNs with and without a Master's degree in specialist nursing pediatric care (MSc), and 3) compare differences in professional quality of life associated with the nursing experience (years). Design and methods: This study adopted a cross-sectional survey design. The PROQoL (R)-5-questionnaire was administered as a web survey to 160 RNs at four pediatric wards and two neonatal units of two hospitals in Sweden. Results: Seventy-one RNs responded to the survey. Overall, they reported a sufficient professional quality of life. RNs with an MSc suffered significantly lower secondary traumatic stress levels. Experienced RNs reported significantly higher compassion satisfaction and lower occupational burnout. Conclusion: Higher education and longer experience are beneficial for nurses' professional quality of life when working in pediatric care units. Practical implications: Results from this study highlights the importance of offering RN education in pediatric care at master level and supporting novice nurses, to prevent negative professional well-being outcomes in pediatric care, because the health of nurses is of utterly importance when crisis such as a pandemic hits the world. The findings also suggest that the conditions for professional quality of life could improve through activities such as self-care, time for reflection, better working hours, competence-adjusted salary, and educational opportunities. (c) 2023 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

  • 3.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Measuring hair cortisol concentration, insomnia symptoms and quality of life in preschool children with severe early childhood caries - a case-control pilot study2023In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 81, no 7, p. 508-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveThis study aimed to 1) investigate the relationships between hair cortisol concentration (HCC), insomnia symptoms, Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in preschool children with severe early childhood caries, 2) compare HCC, insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL in preschool children with severe early childhood caries with these factors in children without clinical signs of dental caries, and 3) explore correlations between caries scores and HCC, insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL.Material and MethodsA case-control pilot study, including 12 children with severe early childhood caries and 28 controls, aged 3-5 years. Dental examination was performed and hair samples for cortisol were taken. Parents filled out questionnaires about their childs insomnia symptoms, HRQoL and OHRQoL. Interpreters were used in families with language difficulties.ResultsThe key findings in this pilot study were tendencies that children with severe early childhood caries had more insomnia symptoms, and poorer OHRQoL than the controls. Caries scores was correlated with insomnia symptoms and OHRQoL.ConclusionsDentists should include questions about the childs sleep when they see the child, as insomnia related to dental caries may lead to several physical, mental, and social problems.

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  • 4.
    Støre, Siri Jakobsson
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Wästlund, Erik
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Norell, Annika
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Kristianstad Univ, Sweden.
    Mind, Body and Machine: Preliminary Study to Explore Predictors of Treatment Response After a Sleep Robot Intervention for Adults with Insomnia.2023In: Nature and Science of Sleep, ISSN 1179-1608, Vol. 15, p. 567-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The study aimed to explore characteristics of responders to a sleep robot intervention for adults with insomnia, and the likelihood that participants responded to the intervention.

    METHODS: Data from the intervention and the control group in a randomized waitlist-controlled trial (n = 44) were pooled together after both had undergone the intervention. A repeated measures ANOVA and Friedman tests were used to explore changes over time. Differences in baseline characteristics between responders (n = 13), defined as a reduction of -5 on the Insomnia Severity Index from pre- to post-intervention, and non-responders (n = 31) were analyzed with t-tests and chi-square tests. Finally, logistic regression models were estimated.

    RESULTS: Baseline anxiety was the only statistically significant difference between responders and non-responders (p = 0.03). A logistic regression model with anxiety and sleep quality as predictors was statistically significant, correctly classifying 83.3% of cases.

    DISCUSSION: The results imply that people with lower anxiety and higher sleep quality at baseline are more likely to report clinically significant improvements in insomnia from the sleep robot intervention.

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  • 5.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grundström, Hanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Supporting girls with painful menstruation - A qualitative study with school nurses in Sweden2023In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 68, p. e109-e115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Painful menstruation is common among girls. To optimize school nurses' work more knowledgeabout their experiences of supporting these girls is needed. The aim of this study was to describe school nurses'experiences of supporting girls with menstrual pain.Methods: Interviews were conducted with 15 school nurses in Sweden and analyzed using thematic analysis.Results: Three themes emerged: Taking menstrual pain seriously, Being a disseminator of knowledge, andExternal conditions for conducting professional work as a school nurse.Conclusion: School nurses felt competent in supporting girls with menstrual pain. However, they lacked struc-tural, written guidelines and routines for how to treat, support, follow-up and refer girls with menstrual pain.Practice implications: School education about menstruation and sexual health needs to be strengthened. Cooper-ation with other healthcare facilities and networks with other school nurses should be increased. Specific guide-lines on how to support girls with menstrual pain should be implemented.

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  • 6.
    Store, Siri Jakobsson
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Wästlund, Erik
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Norell-Clarke, Annika
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden; Kristianstad Univ, Sweden.
    The effects of a sleep robot intervention on sleep, depression and anxiety in adults with insomnia - A randomized waitlist-controlled trial2023In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 32, no 3, article id e13758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study objective was to assess if a 3-week intervention with the Somnox sleep robot had effects on symptoms of insomnia, somatic arousal, and/or concurrent symptoms of depression and anxiety in adults with insomnia, compared with a waitlist-control group. The participants (n = 44) were randomized to a 3-week intervention with the sleep robot (n = 22), or to a waitlist-control group (n = 22). The primary outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index administered at baseline, mid-intervention, post-intervention and at 1-month follow-up. Secondary outcome measures were the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Additionally, sleep-onset latency, wake time after sleep onset, total sleep time and sleep efficiency were measured the week prior to and the last week of the intervention, both subjectively with the Consensus Sleep Diary and objectively with wrist actigraphy. Mixed-effects models were used to analyse data. The effect of the sleep robot on the participants insomnia severity was not statistically significant. The differences between the intervention group and the control group on the measures of arousal, anxiety and depression were also not statistically significant, and neither were the sleep diary and actigraphy variables. In conclusion, a 3-week intervention with daily at-home use of the robot was not found to be an effective method to relieve the symptom burden in adults with insomnia.

