liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Gryszel, Maciej
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Byun, Donghak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Burtscher, Bernhard
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brodsky, Jan
    Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic.
    Simon, Daniel T
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Glowacki, Eric Daniel
    Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic.
    Strakosas, Xenofon
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Donahue, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vertical Organic Electrochemical Transistor Platforms for Efficient Electropolymerization of Thiophene Based Oligomers2024In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) have emerged as promising candidates for various fields, including bioelectronics, neuromorphic computing, biosensors, and wearable electronics. OECTs operate in aqueous solutions, exhibit high amplification properties, and offer ion-to-electron signal transduction. The OECT channel consists of a conducting polymer, with PEDOT:PSS receiving the most attention to date. While PEDOT:PSS is highly conductive, and benefits from optimized protocols using secondary dopants and detergents, new p-type and n-type polymers are emerging with desirable material properties. Among these, low-oxidation potential oligomers are highly enabling for bioelectronics applications, however the polymers resulting from their polymerization lag far behind in conductivity compared with the established PEDOT:PSS. In this work we show that by careful design of the OECT geometrical characteristics, we can overcome this limitation and achieve devices that are on-par with transistors employing PEDOT:PSS. We demonstrate that the vertical architecture allows for facile electropolymerization of a family of trimers that are polymerized in very low oxidation potentials, without the need for harsh chemicals or secondary dopants. Vertical and planar OECTs are compared using various characterization methods. We show that vOECTs are superior platforms in general and propose that the vertical architecture can be expanded for the realization of OECTs for various applications.

  • 2.
    Massetti, Matteo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Silan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Padinhare, Harikesh
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Burtscher, Bernhard
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Diacci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tu, Deyu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fully 3D-printed organic electrochemical transistors2023In: NPJ FLEXIBLE ELECTRONICS, ISSN 2397-4621, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are being researched for various applications, ranging from sensors to logic gates and neuromorphic hardware. To meet the requirements of these diverse applications, the device fabrication process must be compatible with flexible and scalable digital techniques. Here, we report a direct-write additive process to fabricate fully 3D-printed OECTs, using 3D printable conducting, semiconducting, insulating, and electrolyte inks. These 3D-printed OECTs, which operate in the depletion mode, can be fabricated on flexible substrates, resulting in high mechanical and environmental stability. The 3D-printed OECTs have good dopamine biosensing capabilities (limit of detection down to 6 mu M without metal gate electrodes) and show long-term (similar to 1 h) synapse response, indicating their potential for various applications such as sensors and neuromorphic hardware. This manufacturing strategy is suitable for applications that require rapid design changes and digitally enabled direct-write techniques.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Diacci, Chiara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Burtscher, Bernhard
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berto, Marcello
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Ruoko, Tero-Petri
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Tampere Univ, Finland.
    Lienemann, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greco, Pierpaolo
    Univ Ferrara, Italy; Ist Italiano Tecnol, Italy.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Borsari, Marco
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bortolotti, Carlo A.
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Biscarini, Fabio
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy; Ist Italiano Tecnol, Italy.
    Organic Electrochemical Transistor Aptasensor for Interleukin-6 Detection2023In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) biosensor for the detection of interleukin 6 (IL6), an important biomarker associated with various pathological processes, including chronic inflammation, inflammaging, cancer, and severe COVID-19 infection. The biosensor is functionalized with oligonucleotide aptamers engineered to bind specifically IL6. We developed an easy functionalization strategy based on gold nanoparticles deposited onto a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) gate electrode for the subsequent electrodeposition of thiolated aptamers. During this functionalization step, the reduction of sulfide bonds allows for simultaneous deposition of a blocking agent. A detection range from picomolar to nanomolar concentrations for IL6 was achieved, and the selectivity of the device was assessed against Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF), another cytokine involved in the inflammatory processes.

  • 4.
    Burtscher, Bernhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Urbina, Pamela Allison Manco
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Diacci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Borghi, Simone
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Pinti, Marcello
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Cossarizza, Andrea
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Salvarani, Carlo
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Biscarini, Fabio
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy; Ist Italiano Tecnol, Italy.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bortolotti, Carlo A.
    Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Sensing Inflammation Biomarkers with Electrolyte-Gated Organic Electronic Transistors2021In: Advanced Healthcare Materials, ISSN 2192-2640, E-ISSN 2192-2659, Vol. 10, no 20, article id 2100955Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An overview of cytokine biosensing is provided, with a focus on the opportunities provided by organic electronic platforms for monitoring these inflammation biomarkers which manifest at ultralow concentration levels in physiopathological conditions. Specifically, two of the fields state-of-the-art technologies-organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) and electrolyte gated organic field effect transistors (EGOFETs)-and their use in sensing cytokines and other proteins associated with inflammation are a particular focus. The overview will include an introduction to current clinical and "gold standard" quantification techniques and their limitations in terms of cost, time, and required infrastructure. A critical review of recent progress with OECT- and EGOFET-based protein biosensors is presented, alongside a discussion onthe future of these technologies in the years and decades ahead. This is especially timely as the world grapples with limited healthcare diagnostics during the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19)pandemic where one of the worst-case scenarios for patients is the "cytokine storm." Clearly, low-cost point-of-care technologies provided by OECTs and EGOFETs can ease the global burden on healthcare systems and support professionals by providing unprecedented wealth of data that can help to monitor disease progression in real time.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf