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  • 1.
    Trulsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ahlgren, Weimar
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Hosp Eksjo, Sweden.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sandström, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Attitudes and perceptions of healthcare professionals related to family participation in surgical cancer care - A mixed method study2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 2530-2539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThis study investigated healthcare professionals attitudes and perceptions towards the familys participation in surgical cancer care. DesignA prospective mixed method study. MethodsThe study was conducted at three hospitals in Sweden with registered nurses, assistant nurses and surgeons. Data included 43 completed Families Importance in Nursing Care (FINC-NA) questionnaires answered by registered nurses and qualitative data from 14 interviews with surgeons and assistant nurses. Data analysis was performed according to the Creswell convergent parallel mixed method. ResultsBoth quantitative and qualitative data demonstrated that the family was an important resource in nursing care, was highly valued as a conversational partner and had resources that should be considered. Each family should be supported in determining their role and as implements for maintaining a functioning family constellation and increasing their participation. Patient or Public ContributionNo patient or public contribution.

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  • 2.
    Blomquist, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Motivation and Life Circumstances Affecting Living Habits Prior to Gastrointestinal Cancer Surgery- An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis2023In: Inquiry, ISSN 0046-9580, E-ISSN 1945-7243, Vol. 60, article id 00469580231170544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to explore the patients experiences to get insights into their living habits prior to gastrointestinal cancer surgery. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach was used. Six in-depth interviews with participants recruited from a hospital in southeast Sweden. The IPA analysis identified 3 themes: The influence of the cancer diagnosis on awareness and motivation, Life circumstances affecting living habits, and Activities bringing mental strength. The participants expressed their motivation level and circumstances in life. Various types of activities and support promoted physical and mental health. Motivation level and circumstances in life both influence living habits. Various kinds of activities and support promote patients physical and mental health. Nurses need to investigate patients experiences when developing person-centered support to achieve health-promoting behavior prior to cancer surgery.

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  • 3.
    Ibrahim, Farzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    In the Shadows of Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer: An Interview Study with Next of Kin about Their Experiences Participating in Surgical Cancer Care2020In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 579-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to explore the experiences of participation among the next of kin of patients who had surgery for upper abdominal tumours. This study had a qualitative research design and data were analysed by thematic analysis. Eleven qualitative interviews were conducted with next of kin to patients who had surgery for liver, bile duct or pancreatic malignancy. The following themes emerged:from the shadows to an important roleandan inviting and inhibiting environment for participation.Next of kin were a central part of their loved ones care but often in the shadows. The next of kin described how they were not always invited and often they had to struggle to get involved. Next of kin often have a major psychosocial role to supporting the patient during and after discharge, and therefore need to be invited and involved in the whole care process.

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  • 4.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History, Tourism and Media. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Folkhälsoskillnaderna består mellan Norrköping och Linköping [Public health differences between »the twin cities« persist].2019In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 116, article id FI6HArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    A decade ago, major public health differences between two neighboring, equal sized large Swedish cities, Norrköping and Linköping (»the Twin cities«) were revealed. These differences were considerable for cardiovascular mortality and life expectancy. An important finding was that cardiovascular mortality rates for men and women in the city of Norrköping were highest compared to other major Swedish cities. In this follow-up, a decade later, cardiovascular mortality rates are still highest for the Norrköping population in comparison to the largest Swedish cities. There are also still profound and major public health differences between these twin cities. The differences seem to persist over time. These differences could not be explained by differences in health care, but are rather reflecting different social history and socioeconomic and life style differences in these two cities.

  • 5. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Risks for cardiovascular disease in middle-aged women in different social environments2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The importance of the social environment and human life conditions for public health was early recognized in community medicine. Despite major reductions in recent decades, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity for both genders in all European countries. 

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to increase our knowledge of factors in the social environment and of individual psychosocial factors that could explain why some women in working ages are affected by cardiovascular diseases.

    Methods: The Swedish sample comes from the urban population in two major cities in a region in the south-east of Sweden, the Twin cities. According to their social history they could be labelled a “blue-collar” and a “white-collar” city. Cardiovascular morbidity data in all papers for the Twin cities was derived from a computerized population-based administrative Health Care Register (HCR). In Paper IV, we made a comparative study between Sweden and Scotland, the Scottish data comes from the Scottish Health Survey.