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  • 7.
    Smith, Stephanie
    et al.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Perth Childrens Hosp, Australia.
    Tallon, Mary
    Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Smith, James
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Morelius, Evalotte
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Perth Childrens Hosp, Australia.
    Parental sleep when their child is sick: A phased principle-based concept analysis2022In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 31, no 5, article id e13575Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep is a common challenge for parents with sick children and can impact parents health, wellbeing, and caregiving responsibilities. Despite the vast research around parental sleep when their child is sick, the concept is not clearly defined. A phased principle-based concept analysis that includes triangulation of methods and quality criteria assessment was used to explore how the concept is described, used, and measured in the current literature. The aim was to analyse and clarify the conceptual, operational, and theoretical basis of parental sleep when their child is sick to produce an evidence-based definition and to identify knowledge gaps. A systematic literature search including databases CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, PsychARTICLES, PsychINFO, Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science, identified 546 articles. The final dataset comprised 74 articles published between 2005 and 2021 and was assessed using a criteria tool for principle-based concept analysis. Data were managed using NVivo, and thematic analysis was undertaken. A precise definition is not present in the literature. Various tools have been used to measure parents sleep, as well as exploration via interviews, open-ended questions, and sleep diaries. The terminology used varied. Parental sleep when their child is sick is interrelated with other concepts (e.g., stress). A recommended definition is offered. A conceptual understanding of parental sleep when their child is sick will help to guide translational research and to conduct studies critical to clinical practice and research. Future research includes developing a measurement tool for parental sleep when their child is sick to be used in study design and future interventions.

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  • 8.
    Store, Siri Jakobsson
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Wastlund, Erik
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health.
    Clarke, Annika Norell
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Technically sleeping? A clinical single-case study of a commercial sleep robot2022In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 919023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Somnox sleep robot is promoted as sleep enhancing. The current study investigated individual effects, the acceptability and the safety of, and experiences with, a 3-week intervention in adults with insomnia. A repeated ABA single-case design (n = 4) was used to evaluate the effects of the sleep robot compared with baseline, as measured with a sleep diary and actigraphy. Pre-, post-, and 1-month follow-up assessments were conducted, measuring symptoms of insomnia, level of somatic arousal, and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Questions about adherence were included in the sleep diary. Individual interviews were conducted post intervention to explore the participants experiences with the sleep robot. The sleep diary and actigraphy data showed marginal differences, and if something, often a slight deterioration in the intervention phase. Three participants reported improvements regarding their sleep in the interviews compared with baseline, which mirrored the results on the questionnaires (insomnia and arousal) for two of the participants. The same three participants adhered to the intervention. Stable or improved self-assessed symptoms of depression and anxiety, and information from the individual interviews, suggest that the intervention is safe for adults with insomnia. The results regarding the effects of the sleep robot were mixed, and ought to be scrutinized in larger studies before confident recommendations can be made. However, the study supports the acceptability and safety of the intervention in adults with insomnia.

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  • 9.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden; Dalen Hosp, Sweden.
    Weber-Falk, Megan
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Communication, self-esteem and prolonged grief in parent-adolescent dyads, 1 - 4 years following the death of a parent to cancer2021In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 50, article id 101883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Talking and grieving together may be advantageous for maintaining belief in a meaningful future and can help bereaved adolescents and their parents to cope better with the situation. The aim of this study was to explore communication, self-esteem and prolonged grief in adolescent-parent dyads, following the death of a parent to cancer. Method: This study has a descriptive and comparative design. Twenty family dyads consisting of parentally bereaved adolescents (12 & ndash;19 years) and their widowed parents completed the Parent and Adolescent Communication Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Prolonged Grief-13, 1 & ndash;4 years following the death of a parent. Results: Twelve family dyads reported normal-high parent-adolescent communication, 11 dyads rated normal high self-esteem. Two adolescents and three parents scored above the cut-off for possible prolonged grief disorder (>= 35), none of these were in the same dyads. There was a difference (p < .05) between boys (mean 40.0) and girls (mean 41.9) with regard to open family communication, as assessed by parents. Girls reported lower self-esteem (mean 26.0) than boys (mean 34.1, p < .01). Conclusions: This study provides insights from parentally bereaved families which indicate that despite experiencing the often-traumatic life event of losing a parent or partner, most participants reported normal parent adolescent communication, normal self-esteem and few symptoms of prolonged grief. The potential usefulness of identifying families who may need professional support in family communication following the death of a parent is discussed.

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  • 10.
    Al-Motlaq, Mohammad
    et al.
    Hashemite Univ, Jordan.
    Neill, Sarah
    Univ Plymouth, England.
    Foster, Mandie Jane
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Perth Childrens Hosp, Australia.
    Coyne, Imelda
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland; Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Houghton, Davina
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Rising-Holmstrom, Malin
    Mid Sweden Univ, Sweden.
    Majamanda, Maureen
    Univ Malawi, Malawi; Consortium Adv Training Africa CARTA, Kenya.
    Position statement of the international network for child and family centered care: Child and family centred care during the COVID19 pandemic2021In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 61, p. 140-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is the position of the International Network for Child and Family Centered Care (INCFCC) that COVID-19 restrictions pose tremendous challenges for the health care team in their efforts to provide child and family centered care (CFCC). COVID-19 restrictions impact on the familys right to be presernt with their ill child and to contribute to the caring process. A limited number of articles have discussed challenges about the successful delivery of CFCC during the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on current literature, the INCFCC stresses the need for continuous facilitation implementation of child and family centred care as, it is essential for childrens physical and psychological wellbeing. Furthermore we believe that the families presence and participation holds more benefits than risks to the health of children, their families, and the health care team. (C) 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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  • 11.
    Falk, Megan W.
    et al.
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden; Dalen Hosp, Sweden.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Psychological symptoms in widowed parents with minor children, 2-4 years after the loss of a partner to cancer2021In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1112-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives This study aimed to explore psychological symptoms in widowed parents with minor children, 2-4 years after the death of their partner. A second aim was to examine the associations between psychological symptoms and nonmodifiable and modifiable illness and healthcare-related factors. Methods A cross-sectional survey study on widowed parents with minor children after the loss of a partner to cancer. In total, 42 parents completed an online questionnaire including instruments for assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, grief rumination, prolonged grief, and posttraumatic stress. Descriptive statistics, Spearmans correlation coefficients, Mann-Whitney U tests and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze differences in symptomology based on modifiable and nonmodifiable factors. Results Parents reported moderate-severe symptoms of anxiety, posttraumatic stress, and depression. Reporting having received more information during the partners illness regarding how the illness could affect the partners somatic and psychological health and where to turn for support were associated with fewer psychological symptoms. Conclusions A substantial proportion of widowed parents with minor children reported a moderate-severe symptom burden regarding depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress, and less so with prolonged grief symptoms. This study also highlighted the value of receiving information from healthcare personnel regarding the somatic and psychological effects of a partners illness and where widowed parents can turn for support.

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  • 12.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    et al.
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Sleep and its relation to health-related quality of life in 3-10-year-old children2021In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 1043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundConsidering the reports of increasing sleep problems in children, affecting health and well-being in young children and their families, we found it important to gain more knowledge about sleep and its correlation to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in young, healthy children. The aims with this study were to describe sleep quality, sleep duration, and HRQoL in healthy 3-10-year-old children and to test associations between childrens sleep and HRQoL.MethodsParents of 160 children (average age: 6.9years, SD 2.2) participated in the study. Sleep onset problems (SOP), sleep maintenance problems (SMP), and sleep duration were measured by the Pediatric Insomnia Severity Index (PISI). KIDSCREEN-27 was used to measure HRQoL in five dimensions: physical well-being, psychological well-being, autonomy and parent relation, social support and peers, and school environment.ResultsThe average score was 2.2 for SOP (SD +/-2.2) and 1.3 for SMP (SD +/-1.6). Few children (2%) were reported to sleep less than 8 h per night. Younger children had statistically significant higher SOP and SMP than older children. Correlations were found between SOP and poor psychological well-being (p<0.05, rho=-0.16), and between SMP and poor physical wellbeing (p<0.05, rho=-0.16), psychological well-being (p<0.05, rho=-0.21), poor school environment (p<0.01, rho=-0.29), autonomy and parent relation (p<0.05, rho=-0.16), and poor social support and peers (p<0.05, rho=-0.19). Conclusion: Childrens sleep associates with health-related quality of life and needs to be acknowledged in child health care settings and schools.

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  • 13.
    Store, Siri Jakobsson
    et al.
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Wästlund, Erik
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Norell-Clarke, Annika
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    The effects of a sleep robot intervention on sleep, depression and anxiety in adults with insomnia - Study protocol of a randomized waitlist-controlled trial2021In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, ISSN 1551-7144, E-ISSN 1559-2030, Vol. 110, article id 106588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder characterized by difficulties initiating sleep, maintaining sleep and/or early-morning awakenings. Hyperarousal is a common causal and maintaining factor in insomnia models. Different techniques to decrease arousal have shown to be effective. Calm breathing can be one approach to enhance sleep. The Somnox sleep robot looks like a bean-shaped cushion to hug, and it gives physical and auditive guidance to calm down the users breathing. There is currently no impartial empirical evidence of the sleep robots effects on insomnia. This study is a randomized waitlist-controlled trial with a recruitment target of a minimum of 44 adults with insomnia and sleep disturbing arousal. Participants will complete pre-, mid- and post-intervention assessments, in addition to a 1-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure is the Insomnia Severity Index. Secondary sleep outcome measures are the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale, a sleep diary and actigraphy. A secondary comorbid symptoms outcome measure is the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The main research question is whether treated participants have greater improvements regarding symptoms of insomnia post-intervention, compared with the waitlist control group. The analytic approach will be mixed-effects models. The current study will increase the knowledge on breath guidance as a way to reduce hyperarousal and enhance sleep. The sleep robot is a novel method and a potential treatment option for people with insomnia, when the recommended first-line treatments of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and pharmaceuticals are inaccessible or undesirable. The ethics of healthcare robotics is discussed.

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  • 14.
    Loyland, Borghild
    et al.
    OsloMet Oslo Metropolitan Univ, Norway.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Kristjansdottir, Gudrun
    Univ Iceland, Iceland; Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland.
    Sjolie, Hege
    OsloMet Oslo Metropolitan Univ, Norway.
    A systematic integrative review of parents experience and perception of sleep when they stay overnight in the hospital together with their sick children2020In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 29, no 5-6, p. 706-719Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To elucidate knowledge available on parents experience and perception of sleep when they stay overnight in hospital together with their sick children. Background In Nordic countries, children are entitled to have at least one parent with them during hospitalisation. Parents sleep, when accommodated at the hospital during the childs admission, may be a challenge. Design A systematic literature search was conducted in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO; period is restricted from 1 January 2007 to 1 April 2019. Studies included were those in which parents were accommodated in hospital with their child, 0-18 years of age, for at least one night. Original peer-reviewed scientific research papers conducting qualitative, quantitative or mixed designs were included. Systematic reviews were not included. This systematic integrative review was registered in PROSPERO and performed according to the PRISMA guidelines. All authors participated in study selection, data extraction and quality assessment of the literature. Results Fifteen studies were included, and they varied in terms of origin, aims, design, methods used and sample size. Three overall main themes appeared: sleep quality, factors affecting sleep and consequences of sleep loss. Combined psychological factors were found to affect parents sleep, as well as isolated psychological factors, for example, stress, anxiety, worries and difficult thoughts. Environmental and social factors were also identified, for example, privacy and caring for family. Conclusion Study of this subject is still in its exploratory phase. There is a need for the development of theory of substance in the clarification of the meaning of sleep among parents during difficult times such as childrens hospitalisation. Relevance to clinical practice Understanding risk factors associated with sleep and sleep deprivation in parents staying overnight in the hospital with their sick child is important, since lack of sleep may lead to serious stress-related outcomes for the parents.

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  • 15.
    Lundgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health.
    Norell Clarke, Annika
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Adolescents’ experiences of staying overnight at family-centered pediatric wards2020In: Sage Open Nursing, E-ISSN 2377-9608, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Sleep is essential for health and recovery. Hospital stays may affect adolescents’ sleep quality negatively as routines in the ward are not adapted for adolescents’ developmental status or sleep habits. The aims with this study were to (a) explore and describe how adolescents experience sleep in the family-centered pediatric ward, (b) explore and describe how adolescents experience the presence or absence of a parent during the hospital stay, and (c) identify circumstances that the adolescents describe as influential of their sleep in the pediatric wards.

    Methods

    This is a qualitative interview study employing thematic analysis with an inductive and exploratory approach. Sixteen adolescents aged between 13 and 17 years participated in the study.

    Results

    Three themes were found: the importance of good sleep, safety as a prerequisite for sleep in hospital, and circumstances influencing adolescents’ sleep in hospital.

    Conclusion

    The adolescents described their sleep at the pediatric ward positively, but mentioned disturbing factors associated with pain, nightly check-ups, noises, and inactivity. Parental presence was perceived as very positive both during the night and the day.

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  • 16.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Correction: Swedish translation and validation of the Pediatric Insomnia Severity Index (vol 20, 253, 2020)2020In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, BMC PEDIATRICS, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 333Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.

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  • 17.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Olsson, Emma
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Univ Hosp Orebro, Sweden.
    Sahlén Helmer, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Thernstrom Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    External barriers for including parents of preterm infants in a randomised clinical trial in the neonatal intensive care unit in Sweden: a descriptive study2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 12, article id e040991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Performing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in neonatal intensive care is challenging in many ways. While restrictive inclusion criteria or busy study protocols are obvious barriers, external barriers leading to termination of a study are seldom discussed. The aim of this study was to describe barriers for inclusion of families in neonatal intensive care in an RCT aiming to evaluate the effects of continuous skin-to-skin contact on mood and sleep quality in parents of preterm infants, as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge. Design A descriptive study. Setting Three out of seven tertiary neonatal intensive care units in Sweden participated in a two-arm RCT that was terminated because of low inclusion rate. Participants Before termination of the study, 11 out of 242 families assessed for eligibility were included for participation. Results The major barriers for inclusion in this RCT were external due to (1) lack of intensive care beds in the neonatal ward, causing medically stable infants to be transferred back to the referring hospital quicker than expected, (2) moving directly from the delivery room to a family room without passing an open bay intensive care room or (3) transferring from one neonatal ward to another with the same care level to increase availability of intensive care beds where needed. Other barriers were the inclusion criteria single-birth and Swedish-speaking parent. Conclusions The major barriers for including participants were external constituted by transferals between neonatal wards and cities due to lack of intensive care beds. This is a multifactorial issue related to organisational structures. However, since this affects the possibilities to perform research this study highlights some suggestions to consider when planning prospective intervention studies within a neonatal setting.

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  • 18.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Sjolie, Hege
    Oslo Metropolitan Univ, Norway.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia; Perth Children’s Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia.
    Loyland, Borghild
    Oslo Metropolitan Univ, Norway.
    Like Walking in a Fog: Parents' perceptions of sleep and consequences of sleep loss when staying overnight with their child in hospital2020In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 29, no 2, article id e12945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disruption of parental sleep in hospital, with frequent awakenings and poor sleep quality, limits the parents resources to meet the childs needs and maintain parental wellbeing. The aim of the study was to explore and describe how parents perceive their sleep when staying overnight with their sick child in hospital. A further aim was to explore and describe parents perception of what circumstances influence their sleep in the hospital. Twenty-two parents who were accommodated with their sick child (0-17 years) in paediatric wards in Norway and Sweden participated. Interviews were conducted during the hospital stay to elicit their perspectives. Phenomenography was used to analyse data. Two descriptive categories were found: (a) "Perceptions of sleep", with two sub-categories: "Sleep in the paediatric ward" and "Consequences of sleep loss"; and (b) "Circumstances influencing sleep in the paediatric ward" with three sub-categories: "The importance of the family", "Information and routines at the paediatric ward", and "Accommodation facilities". Parents sleep and needs must be acknowledged in paediatric wards. An individual plan of care for the upcoming night could be a valuable tool for both the parents and nurses. The childs medical needs must be met with respect to the parents willingness to take part in the childs care during the night, and the need for rest and sleep for both parent and child.

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  • 19.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sundell, Anna Lena Lena
    Inst Postgrad Dent Educ, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Swedish translation and validation of the Pediatric Insomnia Severity Index2020In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, BMC PEDIATRICS, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    To increase health and well-being in young children, it is important to acknowledge and promote the child’s sleep behaviour. However, there is a lack of brief, validated sleep screening instruments for children. The aims of the study were to (1) present a Swedish translation of the PISI, (2) examine the factor structure of the Swedish version of PISI, and test the reliability and validity of the PISI factor structure in a sample of healthy children in Sweden.

    Methods

    The English version of the PISI was translated into Swedish, translated back into English, and agreed upon before use. Parents of healthy 3- to 10-year-old children filled out the Swedish version of the PISI and the generic health-related quality of life instrument KIDSCREEN-27 two times. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for baseline and test-retest, structural equation modelling, and correlations between the PISI and KIDSCREEN-27 were performed.

    Results

    In total, 160 parents filled out baseline questionnaires (test), whereof 100 parents (63%) filled out the follow-up questionnaires (retest). Confirmative factor analysis of the PISI found two correlated factors: sleep onset problems (SOP) and sleep maintenance problems (SMP). The PISI had substantial construct and test-retest reliability. The PISI factors were related to all KIDSCREEN-27 dimensions.

    Conclusions

    The Swedish version of the PISI is applicable for screening sleep problems and is a useful aid in dialogues with families about sleep.

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  • 20.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Morelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 620-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To study the cortisol response in parents staying with their child in paediatric wards, to compare the parents’ cortisol levels between the paediatric ward and at home 4 weeks after discharge and to compare the parents’ cortisol levels with data of an adult reference population, reported by Wust et al., as there are few studies investigating parental cortisol.

    Design

    This study has a descriptive and prospective comparative design.

    Method

    Thirty‐one parents participated. Saliva samples were collected in the paediatric ward and 4 weeks later at home.

    Results

    The parents had lower morning awakening cortisol levels in the paediatric ward than at home after discharge. There were no statistically significant differences in postawakening cortisol or cortisol awakening response (CAR). The child's age, diagnosis or previously diagnosed chronic condition did not affect the parents’ cortisol levels. The morning and postawakening cortisol levels were lower than those of the reference population.

    Conclusion

    The hospital stay with a sick child affects parents’ cortisol levels. Parental stress needs more attention to find interventions to prevent the risk of stress‐related complications that subsequently can affect the care of the child.

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  • 21.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sahlén Helmer, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Olsson, Emma
    Department of Pediatrics and Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Shorey, Shefaly
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Effect of skin-to-skin contact on parents sleep quality, mood, parent-infant interaction and cortisol concentrations in neonatal care units: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Separation after preterm birth is a major stressor for infants and parents. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a method of care suitable to use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimise separation between parents and infants. Less separation leads to increased possibilities for parent-infant interaction, provided that the parents’ sleep quality is satisfactory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous SSC on sleep quality and mood in parents of preterm infants born <33 weeks of gestation as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge.

    Methods and analysis A randomised intervention study with two arms—intervention versus standard care. Data will be collected from 50 families. Eligible families will be randomly allocated to intervention or standard care when transferred from the intensive care room to the family-room in the NICU. The intervention consists of continuous SSC for four consecutive days and nights in the family-room. Data will be collected every day during the intervention and again at the time of discharge from the hospital. Outcome measures comprise activity tracker (Actigraph); validated self-rated questionnaires concerning sleep, mood and bonding; observed scorings of parental sensitivity and emotional availability and salivary cortisol. Data will be analysed with pairwise, repeated measures, Mann Whitney U-test will be used to compare groups and analysis of variance will be used to adjust for different hospitals and parents’ gender.

    Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Regional Research Ethics Board at an appropriate university (2016/89–31). The results will be published in scientific journals. We will also use conferences and social media to disseminate our findings.

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  • 22.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. e544-e550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family‐centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers’ and fathers’ sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents’ sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily‐life home setting after discharge.

    Background

    Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents’ sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child.

    Methods

    This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty‐two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood.

    Results

    The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood.

    Conclusion

    Parents’ sleep quality in family‐centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice

    The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents’ sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well‐being in the family.

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  • 23.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Askenteg, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Wikner, Ulrica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    "To Cope with Everyday Life, I Need to Sleep" - A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Sleep Loss in Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis.2018In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 43, p. E59-E65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The whole family is affected when a child has atopic dermatitis (AD), and parents experience sleep disruption related to the child's condition leading to physical and mental exhaustion, mood swings, loss of concentration and lower job performance. This study aimed to explore and describe perceptions of sleep in parents of children <2 years old with AD, consequences of parental sleep loss, and what strategies the parents used to manage sleep loss and to improve sleep.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: This qualitative interview study had an inductive and descriptive design. Twelve parents (eleven mothers and one father) participated in the study. Data analysis was performed using a phenomenographic approach.

    RESULTS: Three categories of description were found: Acceptance and normalization of parental sleep loss; Changed routines and behavior to compensate for sleep loss; and Support is needed to gain sleep and manage daily life.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sleep loss due to the child's AD affected the parents' emotional state, mood, well-being, cognitive function, ability to concentrate and take initiative, and sensitivity to stress and sound negatively. The parents managed their sleep loss mainly by changing their behavior and creating new routines, by taking me-time and through support from partners.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Pediatric nurses should acknowledge sleep loss in parents of small children with AD in time to prevent negative consequences, which affect the well-being of the entire family. Advice on how to improve sleep should be given early to increase the parents' understanding, make them feel safer and strengthen them in their parenthood.

  • 24. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their child is ill and needs medical care, irrespective of the child’s age, diagnosis or the severity of the illness. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, to care for their ill child, and to cope with the challenges they face.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate sleep, mood, cortisol response, and sense of coherence (SOC) in parents caring for children in need of medical care, and to identify factors that may influence parents’ sleep.

    This thesis includes four original studies; two of these are quantitative, prospective, descriptive and comparative studies including parents (n=82) accommodated in six pediatric wards with their ill child, using questionnaires and sleep logs to measure sleep, mood and SOC, and saliva cortisol to measure cortisol response. A follow-up was performed four weeks later at home, after hospital discharge. The other two studies are qualitative, inductive and explorative interview studies, including parents (n=12) staying overnight with their preterm and/or ill infant in three neonatal intensive care units, and parents (n=15) with a child receiving hospital-based home care in two pediatric outpatient clinics. The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenographic method.

    Being together with one’s family seems beneficial for sleep and may decrease stress. The ability to stay with the child, in the hospital or at home, was highly appreciated by the parents. When caring for a child with illness, parents’ sleep quality was sufficient in the hospital; however, sleep quality improved further (p<0.05) at home after discharge. The parents reported frequent nocturnal awakenings in the hospital caused by the child, medical treatment and hospital staff. Concern and anxiety about the child’s health, and uncertainty about the future were stressors affecting the parents’ sleep and mood negatively. The parents had lower (p=0.01) morning awakening cortisol levels in the pediatric ward compared to at home, and parents accommodated for more than one night had lower (p<0.05) post-awakening cortisol levels compared to parents staying their first night.

    The findings of this thesis conclude that being together as a family is important for the parents’ sleep. The ability to be accommodated in the hospital and gather the family around the child may have given the parents time for relaxation and recovery, that in turn may lead to a less stressful hospital stay. When it is beneficial for the child, the whole family should be included in the pediatric care. Moreover, pediatric nurses must acknowledge parents’ sleep, in hospital and at home. Medical treatment and care at night should be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents in order to maintain health and well-being in the family.

    List of papers
    1. Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study
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    2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 5-6, p. 717-727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To explore and describe how parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care perceive their sleep.

    BACKGROUND:

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their newborn infant is preterm and/or sick. This affects bonding. By developing more family-centred care units with single-family rooms, parents are given the opportunity to stay and care for their newborn infant(s) 24 hours a day. Lack of sleep may affect new parents' ability to cope with the many challenges they face on a daily basis.

    DESIGN:

    A phenomenographic study with an inductive and exploratory design.

    METHODS:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve parents of infants in neonatal care between January-March 2012. To describe variations in perception of the phenomenon, data were analysed using phenomenography.

    FINDINGS:

    Four descriptive categories were identified within the phenomenon sleep in parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care: impact of stress on sleep; how the environment affects sleep; keeping the family together improves sleep; and, how parents manage and prevent tiredness.

    CONCLUSION:

    Anxiety, uncertainty and powerlessness have a negative influence on sleep. This can be decreased by continuous information, guidance and practical support. Skin-to-skin care was perceived as a stress-reducing factor that improved relaxation and sleep and should be encouraged by the nurse. The parents also mentioned the importance of being together. Having a private place where they could relax and take care of themselves and their newborn infant improved sleep. It was also desirable to involve older siblings in order to decrease feelings of loneliness, sadness and isolation.

    RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Improved parental sleep in neonatal care may help the families cope with the situation and facilitate problem-solving, emotional regulation and the transition to parenthood.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2015
    Keywords
    family nursing; family-centred care; kangaroo mother care; neonatal intensive care; nursing; siblings; skin-to-skin care
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115549 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12654 (DOI)000350354700010 ()25041598 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)Östergötland County Council
    Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    2. Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.
    2015 (English)In: Nursing Research, ISSN 0029-6562, E-ISSN 1538-9847, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 372-380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Caring for an ill child at home gives the family the chance to be together in a familiar environment. However, this involves several nocturnal sleep disturbances, such as frequent awakenings and bad sleep quality, which may affect parents' ability to take care of the child and themselves.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe parents' perceptions of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care (HBHC) services.

    Method: This is a phenomenographical study with an inductive, exploratory design. Fifteen parents (11 mothers and 4 fathers) with children enrolled in HBHC services were interviewed. Data were analyzed to discover content-related categories describing differences in ways parents experienced sleep when caring for their children receiving HBHC.

    Results: Four descriptive categories were detected: sleep influences mood and mood influences sleep; support influences safeness and safeness influences sleep; the child's needs influence routines and routines influence sleep; and "me time" influences sleep.

    Discussion: Sleep does not affect only the parents' well-being but also the child's care. Symptoms of stress may limit the parents' capacity to meet the child's needs. Support, me time, and physical activity were perceived as essential sources for recovery and sleep. It is important for nurses to acknowledge parental sleep in the child's nursing care plan and help the parents perform self-care to promote sleep and maintain life, health, and well-being.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott-Ravn Publisher, 2015
    Keywords
    children, chronic illness, home care services, parents, qualitative research, sleep
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121085 (URN)10.1097/NNR.0000000000000108 (DOI)000361361000006 ()26325279 (PubMedID)
    Projects
    Parents’ stress and sleep quality when their children need medical care
    Funder
    Östergötland County CouncilMedical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)
    Available from: 2015-09-07 Created: 2015-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
    3. Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. e544-e550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family‐centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers’ and fathers’ sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents’ sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily‐life home setting after discharge.

    Background

    Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents’ sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child.

    Methods

    This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty‐two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood.

    Results

    The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood.

    Conclusion

    Parents’ sleep quality in family‐centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice

    The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents’ sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well‐being in the family.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2018
    Keywords
    adolescents, child, child nursing, children’s nurses, family nursing, family-centred care, hospitalised child, paediatrics, parent, sleep
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143585 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14092 (DOI)000425733600018 ()28960555 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85037348121 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-159681]; Region of Ostergotland, Sweden

    Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2019-05-01Bibliographically approved
    4. The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital
    2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 620-625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To study the cortisol response in parents staying with their child in paediatric wards, to compare the parents’ cortisol levels between the paediatric ward and at home 4 weeks after discharge and to compare the parents’ cortisol levels with data of an adult reference population, reported by Wust et al., as there are few studies investigating parental cortisol.

    Design

    This study has a descriptive and prospective comparative design.

    Method

    Thirty‐one parents participated. Saliva samples were collected in the paediatric ward and 4 weeks later at home.

    Results

    The parents had lower morning awakening cortisol levels in the paediatric ward than at home after discharge. There were no statistically significant differences in postawakening cortisol or cortisol awakening response (CAR). The child's age, diagnosis or previously diagnosed chronic condition did not affect the parents’ cortisol levels. The morning and postawakening cortisol levels were lower than those of the reference population.

    Conclusion

    The hospital stay with a sick child affects parents’ cortisol levels. Parental stress needs more attention to find interventions to prevent the risk of stress‐related complications that subsequently can affect the care of the child.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155717 (URN)10.1002/nop2.245 (DOI)000461835600041 ()30918712 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062974527 (Scopus ID)
    Projects
    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care
    Funder
    Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), FORSS‐159681
    Available from: 2019-03-25 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2020-04-27Bibliographically approved
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    What about the parents?: Sleep quality, mood, saliva cortisol response and sense of coherence in parents with a child admitted to pediatric care
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  • 25.
    Edéll-Gustfsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johnsson, Ewa
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Jenny
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Mörelius, Eva-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care.: A phenomenographic study2015In: Disability, Chronic Disease and Human Development / [ed] Joav Merrick, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2015, no 5-6Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their newborn infant is preterm and/or sick. This affects bonding. By developing more family-centered care units with single-family rooms, parents are given the opportunity to stay and care for their newborn infant(s) twenty-four hours a day. Lack of sleep may affect the new parents’ ability to handle the situation.

    Aim

    To explore and describe how parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care perceive their sleep.

    Methods This is a phenomenographic study with an inductive, exploratory design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve parents of infants in neonatal care. Data was analysed to describe variations of the phenomenon.

    Findings

    Four descriptive categories were identified within the phenomenon sleep in parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care; Impact of stress on sleep, How the environment affects sleep, Keeping the family together improves sleep, and How parents manage and prevent tiredness.

    Conclusion

    Anxiety, uncertainty and powerlessness have a negative influence on sleep. This can be decreased by continuous information, guidance, and practical support. Skin-to-skin-care is an important source for recovery, relaxation and sleep, and should be encouraged by the nurse. The parents also mentioned the importance of being together. To have a private place where they could relax and take care of themselves and their newborn infant improved sleep. It was also desirable to involve older siblings in order to decrease feelings of loneliness, sadness and isolation. Improved parental sleep in the neonatal care may help the families to cope with the situation, and facilitate problem-solving, emotional regulation, and the transition to parenthood.

  • 26.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Johnsson, Ewa
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Jenny
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 5-6, p. 717-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To explore and describe how parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care perceive their sleep.

    BACKGROUND:

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their newborn infant is preterm and/or sick. This affects bonding. By developing more family-centred care units with single-family rooms, parents are given the opportunity to stay and care for their newborn infant(s) 24 hours a day. Lack of sleep may affect new parents' ability to cope with the many challenges they face on a daily basis.

    DESIGN:

    A phenomenographic study with an inductive and exploratory design.

    METHODS:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve parents of infants in neonatal care between January-March 2012. To describe variations in perception of the phenomenon, data were analysed using phenomenography.

    FINDINGS:

    Four descriptive categories were identified within the phenomenon sleep in parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care: impact of stress on sleep; how the environment affects sleep; keeping the family together improves sleep; and, how parents manage and prevent tiredness.

    CONCLUSION:

    Anxiety, uncertainty and powerlessness have a negative influence on sleep. This can be decreased by continuous information, guidance and practical support. Skin-to-skin care was perceived as a stress-reducing factor that improved relaxation and sleep and should be encouraged by the nurse. The parents also mentioned the importance of being together. Having a private place where they could relax and take care of themselves and their newborn infant improved sleep. It was also desirable to involve older siblings in order to decrease feelings of loneliness, sadness and isolation.

    RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Improved parental sleep in neonatal care may help the families cope with the situation and facilitate problem-solving, emotional regulation and the transition to parenthood.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Parental mood when staying overnight at hospital with their sick child2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental mood when staying overnight at hospital with their sick child

    Objective

    to describe mood in parents, staying with their sick children overnight at the hospital.

    Methodology

    A descriptive design, including 75 parents staying overnight at hospital with their sick child, was used. The parents filled out Mood-scale the morning after staying overnight at the hospital. The Mood-scale is a validated and reliable self-administered instrument measuring six dimensions of mood; control, calmness, social orientation, pleasantness, activation, and extraversion (Sjöberg L, 1979). The study is a part of a larger project, with focus on mood, stress and sleep in parents staying with their sick children overnight at the hospital.

    Results

    The result will describe how parents report their total mood and how they report the different dimensions when they stay with their sick children overnight at the hospital. A comparison will be made between the parent´s mood and gender and the child´s age. Data is under analysis and will be presented as preliminary data.

     

    Conclusion

    According to UNICEF Convention on the Rights of the Child, children in hospital have the right to have their parents with them at all times and parents should be offered accommodation and be encouraged to stay. However, the hospital environment, in combination with having a sick child, might affect the parent´s mood, which in turn might affect the ability to handle the situation and the child´s care. Therefore it is of importance to study parental mood and find ways to help the families during their hospital stay.

  • 28.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Edéll-Gustfsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Parents´ perception of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care services2015In: The Gerry Schwartz and Heather Reisman 4th International Conference on Pediatric Chronic Diseases, Disability and Human Development: ICCD 2015 Jerusalem Israel / [ed] Kerem, Eitan, Jerusalem: Paragon Israel , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Caring for a sick child creates great demands for the parents. Sleep is an important aspect of wellbeing and is strongly related to stress and quality of life. Caring for a child at home gives the family the opportunity to be together in a familiar environment, but includes several sleep disturbances during the night which affects the ability to handle the situation.

    Aim: To describe parents’ perceptions of circumstances influencing their own sleep, living with a child enrolled in Hospital-Based Home Care Services.

    Method: This is a phenomenographic study with an inductive, exploratory design, using semi-structured interviews with main and follow-up questions. Fifteen parents with children enrolled in Hospital-Based Home Care Services were included.

    Findings: The outcome space consists of four descriptive categories: s; Sleep influence mood and mood influences sleep, Support and safeness influence sleep, The child´s needs and routines influence sleep, and Me-time influences sleep.

    Discussion: Parents to children in Hospital-Based Home Care Services perceive their sleep differently depending on how safe they feel with the situation. Troubling thoughts, bedtime worries, anxiety and stress affect sleep negatively. Safeness is prerequisite for sleep. Shared responsibility and social support help the parents to cope with the daily life and thus facilitate sleep. The parents adjust their routines after the cild´s needs to find time for sleep and relaxation. Me-time and physical activity was perceived as important tools to improve coping and sleeping.

  • 29.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Edéll-Gustfsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sleep of Parents Living With a Child Receiving Hospital-Based Home Care: A Phenomenographical Study.2015In: Nursing Research, ISSN 0029-6562, E-ISSN 1538-9847, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 372-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Caring for an ill child at home gives the family the chance to be together in a familiar environment. However, this involves several nocturnal sleep disturbances, such as frequent awakenings and bad sleep quality, which may affect parents' ability to take care of the child and themselves.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe parents' perceptions of circumstances influencing their own sleep when living with a child enrolled in hospital-based home care (HBHC) services.

    Method: This is a phenomenographical study with an inductive, exploratory design. Fifteen parents (11 mothers and 4 fathers) with children enrolled in HBHC services were interviewed. Data were analyzed to discover content-related categories describing differences in ways parents experienced sleep when caring for their children receiving HBHC.

    Results: Four descriptive categories were detected: sleep influences mood and mood influences sleep; support influences safeness and safeness influences sleep; the child's needs influence routines and routines influence sleep; and "me time" influences sleep.

    Discussion: Sleep does not affect only the parents' well-being but also the child's care. Symptoms of stress may limit the parents' capacity to meet the child's needs. Support, me time, and physical activity were perceived as essential sources for recovery and sleep. It is important for nurses to acknowledge parental sleep in the child's nursing care plan and help the parents perform self-care to promote sleep and maintain life, health, and well-being.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Edéll-Gustfsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Perceptions of sleep by parents of children in hospital organized home-care2014In: Programbok Barnveckan 2014, Malmö, 7-11 april,  2014, 2014, p. 33-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Caring for a sick child creates great demands for the parents. Sleep is an important aspect of wellbeing and is strongly related to stress and quality of life. Caring for a child at home gives the family the opportunity to be together in a familiar environment. On the other hand it includes several sleep disturbances during the night which affects the ability to handle the situation.

     

    Aim

    To explore parents’ perceptions of sleep living with a child enrolled in hospital-organized home-care.

     

    Material

    Fifteen parents with children enrolled in hospital-organized home-care were included.

     

    Method

    Interviews with open-ended questions, analysed with a phenomenographic method.

     

    Results

    Four descriptive categories were identified; Anxiety, stress and demands affects sleep negatively’, ‘When I get support I feel safe’, ‘Routines optimizes time for sleep’, and ‘Time for oneself is important for relaxation’

     

    Conclusion

    Sleep is important for the parents in several aspects. They are in a stressful situation with high demands both from the society and from themselves and there is often a lack of support from relatives and friends. Nurses need to acknowledge and promote parents’ sleep when they care for their sick children at home and support them in the caregiving.

  • 31.
    Edell-Gustafsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johnsson, Ewa
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Jenny
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Parents’ perceptions of sleeping in a neonatal intensive care unit2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Sleep is important for mental and emotional health. For parents staying in the hospital with their preterm and/or sick infant, lack of sleep may affect their ability to handle the situation, supporting their infant, and participate in decision-making. Moreover, when a child is born preterm, parents may experience stress that potentially affects their ability to interact and bond with the infant.

     

    Purpose

    To describe parents’ perceptions of what it is like to sleep in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a room nearby or in the same room as their infant.

     

    Material

    Twelve parents (eight mothers and four fathers) of infants born between week 29 and 36, in three different hospitals, were included. Eight of the parents slept in the same room as their infants and four parents slept in parents’ rooms in the NICU.  

     

    Methods

    Parents were interviewed with open-ended questions. Data was analysed with a phenomenographic method according to Marton and Both.

     

    Results

    Five descriptive categories in the phenomenon of parents’ perception of how it is to sleep  in a NICU  were  identified; Transition to parenthood, How parents perceive and manage their tiredness, A feeling of being out of control, Different forms of support and Environment.

     

    Conclusions

    Parents in the NICU are vulnerable, in a stressful situation, with an infant in need of neonatal intensive care. At the same time they are going through a complicated transition to parenthood. Hence sleep is important for the parents in several aspects, and NICU staff needs to acknowledge and promote parents’ sleep. 

  • 32.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Perceptions of sleep quality and stress by parents of children enrolled in hospital organized home-care2013In: Nordic Advances in Health Care Sciences Research, Lund, 2013: Abstract book / [ed] Gerd Ahlström, Lena von Koch, 2013, p. 56-56Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Caring for a sick child creates much greater demands for parents than those associated with raising a healthy child. Parents of chronically ill children reports higher levels of parental stress as a consequence of the substantial social, emotional and personal demands associated with caring. Sleep quality is an important aspect of wellbeing and is strongly related to stress and quality of life. In some Swedish counties families are offered hospital organized home-care for sick children. Caring for a child at home gives the family the opportunity to be together in an environment they know well and where they can feel comfortable and secure. On the other hand it includes several sleep disturbances during the night which affects the ability to handle the situation and support their child. No other study is found about how parents sleep when their child is enrolled in hospital organized home-care.

     

    Aim

    To explore parents’ perceptions of sleep quality and stress when they sleep at home with a child enrolled in hospital organized home-care.

     

    Material

    Fifteen parents (11 mothers and 4 fathers) with children enrolled in hospital organized home-care from one university hospital and one general hospital in South-eastern Sweden were included. The children ranged in age 0-12 years.

     

    Method

    Parents were interviewed with open-ended questions. Data was analysed with a phenomenographic method according to Marton and Both.

     

    Results

    Four descriptive categories in the phenomenon of parents’ perceptions of sleep quality and stress when they sleep at home with a child enrolled in hospital organized home-care were identified; Routines helps to manage the situation, Time for oneself and the partner, Feelings of isolation and Need of support

     

    Conclusion

    Sleep is important for the parents in several aspects. They are in a stressful situation with high demands both from the society and from themselves and there is often a lack of support from relatives and friends. Nurses need to acknowledge and promote parents’ sleep when they care for their sick children at home and support them in the caregiving.

  • 33.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Eriksson, Jennie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Time of initiation of skin-to-skin contact in extremely preterm infants in Sweden2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 14-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  To describe the time of first skin-to-skin contact in extremely preterm infants in a national perspective and to investigate possible factors affecting the time of first skin-to-skin contact. Methods:  A population-based prospective descriptive study of extremely preterm infants (n = 520) in seven regional hospitals in Sweden. Results:  Extremely preterm infants in Sweden experience first skin-to-skin contact with the parent at a median of six postnatal days (range 0-44). Low gestational age, a high score on the clinical risk index for babies, and the number of days on a ventilator tended to delay first skin-to-skin contact. A statistically significant difference was also found between regional hospitals. Conclusion:  There is a difference in the time of first skin-to-skin contact based on the infant's medical condition and the tradition in the neonatal intensive care unit at the regional hospital where the infant is born.

1 - 33 of 33
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