liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Parker, Daniela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Manan Dar, Abdul Manan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Armada Moreira, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Scuola Int Super Studi Avanzati, Italy.
    Bernacka Wojcik, Iwona
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rai, Rajat
    Univ Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Mantione, Daniele
    Univ Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain; Basque Fdn Sci, Spain.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Biohybrid Energy Storage Circuits Based on Electronically Functionalized Plant Roots2024In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biohybrid systems based on plants integrate plant structures and processes into technological components targeting more sustainable solutions. Plants' biocatalytic machinery, for example, has been leveraged for the organization of electronic materials directly in the vasculature and roots of living plants, resulting in biohybrid electrochemical devices. Among other applications, energy storage devices were demonstrated where the charge storage electrodes were seamlessly integrated into the plant tissue. However, the capacitance and the voltage output of a single biohybrid supercapacitor are limited. Here, we developed biohybrid circuits based on functionalized conducting roots, extending the performance of plant based biohybrid energy storage systems. We show that root-supercapacitors can be combined in series and in parallel configuration, achieving up to 1.5 V voltage output or up to 11 mF capacitance, respectively. We further demonstrate that the supercapacitors circuit can be charged with an organic photovoltaic cell, and that the stored charge can be used to power an electrochromic display or a bioelectronic device. Furthermore, the functionalized roots degrade in composting similarly to native roots. The proof-of-concept demonstrations illustrate the potential of this technology to achieve more sustainable solutions for powering low consumption devices such as bioelectronics for agriculture or IoT applications.

  • 2.
    Cucchi, Matteo
    et al.
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne EPFL, Switzerland; Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Parker, Daniela
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gkoupidenis, Paschalis
    Max Planck Inst Polymer Res, Germany.
    Kleemann, Hans
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    In Liquido Computation with Electrochemical Transistors and Mixed Conductors for Intelligent Bioelectronics2023In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 35, no 15, article id 2209516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Next-generation implantable computational devices require long-term-stable electronic components capable of operating in, and interacting with, electrolytic surroundings without being damaged. Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) emerged as fitting candidates. However, while single devices feature impressive figures of merit, integrated circuits (ICs) immersed in common electrolytes are hard to realize using electrochemical transistors, and there is no clear path forward for optimal top-down circuit design and high-density integration. The simple observation that two OECTs immersed in the same electrolytic medium will inevitably interact hampers their implementation in complex circuitry. The electrolytes ionic conductivity connects all the devices in the liquid, producing unwanted and often unforeseeable dynamics. Minimizing or harnessing this crosstalk has been the focus of very recent studies. Herein, the main challenges, trends, and opportunities for realizing OECT-based circuitry in a liquid environment that could circumnavigate the hard limits of engineering and human physiology, are discussed. The most successful approaches in autonomous bioelectronics and information processing are analyzed. Elaborating on the strategies to circumvent and harness device crosstalk proves that platforms capable of complex computation and even machine learning (ML) can be realized in liquido using mixed ionic-electronic conductors (OMIECs).

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Parker, Daniela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Daguerre, Yohann
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Dufil, Gwennael
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mantione, Daniele
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Solano, Eduardo
    ALBA Synchrotron Light Source, Spain.
    Cloutet, Eric
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Hadziioannou, Georges
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Näsholm, Torgny
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlopoulou, Eleni
    Fdn Res & Technol Hellas, Greece.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Correction: Biohybrid plants with electronic roots via in vivo polymerization of conjugated oligomers (vol 8, pg 3295, 2021)2022In: Materials Horizons, ISSN 2051-6347, E-ISSN 2051-6355, Vol. 9, p. 2317-1317Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Parker, Daniela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Daguerre, Yohann
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Dufil, Gwennael
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mantione, Daniele
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Solano, Eduardo
    ALBA Synchrotron Light Source, Spain.
    Cloutet, Eric
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Hadziioannou, Georges
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Nasholm, Torgny
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlopoulou, Eleni
    Fdn Res & Technol Hellas, Greece.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Biohybrid plants with electronic roots via in vivo polymerization of conjugated oligomers2021In: Materials Horizons, ISSN 2051-6347, E-ISSN 2051-6355, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 3295-3305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant processes, ranging from photosynthesis through production of biomaterials to environmental sensing and adaptation, can be used in technology via integration of functional materials and devices. Previously, plants with integrated organic electronic devices and circuits distributed in their vascular tissue and organs have been demonstrated. To circumvent biological barriers, and thereby access the internal tissue, plant cuttings were used, which resulted in biohybrids with limited lifetime and use. Here, we report intact plants with electronic functionality that continue to grow and develop enabling plant-biohybrid systems that fully maintain their biological processes. The biocatalytic machinery of the plant cell wall was leveraged to seamlessly integrate conductors with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity along the root system of the plants. Cell wall peroxidases catalyzed ETE-S polymerization while the plant tissue served as the template, organizing the polymer in a favorable manner. The conductivity of the resulting p(ETE-S) roots reached the order of 10 S cm(-1) and remained stable over the course of 4 weeks while the roots continued to grow. The p(ETE-S) roots were used to build supercapacitors that outperform previous plant-biohybrid charge storage demonstrations. Plants were not affected by the electronic functionalization but adapted to this new hybrid state by developing a more complex root system. Biohybrid plants with electronic roots pave the way for autonomous systems with potential applications in energy, sensing and robotics.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Dufil, Gwennael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Parker, Daniela
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gerasimov, Jennifer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen
    Univ Calif Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Enzyme-assisted in vivo polymerisation of conjugated oligomer based conductors2020In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518, Vol. 8, no 19, p. 4221-4227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conjugated polymers conduct both electronic and ionic carriers and thus can stimulate and translate biological signals when used as active materials in bioelectronic devices. Self- and on-demand organization of the active material directly in the in vivo environment can result in the seamless integration of the bioelectronic interface. Along that line, we recently demonstrated spontaneous in vivo polymerization of the conjugated oligomer ETE-S in the vascular tissue of plants and the formation of conducting wires. In this work, we elucidate the mechanism of the in vivo polymerization of the ETE-S trimer and demonstrate that ETE-S polymerizes due to an enzymatic reaction where the enzyme peroxidase is the catalyst and hydrogen peroxide is the oxidant. ETE-S, therefore, represents the first example of a conducting polymer that is enzymatically polymerized in vivo. By reproducing the reaction in vitro, we gain further insight on the polymerization mechanism and show that hydrogen peroxide is the limiting factor. In plants the ETE-S triggers the catalytic cycle responsible for the lignification process, hacks this biochemical pathway and integrates within the plant cell wall, forming conductors along the plant structure.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Mantione, Daniele
    et al.
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Istif, Emin
    Univ Bordeaux, France; Koc Univ, Turkey.
    Dufil, Gwennael
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vallan, Lorenzo
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Parker, Daniela
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brochon, Cyril
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Cloutet, Eric
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Hadziioannou, Georges
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlopoulou, Eleni
    Univ Bordeaux, France.
    Thiophene-Based Trimers for In Vivo Electronic Functionalization of Tissues2020In: ACS APPLIED ELECTRONIC MATERIALS, ISSN 2637-6113, Vol. 2, no 12, p. 4065-4071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic materials that can self-organize in vivo and form functional components along the tissue of interest can result in a seamless integration of the bioelectronic interface. Previously, we presented in vivo polymerization of the conjugated oligomer ETE-S in plants, forming conductors along the plant structure. The EDOT-thiophene-EDOT trimer with a sulfonate side group polymerized due to the native enzymatic activity of the plant and integrated within the plant cell wall. Here, we present the synthesis of three different conjugated trimers based on thiophene and EDOT or purely EDOT trimers that are able to polymerize enzymatically in physiological pH in vitro as well as in vivo along the roots of living plants. We show that by modulating the backbone and the side chain, we can tune the electronic properties of the resulting polymers as well as their localization and penetration within the root. Our work paves the way for the rational design of electronic materials that can self-organize in vivo for spatially controlled electronic functionalization of living tissue.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf