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  • 1.
    Brusselaers, Nicolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gundlegård, David
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zernis, R.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Decision support for improved construction traffic management and planning2024In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 104, article id 105305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Densifying cities continuously call for new construction, renovation and demolition projects, each generating vast amounts of heavy goods vehicle (HGV) transports. However, how construction transportation affects the urban traffic network remains largely unexplored. This study addresses spatiotemporal network impacts from construction transport, by leveraging traditional traffic and transport simulation. To this end, a framework is presented including (i) a simulation model to compute traffic effects caused by varying off-site construction site transport demands, and (ii) conceptual applications of the simulation model showing construction logistic planning strategies to mitigate congestion disturbances. Simulations are conducted in MATSim using detailed secondary datasets describing site-specific transport arrivals from a case of six projects in Norrköping, Sweden. Subsequently, increasing transport demands were assessed on various time-window arrival scenarios against the baseline schedule, which can be used as decision support in urban planning. Results highlight how rigorous construction transport planning avoiding peak-traffic hours can significantly alleviate traffic congestion. This study also emphasizes the need to combine all simultaneous construction projects’ demands when evaluating disturbances on city-level, alongside the impact on individual links and microenvironments. This study adds knowledge by visualizing the traffic impact during urban transformation.

  • 2.
    Backstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Halldorsson, Arni
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Middle-range theorising supporting and supported by action research: focusing on practitioner preparedness2024In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased demand for actionable knowledge in operations- and supply chain management has fuelled the interest in collaborative, action-oriented research design as well as modes of theorising that generate adaptable and actionable frameworks. Whilst action research (AR) design as well as middle-range theories (MRT) offer guiding principles herein, they are researcher centric in nature. It is taken for granted that practitioners that enter such an endeavour have a certain level of knowledge or experience prior to the initial stages of formalising the research problem. Practitioners in non-academic, operations management-intensive industries or craftsmanship-based industries, such as construction or carpeting (often in the SME range) are often neither prepared nor equipped with the principles necessary to convey their managerial challenges into collaborative research design. This risk limiting or even hindering altogether such participation. This paper elaborates on combining the logic of AR and MRT. By conceptualising a preparatory phase for initiating practitioner engagement, complementing the conventional AR cycle, a four-step approach is presented: (1) Identifying a joint interest; (2) Teaching - Awakening interest in the topic through MRT frameworks; (3) Accepting buy-in to the AR cycle and determining the problem; and (4) Proposing MRT frameworks for analysis and entering the traditional AR cycle.

  • 3.
    Thunberg, Micael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A model for visualizing cost shifts when introducing construction logistics setups2023In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 757-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify how the responsibilities and costs of planning, controlling and executing the material, resource and waste flows are shifted between actors when introducing a construction logistics setup (CLS) as a product innovation in a construction project, compared to the traditional way of organizing these activities.

    Design/methodology/approach This study is an analytical conceptual research study which aims to bring new insights into a problem through logical relationship building. Empirical data are gathered in two cases where CLSs are used, through observations and interviews regarding how the activities within the order-to-delivery process are performed. The results have been discussed at workshops with suppliers, installation companies, contractor firms and trade unions.

    Findings The outcome of this study is a model for illustrating how costs and responsibilities are shifted in the construction project and supply chain when a CLS is introduced. The cost shift is dependent on the activity shift that accompanies the services included in the setup.

    Practical implications The practical contribution of this work is twofold. First, this study provides a methodology of how to evaluate the impact of logistics services on the actors in the construction project. Second, this study shows shifts in costs and responsibilities in logistics activities with the introduction of construction logistics services.

    Originality/value The theoretical contributions of the model and this study lie in the inclusion of a multi-actor perspective in total cost modelling in supply chains.

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  • 4.
    Gremyr, Ida
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gatenholm, Gabriella
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Halldorsson, Arni
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Blueprinting construction logistics services for quality improvement2023In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 60-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction logistics services can, if implemented with high quality, positively impact both efficiency and sustainability of construction projects. However, present quality management frameworks have not been developed for temporary multi-actor contexts, such as construction, which is largely lacking industrialised processes. Still, construction logistics service providers provide service offerings to temporary settings and could thus benefit from a service quality perspective. Applying this perspective, this study supports the quality improvement of construction logistics services by using a service modularity approach to identify the services to prioritise for improvement. Building on interviews, concept mapping, and a service blueprint of a construction logistics setup, a priority matrix for improvements is developed. The first step in using this matrix is to operationalise the construction logistics setup in modules based on blueprinting. Second, the matrix evaluates the modules against nine empirically derived improvement enablers such as practices and forums for learning, and data measurements enabling the comparison and followup of construction logistics services. In conclusion, the priority matrix helps focus the improvements on modules with high likelihood of successful improvements. Improvements that can become sustained over time through the reuse of standardised modules in upcoming projects.

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  • 5.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundberg, Kristina
    Ecoloop.
    Eriksson, Linnea
    VTI.
    Circular soil and rock masses – a public-private relational mess2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is at EU bottom of circular soil and rock masses. The purpose of this study is to capture the relationship between the overall system and subsystems of circular soil and rock masses to identify barriers to establishing efficient circular soil and rock material flows. The main hinders are lateness of action, legislation, and lack of information sharing. This together creates a relational mess between the subsystems, leading to a lack of understanding of how to act. The relations must be clarified before public procurement will have its intended impact to increase circularity and decrease transport emissions.

  • 6.
    Naz, Farah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Clarifying the Interface Between Construction Supply Chain and Site: A Key to Improved Delivery Efficiency2023In: Advances in Production Management Systems: Production Management Systems for Responsible Manufacturing, Service, and Logistics Futures / [ed] Erlend Alfnes, Anita Romsdal, Jan Ola Strandhagen, Gregor von Cieminski, David Romero, Cham: Springer, 2023, p. 140-153Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to capture non-value adding activities of the order-to-delivery process at the interface between construction site and the supply chain to identify efficiency improvement potentials. The paper is based on a case study of a Swedish construction site. The unit of observation has been the activities taking place at the interface between construction supply chain and construction site. i.e. deliveries and on-site material handling. Data is collected through observations in the unloading zone of the construction site, unstructured interviews, and a workshop with site management. The findings of the paper show that there exists fuzziness in the interface of construction supply chain and construction site causing the observed non-value adding activities such as waiting, excessive material handling, unnecessary vehicle movements etc. The root causes of the fuzziness are poor planning, lack of communication between site management and transporter/material supplier, and lack of standard operating procedures for unloading. The paper provides knowledge of the importance of managing interface between construction supply chain and site to remove non-value adding activities. Additionally, the paper provides a clear view of the different actors’ roles in the non-value adding activities and give suggestions of how to improve efficiency of construction deliveries. The paper is based on a single case study and further studies are needed to provide deeper insights into the phenomenon.

  • 7.
    Klar, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, SE-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Angelakis, Vangelis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Digital Twins for Ports: Derived From Smart City and Supply Chain Twinning Experience2023In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 11, p. 71777-71799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ports are striving for innovative technological solutions to cope with the ever-increasing growth of transport, while at the same time improving their environmental footprint. An emerging technology that has the potential to substantially increase the efficiency of the multifaceted and interconnected port processes is the digital twin. Although digital twins have been successfully integrated in many industries, there is still a lack of cross-domain understanding of what constitutes a digital twin. Furthermore, the implementation of the digital twin in complex systems such as the port is still in its infancy. This paper attempts to fill this research gap by conducting an extensive cross-domain literature review of what constitutes a digital twin, keeping in mind the extent to which the respective findings can be applied to the port. It turns out that the digital twin of the port is most comparable to complex systems such as smart cities and supply chains, both in terms of its functional relevance as well as in terms of its requirements and characteristics. The conducted literature review, considering the different port processes and port characteristics, results in the identification of three core requirements of a digital port twin, which are described in detail. These include situational awareness, comprehensive data analytics capabilities for intelligent decision making, and the provision of an interface to promote multi-stakeholder governance and collaboration. Finally, specific operational scenarios are proposed on how the ports digital twin can contribute to energy savings by improving the use of port resources, facilities and operations.

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  • 8.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ringdahl, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Measurement and sonification of construction site noise and particle pollution data2023In: Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, ISSN 2046-6099, E-ISSN 2046-6102, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 742-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The noise and dust particles caused by the construction transport are by most stakeholders experienced as disturbing. The purpose of this study is to explore how sonification can support visualization in construction planning to decrease construction transport disturbances.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents an interdisciplinary research project, combining research on construction logistics, internet of things and sonification. First, a data recording device, including sound, particle, temperature and humidity sensors, was implemented and deployed in a development project. Second, the collected data were used in a sonification design, which was, third, evaluated with potential users.

    Findings – The results showed that the low-cost sensors used could capture “good enough” data, and that the use of sonification for representing these data is interesting and a possible useful tool in urban and construction transport planning.

    Research limitations/implications – There is a need to further evolve the sonification design and better communicate the aim of the sounds used to potential users. Further testing is also needed.

    Practical implications – This study introduces new ideas of how to support visualization with sonification planning the construction work and its impact on the vicinity of the site. Currently, urban planning and construction planning focus on visualizing the final result, with little focus on how to handle disturbances during the construction process.

    Originality/value – Showing the potentials of using low-cost sensor data in sonification, and using sonification together with visualization, is the result of a novel interdisciplinary research area combination.

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  • 9.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Teaching supply chain management through megagames2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into how supply chain management canbe taught using megagames as a pedagogical motor. This study has had a longitudinalaction research approach to student centred learning as it builds on a previous paper onintroducing a theme of cross-functional decision-making through combining lectures,case assignment, and computer-based tools. Combining case work and the megagame hasled to activity independence and room for new reflections. What can be seen is thatexchanging the computer-based tool for a megagame has allowed students a deeperunderstanding of not only decision-making, but also decision-formulation.

  • 10.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Linnea
    Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, MAP Unit, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lemon, Nina
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden.
    An Interactive Visualization Tool for Collaborative Construction Logistics Planning-Creating a Sustainable Project Vicinity2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 24, article id 17032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intensity of urban development is presently high, creating a construction boom. The number of transports per project is a major consideration in urban goods transport and emissions from a project. Presently, the stakeholders take part in a "blame game" in assigning fault for the emissions from construction transport and the disturbances to society in the vicinity of construction sites. Incorporation of logistics into urban planning requires an increased understanding of the interaction between construction transport flows and urban land use, and the inclusion of different stakeholders. The purpose of the study is to support collaborative planning of construction transport in urban planning, and specifically to explore how a planning tool based on interactive visualization could be designed. An action research process has generated two prototypes of an interactive visualization tool for collaborative planning of construction transport. The prototype facilitates a "shared deliberation space" by identifying alternatives and assessing predicted consequences, which supports a collaborative urban planning process. Based on the research conducted, we claim that the responsibility of construction transport planning should be taken by the municipality, i.e., the urban planning and traffic planning functions.

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  • 11.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sezer, Ahmet Anil
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Angelakis, Vangelis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gundlegård, David
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Construction related urban disturbances: Identification and linking with an IoT-model2022In: Automation in Construction, ISSN 0926-5805, E-ISSN 1872-7891, Vol. 134, article id 104038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While being a significant part of the urban development, construction projects disturb different stakeholders in various ways. There are three problems associated with construction disturbances: (i) most of these disturbances are not recognised by the people causing them, (ii) they are not monitored and (iii) if they are to be monitored, data is spread among stakeholders. This paper defines what a disturbance is, presents a list of disturbances, linking disturbances to stakeholders and, categorising them based on their distance from construction sites (responding to (i)). Next, a IoT domain model is developed, demonstrating how IoT in construction needs to be combined with the sensors of smart cities to capture the primitives of these disturbances (responding to (iii)). This is a first step towards enabling large-scale data-gathering of construction transport disturbances (responding to (ii)), which is a necessity to predict them and allow better construction transport planning to decrease disturbances.

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  • 12.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Green construction logistics – a multi-actor challenge2022In: Research in Transportation Business and Management (RTBM), ISSN 2210-5395, E-ISSN 2210-5409, Vol. 45, article id 100830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction transport have a severe environmental impact. To address the environmental problems requires that the complexity of construction, including the many different actors and their goals, is captured. The purpose of this article is to propose a new conceptual model for construction logistics systems, with the aim of advancing the transition to more environmentally friendly construction transport. The conceptual model was developed based on different theoretical frameworks, and also improved based on practitioner's workshops. The conceptual model is based on five interconnected layers of activities: urban land use; construction; construction supply chain; transport; and infrastructure and three subsystems. The model indicates on what layers different actors in the subsystems act and how different actors can influence the environmental performance of construction logistics systems by their decisions. In relation to similar multi-layer models, construction logistics also need to embrace municipal actors. For example, the traffic planning may offer available infrastructure to improve fill rates and energy efficiency, but fill rate is the direct result of the suppliers decisions, which is indirectly affected by the main contractor's schedule. In particular, modal split is influenced by a range of decisions by different actors, complicating the selection of a more environmentally friendly transport mode.

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  • 13.
    Mogos, Maria Flavia
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alfnes, Erlend
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Strandhagen, Jan Ola
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Investigating relationships between production transfer management and transfer success2022In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 1124-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This paper explores the operationalization of production network coordination - the production transfer (PT) - and the relationships between transfer risk sources, preventive actions, supply chain disruptions, corrective actions and losses to better understand how to mitigate the risk and achieve an effective transfer process. Design/methodology/approach A longitudinal field study of a PT process from Norway to Spain was studied in depth for 25 months. Findings The paper presents the implications of three areas of importance for PT success: (1) how the transfer influences the plant roles, (2) the cross-locational management of the transfer project at the sender and receiver and (3) whether adapting the transferred production to the receivers environment is an enabler or an inhibitor of transfer success. Practical implications The findings about how to mitigate the transfer risk and the frameworks of risk sources, supply chain disruptions, losses and preventive and corrective actions, along with the examples from the in-depth study, can aid the practitioners in managing PTs and achieving the relocation goals. Originality/value This is one of the first studies of PT, which is from the perspective of both transfer parties, and addresses both preventive and corrective actions and all the transfer phases. Moreover, this study addresses the operational aspects of production network coordination, which received limited attention in earlier research.

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  • 14.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kjellsdotter-Ivert, Linea
    VTI, Sverige.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engevall, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Slutrapport Fossilfri Bygglogistik2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Byggtransporter står för en betydande andel av CO2-utsläppen i byggprojekt (ca 10%) och en bättre logistik leder till lägre utsläpp, mindre trängseleffekter och lägre kostnader. Projektet Fossilfri Bygglogistik, finansierat av Trafikverket genom Triple F, har 2019-2021 studerat potentialen i att minska utsläppen från byggtransporter med förbättrad logistik baserat på ett systemsynsätt. Projektet har varit ett samarbete mellan Linköpings universitet, VTI, Logistikia, Energifabriken, Renall, Almroths, SanktKors, Stångåstaden, Hyresbostäder, Peab, NCC, RagnSells, PreZero, Lambertsson och Byggföretagen.

    Projektet har utgått från tre frågeställningar:

    • Vad är potentialerna med samordnad bygglogistik och vad krävs för att hämta hem dessa?

    • Vilka metoder/lösningar är användbara för att nå målet om fossilfrihet?

    • Vad är rollfördelningen mellan aktörer. som är delaktiga i ett bygglogistiksystem, och behöver den förändras för att uppnå fossilfrihet

    Projektet har tre huvudsakliga resultat:

    1) Utvärdering av piloter såsom nyttan av bygglogistiklösningar i olika projekt och för olika aktörer, mätetal för byggtransporter och möjliga data för att följa upp, samt effekterna av en HVO-tank på site.

    2) Potentialerna i att arbeta med en fossilfri bygglogistik utifrån ett systemperspektiv där inte bara enskilda byggen studeras utan även större bygglogistiksystem samt hur man kan beräkna CO2 emissionerna från bygglogistiken för den samlade byggvolymen i en stad.

    3) En beskrivning av hur aktörerna i bygglogistiksystemet och hur de påverkar olika åtgärder för att minska utsläppen genom sina respektive roller har också identifierats.En av de viktigaste slutsatserna är att det idag saknas rätt förutsättningarna för att implementera en fossilfri bygglogistik i stor skala. Det saknas gemensamma målbilder för logistiken.

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  • 15.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Angelakis, Vangelis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    RISE, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Eriksson, Linnea
    VTI, Sverige.
    Gundlegård, David
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lemon, Nina
    RISE, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ringhdahl, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sezer, Ahmet Anil
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Störningsfri stad: slutrapport i projektet Visualiserad byggtrafikplanering för en störningsfri stadsutveckling2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Störningsfri stad har kombinerat kunskaper inom Trafikplanering, Visualisering, Bygglogistik, Sensorer och Offentlig planering och styrning. Projektet har letts av Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för Teknik och Naturvetenskap och finansierats av Vinnova, IHS. Projektet har löpt mellan slutet av 2018 och 2021 ut. Projektdeltagare har varit VTI, RISE, Norrköpings kommun, Linköpings kommun, Stockholm stad, Uppsala kommun, Trafikverket Projekt Ostlänken, LE Lundbergs Fastigheter, Wiklunds Åkeri, Wellsec, SanktKors, Byggföretagen, Telenor och Logistikia.Projektet har utvecklat en verktygsprototyp som stöttar kollaborativ planering av byggtrafik och stadsplanering genom att visualisera pågående byggprojekts sammanlagda mängd transporter och var i staden (i form av en kartvy) det uppstår störningar i form av förseningar pga dessa. Verktyget bygger på en MATSim trafikmodell (i nuläget Norrköping) inkluderande både persontransporter (modellerat baserat på mobilnätsdata) och byggtrafik (modellerat baserat på data från bygglogistiklösningar). Med hjälp av verktyget kan olika scenarier för att minska störningarna av byggtransporter testas. För att stötta användandet av verktyget har en kollaborativ planeringsprocess som visar på hur de olika aktörerna involverade i planeringen av byggtransporter och stadsutveckling behöver interagera med varandra utvecklats. Projektet också deltagit i utvecklingen av en sensorbox (partiklar, luftfuktighet, temperatur och ljud) samt slangmätningsmetodik för att öka kunskapen om byggtransporter. Baserat på de resultat som projektet har behovsägarna har påbörjat arbeten med att bättre hantera de störningar som uppstår pga byggprojekt i staden.

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  • 16.
    Naz, Farah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ivert, Linea Kjellsdotter
    Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    The Potential of Improving Construction Transport Time Efficiency - A Freight Forwarder Perspective2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 17, article id 10491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction transport, in general, is not carried out efficiently, resulting in unnecessary costs and CO2 emissions. Although it has been found that there is a great potential to improve construction transport, little research has been conducted within this field. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the construction transport time efficiency by identifying non-value-adding activities and their causes from a freight forwarder perspective. A single case study was conducted and two flows, a goods delivery flow and a waste material flow, were mapped and analyzed with the help of value stream mapping (VSM). We ran two workshops to discuss the findings of the VSM. The results from this study show that there is large potential for improving construction transport time efficiency as over 40% of the time was used for non-value-adding activities. Although transport suffers from similar non-value-adding activities undertaken in other industries, this study identifies the transport activities with respect to construction transport. The findings further highlight areas of potential improvements, such as improved information sharing, planning, and coordination among all stakeholders. This knowledge can be used by the freight forwarder and the main contractor to improve construction transport time efficiency. The limitation of this study is that it is based on a single case of a freight forwarder. It does not provide a full picture of construction transport efficiency but rather a starting point for future studies.

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  • 17.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thunberg, Micael
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundberg, Kristina
    EcoLoop, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Potential of Mass Logistics Centres to Increase Transport Efficiency2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Lately, mass logistics centres (MLCs) have emerged to increase transport efficiency in soil and rock (mass) material transports. However, the impact of these MLCs has received limited attention. The purpose of this study is to explore the potential of MLCs to increase transport efficiency in terms of number of transports, distance travelled, transport work, and emissions.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The purpose is fulfilled through a scenario analysis of an MLC and its effect on distance travelled, transport work, fuel consumption, and emissions as well as the traditional measure of number of transports. 

    Findings

    The study finds that the traditional transport efficiency measure “number of transports” is insufficient in describing transport efficiency in MLCs and similar logistics setups. A logistics centre will lead to more transports but with the correct setup, transport work, distance travelled, fuel consumption and emissions can be reduced.

    Research limitations/implications

    This study is limited to one MLC in Sweden. Future research should investigate other MLCs and go deeper into how MLCs should be designed to increase transport efficiency.

    Practical implications

    Contractors and municipalities can find support on how to evaluate the transport efficiency effects an MLC has.

    Social implications

    This study is an important step in analysing the potential of MLCs as a tool for reducing the negative impact of mass transports. 

    Originality

    This is one of the first in-depth studies of how MLCs affect mass transport flows from a transport efficiency perspective. 

  • 18.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jenny, Bäckstrand
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    The role of supplier information availability for construction supply chain performance2022In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 33, no 9-10, p. 863-874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of coordination of the construction supply chain (CSC) creates a chain of problems. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to knowledge about coordination within CSCs and how the lack thereof can impact their supply chain performance. Coordination encompasses several different mechanisms, whereof focus here have been information sharing with the unit of analysis suppliers’ information availability. Four suppliers active within the CSC, delivering to several different projects have been studied. These represent two different delivery patterns, continuous and intermittent deliveries. Based on the analysis of their information availability are two propositions made; 1) due to the loose couplings and the lack of understanding among main contractors of the value of information sharing, suppliers with continuous supply have an information advantage due to their presence on site, 2) suppliers can enhance their information availability, by increasing their service offering to customers.

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  • 19.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nolz, Pamela C.
    AIT Austrian Inst Technol, Austria; St Polten Univ Appl Sci, Austria.
    Seragiotto, Clovis
    AIT Austrian Inst Technol, Austria.
    A mixed method evaluation of economic and environmental considerations in construction transport planning: The case of Ostlänken2021In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 69, article id 102840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among the construction related transports, the transport of soil and rock materials stand for a major part. The purpose of this study is to develop an approach enabling scenario analysis of the relation between storage location and soil and rock material transport planning. The study follows a sequential exploratory mixed methods design. First a literature review and a qualitative case study identifies the problem. Second a quantitative optimization method is used to evaluate possible scenarios showing the interdependence between storage location costs and transport impact. The study has two main contributions, the mixed methods approach to evaluate economic and environmental considerations in an infrastructure project and the scenario analysis of different options for inventory control and transport. The presented study adds knowledge to transport efficiency of rock and soil materials.

