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  • 1.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Barmark, Mimmi
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Correction: Mental health and academic performance: a study on selection and causation effects from childhood to early adulthood (vol 56, pg 857, 2021)2024In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 24, p. 199-199Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Lindblad, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Johansson, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    No correlation to collagen synthesis disorders in patients with Perthes' disease: a nationwide Swedish register study of 3488 patients2024In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 25, no 1, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMutations of the COL2A1 gene have been identified in patients with Perthes' disease. Several studies have hypothesised a connection between Perthes' disease and collagen synthesis disorders, especially COL2A1-related disorders, but no large studies on the subject have been made. The aim of this study was thus to discover if there is a connection between patients presenting with Perthes' disease, and collagen synthesis disorders. A secondary aim was to see if the children with both disorders had less optimal birth characteristics than the rest.MethodsSwedish national registers were used to collect data on children diagnosed with Perthes' disease or a collagen synthesis disorder. These registers include all births in Sweden, and data from both outpatient and in-hospital visits. A wide range of data is included besides diagnoses. All children with follow-up data to the age of 15 years were included. Pearson's chi-square was used for analysis. Statistical significance was further analysed with Fisher's Exact Test.ResultsIn total, 3488 children with either diagnosis were included. 1620 children had only Perthes disease, while 1808 children had only a collagen synthesis disorder. Five children were found to have both the diagnosis Perthes' disease and a collagen synthesis disorder. One child was large for their gestational age and none of the children had a low birthweight. Two of the children were moderately preterm.ConclusionsThe distinct lack of overlap in such a large body of material raises doubt about a connection between the presentation of Perthes' disease and collagen synthesis disorders, either COL2A1-related or not. We could not find an overrepresentation of less optimal birth characteristics either.

  • 3.
    Kassymova, Gulnara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Övr Regionledningskontoret. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The Impact of Symptoms of Depression, Anxiety, and Low Stress-Coping Capacity on the Effects of Telephone Follow-Up on Recovery Measures After Hysterectomy2024In: Women's Health Reports, E-ISSN 2688-4844, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 304-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To investigate if symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress-coping capacity have an impact on the effect of telephone follow-up (TFU) on trajectories of six recovery measures after hysterectomy and influence the occurrence of unplanned telephone contacts (uTCs) and unplanned visits (uVs) to health care providers.Material and Methods: A post hoc nonrandomized analysis of participants enrolled in a randomized, four-armed, single-blinded, controlled multicenter intervention study comprising 487 women where the women were allocated 1:1:1:1 to one of four TFU models. The Swedish Postoperative Symptom Questionnaire (SPSQ) and two health-related quality of life questionnaires, the EuroQoL-5 dimension with three levels (EQ-5 D-3 L) and the Short-Form-Health Survey (SF-36) assessed the recovery measures. The six recovery measures consisted of the EQ-5D-3L health index, the SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS), and the maximum and average pain intensity, and symptom sum score obtained from the SPSQ. Psychological distress was evaluated by the psychometric forms, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Stress Coping Inventory. The occurrence of uTC and uV within the 6 weeks of follow-up was registered.Results: Preoperative anxiety, depression, and stress-coping capacity did not modify the effects of the TFU models on the trajectories of the recovery measures, although anxiety and depression were strongly associated with all six recovery measures. uTCs, but not uVs occurred more often in the women with anxiety.Conclusions: Preoperative anxiety, depression, and stress-coping capacity did not appear to influence the effects of TFU contacts on the recovery measures after hysterectomy. Preoperative anxiety seemed to increase the occurrence of uTC. Clinical Trials Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01526668).

  • 4.
    Widbom, Andreas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Stina
    Sodra Alvsborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    The motives and experiences of donor-conceived persons requesting the identity of their sperm donors2024In: Reproductive BioMedicine Online, ISSN 1472-6483, E-ISSN 1472-6491, Vol. 48, no 1, article id 103413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research question: What are the motives and experiences of donor -conceived persons (DCP) who search for and receive information about their identity -release sperm donor? Design: A qualitative interview study with 29 individuals (21 women, seven men, one non -binary) who were consecutively recruited after having requested information about their sperm donor at five Swedish University hospitals. All participants were conceived after donor insemination to heterosexual couples within an identity -release donation programme. Individual semistructured interviews were conducted face-to-face or via telephone between September 2016 and November 2019, and transcribed audio recordings were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. Results: The motives and experiences of DCP were described in two themes. The theme 'donor information can fill different needs' describes that varying motives, thoughts and feelings are related to searching for and obtaining donor information. Motives ranged from curiosity and a desire for agency over one's conception to hopes of finding a new father. The theme 'navigating donor information in a relational context' describes the process of obtaining donor information as interpersonal, highlighting that the DCP needs to balance the interests of different stakeholders, and that obtaining donor information can challenge the relationship quality with the father. Conclusions: Obtaining the donor's identity has the potential to affect the understanding of DCP of themselves, and to influence relationships within their family in unexpected and challenging ways. Therefore, adequate resources should be allocated to support the growing number of families after identity -release donation.

  • 5.
    Kassymova, Gulnara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Effect of nurse-led telephone follow-up on postoperative symptoms and analgesics consumption after benign hysterectomy: a randomized, single-blinded, four-arm, controlled multicenter trial2023In: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, ISSN 0932-0067, E-ISSN 1432-0711, Vol. 307, no 2, p. 459-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The study aimed to determine if planned telephone follow-up, especially when adding structured, oriented coaching, reduces the intensity of postoperative symptoms and decreases analgesics consumption after benign hysterectomy. Methods A randomized, single-blinded, four-armed, controlled multicenter trial of 525 women scheduled for hysterectomy was conducted in 5 hospitals in the southeast health region of Sweden. The women were allocated 1:1:1:1 into four follow-up models: (A) no telephone follow-up (control group); (B) one planned, structured, telephone follow-up the day after discharge; (C) as B but with additional telephone follow-up once weekly for 6 weeks; and (D) as C but with oriented coaching telephone follow-up on all occasions. Postoperative symptoms were assessed using the Swedish Postoperative Symptoms Questionnaire. Analgesic consumption was registered. Unplanned telephone contacts and visits were registered during the 6 weeks of follow-up. Results In total, 487 women completed the study. Neither pain intensity, nor symptom sum score or analgesic consumption differed between the intervention groups. Altogether, 224 (46.0%) women had unplanned telephone contacts and 203 (41.7%) had unplanned visits. Independent of intervention, the women with unplanned telephone contacts had higher pain intensity and symptom sum scores, particularly if an unplanned telephone contact was followed by a visit, or an unplanned visit was preceded by an unplanned telephone contact. Conclusion Telephone follow-up did not seem to affect recovery regarding symptoms or analgesic consumption after benign hysterectomy in an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) setting. Unplanned telephone contacts and visits were associated with more postoperative symptoms, especially pain. Trial registration The study is registered in ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01526668 retrospectively from January 27; 2012. Date of enrolment of first patient: October 11; 2011.

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  • 6.
    Martinez Serrano, Cristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Inst Agr & Food Res & Technol CSIC INIA, Spain.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Övr Regionledningskontoret.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Epigenetic modifications appear in the human placenta following anxiety and depression during pregnancy2023In: Placenta, ISSN 0143-4004, E-ISSN 1532-3102, Vol. 140, p. 72-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The future health of the offspring can be influenced by longstanding maternal anxiety and depression disorders during pregnancy. The present study aimed to explore the effect of psychiatric disorders during pregnancy on placental epigenetics. Methods: We measured DNA methylation patterns in term-placentas of women either suffering longstanding anxiety and depression symptoms (Index group, with overt symptoms), or a healthy population (Control, none/ only mild symptoms). Whole genome DNA methylation profiling was performed using the TruSeq (R) Methyl Capture EPIC Library Prep Kit (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA) for library preparation and NGS technology for genomic DNA sequencing.Results: The results of high-throughput DNA methylation analysis revealed that the Index group had differential DNA methylation at epigenome-wide significance (p < 0.05) in 226 genes in the placenta. Targeted enrichment analyses identified hypermethylation of genes associated with psychiatric disorders (BRINP1, PUM1), and ion homeostasis (COMMD1), among others. The ECM (extracellular matrix)-receptor interaction pathway was significantly dysregulated in the Index group compared to the Control. In addition, DNA methylation/mRNA integration analyses revealed that four genes with key roles in neurodevelopment and other important processes (EPB41L4B, BMPR2, KLHL18, and UBAP2) were dysregulated at both, DNA methylation and transcriptome levels in the Index group compared to Control.Discussion: The presented results increase our understanding of how maternal psychiatric disorders may affect the newborn through placental differential epigenome, suggesting DNA methylation status as a biomarker when aiming to design new preventive techniques and interventions.

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  • 7.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nedstrand, Elizabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Long-term follow-up of mental health and satisfaction in a Swedish sample of sperm and egg donors after open-identity donation2023In: Reproductive BioMedicine Online, ISSN 1472-6483, E-ISSN 1472-6491, Vol. 47, no 6, article id 103417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research question: How is the mental health of open-identity gamete donors and their satisfaction with their contributions 14-17 years after acceptance as a donor?Design: The Swedish Study on Gamete Donation is a longitudinal study comprising women and men who were accepted as donors at seven Swedish university clinics between 2005 and 2008. The latest (fifth) follow-up included 215 open-identity donors (response rate 87%): 123 oocyte donors and 92 sperm donors. The donors answered a questionnaire regarding their perceptions, experiences and expectations after gamete donation 14-17 years previously. Results: The donors were satisfied with the experience of donating, and no differences were detected between sperm and oocyte donors. Oocyte donors were more than twice as likely to feel that family and friends were proud of their donation compared with sperm donors (51% versus 23%, P < 0.001). In total, six donors regretted their donation: four oocyte donors and two sperm donors. Sperm donors were more frequently satisfied with the financial compensation compared with oocyte donors (P = 0.005). No difference in the development of symptoms of anxiety or depression was detected 14-17 years post-donation.Conclusion: Long-term follow-up studies on donors are important for recruiting donors, and for recipients and the children who will be conceived with donated gametes. The results from the current study indicate that donors, generally, have good mental health and do not regret their decision to donate gametes. These findings are reassuring for all parties involved.

  • 8.
    Pettersson, Malin Lindell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Perceived social support in solo women seeking treatment with donor gametes and in women in heterosexual couples seeking IVF-treatment with own gametes2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 2733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solo motherhood is a family constellation that is becoming increasingly common in high income countries. The demographic characteristics of solo women entering treatment with donated sperm or embryo have been shown to be different from that of cohabiting women. The general importance of perceived social support is frequently amplified when health and quality of life are concerned, and positively affects mental health status, experienced stress, perceived self-efficacy during the transition to parenthood and during parenthood itself. The objective of the present study was to compare demographic characteristics, social network and perceived social support among solo women and cohabiting women awaiting fertility treatment. This objective was explored with a study-specific demographic and background questionnaire as well as through questions on access to practical support and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) assessing different sources of support. This study is a part of a longitudinal prospective multicenter study of solo women who awaited donation treatment in six Swedish public and private fertility clinics and a comparison group of women who were cohabiting/married to male partner and awaited in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment with the couples own gametes. A total of 670 women were invited and 463 accepted participation (69% response rate); 207 solo women (study group) and 256 cohabiting women (comparison group). The results show significant differences in age, education, and employment between the groups. Solo women were on average 3.6 years older, had a higher level of education, a higher-income profession, and were more frequently working full time. Solo women perceived an equally high degree of social support from their families, significantly higher levels of support from friends and significantly lower support from a significant other compared to cohabiting women. Solo women expected their mother to be the most supportive person in future parenthood, while cohabiting women most often stated their cohabiting partner to fill that role. The study adds to the body of knowledge of solo women as a sociodemographic distinct group going at motherhood alone, stating a high degree of currently perceived and expected social support. The previously studied negative impact that lack of a co-parent might have, may be attenuated by the expected and perceived social support from family and friends.

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  • 9.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Vingard, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Agnafors, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sodra Alvsborgs Hosp, Sweden.
    Sense of coherence and health in women: a 25-year follow-up study2023In: BMC Women's Health, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundHealth and Sense of Coherence (SOC) has been shown to be intertwined and argued to have a reciprocal relationship. The theory of SOC implies relatively stable scores during adulthood, however there are few longitudinal studies on the association between SOC and mental and somatic health. The main aim of the present study was to examine how SOC and self-rated health (SRH) are related during 25 years of follow-up.MethodsUsing paper questionnaires distributed by postal services, 415 mothers were followed from childbirth and 25 years prospectively. SOC was measured at three, 12 and 25 years after inclusion. Self-reports on health status were obtained at the 25-year follow-up. The association between SOC and self-reported health as well as the effect of sociodemographic factors and experience of stressful life events was assessed through regression models.ResultsSOC scores increased between three and 12 years after inclusion, and slightly decreased at the 25-year follow-up. Women of good health had a higher SOC-score at all three measurements compared to women of poor health. Multiple logistic regression showed that the likelihood of reporting good health increased with the number of times the women had reported SOC-scores above the 75th percentile. Moreover, women who had not been through a divorce were close to 60% more likely to report good health compared to women who had been through a divorce, whereas women not reporting stressful life events during the past two years were more than twice as likely to report good health. Symptoms below cut-off for postpartum depression and not having been through a divorce were associated with SOC scores above the 75th percentile.ConclusionThis 25-year follow-up study of a cohort of women reports good stability of SOC assessments in the vast majority of women. There was a stronger and more stable SOC in women with better health. The findings are in line with other studies on the predictive value of SOC and self-perceived health.

  • 10.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sodra Alvsborgs Hosp, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Goran
    Marie Cederschiold Univ, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Symptoms of depression and internalizing problems in early adulthood - associated factors from birth to adolescence2023In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 77, no 8, p. 799-810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeEven though the mechanisms behind the development of depression and internalizing problems remains unknown, many different factors have been shown to increase the risk. Longitudinal studies enable the investigation of exposure during different developmental periods during childhood. This study aims to examine factors associated with depressive and internalizing problems at age 20 in terms of sociodemographic factors, previous mental health problems and stressful life events during childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood.MethodsA birth cohort of 1723 children were followed to age 20. At the 20-year follow-up, n = 731 (44%) participated. Standardized instruments were filled out at baseline and the 3-,12- and 20-year follow-ups.ResultsDepressive problems at age 20 were associated with female gender, experience of interpersonal life events reported at age 20, bullying victimization and reports on paternal mental health problems. Participants with depressive problems were also less likely to have experienced adolescence as happy and to report that their father had been a good father. Internalizing problems at age 20 were, in addition, associated with internalizing problems at age 12 and reports on maternal mental health problems. Internalizing problems were associated with a lower likelihood of experiencing adolescence as happy in the final model.ConclusionRecent events (i.e. interpersonal life events and bullying) seemed to be the most influential factors on the development of internalizing and depressive problems. Internalizing problems during childhood increased the risk for internalizing problems in early adulthood, emphasizing the importance of early intervention. Fewer factors were found to increase the risk for depressive problems compared to internalizing problems.

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  • 11.
    Pettersson, Malin Lindell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nedstrand, Elizabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal advanced age, single parenthood, and ART increase the risk of child morbidity up to five years of age2022In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Advanced maternal age, single status and use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) are increasing in mothers in high-income countries, and all are known risk factors for negative obstetric outcomes. Less is known about their long-term consequences for childhood morbidity. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate morbidity up to five years of age, in the children of older, single, and/or ART-treated mothers. Methods A cross-sectional using Swedish registers was performed comprising 23 772 children. The prevalence of diagnosis and the number of hospital visits for specialist care, were compared and analyzed in relation to maternal age at childbirth, maternal civil status, and mode of conception. The odds ratio for specialized care within each ICD-chapter were estimated using single and multiple logistic regression. Results Children born to single mothers and children conceived using ART had significantly more outpatient visits for specialist care and significantly more diagnoses compared to children with married/cohabiting mothers, and spontaneously conceived children. Children born to mothers of advanced maternal age (>= 40) had fewer in- and outpatient visits. However, they were significantly more often diagnosed within ICD-chapters XVI, XVII i.e., they experienced more morbidity in the neonatal period. Conclusion The results indicate that children born to single mothers and children of ART-treated mothers have a higher morbidity and consume more specialist care than children of married/cohabiting and spontaneously pregnant mothers. We conclude that the use of ART, maternal single status and advanced maternal age are risk factors of importance to consider in pediatric care and when counseling women who are considering ART treatment.

