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  • 1.
    Andersson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Äänismaa, Riikka
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Huusko, Jenni
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Behaviour of European wild boars (Sus scrofa) in connection with farrowing in an enclosure2011In: Mammalian Biology, ISSN 1616-5047, E-ISSN 1618-1476, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 332-338Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wild boars (Sus scrofa) are often kept in enclosures for hunting or meat production purposes in Sweden. The sows are known to undergo behavioural changes in connection with farrowing and their natural behaviours may be compromised by the limited area of the enclosure. The aim of this study was to quantitatively describe wild boar sows’ behaviour when farrowing in an enclosure. A field study was carried out in a hunting enclosure, where 1200 hours of behavioural recordings and data from 22 farrowings were collected. According to the results, the farrowing period could be divided into 3 phases: pre-farrowing, isolation and sociality phases (in relation to farrowing: day -14 to -1, day 1 to 8, day 9 to 14 respectively). The activity decreased during isolation and increased in the sociality phase (p<0.05), whereas the average distance to other individuals increased during isolation and decreased in the sociality phase (p<0.05). Nose contacts with other individuals increased in the isolation phase (p<0.05) and habitat use changed towards more protective habitats after farrowing. 68 % of the nests were situated in edges between two habitats of different vegetation density and 73% had some kind of protection to the north. We conclude that farrowing induces a number of changes in the activity, social behaviour and habitat preference in captive European wild boars. This may need attention when enclosures for this species are designed.

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  • 2.
    Andersson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Valros, Anna
    University of Helsinki, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine – Research Centre for Animal Welfare, Department of Production Animal Medicine,00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Rombin, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Extensive infanticide in enclosed European wild boars (Sus scrofa)2011In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, ISSN 0168-1591, E-ISSN 1872-9045, Vol. 134, no 3, p. 184-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infanticidal behaviour is wide-spread among animals of various taxonomic groups, but has not previously been reported in European wild boars, which are commonly kept in enclosures in Sweden and Finland for meat and recreation purposes. We studied the behaviour of wild boars in one enclosure during three reproductive seasons. Non-maternal infanticide was documented in 14 out of 22 litters, causing the deaths of all piglets in all but one affected litters. Infanticide was typically performed during or shortly after parturition by a sow which was older and larger than the victimised sow, and we found no effect of relatedness. A questionnaire sent to 112 owners of enclosures in Sweden and Finland resulted in 62 responses. Although the owners were often not able to provide exact figures on reproduction and mortality, non-maternal infanticide was reported to be the most common cause of piglet mortality, which in total was estimated to 29.1%. The occurrence of infanticide was unrelated to size of enclosure and to variations in husbandry routines, which all together may suggest that the behaviour is part of the normal behavioural repertoire in European wild boars. The observed levels of infanticide constitute a major welfare problem in captive wild boars.

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  • 3. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Andersson, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Maternal behaviour, infanticide and welfare in enclosed European wild boars (Sus scrofa)2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    European wild boars (Sus scrofa) are kept in Swedish enclosures for hunting and meat production purposes. The sows are known to undergo behavioural changes in connection with farrowing and their natural behaviours may be compromised by the limited area of the enclosure. The general aim of this thesis was to provide detailed quantitative data on wild boar sows when farrowing in captivity and to report whether possible needs can be compromised by the limitations of an enclosure. Specifically, it was aimed to provide a quantitative and functional account of the occurrence of infanticide, and its possible relations to welfare of confined wild boars.

    A field study was carried out in a hunting enclosure, where 1200 hours of behavioural recordings and data from 22 farrowings were collected. The farrowing period could be divided into three phases: pre-farrowing, isolation and sociality phases (in relation to farrowing: day -14 to -1, day 1 to 8, day 9 to 14 respectively). The activity decreased during isolation and increased in the sociality phase. The average distance to other individuals increased during isolation and decreased in the sociality phase. Habitat use changed towards more protective habitats after farrowing (Paper I).

    Non-maternal infanticide was documented in 14 out of 22 litters. Infanticide, typically performed by an older and larger sow than the mother, caused the deaths of all neonates in all but one affected litters. We found no effect of relatedness. A questionnaire sent to 112 owners of enclosures in Sweden and Finland resulted in 62 responses. Although the owners were often not able to provide exact figures on reproduction and mortality, nonmaternal infanticide was reported to be the most common cause of piglet mortality. The occurrence of infanticide was unrelated to size of enclosure and to variations in husbandry routines. All together results may suggest that non-maternal infanticide is part of the normal behavioural repertoire in wild boars (Paper II).

    The studies of this thesis reveals the farrowing period as the most dynamic and perhaps most challenging for wild boar sows in enclosures. There are serious welfare concerns in the husbandry of wild boars in Swedish enclosures. The most obvious welfare problem is non-maternal infanticide, where both sows and piglets are assumed to suffer, and where the outcome from the action must be considered unacceptable. If wild boar husbandry shall be equated with other animal husbandry in our society, it needs to be regulated to overcome many of the presented potential welfare problems in this thesis.

    List of papers
    1. Behaviour of European wild boars (Sus scrofa) in connection with farrowing in an enclosure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behaviour of European wild boars (Sus scrofa) in connection with farrowing in an enclosure
    2011 (English)In: Mammalian Biology, ISSN 1616-5047, E-ISSN 1618-1476, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 332-338Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Wild boars (Sus scrofa) are often kept in enclosures for hunting or meat production purposes in Sweden. The sows are known to undergo behavioural changes in connection with farrowing and their natural behaviours may be compromised by the limited area of the enclosure. The aim of this study was to quantitatively describe wild boar sows’ behaviour when farrowing in an enclosure. A field study was carried out in a hunting enclosure, where 1200 hours of behavioural recordings and data from 22 farrowings were collected. According to the results, the farrowing period could be divided into 3 phases: pre-farrowing, isolation and sociality phases (in relation to farrowing: day -14 to -1, day 1 to 8, day 9 to 14 respectively). The activity decreased during isolation and increased in the sociality phase (p<0.05), whereas the average distance to other individuals increased during isolation and decreased in the sociality phase (p<0.05). Nose contacts with other individuals increased in the isolation phase (p<0.05) and habitat use changed towards more protective habitats after farrowing. 68 % of the nests were situated in edges between two habitats of different vegetation density and 73% had some kind of protection to the north. We conclude that farrowing induces a number of changes in the activity, social behaviour and habitat preference in captive European wild boars. This may need attention when enclosures for this species are designed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2011
    Keywords
    Wild boar; behaviour; farrowing; enclosure
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-57983 (URN)10.1016/j.mambio.2011.01.010 (DOI)000291118200014 ()
    Note
    Original Publication: Annelie Andersson, Riikka Äänismaa, Jenni Huusko and Per Jensen, Behaviour of European wild boars (Sus scrofa) in connection with farrowing in an enclosure, 2011, Mammalian Biology, (76), 3, 332-338. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mambio.2011.01.010 Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V. Amsterdam http://www.elsevier.com/ Available from: 2010-07-13 Created: 2010-07-13 Last updated: 2023-12-28
    2. Extensive infanticide in enclosed European wild boars (Sus scrofa)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extensive infanticide in enclosed European wild boars (Sus scrofa)
    2011 (English)In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, ISSN 0168-1591, E-ISSN 1872-9045, Vol. 134, no 3, p. 184-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Infanticidal behaviour is wide-spread among animals of various taxonomic groups, but has not previously been reported in European wild boars, which are commonly kept in enclosures in Sweden and Finland for meat and recreation purposes. We studied the behaviour of wild boars in one enclosure during three reproductive seasons. Non-maternal infanticide was documented in 14 out of 22 litters, causing the deaths of all piglets in all but one affected litters. Infanticide was typically performed during or shortly after parturition by a sow which was older and larger than the victimised sow, and we found no effect of relatedness. A questionnaire sent to 112 owners of enclosures in Sweden and Finland resulted in 62 responses. Although the owners were often not able to provide exact figures on reproduction and mortality, non-maternal infanticide was reported to be the most common cause of piglet mortality, which in total was estimated to 29.1%. The occurrence of infanticide was unrelated to size of enclosure and to variations in husbandry routines, which all together may suggest that the behaviour is part of the normal behavioural repertoire in European wild boars. The observed levels of infanticide constitute a major welfare problem in captive wild boars.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2011
    Keywords
    Behaviour; enclosure; farrowing; infanticide; Sus scrofa; wild boar
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-57984 (URN)10.1016/j.applanim.2011.08.001 (DOI)000296114100013 ()
    Note
    Funding agencies|Swedish Board of Agriculture||Swedish Animal Welfare Agency||Available from: 2010-07-13 Created: 2010-07-13 Last updated: 2023-12-28
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    Maternal behaviour, infanticide and welfare in enclosed European wild boars (Sus scrofa)
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  • 4. Mayntz, Michael
    et al.
    Sender, Grazyna
    Andersson, Annelie
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Zoology .
    Sederstrom, Roger
    The influence of milk withdrawal, stable routines and separation from dam on suckling behaviour of Hereford calves2006In: Archiv für Tierzucht, engelsk paralleltittel, ISSN 0003-9438, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 545-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of milk withdrawal, stable routines and separation from dam on suckling behaviour of beef calves was tested in an 8x8 Latin square experiment. Length of the meal and length of the longest bout were measured to describe the meal as a whole. Length of pre-stimulation, increasing ejection, declining ejection, and after stimulation were measured to describe the structure of meal. Eagerness of suckling was described as relative suckling time and non-suckling. Milk withdrawal increased length of meal and longest bout, but did not influence structure of meal. Milk withdrawal resulted in cistern-milk being available already before ejection and thereby in longer bouts during pre-stimulation. Milk withdrawal had no influence on eagerness of suckling. Stable routines had no influence on meal as a whole, but increased pre- and decreased after-stimulation and tended to result in somewhat longer bouts during pre-stimulation. There was no influence of stable routines on eagerness of suckling. Separation from dam had no influence on meal as a whole or structure of meal, but increased eagerness of suckling for the whole meal and for almost all periods. The experimental results partially sustained results from a field study.

1 - 4 of 4
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
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