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  • 20.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Characterizing third-party logistics setups in the context of construction2021In: International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, ISSN 0960-0035, E-ISSN 1758-664X, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 325-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The use of third-party logistics (TPL) setups in construction has increased but is still a new phenomenon. The purpose was to increase understanding of how structural and management dimensions are related in CLSs by describing how CTPL setups are used. Design/methodology/approach Ten dimensions to describe and structure CLSs were identified from the literature and used to structure a cross-case analysis of 13 Swedish CLSs. Findings The main findings are: (1) there are three typical initiators of CLSs: municipalities, developers and contractors; (2) CLSs are drivers for service differentiation and modularization among TPL providers as construction specific services are required; (3) CLSs play a new role in construction by coordinating logistics activities between the construction project and the vicinity of the site. Research limitations/implications The study is based on 13 cases in the Swedish construction context. Additional studies of CLSs in other countries are needed. Practical implications The ten dimensions can be used as a guide in designing a CLS and in determining the order of design decisions. The identification and structuring of CTPL services also exemplify the variety of service offerings. Originality/value This is one of the first cross-case analyses of CLSs enabling the characterization of CTPL setups. This study identifies how different services included in the setup relate to the roles of SCM and logistics in construction.

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  • 21.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Construction logistics in urban development projects – learning from, or repeating, past mistakes of city logistics?2021In: The International Journal of Logistics Management, ISSN 0957-4093, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 49-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The construction industry is reluctant to utilize construction logistics centres (CLC). To understand why, the purpose of the study is to increase the understanding of drivers and challenges of CLC utilization.

    Design/methodology/approach – Adopting an activity-based cost methodology, nine construction projects’ CLC utilization in a Swedish urban development project is analyzed for a time period of three years (2013–2016).

    Findings – There is a difference between drivers and challenges for implementing and utilizing CLCs, which are often implemented to reduce third-party disturbances. The drivers to utilize a CLC, however, stem from achieving efficient logistics. The authors identify two different utilization strategies; the CLC is used either for just-in-time (JIT) deliveries or as a consolidation point.

    Research limitations/implications – The study shows that construction logistics is to some extent repeating some mistakes of its big brother, city logistics. The study hypothesizes that there are differences between CLC implementation and utilization drivers and challenges that are often overlooked, which can explain the lack of CLC utilization.

    Practical implications – The study shows that it is crucial for construction projects to develop and formulate a logistics strategy for how to utilize the setup, i.e. deciding whether to use the setup as aconsolidation point leading to fewer deliveries and more materials on-site, or as JIT, leading to more deliveriesbut fewer materials on-site.

    Social implications – CLCs can reduce environmental impact and third-party disturbances. However, tomake this come true, acceptance among the users is needed. The study provides understanding of drivers and barriers for CLC implementation and utilization that can increase acceptance among users (i.e. construction projects).

    Originality/value – The current study is one of the first studies to analyze CLC utilization.

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  • 22.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nolz, Pamela
    St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences, St. Pölten, Austria; AIT Austrian Institute of Technology, Vienna, Austria.
    de Radiguès de Chennevière, Philippine
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, MOBI, Brussels, Belgium.
    van Lier, Tom
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, MOBI, Brussels, Belgium.
    Macharis, Cathy
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, MOBI, Brussels, Belgium.
    Creating stakeholder awareness in construction logistics by means of the MAMCA2021In: City and Environment Interactions, ISSN 2590-2520, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temporariness of construction supply chains, in combination with the multiplicity of stakeholders complicates the organization of construction logistics. The problem for cities today is not the construction materials’ transports as such, it is how to ensure accessibility and mobility for stakeholders during the construction time. In general, there is no tradition of including different stakeholder perspectives when evaluating construction logistics setups. However, in other urban freight transport applications, multi-stakeholder dialogues are more common, and one methodology suggested and used as a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) method is the Multi-Actor Multi-Criteria Analysis (MAMCA). In this paper we develop a customized methodology for applying MAMCA in a construction logistics context, gradually refining the methodology along five cases in three different countries. We show how MAMCA must be adapted to fit the construction context. The main differences are: (1) predefined construction logistics alternatives, (2) predefined actors and criteria groups, and (3) the possibility of using the method in role play to create awareness of stakeholder views in homogenous groups. The methodology proved to be valuable for (1) identifying relevant stakeholders and their criteria, (2) identifying and understanding stakeholders’ preferences regarding construction logistics, and (3) creating awareness of the need to initiate construction logistics in a project. Furthermore, it showed the need to clarify whom is to take responsibility for initiating the use of construction logistics setups.

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  • 23.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fufa, Selamawit Mamo
    Sintef, Oslo, Norway.
    Venås, Christoffer
    Omsorgsbygg, Norway.
    Brusselears, Nicholas
    Vrieje Universitet Brussels, Belgium.
    Deliverable 1.2: Application of scenarios of construction logistics2021Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Sezer, Ahmet Anil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Environmental impact of construction transport and the effects of building certification schemes2021In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 172, article id 105688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction industry is associated with low productivity growth rates and environmental harm and, has a crucial role to play to reach the SDGs adopted by the UN in 2015. Construction logistics offer useful solutions to improve both the productivity and sustainability of the industry. The purpose of this paper is to investigate, in detail, the environmental impact of construction transport and whether the building certification scheme for a construction project has any influence on its transport arrangements. The analysis in this paper is based on a multiple case study of 40 Swedish projects. The results show that construction projects with better environmental ratings generated less emissions from construction transport. However, among the ten projects with highest transport/m2, five were certified. Construction logistics solutions (CLSs) such as terminals and checkpoints are useful in reducing the number of transports, and thereby reducing emissions. But the usefulness of a CLS is influenced by gross floor area and type of project, as well as the phase which the solution is implemented in. This study contributes to a better understanding of construction transport patterns and reducing environmental harm of these transports. The results of this paper are beneficial for construction site managers, logistics consultants and transport companies, helping them to implement CLSs in a more useful way, depending on the phase and type of project.

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  • 25.
    Cheng, Yang
    et al.
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark; Jiangxi Univ Finance & Econ, Peoples R China.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fleury, Afonso
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Guest editorial - Rethinking international manufacturing in times of global turbulence2021In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 1113-1120Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 26.
    Bjorgum, Oyvind
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Aaboen, Lise
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Norway.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Low power, high ambitions: New ventures developing their first supply chains2021In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 27, no 1, article id 100670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates sourcing decisions for new ventures. Sourcing decisions are especially problematic for start-ups because they lack resources, knowledge and legitimacy to evaluate and interact with suppliers. We develop and apply a framework that connects global sourcing, relationship development and attractiveness. Further, we investigate how new ventures develop their first supply chains by conducting an exploratory mul-tiple case study of six Norwegian start-ups. Based on our findings, we develop three propositions regarding how start-ups mediate their lack of attractiveness through pre-sales and by choosing shorter supply chains and smaller suppliers. The implications for practice include emphasizing the importance of developing a business relation-ship with the supplier in parallel with making sourcing decisions. This study is a novel contribution to an underexplored topic, and we conclude by proposing a research agenda for future explorations of start-ups and supply chain development.

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  • 27.
    Bö, Lars Arne
    et al.
    Sintef, Trondheim, Norway.
    Fufa, Selamawit Mamo
    Sintef, Trondheim, Norway.
    Flyen, Cecilie
    Sintef, Trondheim, Norway.
    Venås, Christoffer
    Oslobygg, Norway.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brusselears, Nicolas
    Vrieje Universitet Brussels, Belgium.
    MIMIC Deliverable 4.3 - Policy Instruments2021Report (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Sezer, Ahmet Anil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Paving the Path towards Efficient Construction Logistics by Revealing the Current Practice and Issues2021In: Logistics, ISSN 2305-6290, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple deliveries and long turnaround times on construction sites harm the environmentand disturb on-site productivity and safety. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the transportpatterns of construction material deliveries, including turnaround times. In order to investigatethe number of transports and turnaround times, transport data for 13 Swedish construction sites,which were collected with the help of booking systems, were used. By comparing data from the cases,several patterns were observed: (i) very few projects receive deliveries at weekends, (ii) almost allprojects receive 50% of their daily deliveries before 09:00, (iii) long goods, standard euro pallets andlightweight goods (less than 500 kg) are the most common deliveries, (iv) trucks and delivery vansare the most common vehicles used and (v) goods to be handled by crane and lightweight goodsgenerate the longest turnaround time/delivery. This is one of the rare studies revealing currentpractice and issues associated with material deliveries, which is a necessary first step to increaseefficiency of construction logistics. This study shows that it is possible to influence these issues,as some projects performed better than others regarding turnaround times and transport.