    Results: In Paper I, the cumulative incidence of different cardiovascular diagnoses for younger and also elderly men and women were significantly higher in the population of the blue collar city in all ages and for both sexes. The qualitative interviews of women after an MI, in Paper II, the findings revealed a broad picture of social factors, life circumstances, personalities and, not least, psychosocial factors that are important to middle-aged women who have suffered an MI. Paper III demonstrated that women with a high level of the personality trait “being a Good Girl” reported significantly more psychosocial risk factors for CVD and more commonly report chest pain without seeking medical care, no increased incidence for various CVD-diagnoses were found. The comparative study (Paper IV) clearly showed that Scottish middle-aged women are – relative to Swedish women - particularly affected by a worse profile of CVD risks, even after adjustment for education.  

    Conclusions: The social environment is of importance for cardiovascular risks and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This has been shown in Swedish Twin cities context and also in comparative studies between Swedish and Scottish women. The thesis gives strong implications for an upstream public health approach initiating long-term community intervention program in the blue collar city and among Scottish middle-aged women.

    List of papers
    1. Cardiovascular disease occurrence in two close but different social environments
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular disease occurrence in two close but different social environments
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    2011 (English)In: International Journal of Health Geographics, E-ISSN 1476-072X, Vol. 10, no 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases estimate to be the leading cause of death and loss of disability-adjusted life years globally. Conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases only partly account for the social gradient. The purpose of this study was to compare the occurrence of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular mortality in two close cities, the Twin cities. Methods: We focused on the total population in two neighbour and equally sized cities with a population of around 135 000 inhabitants each. These twin cities represent two different social environments in the same Swedish county. According to their social history they could be labelled a "blue-collar" and a "white-collar" city. Morbidity data for the two cities was derived from an administrative health care register based on medical records assigned by the physicians at both hospitals and primary care. The morbidity data presented are cumulative incidence rates and the data on mortality for ischemic heart diseases is based on official Swedish statistics. Results: The cumulative incidence of different cardiovascular diagnoses for younger and also elderly men and women revealed significantly differences for studied cardiovascular diagnoses. The occurrence rates were in all aspects highest in the population of the "blue-collar" twin city for both sexes. Conclusions: This study revealed that there are significant differences in risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality between the populations in the studied different social environments. These differences seem to be profound and stable over time and thereby give implication for public health policy to initiate a community intervention program in the "blue-collar" twin city.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2011
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66880 (URN)10.1186/1476-072X-10-5 (DOI)000286525800001 ()
    Note

    Original Publication: Carina Wennerholm, Björn Grip, AnnaKarin Johansson, Hans Nilsson, Marja-Liisa Honkasalo and Tomas Faresjö, Cardiovascular disease occurrence in two close but different social environments, 2011, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH GEOGRAPHICS, (10), 5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-072X-10-5 Licensee: BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/

    Available from: 2011-03-22 Created: 2011-03-21 Last updated: 2023-02-24
    2. Life before myocardial infarction - a qualitative study of middle-aged women
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life before myocardial infarction - a qualitative study of middle-aged women
    2014 (English)In: Health, ISSN 1949-4998, E-ISSN 1949-5005, Vol. 6, p. 2765-2774Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The health burden of myocardial infarction is rising for middle-aged women and they are underrepresented in research of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore how life had been for middle-aged women before they suffered a myocardial infarction (MI). Through a health care register, we identified all women (n = 46) under 65 years of age in a defined region in southeast Sweden who had suffered an MI the past 2 years and a strategic selection of n = 16 women from these was made. These selected women were interviewed and their narratives were interpreted by qualitative content analysis. The qualitative interviews generated five general themes: “Serious life events”, “Negative affectivity”, “Loneliness”, “Being a good girl” and “Lack of control”. The interviews revealed that many of these women had been exposed to extreme and repeated traumatic life events in their lives. Many had a cynical attitude towards others, felt lonely and experienced a lack of social support. Many of these women endeavored to “be a good girl”, which was a special psychosocial phenomenon found. This study uncovered that these women before they suffered an MI were affected by a variety of psychosocial factors. The study stresses the importance of psychosocial risk factors in the assessment of middle-aged women’s risk profile for MI. A general conclusion for clinical practice is that in the assessment of the individual risk for myocardial infarction for middle-aged women, potential psychosocial factors might also be considered.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wuhan, Hubei Province, China: Scientific Research Publishing, 2014
    National Category
    General Practice
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115734 (URN)10.4236/health.2014.620316 (DOI)
    Available from: 2015-03-18 Created: 2015-03-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    3. Two tales of cardiovascular risks-middle-aged women living in Sweden and Scotland: a cross-sectional comparative study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two tales of cardiovascular risks-middle-aged women living in Sweden and Scotland: a cross-sectional comparative study
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e016527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare cardiovascular risk factors as well as rates of cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged women from urban areas in Scotland and Sweden.

    DESIGN: Comparative cross-sectional study.

    SETTING: Data from the general population in urban areas of Scotland and the general population in two major Swedish cities in southeast Sweden, south of Stockholm.

    PARTICIPANTS: Comparable data of middle-aged women (40-65 years) from the Scottish Health Survey (n=6250) and the Swedish QWIN study (n=741) were merged together into a new dataset (n=6991 participants).

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: We compared middle-aged women in urban areas in Sweden and Scotland regarding risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), CVD diagnosis, anthropometrics, psychological distress and lifestyle.

    RESULTS: In almost all measurements, there were significant differences between the countries, favouring the Swedish women. Scottish women demonstrated a higher frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, low vegetable consumption, a sedentary lifestyle and also more psychological distress. For doctor-diagnosed coronary heart disease, there were also significant differences, with a higher prevalence among the Scottish women.

    CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first studies that clearly shows that Scottish middle-aged women are particularly affected by a worse profile of CVD risks. The profound differences in CVD risk and outcome frequency in the two populations are likely to have arisen from differences in the two groups of women's social, cultural, political and economic environments.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017
    Keywords
    cardiovascular risk factors, comparative study, lifestyle, middle-aged women, psychological distress, public health
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140935 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016527 (DOI)000411802700172 ()28790040 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027162863 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Heart and Lung Association [E136-15/E106/13]; Clinic ALF funds, Region Ostergotland, Sweden [LiO-446241]; Research and PhD studies Committee (FUN), Linkoping University, Sweden [LiU-2014-020251]

    Available from: 2017-09-18 Created: 2017-09-18 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
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    Risks for cardiovascular disease in middle-aged women in different social environments
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  • 6.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bromley, Catherine
    Public Health Observatory Division, NHS Health Scotland, Edinburgh, UK..
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Frank, John
    Scottish Collaboration of Public Health Research & Policy (SCPHRP); Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Two tales of cardiovascular risks-middle-aged women living in Sweden and Scotland: a cross-sectional comparative study2017In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e016527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare cardiovascular risk factors as well as rates of cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged women from urban areas in Scotland and Sweden.

    DESIGN: Comparative cross-sectional study.

    SETTING: Data from the general population in urban areas of Scotland and the general population in two major Swedish cities in southeast Sweden, south of Stockholm.

    PARTICIPANTS: Comparable data of middle-aged women (40-65 years) from the Scottish Health Survey (n=6250) and the Swedish QWIN study (n=741) were merged together into a new dataset (n=6991 participants).

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: We compared middle-aged women in urban areas in Sweden and Scotland regarding risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), CVD diagnosis, anthropometrics, psychological distress and lifestyle.

    RESULTS: In almost all measurements, there were significant differences between the countries, favouring the Swedish women. Scottish women demonstrated a higher frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, low vegetable consumption, a sedentary lifestyle and also more psychological distress. For doctor-diagnosed coronary heart disease, there were also significant differences, with a higher prevalence among the Scottish women.

    CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first studies that clearly shows that Scottish middle-aged women are particularly affected by a worse profile of CVD risks. The profound differences in CVD risk and outcome frequency in the two populations are likely to have arisen from differences in the two groups of women's social, cultural, political and economic environments.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Two tales of cardiovascular risks-middle-aged women living in Sweden and Scotland: a cross-sectional comparative study.
  • 7.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jern, Michaela
    Honkasalo, Marja-Liisa
    Center for the Study of Culture and Health, University of Turku, Finland.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Life before myocardial infarction - a qualitative study of middle-aged women2014In: Health, ISSN 1949-4998, E-ISSN 1949-5005, Vol. 6, p. 2765-2774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The health burden of myocardial infarction is rising for middle-aged women and they are underrepresented in research of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore how life had been for middle-aged women before they suffered a myocardial infarction (MI). Through a health care register, we identified all women (n = 46) under 65 years of age in a defined region in southeast Sweden who had suffered an MI the past 2 years and a strategic selection of n = 16 women from these was made. These selected women were interviewed and their narratives were interpreted by qualitative content analysis. The qualitative interviews generated five general themes: “Serious life events”, “Negative affectivity”, “Loneliness”, “Being a good girl” and “Lack of control”. The interviews revealed that many of these women had been exposed to extreme and repeated traumatic life events in their lives. Many had a cynical attitude towards others, felt lonely and experienced a lack of social support. Many of these women endeavored to “be a good girl”, which was a special psychosocial phenomenon found. This study uncovered that these women before they suffered an MI were affected by a variety of psychosocial factors. The study stresses the importance of psychosocial risk factors in the assessment of middle-aged women’s risk profile for MI. A general conclusion for clinical practice is that in the assessment of the individual risk for myocardial infarction for middle-aged women, potential psychosocial factors might also be considered.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Life before myocardial infarction - a qualitative study of middle-aged women
  • 8.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grip, Björn
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Local History. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Honkasalo, Marja-Liisa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cardiovascular disease occurrence in two close but different social environments2011In: International Journal of Health Geographics, E-ISSN 1476-072X, Vol. 10, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases estimate to be the leading cause of death and loss of disability-adjusted life years globally. Conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases only partly account for the social gradient. The purpose of this study was to compare the occurrence of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular mortality in two close cities, the Twin cities. Methods: We focused on the total population in two neighbour and equally sized cities with a population of around 135 000 inhabitants each. These twin cities represent two different social environments in the same Swedish county. According to their social history they could be labelled a "blue-collar" and a "white-collar" city. Morbidity data for the two cities was derived from an administrative health care register based on medical records assigned by the physicians at both hospitals and primary care. The morbidity data presented are cumulative incidence rates and the data on mortality for ischemic heart diseases is based on official Swedish statistics. Results: The cumulative incidence of different cardiovascular diagnoses for younger and also elderly men and women revealed significantly differences for studied cardiovascular diagnoses. The occurrence rates were in all aspects highest in the population of the "blue-collar" twin city for both sexes. Conclusions: This study revealed that there are significant differences in risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality between the populations in the studied different social environments. These differences seem to be profound and stable over time and thereby give implication for public health policy to initiate a community intervention program in the "blue-collar" twin city.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 9.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jern, Michaela
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Engelska: Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical Programme.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    How Could Cardiovascular Disease Occurrence Be so Different in Two Close Cities?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The leading cause of death and loss of disability-adjusted life years globally are cardiovascular diseases. Conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases only partly account for the social gradient. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence of common cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular mortality in defined populations in two geographical close but socially different cities, a white-collar and a blue-collar twin city - “The Twincities”.

    Methods: We focused on the total population in these two neighbouring and equally sized cities with a population of around 135 000 inhabitants respectively, representing two close but different social environments in the same Swedish county. Data about morbidity for the two cities was derived from an administrative health care register based on medical records assigned by the physicians at both hospitals and primary care and calculated as cumulative incidence rates. Mortality for ischemic heart diseases is based on official Swedish national statistics.

    Results: The cumulative incidence of cardiovascular diagnoses for younger as well as elderly men and women revealed significant differences between these two cities. The relative risks for both sexes were highest for all cardiovascular diagnosis studied and cardiovascular mortality in the population of the blue-collar twin city.

    Conclusions: There are major differences in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality between the studied twin cities representing two close but different social environments. Since these differences seem to be profound and stable over time preventive measures is warranted in the blue-collar city.

  • 10.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jern, Michaela
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Engelska: Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical Programme.
    Honkasalo, Marja-Liisa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Young Women After MI - A Qualitative Study of Social Context and Lay Perceptions of the Disease.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A recently published study by us shows interesting incidence numbers of myocardial infarction (MI) in two close cities. One of the cities has the highest incidence of MI in Sweden. Conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases only partly account for the social gradient. MI among women of working age is a relatively rare event. It can be an indicator of the current health situation in a city. The purpose of this study was to analyze lay perceptions and believes regarding the disease among affected women in their social context. Knowledge about this can give us a better understanding about how they think, act and choose in life.

    Methods: We focused on younger women under 65 years of age affected by MI. Qualitative interviews was made with 12 women in the defined region.

    Results: The majority of the women mentioned inner stress as a cause for, and specific life events adjacent to the MI. All women in the study point out conventional risk factors (smoking, obesity, lack of exercise, diet, and heredity) as an explanation for their MI. Finally, most of these women had high demands on themselves, put other people's needs above their own and some testified about very traumatic life experiences.

    Conclusions: Knowledge about young women affected by MI and their lay perceptions is an important prerequisite for preventive measures for this special group.

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