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  • 29.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Billger, Monica
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Brusselears, Nicholas
    Vrieje Universität Brussels, Belgium.
    Fufa, Selamawit Mamo
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Al Fahel, Rodrigue
    Closer, Sweden.
    Mommens, Koen
    Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Belgium.
    Smart construction logistics governance: A systems view of construction logistics in urban development2021In: Proceedings of the 57th ISOCARP World Planning Congress, 2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To reduce disturbances and impact from construction transports during urban development, logistics flows need to be managed and controlled efficiently. One way to do so is using construction logistics setups. However, these rarely take both initiator and end-user perspectives into consideration. The paper builds on a longitudinal multiple-case study with cases from Belgium, Norway, and Sweden. The cases provide insights on different tools and approaches for gathering stakeholder input, simulation and forecasting of transport volumes, what type of services are needed in urban construction projects, and different governance measures and incentives. A cross-case analysis was performed to find similarities and differences between the countries. The result of the study is a conceptual framework, presenting a systems overview of the decision routes in urban development linked to construction logistics.

  • 30.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Billger, Monica
    Chalmers University, Sweden.
    Brusselaers, Nicolas
    Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Belgium.
    Selamawit Mamo, Fufa
    Sintef, Norway.
    Al Fahel, Rodrigue
    Closer, Sweden.
    Mommens, Koen
    Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Belgium.
    Smart Construction Logistics Governance: A systems view of construction logistics in urban development2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To reduce disturbances and impact from construction transports during urban development, logistics flows need to be managed and controlled efficiently. One way to do so is using construction logistics setups. However, these rarely take both initiator and end-user perspectives into consideration. The paper builds on a longitudinal multiple-case study with cases from Belgium, Norway, and Sweden. The cases provide insights on different tools and approaches for gathering stakeholder input, simulation and forecasting of transport volumes, what type of services are needed in urban construction projects, and different governance measures and incentives. A cross-case analysis was performed to find similarities and differences between the countries. The result of the study is a conceptual framework, presenting a systems overview of the decision routes in urban development linked to construction logistics.

  • 31.
    Eriksson, Victor
    et al.
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hulthén, Kajsa
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Goteborg, Sweden.
    Sundquist, Viktoria
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Goteborg, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The role of public actors in construction logistics: effects on and of relational interfaces2021In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 791-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public actors are increasingly enforcing the use of specifically designed construction logistics setups (CLS) to cope with logistical challenges and minimising disturbances on third parties in large construction projects. The organising of these CLS is contingent on the interaction among several types of actors. The purpose of the paper is to advance the understanding of the design and use of CLS and the distribution of various outcomes of such arrangements on the actors involved. The paper analyses the role of public actors in the initiating of CLS and how this affects the relational interfaces in the CLS triad of developers, contractors and logistics service providers, and the outcomes of their interactions. First, the main reason for a public actor to initiate a CLS is not cost, productivity or innovativity gains, but to decrease disturbances on third parties. Second, developers and contractors are forced to use the CLS initiated by the public actor. This makes them take on a forced customer role, explaining why these actors are often resistant to adopt to a certain CLS. Third, ripple effects, such as unintended costs and productivity impacts, occur in the construction supply chain because of the use of CLS.

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  • 32.
    Brusselears, Nicholas
    et al.
    Dept. of Business Technology and Operations, MOBI Research Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Mommens, Koen
    Dept. of Business Technology and Operations, MOBI Research Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Venås, Christoffer
    Dept. of Architectural Engineering, SINTEF, Norway.
    Flyen, Cecilie
    Dept. of Architectural Engineering, SINTEF, Norway.
    Fufa, Selamawit
    Dept. of Architectural Engineering, SINTEF, Norway.
    Macharis, Cathy
    Dept. of Business Technology and Operations, MOBI Research Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
    Economic, social and environmental impact assessment for off-site construction logistics: the data availability issu2020In: IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science / [ed] Holger Wallbaum, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden Alexander Hollberg, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden Liane Thuvander, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden Paula Femenias, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden Izabela Kurkowska, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden Kristina Mjörnell, RISE and Lund Technical University, Gothenburg/Lund, Sweden Colin Fudge, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ntroduction. The ongoing urbanization trend makes local governments densify their built environment, hence stimulating construction and renovation works in urban areas. Construction intrinsically strongly relies on logistics activities, which in turn are the source of environmental nuisances. The latter are referred to as external costs when they are not borne by the polluter himself, such as greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, congestion, etc. Accurate external cost calculations require accurate data to consider significant calculation-variables. However, current calculations are often based on the number of vehicles used and on transported volume rather than vehicle- or tonne-kilometres, hence not adequate to conduct external cost calculations. Methods. The MIMIC-project1 aims to reduce the impact of construction logistics. Therefore, an integrated impact assessment framework will be developed, assessing the economic and environmental influence of different off-site construction logistics solutions. The necessary data to conduct such an impact assessment are however not always available, complicating calculations. This paper highlights the current gap in accurate data on urban construction logistics flows, the considerable uncertainty about existing figures on construction transport and their methodology, and presents the data availability issue in the development of such a framework, using empirical research. Results. Logistics flows data are typically scattered amongst different actors and various in format. Harmonizing different data categories and sources to feed the framework with relevant logistics variables, this paper presents what is possible to calculate using available data in 4 pilot cases in Belgium, Sweden, Norway and Austria. The various data sources highlight the complexity to develop a framework flexible enough to cope with specific local constraints, whilst generic enough to allow comparability across the European cases, and ultimately across construction logistics globally. Furthermore, a shift is needed towards other data collection methods (GPS, digital waybills etc.). Conclusions. This paper presents the data availability issue in the development of an impact assessment framework for construction logistics, harmonizing different data sources in order to conduct external cost calculations for construction transport.

  • 33.
    Brusselaers, Nicolas
    et al.
    Dept. of Business Technology and Operations, MOBI Research Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium .
    Mommens, Koen
    Dept. of Business Technology and Operations, MOBI Research Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium .
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Venås, Christoffer
    Dept. of Architectural Engineering, SINTEF, Norway .
    Flyen, Cecilie
    Dept. of Architectural Engineering, SINTEF, Norway .
    Fufa, Selamawit Mamo
    Dept. of Architectural Engineering, SINTEF, Norway .
    Macharis, Cathy
    Dept. of Business Technology and Operations, MOBI Research Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium .
    Economic, social and environmental impact assessment for off-site construction logistics: the data availability issue2020In: World Sustainable Built Environment - Beyond 2020, IOP Publishing , 2020, no 3Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. The ongoing urbanization trend makes local governments densify their built environment, hence stimulating construction and renovation works in urban areas. Construction intrinsically strongly relies on logistics activities, which in turn are the source of environmental nuisances. The latter are referred to as external costs when they are not borne by the polluter himself, such as greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, congestion, etc. Accurate external cost calculations require accurate data to consider significant calculation-variables. However, current calculations are often based on the number of vehicles used and on transported volume rather than vehicle- or tonne-kilometres, hence not adequate to conduct external cost calculations. Methods. The MIMIC-project1 aims to reduce the impact of construction logistics. Therefore, an integrated impact assessment framework will be developed, assessing the economic and environmental influence of different off-site construction logistics solutions. The necessary data to conduct such an impact assessment are however not always available, complicating calculations. This paper highlights the current gap in accurate data on urban construction logistics flows, the considerable uncertainty about existing figures on construction transport and their methodology, and presents the data availability issue in the development of such a framework, using empirical research. Results. Logistics flows data are typically scattered amongst different actors and various in format. Harmonizing different data categories and sources to feed the framework with relevant logistics variables, this paper presents what is possible to calculate using available data in 4 pilot cases in Belgium, Sweden, Norway and Austria. The various data sources highlight the complexity to develop a framework flexible enough to cope with specific local constraints, whilst generic enough to allow comparability across the European cases, and ultimately across construction logistics globally. Furthermore, a shift is needed towards other data collection methods (GPS, digital waybills etc.). Conclusions. This paper presents the data availability issue in the development of an impact assessment framework for construction logistics, harmonizing different data sources in order to conduct external cost calculations for construction transport.

  • 34.
    Venås, Christoffer
    et al.
    SINTEF Community, Oslo, Norway.
    Fufa, Selamawit
    SINTEF Community, Oslo, Norway.
    Flyen, Cecilie
    SINTEF Community, Oslo, Norway.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brusselaers, Nicholas
    MOBI research centre, VUB, Brussels, Belgium.
    Mommens, Koen
    MOBI research centre, VUB, Brussels, Belgium.
    Macharis, Cathy
    MOBI research centre, VUB, Brussels, Belgium.
    No or low emissions from construction logistics – Just a dream or future reality?2020In: World Sustainable Built Environment online conference BEYOND 2020 / [ed] Holger Wallbaum, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Construction sites are among the major sources of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) in the construction industry. Large quantities of construction materials and other resources need to be transported to, within, and from construction sites. Implementation of different construction logistics solutions can reduce the impact from construction. The objectives of this article are to map the status and present the current practice of construction logistics in Norway, and to discuss how different no or low emission construction logistics solutions can be promoted. Methods: Methods applied are a literature review including findings from the recent development of emission free construction sites and qualitative case study with interviews carried out in Norway. Results: Findings indicate that lack of regulations, specific requirements and awareness, and use of traditional methods to avoid risks are some of the challenges for minimizing impact from construction logistics. However, opportunities are also present; mainly driven by political ambitions, improved environmental requirements in public procurement tenders and market demands and ambitions for reductions in emissions and costs. Preliminary results from interviews in Norway support these findings. Conclusions: The study show that the goal of achieving no or low emission from construction site is possible through setting ambitious requirements, good planning and a close and open collaboration between involved stakeholders. Grant support: This work is part of the Joint Programming Initative (JPI) Urban Europe project "Minimizing impact of construction material flows in cities: Innovative Co-Creation", supported by the national research councils of the participating countries (Sweden, Norway, Austria, Belgium).

  • 35.
    Venås, Christoffer
    et al.
    SINTEF Community, Oslo, Norway.
    Flyen, Cecilie
    SINTEF Community, Oslo, Norway.
    Fufa, Selamawit Mamo
    SINTEF Community, Oslo, Norway.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brusselaers, Nicolas
    MOBI research centre, VUB, Brussels, Belgium.
    Mommens, Koen
    MOBI research centre, VUB, Brussels, Belgium.
    Macharis, Cathy
    MOBI research centre, VUB, Brussels, Belgium.
    No or low emissions from construction logistics – Just a dream or future reality?2020In: : World Sustainable Built Environment conference: Beyond 2020, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2 - 4 November, 2020, IOP Publishing , 2020, no 4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Construction sites are among the major sources of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) in the construction industry. Large quantities of construction materials and other resources need to be transported to, within, and from construction sites. Implementation of different construction logistics solutions can reduce the impact from construction. The objectives of this article are to map the status and present the current practice of construction logistics in Norway, and to discuss how different no or low emission construction logistics solutions can be promoted. Methods: Methods applied are a literature review including findings from the recent development of emission free construction sites and qualitative case study with interviews carried out in Norway. Results: Findings indicate that lack of regulations, specific requirements and awareness, and use of traditional methods to avoid risks are some of the challenges for minimizing impact from construction logistics. However, opportunities are also present; mainly driven by political ambitions, improved environmental requirements in public procurement tenders and market demands and ambitions for reductions in emissions and costs. Preliminary results from interviews in Norway support these findings. Conclusions: The study show that the goal of achieving no or low emission from construction site is possible through setting ambitious requirements, good planning and a close and open collaboration between involved stakeholders. Grant support: This work is part of the Joint Programming Initative (JPI) Urban Europe project "Minimizing impact of construction material flows in cities: Innovative Co-Creation", supported by the national research councils of the participating countries (Sweden, Norway, Austria, Belgium).

  • 36.
    Bergström, Karl
    et al.
    Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, CHALMERS, Gothenburg.
    Billger, Monica
    Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, CHALMERS, Gothenburg.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The MIMIC construction logistics game: facilitating group discussion and understanding of construction logistics through gameplay2020In: IOP Conf. Series: Earth and Environmental Science / [ed] Holger Wallbaum, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe the development of an innovative planning tool to promote the knowledge and collaboration needed to overcome challenges in the sanitation sector. A serious game was designed to share knowledge about resource recovery and support attitude-change and collaboration between stakeholders. This study documents the co-design process of game development from conception based on a set of specifications the game should achieve, through iterative testing with relevant stakeholders as players. The resulting prototype of the game showed that it was not possible to include all the original desired specifications in the final game. Stakeholders found that the game was engaging, stimulated creativity and achieved its goal.

  • 37.
    Sezer, Ahmet Anil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The transport footprint of Swedish construction sites2020In: IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2020, Vol. 588, article id 042001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies related to GHG emissions from the construction industry are focusing mainly on impact from the phases of building use and on-site production while neglecting the footprint due to transportation during the production phase. In this paper the aim is to investigate transport footprint owing to material and waste transports to and from construction sites in Sweden, based on secondary data analysis of construction projects. The choice between efficient logistics considering the time pressure in construction projects and logistics with reduced GHG emissions is a difficult one, however previous studies report that with better logistics solutions and planning, both goals can be achieved. This study contributes by delivering a better understanding of the transport patterns of construction projects as well as the GHG emissions from construction transport. Among the studied projects, 2450 transports/project and 31 transports/flat are noted. Transport footprint from the new flat production at 2017 in Sweden is estimated around 422800 tonsCO2. Increasing the understanding of the transport patterns will lead to better policies to control traffic and better use of construction logistics setups for different phases of projects. Since the main limitation here is data quality and lack of data, further research aims to improve data collection, investigating possible data sources and their quality.

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  • 38.
    Mogos, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alfnes, Erlend
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    A production-transferprocedure based on risk management principles2019In: Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, ISSN 2398-5364, E-ISSN 2398-5372, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 103-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose –This paper develops a procedure for preparing production transfers based on risk management principles. The procedure should help companies reduce the amount of supply disruptions during transfers and achieve their outsourcing/offshoring objectives.

    Design/methodology/approach – The procedure was developed during a 3-year Design Science study. First, a literature review and case studies were conducted to frame the research problem. Second, a preliminary procedure was developed based on preventive actions from the production transfer literature. Third, the procedure was implemented during an electronics-offshoring case and refined during workshops with the sender and receiver’s transfer-personnel. Fourth, during a seminar, transfer experts verified the procedure by applying it to outsourcing/offshoring cases with which they had experience.

    Findings – Most of the preventive actions were evaluated as relevant for the transfers the procedure was applied to, regardless of industry and relocation type. Nevertheless, the electronics-offshoring case showed that the amount of resources the transfer parties were willing to invest in interactive actions (e.g. cross-locational transfer of personnel) depended on the transfer’s risk level and profit impact. This paper provides propositions about how to better allocate personnel during relocations and enhances the production transfer literature by clarifying transfer-risk management.

    Practical implications – The procedure can be used during the production-transfer phase as a preparation procedure. Moreover, it informs the decision-making process during the relocation-decision and supplier-selection phases.

    Originality/value – To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first production-transfer-preparation procedure based on risk management principles.

  • 39.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Construction logistics governing guidelines in urban development projects2019In: Construction Innovation, ISSN 1471-4175, E-ISSN 1477-0857, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 89-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Construction logistics centres (CLC) is one possible solution to manage logistics flows in urban construction projects. The aim of CLC’s are to decrease disturbances to the surrounding environment and to improve logistics flows and the planning of the same to construction sites. However, as CLC’s is a new phenomenon, there is a lack of research with regards to how CLC’s are experienced by stakeholders utilising and/or running them. Therefore, the paper answers two research questions relating to the experiences of three

    different stakeholder groups using a CLC in a large development project.

    Design/methodology/approach: An exploratory single case research design was chosen to explain how the utilisation and governance of a CLC has been experienced by three main contractors, the CLC operator and the municipality initiating the CLC. Case study methodology is a valid choice when the context and experiences are critical to understanding the phenomenon comprehensively.

    Data has been collected through interviews, site visits, observations and documentation. 

    Findings: There is potential in utilising CLC’s in development projects, and positive aspects such as consolidation effects and enhanced planning efforts were found. What is evident however, is that the design and implementation of CLC’s must be based on comprehensive stakeholder analysis and clear governance strategies to lay the foundation for a good construction process for the main contractors. Aspects to consider when designing a CLC governance strategy identified were: customer clarification, multi-stakeholder logistics analysis, and information.

    Research implications: Problems and possibilities in utilising CLC’s are explored and future research directions are presented. Further research is needed to verify the findings from SRS. With the novelty of CLC’s, it would be useful to study other CLC projects and different solutions as well. 

    Practical implications: Contractors, TPL providers, and municipalities can find inspiration for how to design and implement CLC governance strategies based on experiences from the SRS case.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes by highlighting contextual aspects affecting the experiences of using and operating CLC’s from different stakeholder perspectives.

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  • 40.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Peltokorpi, Antti
    Aalto University.
    Designing Construction Logistics Solutions in Hospital Projects2019In: Proceedings of the 31st NOFOMA Conference: Supply Chains and Sustainable Development of Societies, Oslo, Norway, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    When hospitals are built or renovated, they are often operational. To reduce disturbances and improve logistics performance, construction logistics solutions (CLS) can be deployed. Presently, there is no best practice regarding CLS organizing. The purpose of this study is to explore how CLS’s can be classified in order to improve the organization of future hospital project CLS’s.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This study compares how CLS’s have been organized in six hospital projects in Sweden, Finland and Denmark with the help of city logistics classification models. Cross-case analysis aiming at finding similarities/differences in CLS organizing is conducted, classifying them in accordance with city logistics literature.

    Findings

    This study shows that hospital CLS’s are often initiated as a problem solver for disturbances without considering how logistics can provide more value or how to follow up the CLS performance. The study operationalizes abstract measures from city logistics alongside contextual considerations to propose a new process for designing hospital CLS’s.

    Research implications

    The study highlights how different city logistics elements should be translated into operational and organizational features of CLS’s in hospital construction projects.

    Practical implications

    The study provides a practical process of designing a CLS’s for hospital projects by utilizing current knowledge from city logistics and contextual factors affecting hospital projects.

    Original/value

    This is one of the first studies that compare different CLS’s in hospital construction based on a structure accepted within the logistics area, i.e. city logistics.

  • 41.
    Larsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tactical capacity planning in hospital departments2019In: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, ISSN 0952-6862, E-ISSN 1758-6542, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 233-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore tactical planning potential within hospital departments. The study had two objectives: first, to develop a framework for tactical capacity planning in healthcare departments by identifying and structuring essential components for healthcare capacity management; and, second, to identify context-specific requirements and functionality demands on tactical planning processes within healthcare. Design/methodology/approach A framework for tactical capacity planning was developed through a literature review. Additionally, an exploratory multiple-case study was performed, with cases from three Swedish hospital departments, which provide the opportunity to study framework applicability in its natural context. Findings Findings illustrate how an active tactical planning process can facilitate adjustments to capacity. However, the multiple-case study shows that there are contextual differences between departments, depending on available treatments and resources that affect capacity adjustments, and how the planning process activities should be structured. Originality/value This project develops a framework for a tactical capacity-planning process adapted to healthcare provider contexts. By developing the framework, based on the literature and tactical level planning processes within three Swedish hospital case studies, the authors bridge gaps between theory and application regarding healthcare capacity planning.

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  • 42.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Malm, Anna
    Saab AB Aeronautics, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skov Madsen, Erik
    SDU Centre for Sustainable Supply Chain Engineering, Institute of Technology and Innovation, Syddansk Universitet, Odense, Denmark.
    Technology transfer as apart of the business: Inter-organizational transfer strategies based on experiences of aircraft production2019In: Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, ISSN 2398-5364, E-ISSN 2398-5372, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 151-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is through a literature study and a study of the Saab offset cases to identify strategies to increase inter-organizational transfer capability.

    Design/Methodology/Approach

    Based on a literature study and a study of three of Saab’s offset cases and Saab’s process for technology transfer.

    Findings

    This study has identified inter-organisational transfer strategies based on the importance of the hierarchy of decision-making and the change from capacity transfers to capability transfers in offset business. 1) The type of performance goals set in the business agreement decides how to realise the transfer. 2) The hierarchy of decision-making create a need to align the understanding of the performance goals between the different parts of the organisation, which affect the plans for how to transfer knowledge between the organizational as well as the individual levels. 3) To reach the performance goals of the technology transfer there need to be a balance between the disseminative capability of the sender and the absorptive capability of the receiver.

    Limitations

    This study is based on a single case within a relatively unique industry with an offset perspective and production transfers. Therefore, there is also a need for future studies to confirm the identified relationships within outsourcing/offset within other industries and other types of transfers.

    Originality/value: A change from capacity transfers to capability transfers in both outsourcing/offshoring and offset business indicates that more research should be placed on the disseminative capacity of the sender. The literature review revealed that the disseminative capacity of the sender has been the subject of less research than the absorptive capacity of the receiver.

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  • 43.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Patrik
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    The impact of knowledge properties on international manufacturing transfer performance2019In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 30, no 2-3, p. 197-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines how knowledge properties of a manufacturing activity transfer in international manufacturing network impact performance during the transfer itself and after steady state has been reached. Hierarchical regression was used to test the relationship on survey data from 178 companies. Knowledge properties as a group was significantly affected by both performance measures when controlling for the effects of sender unit experience, sender unit size and receiver unit experience. The activities transferred thus impact the success of the transfer. The control variables of sender unit experience and receiver unit experience have their relatively strongest performance effects after steady state has been reached. Independency was the single knowledge property dimensions with the strongest relative performance effect. This is one of the first survey studies to cover both the performance of the transfer itself and after reaching steady state of manufacturing transfers. Several strands of further research were therefore identified.

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  • 44.
    Thunberg, Micael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The information exchange pyramid in construction supply chains2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Thunberg, Micael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kjellsdotter Ivert, Linea
    Stiftelsen Chalmers industriteknik, Göteborg.
    Liljestrand, Kristina
    Stiftelsen Chalmers industriteknik, Göteborg.
    Behovet av informationsdelning i byggbranschen2018In: PLANs Forsknings- och tillämpningskonferens 2018. Artiklar från konferensen på Tekniska högskolan i Jönköping, Jönköping 23-24 oktober 2018, Jönköping: Jönköping University , 2018, p. 233-247Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den ökade efterfrågan om att digitalisera informationsflödet i byggbranschen har fått företagen att inse behovet av att veta vilken information som behöver delas och vem som har behov av informationen. Syftet med denna artikel är att identifiera behovsområden för informationsdelning i gränssnittet mellan försörjningskedjan och byggprocessen i byggprojekt mellan olika aktörer för att identifiera potentialer för förbättring. D.v.s. identifiera vilken information som behöver delas och med vem för att i framtiden kunna skapa t.ex. digitala lösningar som möjliggör automatisk hämtning och uppdatering mellan olika IT-system. För att utröna vilket informationsbehov som finns i branschen genomfördes ett 20-tal semistrukturerade intervjuer med aktörer som återspeglar olika perspektiv i gränssnittet mellan försörjningskedjan och byggprocessen: beställare (inkl. kommuner), entreprenörer, installatörer, maskinuthyrare, materialleverantörer, återvinningsföretag och transportörer. Resultatet visar på att informationsbehovet delvist är liknande när det gäller leveransinformation men skiljer sig en del när det gäller projektinformation. Detta indikerar att informationsbehov kan ses som en ”pyramid” av flera lager med information där understa lagret är leveransinformation som alla upplever behov av. Mellersta lagret är leveransplanering som beställare, entreprenörer, installatörer, maskinuthyrare, materialleverantörer och återvinningsföretag behöver. Det översta lagret utgörs av  projektinformation som beställare, entreprenörer och installatörer behöver. Trots olika perspektiv så är en stor del av informationsbehovet lika, vilket är av vikt för entreprenören att förstå. Detta bidrar även till en tydligare bild av vilken information som behövs av vem. Resultatet ger även bidrag till den rådande forskningen och samhällsdebatten om digitalisering och informationsdelning i byggbranschen. Fortsatta studier behöver bl.a. titta på vem som ska vara ansvarig för insamlandet av informationen, hur den ska digitaliseras och hur den ska hållas à jour.

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    Behovet av informationsdelning i byggbranschen
  • 46.
    Thunberg, Micael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bringing planning back into the picture: How can supply chain planning aid in dealing with supply chain related problems in construction?2018In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 425-442, article id RCME-MS-16-2640R3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are several supply chain related problems facing the construction industry, such as poor construction site logistics, lack of communication and trust. These problems can jeopardise construction projects through delays and cost overruns. Supply chain planning, a part of supply chain management (SCM), can be used as a tool to deal with these problems. The purpose of this paper is to study how linkages between common supply chain related problems in construction can be illustrated and to demonstrate how they could be resolved through supply chain planning. Firstly, we identify how the linkages between common problems can be illustrated, and secondly the role of supply chain planning in resolving these problems. A conceptual model is developed that was verified using three cases with Swedish gypsum and kitchen supply chains. The model is shown to be useful in illustrating how supply chain problems occurring at executional level on-site are related to problems originating in lack of planning at company/pre-construction level. The study thus demonstrates how supply chain planning can aid in resolving supply chain problems. The paper contributes by bringing planning back into the picture and by showing how supply chain planning can help to adopt SCM in construction.

  • 47.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cost modelling construction logistics centres2018In: Proceedings of the 30th annual Nofoma conference; Relevant Logistics and Supply Chain  Management Research, Kolding, Denmark / [ed] Jan Stentoft, Odense: University of Southern Denmark , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Construction logistics centres (CLC) are decreasing disturbances to the surrounding society through improved logistics flows and are a novelty within construction supply chains. Therefore, the knowledge of how to budget for the use of a CLC within the logistics flows is lacking among clients and main contractors. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to analyse what costs a CLC entails and to propose a model for calculating these costs.

    Design/methodology: The cost for a contractor of utilising a CLC has been studied based on the services invoiced to contractors over a time period of three years (2013 – 2016). From this, cost modelling for the most common services provided in CLC’s has been conducted.

    Findings: The study proposes a cost model for CLC’s and indicates the level of these costs compared to the total project size.

    Research implications: Through the cost model for determining the cost of CLC’s, this paper contributes to reducing the barriers towards construction logistics solutions by clarifying the costs in relation to possible benefits.

    Practical implications: Contractors, LSP’s and municipalities can find support on how to calculate the costs of utilising a CLC and also how to develop business models of setting up CLC´s.

    Originality/value: As the use of CLCs is a new phenomenon in construction, this paper contributes by exploring the important and rarely studied cost aspects of CLCs.

  • 48.
    Bäckstrand, Jenny
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The potential of information sharing to improve supply chain performance inconstruction projects2018In: EurOMA 2018 Proceedings: To Serve, to Produce and to Servitize in the Era of Networks, Big Data, and Analytics, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is toexplore the potential of increased supply chain performance by improved informationsharing between suppliers and contractors in the construction supply chains.Six suppliers are included, representing different combinations of supplyingmaterials and tools for the product or services to support production as wellas few or continuous deliveries during the project. The study show that suppliersneed different information sharing practices if they continuously present atsite or have few deliveries. Based on this and information sharing literature,we have developed a model of what information different suppliers need, includinghow and when to exchange it.

  • 49.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janné, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Using computer based multi-actor multi-criteria evaluation methods in master logistics classes2018In: EurOMA 2018 Proceedings: To Serve, to Produce and to Servitize in the Era of Networks, Big Data, and Analytics / [ed] Gyula Vastag, Tamás Koltai and László Monostori, EurOMA , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to provide insights into how to integrate a computer-based evaluation tool to improve the understanding of different perspectives when the teaching of logistics at masters’ level. This study has had an action research approach to student centred learning by introducing a theme of cross-functional decision making through combining lecturing, case assignment and computer based tools. What can be seen is that this inclusion has filled a gap in the education and course. Adding the combination of the preparatory case work and the computer exercise gave the students the activity independence and gave room for new reflections.

  • 50.
    Janné, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Construction Logisitcs Centres - Innovation or Complication?2017In: NOFOMA 2017 The 29th NOFOMA Conference: Taking on Grand Challenges / [ed] Daniel Hellström, Joakim Kembro and Hajnalka Bodnar, Lund: Lund University , 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Construction logistics centres (CLC) is one   possible solution to manage logistics flows in urban construction projects.   The aim of CLC’s are to decrease disturbances to the surrounding environment   and to improve logistics flows and the planning of the same to construction   sites. However, as CLC’s is a new phenomenon, there is a lack of research with   regards to how CLC’s are experienced by stakeholders utilising and/or running   them. Therefore, the paper answers two research questions relating to the   experiences of three different stakeholder groups of the use of a CLC in a   large development project and how these experiences provide directions in   developing CLC governance strategies.

    Design/methodology/approach

    An exploratory single   case research design was chosen to explain how the utilisation and governance of a   CLC has been experienced by three main contractors, the CLC operator and the   municipality initiating the CLC. Case study   methodology is a valid choice when the context and experiences are critical   to understanding the phenomenon comprehensively. Data has been collected   through semi-structured interviews, site visits, observations and project   documentation.

    Findings

    There is potential in utilising   CLC’s in development projects, and positive aspects such as consolidation   effects and enhanced planning efforts were found. What is evident however, is   that the design and implementation of CLC’s must be based on comprehensive   stakeholder analysis and clear governance strategies to lay the foundation   for a good construction process for the main contractors. Major aspects to   consider when designing a CLC governance strategy identified were: clarifying   who the customers are, multi-stakeholder logistics analysis, and information   flows.

    Research   implications

    Problems and possibilities in utilising CLC’s are explored and future   research directions are presented. Further research is needed to verify the   findings from SRS. With the novelty of CLC’s, it would be useful to study   other CLC projects and different solutions as well.

    Practical   implications

    Contractors, TPL providers, and municipalities can find inspiration for   how to design and implement CLC governance strategies based on experiences   from the SRS case.

    Originality/value

    As the use of CLC’s is a new phenomenon, this paper contributes by   highlighting contextual aspects affecting the experiences of using and   operating CLC’s from different stakeholder perspectives.

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