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  • 12.
    Lampic, Claudia
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Johannes
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Leandersson, Pia
    Skane Univ Hosp Malmo, Sweden.
    Solensten, Nils-Gunnar
    IVF Clin Umea Collaborat Umea Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Thurin-Kjellberg, Ann
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Wånggren, Kjell
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    National survey of donor-conceived individuals who requested information about their sperm donor-experiences from 17 years of identity releases in Sweden2022In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 510-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY QUESTION What characterizes the group of donor-conceived (DC) individuals who request information about their identity-release sperm donor in Sweden, and what are their experiences of disclosure, information receipt and donor contact? SUMMARY ANSWER Following three decades of identity-release donation in Sweden, few DC individuals have requested donor information with varying experiences of information receipt and donor contact. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY In 1985, Sweden was the first country worldwide to enact legislation that gave DC individuals the right to obtain identifying information about their donor. Since then, identity-release gamete donation has become available in many countries but there is limited knowledge about the individuals who request donor information. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A nation-wide cross-sectional survey study was performed at all seven University hospitals that provided donation treatment in Sweden during 1985-2002. During this period only donor insemination to heterosexual couples was permitted. Inclusion criteria were being 18 years of age or older, conceived with donor sperm and having requested information about the donor by December 2020. Recruitment was performed during 2016-2020. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS A total of 60 individuals had requested information about their donor. Of these, 53 were approached and 40 individuals, representing 34 families, accepted study participation (75% response rate). Participants completed a postal survey with the WHO-10 well-being index and study-specific questions about experiences of disclosure, motivations for requesting donor information, receipt of information, as well as intentions and experiences of donor contact. Independent t-test and chi-square tests were used to compare ratings of participants with early and late disclosure. MAIN RESULTS AND ROLE OF CHANCE Of similar to 900 DC individuals who had reached adult age, a total of 60 (approximate to 7%) had requested information about the donor. Most of the 40 study participants (78%) made their requests within 2 years after reaching 18 years of age, or following disclosure at later ages (up to 32 years). Several participants had adult DC siblings in the family who had not requested any donor information. All except five participants received identifying information about the donor from the clinic. However, some donors had died or lacked contact information. Among those participants who were able to contact their donor, 41% had done so at the time of the study, while a third of the participants were unsure about potential contact. Several had met the donor in person and a few were in regular contact. About half of the participants had been informed about their donor conception in adolescence or adulthood (age 12-32), and there were significant differences between participants based on age at disclosure. Compared to those with early disclosure, participants with late disclosure were significantly more likely to be dissatisfied with the timing of their disclosure (P = 0.021), to react with negative emotions (P < 0.001), and to subsequently contact the donor (P = 0.047). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION The limited population available for inclusion resulted in a small sample size, despite a high response rate. In addition, mens lower participation rate must be taken into consideration when interpreting the results. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS The small number of individuals requesting information about their identity-release sperm donor is surprising. While not all DC individuals appear to be interested in donor information, it is reasonable to assume that some are unaware of their donor conception and thus unable to make informed decisions regarding their genetic origins. During the coming years, young women and men in many countries will become eligible to access identifying information about their donor. In order to meet the needs of these individuals, and to support positive outcomes for all involved parties, it is essential that adequate protocols and resources are developed.

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  • 13.
    Martinez-Serrano, Cristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prenatal stress, anxiety and depression alter transcripts, proteins and pathways associated with immune responses at the maternal-fetal interface2022In: Biology of Reproduction, ISSN 0006-3363, E-ISSN 1529-7268, Vol. 106, no 3, p. 449-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During pregnancy, the immune system is modified to allow developmental tolerance of the semi-allogeneic fetus and placenta to term. Pregnant women suffering from stress, anxiety, and depression show dysfunctions of their immune system that may be responsible for fetal and/or newborn disorders, provided that placental gene regulation is compromised. The present study explored the effects of maternal chronic self-perceived stress, anxiety, and depression during pregnancy on the expression of immune-related genes and pathways in term placenta. Pregnancies were clinically monitored with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). A cutoff threshold for BAI/EPDS of 10 divided patients into two groups: Index group (>10, n = 11) and a Control group (<10, n = 11), whose placentae were sampled at delivery. The placental samples were subjected to RNA-Sequencing, demonstrating that stress, anxiety, and depression during pregnancy induced a major downregulation of placental transcripts related to immune processes such as T-cell regulation, interleukin and cytokine signaling, or innate immune responses. Expression differences of main immune-related genes, such as CD46, CD15, CD8 alpha & beta ILR7 alpha, and CCR4 among others, were found in the Index group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the key immune-like pathway involved in humoral and cellular immunity named "Primary immunodeficiency" was significantly downregulated in the Index group compared with Controls. Our results show that mechanisms ruling immune system functions are compromised at the maternal-fetal interface following self-perceived depressive symptoms and anxiety during pregnancy. These findings may help unveil mechanisms ruling the impact of maternal psychiatric symptoms and lead to new prevention/intervention strategies in complicated pregnancies. Summary Sentence Mechanisms ruling immune system functions are compromised at the maternal-fetal interface following self-perceived depressive symptoms and anxiety during pregnancy.

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  • 14.
    Widbom, Andreas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst Stockholm, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Psychological adjustment in disclosing and non-disclosing heterosexual-couple families following conception with oocytes or spermatozoa from identity-release donors2022In: Reproductive BioMedicine Online, ISSN 1472-6483, E-ISSN 1472-6491, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1046-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research question: Is there a relationship between disclosure and psychological adjustment in heterosexual-couple families following oocyte donation and sperm donation when the child is 7 years old? Design: This was a cross-sectional study of heterosexual couples with 7-to 8-year-old children conceived with identity-release oocyte donation (n = 83, response rate 56%) or sperm donation (n = 113, response rate 65%). Participants individually completed instruments for the assessment of parents emotional distress (HADS), parenting stress (SPSQ) and relationship quality (ENRICH), and their childs psychological adjustment (SDQ-Swe) and reported whether they had talked with their child about their donor conception.Results: About half of parents had talked with their child about their donor conception (oocyte donation 61%, sperm donation 58%). Separate analyses for mothers and fathers showed no main effects of disclosure or type of donation on the outcomes, nor were there any interaction effects. Overall, mothers and fathers in oocyte donation and sperm donation families were found to be well adjusted, reporting within-normal range levels of anxiety, depression and parental stress, and a high relationship quality. The children were well adjusted, with low levels of emotional and behavioural problems.Conclusions: Overall, the present results confirm previous research indicating that early disclosure of the donor conception to children is not associated with negative outcomes for parents or children. Heterosexual couples using oocyte or sperm donation should be informed that disclosure when the child is 7-8 years old is not detrimental to the psychological adjustment of families.

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  • 15.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala universitet.
    Psykiska komplikationer i samband med förlossningen2022In: Reproduktiv hälsa: barnmorskans kompetensområde / [ed] Helena Lindgren, Kyllike Christensson, Anna-Karin Dykes, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 2, Vol. Sidorna 875-881, p. 875-881Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Thorup, Emilia
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Same-sex mothers experiences of equal treatment, parenting stress and disclosure to offspring: a population-based study of parenthood following identity-release sperm donation2022In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 37, no 11, p. 2589-2598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY QUESTION What are the experiences of same-sex mothers following identity-release sperm donation regarding equal treatment in society, parenting stress and disclosure to child? SUMMARY ANSWER Mothers predominantly reported equal treatment in society, low levels of parenting stress and early disclosure of the donor conception to the child, and half of the couples had also informed the child of his/her right to obtain the donors identity. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The number of two-mother families is increasing, and previous studies have reported about challenges related to heteronormativity, discrimination and the status of the non-birth mother. Same-sex mothers have been found to disclose the childs donor conception earlier than different-sex parents, but little is known regarding disclosure of the childs right to obtain identifying information about the donor. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The present study concerns the fourth wave of data collection of a nation-wide longitudinal study. A total of 143 same-sex mothers (73% response rate) following identity-release sperm donation completed individual surveys when their donor-conceived child had reached age 7. These women represent a total of 82 couples who had undergone sperm donation treatment. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS The study is part of the longitudinal Swedish Study on Gamete Donation (SSGD). Couples accepted for gamete donation treatment at seven Swedish University hospitals were recruited between 2005 and 2008 and were requested to complete postal surveys during four waves of data collection. The present study sample includes same-sex mothers who completed a survey when their donor-conceived child had reached 7 years of age. Data were collected with the Swedish Parenting Stress Questionnaire (SPSQ), and study-specific items on experiences of treatment in society and disclosure behavior. Group comparisons (birth mothers vs non-birth mothers) were conducted using Chi(2)-tests, independent t-tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests, and written comments provided for open-response items were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND ROLE OF CHANCE The mothers were generally open about the childs donor conception and the large majority (>80%) reported being treated positively and in the same way as other parents. However, satisfaction with treatment in health care settings was significantly lower than that reported in contacts with the childs school and recreational activities (P < 0.001) and open-response comments indicate that this may be related predominantly to heteronormative language and assumptions. Birth mothers and non-birth mothers reported similar treatment in society and similar levels of parenting stress. All but one couple had already talked with their 7-year-old child about his/her conception with donor sperm. Half of the couples had also informed the child about his/her opportunity to obtain identifying information about the donor, and remaining couples planned later disclosure. Childrens reactions were generally described as neutral, positive or characterized by interest and curiosity. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION The present study was performed within the context of the Swedish legislation on identity-release donation, which limits the generalizability to same-sex couples using anonymous or known sperm donors. Although no evidence of attrition bias was found, it is possible that those couples who initially declined participation in the SSGD (23%) or dropped out at the fourth wave of data collection (27%) differ from the study sample in terms of variables that we were unable to control for. WIDER IMPLICATION OF THE FINDINGS The present finding that most same-sex mothers in a population-based sample experience equal treatment in society is encouraging and validates previous results from predominantly qualitative studies. Nevertheless, the fact that a subgroup experiences discrimination and less favorable treatment indicates that further action is needed, particularly in child health care settings. The present study is the first to report on the timing of parents disclosure of the childs right to identifying donor information and suggests that disclosure during preschool ages is feasible and does not appear to be related to negative consequences. In view of the increased availability and use of identity-release donation, there is a pressing need to investigate parents intentions, behaviors and needs with regard to talking with their child about his/her opportunity to obtain the donors identity. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) Financial support from the Swedish Research Council (2013-2712) and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (2014-00876). There are no conflicts of interest to declare.

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  • 17.
    Tordon, Rikard
    et al.
    Childrens Welf Fdn, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanström, Jennie
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Svedin, Carl Goran
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Experienced support from family, school and friends among students in out-of-home care in a school-based community survey2021In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 191-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Youth in out-of-home care have elevated risks for adverse events and detrimental circumstances possibly affecting their development. Responses from 311 students in out-of-home care (OHC) were compared with peers living in birth parent care (BPC) and in single birth parent care (sBPC) in a regional school survey, directed to students in compulsory school eighth year and upper secondary school second year. Results indicate OHC students to experience less satisfaction with friends, leisure time, and families. They state less trust in support from friends and families but a more similar level to teachers, counsellors or nurses. OHC students also express being more exposed to abusive experiences online and perceive less sense of security at home and in school. We conclude that welfare institutions need to recognize the components in building trust and safety for students in OHC and that school and other professional institutions have an important role in serve resilience and promote well-being for children in OHC.

  • 18.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Goran
    Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal temperament and character: associations to child behavior at the age of 3 years2021In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The influence of maternal temperament on child behavior, and whether maternal temperament impact boys and girls differently is not thoroughly studied. The aim was to investigate the impact of maternal temperament and character on child externalizing and internalizing problems at age 3. Methods A birth-cohort of 1723 mothers and their children were followed from birth to age 3. At the childs age of 3 months, the mothers filled out standardized instruments on their temperament and character using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) and depressive symptoms using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). At the childs age of 3 years, the mothers reported on child behavior using the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). Results Maternal temperamental trait novelty seeking was positively associated with externalizing problems in the total population and in girls. Harm avoidance was positively associated with externalizing problems in the total population and in boys, and with internalizing problems in the total population and boys and girls respectively. Maternal character traits of self-directedness and cooperativeness were negatively associated with both externalizing and internalizing problems in the total population and in boys and girls respectively. Conclusions Maternal character traits were more influential on child behavior than were temperamental traits, and thus the opportunities for intervention targeted at parental support are good. Maternal mental health and socioeconomic aspects also increased the risk for child behavior problems, indicating the need for recognition and support in clinical settings.

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  • 19.
    Liffner, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Men born small for gestational age or with low birth weight do not improve their rate of reproduction over time: a Swedish population-based study2021In: Fertility and Sterility, ISSN 0015-0282, E-ISSN 1556-5653, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 721-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether the reduced reproductive rate among men born small for gestational age (SGA) or with low birth weight (LBW) is present after up to 44 years of follow-up. Design: Population-based register study. Setting: National registers in Sweden. Patient(s): All men born in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 (n = 1,045,167) followed up to 2018. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Registered fatherhood, infertility diagnoses, and fertility treatments obtained from registers up to 2018 Result(s): Men born SGA or with LBW have a lower chance of becoming fathers than men born with normal birth characteristics: hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 0.91 (0.90-0.92) and 0.88 (0.86-0.90), respectively. The reduction in reproductive rate is more evident after a longer follow-up time. Men born SGA were more likely to receive a diagnosis of infertility. Sperm donation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection were more often used in men born SGA, further strengthening the hypothesis of an association between birth characteristics and male infertility. Conclusion(s): Men born SGA or with LBW have a lower chance of becoming fathers, but the reduction in fertility is smaller for the younger cohort. Further studies are needed to determine if this difference is maintained. (C) 2021 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

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  • 20.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Mohammed, Hussein
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Agnes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Mental disorders and risk factors among pregnant women with depressive symptoms in Sweden: A case-control study2021In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 100, no 6, p. 1068-1074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Identification of pregnant women suffering from depression or other mental disorders is a challenge for antenatal caregivers. The purpose of this case-control study was to describe mental disorders and the risk factors for mental disorders in women with depressive symptoms assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale during the first trimester and to compare them with pregnant women without depressive symptoms. Material and methods In total, 2271 women answered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at the first antenatal visit with a midwife. An Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score of 13 or higher was considered to be screen-positive and these women were further assessed. Screen-negative pregnant women, matched for age and parity, were chosen as controls. Results In total, 149 (6.6%) women were found to be screen-positive. The majority (126, 85%) had at least one mental disorder or risk factor for mental disorder, such as depression (36.0%), anxiety (14.8%), or severe fear of childbirth (20.8%). The screen-positive women were more often smokers (16.1% vs 1.3%), unemployed (19.9% vs 1.3%), or on sick leave (25.3% vs 14.1%) during pregnancy and more often used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor during pregnancy (14.2% vs 2.7%) compared with the screen-negative women (P<.001). Among the screen-negative women (n = 150) only three (2%) presented with symptoms of depression during pregnancy. Conclusions The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale seems to be a valuable screening tool to detect depressive symptoms as well as other mental disorders during early pregnancy.

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  • 21.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Barmark, Mimmi
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Mental health and academic performance: a study on selection and causation effects from childhood to early adulthood2021In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 857-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    An inverse relationship between mental health problems and academic achievement is a well-known phenomenon in the scientific literature. However, how and when this association develops is not fully understood and there is a lack of longitudinal, population-based studies on young children. Early intervention is important if associations are to be found already during childhood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the development of the association between mental health and academic performance during different developmental periods of childhood and adolescence.

    Methods

    Data from a longitudinal birth cohort study of 1700 children were used. Child mental health was assessed through mother’s reports at age 3, and self-reports at age 12 and 20. Academic performance was assessed through teacher reports on educational results at age 12 and final grades from compulsory school (age 15–16) and upper secondary school (age 18–19). The association between mental health and academic performance was assessed through regression models.

    Results

    The results indicate that social selection mechanisms are present in all three periods studied. Behavioral and emotional problems at age 3 were associated with performing below grade at age 12. Similarly, mental health problems at age 12 were associated with lack of complete final grades from compulsory school and non-eligibility to higher education. Academic performance at ages 15 and 19 did not increase the risk for mental health problems at age 20.

    Conclusion

    Mental health problems in early childhood and adolescence increase the risk for poor academic performance, indicating the need for awareness and treatment to provide fair opportunities to education.

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  • 22.
    Marteinsdottir, I
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Parity-related variation in cortisol concentrations in hair during pregnancy2021In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 128, no 4, p. 637-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) monthly in pregnant women and to explore the effect of parity. Design Prospective cohort study from gestational week (GW) 26, at childbirth and postpartum. Setting An antenatal care clinic in southeast Sweden. Sample 390 pregnant women. Methods Cortisol was measured using radioimmunoassay in methanol extracts of ground hair samples. Main outcome measures Hair cortisol concentrations. Results Both primi- and multiparae exhibited an increase in HCC throughout pregnancy. Primiparae had significantly higher HCC in the latter part of the last trimester compared with multiparae (1 month P = 0.003, 2 months P = 0.038). The use of psychotropic medication in the first trimester correlated to HCC postpartum (P < 0.001). HCC in GW 14-17 was associated with HCC in GW 18-21 (primiparae and multiparae, P < 0.001), GW 22-25 (primiparae P = 0.036, multiparae P = 0.033), and 2 months postpartum (primiparae P = 0.049). HCC in GW 18-21 was associated with GW 22-25 in both primiparae (P < 0.001) and multiparae (P < 0.001) as well as 2 months prior to childbirth among primiparae (<0.037). In general, all estimates of HCC in pregnancy and postpartum showed a significant association between HCC for a specific month and the HCC in the previous month (all P < 0.001), except for the association of HCC among primiparae in GW 22-25 and 3 months prior to childbirth. Conclusions Increased cortisol concentrations in hair were observed during pregnancy, which decreased 3 months prior to childbirth in multiparae. The results indicate a quicker suppression of the hypothalamic CRH (corticotropin-releasing hormone) production by placenta CRH in multiparous women.

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  • 23.
    Widbom, Andreas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Stina
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Sodra Alvsborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Positioning the donor in a new landscape - mothers and fathers experiences as their adult children obtained information about the identity-release sperm donor2021In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 2181-2188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY QUESTION: How do heterosexual parents experience identity-release donation when adult children have obtained information about their sperm donor? SUMMARY ANSWER: Adult offsprings receipt of identifying information about the sperm donor challenged the fathers role as a parent, which was reflected in how parents positioned the donor in relation to the family. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: An increasing number of countries provide access to treatment with identity-release or open-identity donors. However, there is limited knowledge about how parents experience and manage the situation when adult offspring obtain identifying information about the donor and may even establish contact with him. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This qualitative interview study included 23 parents whose offspring had obtained information about their sperm donor. Interviews were conducted from October 2018 to January 2019. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: A purposive sample of parents (15 mothers and 8 fathers) was recruited via adult offspring, who had requested identifying donor information at five Swedish University hospitals. All participating parents were part of a heterosexual couple who had conceived with sperm from an identity-release donor. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to face or via telephone, and transcribed audio recordings were analyzed using reflexive thematic analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The parents expressed diverse experiences related to their parenthood and the presence of the donor after offspring had obtained information about him; these were described in two themes. The theme Navigating (in)visible markers of parenthood describes parenthood as embedded with dichotomous meanings of nature and nurture that parents navigated in relation to social approval. The theme Positioning the donor in a new landscape describes how parents managed the presence of the donor by positioning him at a distance or acknowledging him as a person or even as part of the family, while some struggled to position him, giving rise to ambivalent feelings. The absence of genetic connectedness challenged the fathers role as parent, which was reflected in parents positioning of the donor. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The study was performed within the context of the Swedish legislation on identity-release donation and is based on experiences of heterosexual couples who had used sperm donation and had informed their offspring about their donor conception. This, together with the fact that parents accounts were predominantly represented by mothers, must be taken into consideration regarding transferability to other populations. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Negotiations of social and genetic parenthood are still present among parents many years after treatment and may resurface when adult offspring obtain the donors identity. Access of the adult offspring to identifying information about the donor may have unexpected consequences for family relations, including expanding the family to include the donor. Challenges related to male infertility and family dynamics indicate that parents should have access to counseling and support to manage family life with varying genetic linkage within and outside the family unit.

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  • 24.
    Kassymova, Gulnara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The Effect of Follow-Up Contact on Recovery After Benign Hysterectomy: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Four-Arm, Controlled Multicenter Trial2021In: Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1540-9996, E-ISSN 1931-843X, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 872-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The objective of this trial was to analyze the effect of follow-up programs using standard follow-up protocol and structured coaching on recovery after hysterectomy in an enhanced recovery after surgery setting. Materials and Methods: A randomized, four-armed, single-blinded, controlled multicenter trial comprising 487 women was conducted at five hospitals in the southeast region of Sweden. The women were allocated (1:1:1:1) to Group A: no planned follow-up contact; Group B: a single, planned, structured, broadly kept, follow-up telephone contact with the research nurse the day after discharge; Group C: planned, structured, broadly kept follow-up telephone contact with the research nurse the day after discharge and then once weekly for 6 weeks; and Group D: as Group C, but with planned, structured, coaching telephone contact. Recovery was assessed by the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires EuroQoL-5 Dimension with three levels (EQ-5D-3L) and Short-Form-Health Survey with 36 items (SF-36) and duration of sick leave. Results: Neither the recovery of HRQoL as measured by the EQ-5D-3L and the SF-36 nor the duration of sick leave (mean 26.8-28.1 days) differed significantly between the four intervention groups. Irrespective of mode of follow-up contact used, the women had recovered to their baseline EQ-5D-3L health index 4 weeks after surgery. The occurrence of unplanned telephone contact was significantly lower (by nearly 30%) in the women who had structured coaching. Conclusion: Follow-up contact, including coaching, did not seem to expedite the postoperative recovery in HRQoL or reduce the sick leave after hysterectomy, but the coaching seemed to reduce unplanned telephone contact with the health care services. ClinicalTrial.gov (NCT01526668).

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  • 25.
    Wolgast, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The impact of major depressive disorder and antidepressant medication before and during pregnancy on obstetric and neonatal outcomes: A nationwide population-based study2021In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 257, p. 42-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the impact of major depressive disorder (MDD) and antidepressant medication before and during pregnancy on obstetric and neonatal outcomes. Study design: A national register-based cohort study of pregnant women born in Sweden, and their first child born in 2012-2015 (n = 262 329). Women diagnosed with MDD and who had redeemed an antidepressant one year before becoming pregnant ("before pregnancy") and women who were diagnosed with MDD and who had redeemed an antidepressant both before and during pregnancy ("before and during pregnancy") were compared with each other and with women who had neither been diagnosed with MDD nor been prescribed antidepressants (population controls). Results: In comparison to population controls, the "before pregnancy" and the "before and during pregnancy" groups had increased likelihoods of operative childbirth (aOR = 1.19, 95 % CI 1.12-1.27, aOR = 1.38, 95 % CI 1.28-1.48 respectively), and with an increased likelihood for the child being admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (aOR = 1.51, 95 % CI 1.17-1.95, aOR = 1.55, 95 % CI 1.14-2.11). Children born to mothers in the "before and during pregnancy" group had an increased likelihood of preterm birth (aOR = 1.72, 95 % CI 1.52-1.95,), while children to mothers in the "before pregnancy" group had an increased likelihood of low birthweight (aOR = 1.15, 95 % CI 1.00-1.33) compared to population controls. Women in the "before and during pregnancy" group had an increased likelihood for hyperemesis during pregnancy (aOR =1.93, 95 % CI = 1.60-2.32), having an operative childbirth (aOR =1.17, 95 % CI = 1.06-1.29) or a preterm birth (aOR = 1.53, 95 % CI = 1.28-1.81) compared to the "before pregnancy" group. Conclusions: Women with MDD and antidepressant medication prior to becoming pregnant are at increased risk for adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes compared to women without an MDD. Continuation of antidepressant medication during pregnancy somewhat increased the risk for adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes. (C) 2020 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 26.
    Lampic, Claudia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sorjonen, Kimmo
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Understanding parents intention to disclose the donor conception to their child by application of the theory of planned behaviour2021In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 395-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY QUESTION: Does the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) contribute to understanding parents intention to share information about genetic origin with their donor-conceived child? SUMMARY ANSWER: Parents intention to start disclosure was associated with beliefs that disclosure would have desired consequences and a desire to act in accordance to societal norms. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Despite a growing consensus on donor-conceived offsprings right to information about their genetic origin, disclosure to the child remains a challenge for many parents, particularly heterosexual couples. TPB has successfully been applied to many health-related contexts and may contribute to increase understanding of parents decision-making about disclosing the genetic origin to their children. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A cross-sectional survey study of heterosexual couples with children aged 7-8 years following identity-release oocyte donation (OD, n = 83) or sperm donation (SD, n = 113). PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: The study is part of the prospective longitudinal Swedish Study on Gamete Donation. Couples accepted for oocyte or sperm donation treatment at seven fertility clinics were recruited in 2005-2008 and requested to complete four postal surveys in the following 10 years. The present study sample includes heterosexual couples with donor-conceived children aged 7-8 years. Data were collected with the study-specific TPB Disclosure Questionnaire and analysed with path analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: More than half of parents following OD or SD had already disclosed the donor conception to their child (OD 61%, SD 58%). Among parents who had not yet started the disclosure process, the belief that disclosure would have desired consequences (P < 0.05) and a desire to act in accordance to social norms favouring disclosure (P < 0.01) were positively associated with their intention to talk with their child about the donor conception during the upcoming year. In contrast, perceived confidence to talk with the child about his/her genetic origin was found to be negatively associated with the intention to start the disclosure process (P < 0.05). Type of treatment (OD/SD) and the existence or absence of a genetic link to the child were not directly associated with parents disclosure intentions. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The study was performed with heterosexual couples within the context of the Swedish legislation on identity-release donation, which limits the generalizability to other populations. Also, attrition may have introduced selection bias to the study findings. Future studies using the TPB Disclosure Questionnaire (TPB-DQ) with larger samples are needed to validate this measure. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Application of the theory of planned behaviour highlighted the importance of attitudes and social norms for parents intention to share information about the donor conception with their child. The present results add to the complexity of disclosure of donor conception, and may contribute to promote open communication and support family life following donor conception.

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  • 27.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Leandersson, Pia
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lind, Judith
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Access to infertility evaluation and treatment in two public fertility clinics and the reasons for withholding it: a prospective survey cohort study of healthcare professionals2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 12, article id e041538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Study the proportion of patients affected by involuntary childlessness who are denied fertility treatment and the reasons behind this in a publicly funded healthcare system. Design Survey study using prospectively collected information by healthcare professionals. Setting Two university-affiliated fertility clinics in Sweden. Participants Single women and couples in heterosexual and homosexual relationships seeking fertility evaluation and treatment between November 2017 and April 2018 (943 individual cases). Primary and secondary outcome measures Number and proportion of individuals who were either denied, delayed or granted fertility treatment directly. Furthermore, the reasons behind delaying or completely withholding treatment. Results The majority of those seeking evaluation were heterosexual couples (75%), while 14% were single women and 7.5% were same-sex couples. The great majority of those undergoing evaluation were granted treatment either directly (85%) or after in-depth evaluation (7.5%), while 7.5% were denied treatment. Among those who were denied treatment, there were a greater proportion of single women and couples seeking treatment with donated gametes. Among heterosexual couples, gamete origin was not associated with treatment refusal. Although age did not differ between those granted and denied treatment, a higher body mass index (in both recipient and partner, when applicable) was observed among those being refused treatment. Fertility specialists in Sweden focused their assessment on parental factors that may indirectly entail a risk of harm to the future child, such as medical and psychiatric conditions of the individuals involved, their financial constraints and other social reasons, substance abuse and female obesity. Conclusion Being single or receiving treatment with donated gametes can both be reasons for withholding fertility treatment. Although difficult to operationalise, parenting assessment in Sweden is employed interchangeably in treatments with donated gametes (legally mandated assessment) and even autologous gametes (non-legally mandated assessment)-making evident a need for clear official policy guidelines regulating these assessments and the provision of treatment.

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  • 28.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Department of Womens and Childrens Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Department of Womens and Childrens Health, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Elenis, Evangelia
    Department of Womens and Childrens Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Attitudes among paediatric healthcare professionals in Sweden towards sperm donation to single women: a survey study2020In: Fertility research and practice, ISSN 2054-7099, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of families conceived through sperm donation to single women is increasing. However, there is limited knowledge about health care professionals attitudes towards solo-mothers by choice, and there is some indication that professionals personal opinions influence their care of individuals who use alternate ways to build a family. The primary aim of the study was to investigate attitudes towards, and experiences of, families following sperm donation to single women among healthcare professionals working in primary child healthcare.

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  • 29.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rindeborn, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Being born preterm or with low weight implies a risk of infertility and premature loss of ovarian function; a national register study2020In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 125, no 3, p. 235-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Being born with non-optimal birth characteristics has several long-term consequences on health in general but also for the individuals reproductive pattern. In premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) the follicles are depleted or dysfunctional. This results in menopause before the age of 40, and for most of the affected women, it causes infertility. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential effects of being born with non-optimal birth characteristics on the risk of developing POI. Methods:This population-based cohort register study included all women born in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 who were followed until the end of 2012 (age at the end of follow-up ranged between 39 and 59). Women diagnosed with POI were compared with women without this diagnosis with respect to being born small for gestational age, preterm, or with low birth weight. Data on birth characteristics and diagnosis of POI were collected from national registers. Results:A total of 1,033,878 women were included. Being born small for gestational age was associated with a slightly increased odds ratio of POI with 10%. Preterm birth and low birth weight were associated with somewhat increased ORs of POI after exclusion of those born small for gestational age. Similarly, being born preterm or with a low birth weight was also found to be associated with POI to the same extent. Conclusions:Being born with non-optimal birth characteristics may increase the risk of premature ovarian insufficiency.

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  • 30.
    Liffner, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Birth characteristics in men with infertility2020In: Reproductive BioMedicine Online, ISSN 1472-6483, E-ISSN 1472-6491, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 455-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research question: Are low birth weight, prematurity, being born small for gestational age, or both, associated with a higher risk of male factor infertility in adulthood? Design: Retrospective study of a clinical sample of 892 men, diagnosed with an infertility factor (male, female, combined or unexplained) together with their female partner at a University Hospital clinic in Sweden between 2005 and 2010. Data on birth weight and gestational age at birth were retrieved from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. The distribution of non-optimal birth characteristics in relation to infertility factor was described. A control group was created consisting of two men for each index man, born in Sweden in the same year as each index men, as well as a reference group consisting of all men born in Sweden the same years. Results: The likelihood of having been born small for gestational age was almost fivefold higher in men with male factor infertility than in men with unexplained infertility (OR 4.84, 95% CI 1.32 to 1780). Men with male factor infertility were more often born with non-optimal birth characteristics than the control group (14.8% versus 8.5%; P = 0.010) and the reference group (14.8% versus 11.4%; P < 0.001). Men with azoospermia were more often born with non-optimal birth characteristics, compared with men without azoospermia (21.3% versus 12.1%; P = 0.038). Conclusions: The results suggest an association between intrauterine growth restriction and male factor infertility in adulthood.

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  • 31.
    Tordön, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Challenging intellectual, behavioral and educational prerequisites for interventions aimed at school aged children in foster care. A compilation of Swedish test results2020In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 108, article id 104598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children in foster care constitute a vulnerable group with higher risks for exposure to poorer health, adverse experiences during childhood and poor performance in school. School success is considered one of the most important factors to prevent future adversity and there is a growing interest in society for school results for children in foster care or other out-of-home care arrangements. The purpose of this study was to outline prerequisites for interventions aimed at school performance for children in foster care, related to those in normal population studies. In this study assessments of intelligence, literacy and numeracy skills, mental and behavioral conditions were compiled from 856 children in foster care, between preschool class and 7th grade from 22 Swedish municipalities. Results show lower scores in intelligence, most prominent in working memory, adaptive behavior, literacy and numeracy, and more behavioral problems. Ingroup comparisons showed less favorable scores for boys than girls in general, except in mathematics. These findings call for a need to adapt learning conditions in school by individual assessments of children in out-of-home care, rather than assuming age-typical prerequisites.

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  • 32.
    Martinez Serrano, Cristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Expression of Stress-Mediating Genes is Increased in Term Placentas of Women with Chronic Self-Perceived Anxiety and Depression2020In: Genes, ISSN 2073-4425, E-ISSN 2073-4425, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anxiety, chronical stress, and depression during pregnancy are considered to affect the offspring, presumably through placental dysregulation. We have studied the term placentae of pregnancies clinically monitored with the Becks Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). A cutoff threshold for BAI/EPDS of 10 classed patients into an Index group (>10,n= 23) and a Control group (<10,n= 23). Cortisol concentrations in hair (HCC) were periodically monitored throughout pregnancy and delivery. Expression differences of main glucocorticoid pathway genes, i.e., corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD11B2), glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), as well as other key stress biomarkers (Arginine Vasopressin, AVP and O-GlcNAc transferase, OGT) were explored in medial placentae using real-time qPCR and Western blotting. Moreover, gene expression changes were considered for their association with HCC, offspring, gender, and birthweight. A significant dysregulation of gene expression for CRH, AVP, and HSD11B2 genes was seen in the Index group, compared to controls, while OGT and NR3C1 expression remained similar between groups. Placental gene expression of the stress-modulating enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD11B2) was related to both hair cortisol levels (Rho = 0.54;p< 0.01) and the sex of the newborn in pregnancies perceived as stressful (Index,p< 0.05). Gene expression of CRH correlated with both AVP (Rho = 0.79;p< 0.001) and HSD11B2 (Rho = 0.45;p< 0.03), and also between AVP with both HSD11B2 (Rho = 0.6;p< 0.005) and NR3C1 (Rho = 0.56;p< 0.03) in the Control group but not in the Index group; suggesting a possible loss of interaction in the mechanisms of action of these genes under stress circumstances during pregnancy.

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  • 33.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    God prognos för unga vuxna med mycket låg födelsevikt [Follow-up study of very low birthweight children in Sweden at the age of 27-28]2020In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies show that very low birthweight can be an important risk factor for mental problems, disturbed fertility and neuroendocrine dysregulation. In a regional long-term study 56 of 86 adult individuals 27 to 28 years of age with a very low birthweight were compared with normal birthweight controls. Analyses of self-reported mental health, socio-demographic factors, sex hormone levels, and hair cortisol levels showed no significant differences between the groups. However, in order to analyse subgroups with different risk factors from the newborn period or children with a variety of social background factors, larger patient groups are needed.

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  • 34.
    Tordön, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Barnafrid.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Improved Intelligence, Literacy and Mathematic Skills Following School-Based Intervention for Children in Foster Care2020In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interventions aimed at improving school performance for children in foster care are few and are generally not implemented. By preventing failure in school, the prospect of reducing the risk for future poor health, substance abuse, unemployment, and other detrimental social conditions are met. This paper focuses on the change of preconditions for compulsory school performance in out-of-home care children, following an intervention called “Skolfam” that aims to improve school performance by individual assessments and school-based interventions. In this study, data were compiled from prospective repeated tests of 475 children in foster care in Sweden. Educational preconditions were analysed for compulsory school performance, such as intelligence (WISC-IV), psychosocial (SDQ) and adaptive behavior (ABAS-II), literacy (Reading Chains) and mathematical skills (Magne Mathematic Diagnoses) before and after the first 2 years of the “Skolfam” intervention. All tests were age-standardized and performed by experienced professionals. The results showed improved skills in complex aspects of literacy, mathematics, and cognitive performance, but no improvement in less complex literacy skills, adaptive behavior or mental health symptoms. In conclusion, higher-order cognitive functions can develop positively when appropriate school support is provided. Affective function, adaptive behavior, and psychosocial well-being present a more pervasive challenge for children in foster care. Implications for future research, practice in social services, and school is that further development of methods to aid future prospects for children in out-of-home care should aim to improve both cognitive higher-order executive-, and affective functions.

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  • 35.
    Lindell Pettersson, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanberg, Agneta Skoog
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Mothers who have given birth at an advanced age - health status before and after childbirth2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 9739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women postpone childbirth to an age when morbidity is higher and fertility has decreased and yet the knowledge of mothers morbidity related to age remains scarce. Swedish national register data from the Medical Birth Register and National Patient Register was used to investigate the incidence of diseases listed in the International Classification of Diseases, version 10 (ICD-10) in women who gave birth 2007-8. The index group consisted of women 40 years of age or older (n=8 203) were compared to a control group of women, younger than 40 years (n=15 569) at childbirth. The period studied was five years before childbirth to five years after. The main outcome measures were incidence of disease diagnosed in specialized hospital care. Demographical data and use of assisted reproduction (ART) were adjusted for. The results showed that older women were more likely to be single; less frequently used tobacco; were educated on a higher level; had a higher BMI and more often had used ART to become pregnant. The older women showed a higher morbidity rate. In the diagnostic groups: Neoplasms, Blood and immune system, Eye and adnexa, Ear and mastoid, Circulatory, Digestive, Skin and subcutaneous tissue, Musculoskeletal and connective tissue, and Genitourinary. The results add to the body of knowledge of a number of specific risks faced by older mothers and may be used to identify preventive actions concerning fertility and morbidity both before and after childbirth.

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  • 36.
    Andolf, E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Möller, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Prior placental bed disorders and later dementia: a retrospective Swedish register-based cohort study2020In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 127, no 9, p. 1090-1099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate the association between a history of placental bed disorders and later dementia. Design Retrospective population-based cohort study. Setting Sweden. Sample All women giving birth in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 (1 128 709). Methods Women with and without placental bed disorders (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy including pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, spontaneous preterm labour and birth, preterm premature rupture of membranes, abruptio placenta, late miscarriages) and other pregnancy complications were identified by means of the Swedish Medical Birth Register. International classification of disease was used. Data were linked to other National Registers. Participants were followed up until 2013. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios for women with and without pregnancy complications and were adjusted for possible confounders. Main outcome measures Diagnosis of vascular dementia and non-vascular dementia. Results Adjusted for cardiovascular disease and socio-demographic factors, an increased risk of vascular dementia was shown in women with previous pregnancy-induced hypertension (Hazard ratio [HR] 1.88, 95% CI 1.32-2.69), pre-eclampsia (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.23-2.16), spontaneous preterm labour and birth (HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.12-2.42) or preterm premature rupture of membranes (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.08-2.37). No statistically significant increased risk was seen for other pregnancy complications or non-vascular dementia even though many of the point estimates indicated increased risks. Conclusions Women with placental bed disorders have a higher risk for vascular disease. Mechanisms behind the abnormal placentation remain elusive, although maternal constitutional factors, abnormal implantation as well as impaired angiogenesis have been suggested. Tweetable abstract Placental bed syndromes associated with vascular dementia even after adjusting for cardiovascular disease.

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  • 37.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Psychosocial aspects of identity-release gamete donation - perspectives of donors, recipients, and offspring2020In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 125, no 2, p. 175-182Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Donor conception creates families with varying genetic linkage between family members. This may have short-term as well as lifelong psychosocial consequences for all involved. Gamete donors have traditionally been anonymous to recipients and offspring, but there is a growing trend towards identity-release donor programmes that give offspring the right to obtain the donors identity. This review aims to provide an overview of the perspectives of donors and recipients and offspring involved in identity-release donation. The results show that both oocyte and sperm donors have primarily altruistic motives, and recipients, in particular lesbian and single women, are generally open about the donation to their offspring. The few existing studies on offspring perspectives indicate that those who are aware of their donor conception appear to be interested in contact with the donor, and most donors are open to such contact. Investigations of donors and recipients indicate a need for more counselling and support to manage family life with varying genetic linkage within and outside the family unit. This includes preparing for and managing future contact between the donor and his/her family and donor offspring and their family, as well as between donor siblings and their respective families.

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  • 38.
    Lindblad, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Johansson, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping.
    Risk factors during pregnancy and delivery for the development of Perthes disease, a nationwide Swedish study of 2.1 million individuals2020In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    To ascertain or disprove a correlation between suboptimal birth characteristics, breech position at delivery and development of Perthes’ disease.

    Methods

    Study material was collected from nationwide registers regarding diagnoses, birth statistics and delivery data. As study population were included children with a diagnosis code for Perthes’ disease who were alive and living in Sweden at age 13. Children with missing birth statistics were excluded. All children with no Perthes’ disease diagnosis were used as control group. Both single and multiple logistical regression analyses were used to calculate OR for the included characteristics.

    Results

    Children in breech position had a higher risk for developing Perthes’ disease. Children with Perthes’ disease had also a higher probability of having been born pre-term, very pre-term or post-term. Lower than normal birth weight and a lower Apgar-score were also associated with Perthes’ disease.

    Conclusions

    There is a correlation between breech birth and development of Perthes’ disease. There is also correlation to suboptimal birth characteristics. Despite our findings this should not be used for screening of Perthes’ disease as the percentage of children who actually develop it is very low. Also, as of yet there is no possibility to diagnose Perthes’ disease before the presence of skeletal changes. Our findings could be important in finding the cause of Perthes’ disease and therefore developing better diagnostics, treatment and prevention.

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  • 39.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum, Sweden.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Self-reported mental health and cortisol activity at 27-28 years of age in individuals born with very low birthweight2020In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 109, no 5, p. 948-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To assess mental health outcomes of very low birthweight (VLBW, <1500 g) subjects to adulthood and to examine salivary cortisol and hair cortisol levels and their relation to birth characteristics and mental health.

    Methods

    A Swedish regional cohort of 56 VLBW subjects and 55 full‐term controls were assessed at the ages 27‐28 with adult self‐reported scales and the mean of 2 days diurnal salivary cortisol and hair cortisol. The cohorts had been assessed at 15 years of age with youth self‐reported scales.

    Results

    There were no differences between the groups in youth self‐reported scales and adult self‐reported scores. The 24 participating VLBW girls scored lower on youth self‐reported scales externalising and total problem scores than the control girls. In adulthood, the 21 participating VLBW women had significantly higher morning concentrations of salivary cortisol than control women, P = .014. No significant associations were found between cortisol concentrations and adult self‐reported scales internalising, externalising and total scores.

    Conclusion

    Self‐reported mental health in VLBW subjects was comparable with normal birthweight controls indicating a satisfying transition from adolescence to adulthood. VLBW females had higher morning salivary cortisol concentrations, suggesting a gender difference. We found no correlations between cortisol and mental health.

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  • 40.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Adverse obstetric outcomes among female childhood and adolescent cancer survivors in Sweden: A population-based matched cohort study2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 12, p. 1603-1611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Cancer treatment during childhood may lead to late adverse effects, such as reduced musculoskeletal development or vascular, endocrine and pulmonary dysfunction, which in turn may have an adverse effect on later pregnancy and childbirth. The aim of the present study was to investigate pregnancy and obstetric outcomes as well as the offsprings health among childhood and adolescent female cancer survivors. Material and methods This register-based study included all women born between 1973 and 1977 diagnosed with cancer in childhood or adolescence (age amp;lt;21), as well as an age-matched comparison group. A total of 278 female cancer survivors with their first childbirth were included in the study, together with 829 age-matched individuals from the general population. Logistic regression and analysis of variance were used to investigate associations between having been treated for cancer and the outcome variables, adjusting for maternal age, nicotine use and comorbidity. Results Survivors were more likely to have preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.58 to 7.56), undergo induction of labor (aOR 1.66, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.62), suffer labor dystocia (primary labor dystocia aOR 3.54, 95% CI 1.51 to 8.34 and secondary labor dystocia aOR 2.43, 95% CI 1.37 to 4.31), malpresentation of fetus (aOR 2.02, 95% CI 1.12 to 3.65) and imminent fetal asphyxia (aOR 2.55, 95% CI 1.49 to 4.39). In addition, deliveries among survivors were more likely to end with vacuum extraction (aOR 2.53, 95% CI 1.44 to 4.47), with higher risk of clitoral lacerations (aOR 2.18, 95% CI 1.47 to 3.23) and anal sphincter injury (aOR 2.76, 95% CI 1.14 to 6.70) and emergency cesarean section (aOR 2.34 95% CI 1.39 to 3.95). Survivors used pain-reliving methods to a higher extent compared with the comparison group. There was no increased risk of neonate diagnoses and malformations. The results showed that survivors who had been diagnosed with cancer when they were younger than 14 had an increased risk of adverse obstetric outcomes. Conclusions The study demonstrates increased risk of pregnancy and childbirth complications among childhood and adolescent cancer survivors. There is a need to optimize perinatal care, especially among survivors who were younger than 14 at time of diagnosis.

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  • 41.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Attitudes towards embryo donation among healthcare professionals working in child healthcare: a survey study2019In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 19, article id 209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate attitudes towards embryo donation and embryo donation families among professionals working in primary child healthcare, and their experiences of these families.MethodsA cross-sectional online survey was conducted in Sweden between April and November 2016. A total of 712 primary healthcare physicians, registered nurses and psychologists were approached to participate in this study. The study-specific questionnaire measured attitudes and experiences in the following four domains: legalisation and financing, the family and the childs health, clinical experience of meeting families following embryo donation, and knowledge of embryo donation.ResultsOf the 189 women and 18 men who completed the questionnaire (response rate 29%), relatively few (13%) had clinical experience of caring for families following embryo donation. Overall, 69% supported legalisation of embryo donation for infertile couples, and 54% agreed it should be publicly funded. The majority (88%) agreed the child should have the right to know the donors identity. Respondents did not believe that children conceived through embryo donation are as healthy as other children (50%), citing the risks of poor mental health (17%) and social stigmatization (18%). Approximately half reported low confidence in their own knowledge of embryo donation (47%) and wanted to know more (58%).ConclusionsThese results indicate relatively large support among healthcare professionals in Sweden for the legalisation of embryo donation. In order to provide adequate healthcare to families following embryo donation, there is a need to develop educational resources to increase knowledge about the medical and psychosocial consequences of embryo donation among healthcare professionals working in primary healthcare.

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  • 42.
    Tordön, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Fredlund, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Jonsson, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Pribe, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Background, experience of abuse, and mental health among adolescents in out-of-home care: a cross-sectional study of a Swedish high school national sample2019In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To compare experiences for adverse events, especially sexual abuse, and mental health in a group of high school students in out-of-home care with a representative sample of peers of the same age and similar educational attainment living with their parents.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A sample of 5839 students in the third year of Swedish high school, corresponding to a response rate of 59.7%, answered a study specific questionnaire. Data from 41 students living in out-of-home care were compared with data from peers not in out-of-home care in a cross-sectional analyze.

    RESULTS: Students in out-of-home care had more often an immigrant background and a non-heterosexual orientation, had more often experienced physical and penetrative sexual abuse, and more often sought healthcare for mental problems. Disclosure of sexual abuse was less common, and acts of persuasion or adults' use of their social position was more common among students in out-of-home care.

    CONCLUSIONS: Even where the protective factor 'senior educational attainment' is present, risks for abuse and poor mental health are evident for adolescents in out-of-home care. Disclosure of adversity, when it has occurred, ought to be higher among these adolescents with regular contact with social services, but our findings indicate tendencies for the opposite. We therefore suggest routines to be established to screen for adverse life events and mental health actively, along with general and systematic assessments of adversity and mental health during care.

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  • 43.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Cross-border surrogacy: Experiences of heterosexual and gay parents in Sweden2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 68-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Surrogacy is a controversial method of assisted reproduction that is not permitted in many countries. While there is some evidence that families following surrogacy seem to fare well, there is limited knowledge about the experiences of parents who turn to cross-border surrogacy. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the experiences of heterosexual parents and gay fathers who chose cross-border surrogacy to have a child. Material and methods This cross-sectional survey describes the experiences of 30 families (18 heterosexual parent and 12 gay father families). Participants were recruited through a website for a Swedish surrogacy interest group. The participants were requested individually to complete a postal questionnaire including study-specific questions on their experiences of disclosure and the Swedish Parenting Stress Questionnaire. Results All couples but one were still living together and had a child (3 months to 5 years). Parenting stress levels were generally low and were not related to sexual orientation. While almost all parents were open about the childs mode of conception in contacts with health care, gay fathers were significantly more open about using surrogacy in contacts with preschool (P = 0.004) and child recreational activities (P = 0.005) compared with heterosexual parents. A majority described being treated positively or "as any other parent" in these contexts. Conclusions Heterosexual and gay parents reported low levels of parenting stress and generally experienced positive or neutral reactions to their parenthood in contacts with healthcare providers, in preschool, and in the childs recreational activities.

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  • 44.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindell Pettersson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nedstrand, Elizabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Evaluation of risk factors’ importance on adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes in women aged 40 years or older2019In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, article id 92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Women of advanced age (40 years or older) are generally, at risk for pregnancy and delivery related problems. In addition, there is limited knowledge on being of advanced age and having been given Assisted Reproductive Treatment (ART) and its association with negative obstetric outcomes. Therefore, data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register was used to investigate pregnancy and neonatal outcomes for women aged 40 or more who had given birth. The secondary aim was to compare the obstetric outcomes of women who had used ART and women who had not undergoneART while adjusting for marital status across the age groups.

    Method

    Women of advanced age who had given birth in Sweden during 2007–2012 formed the index group, n = 37,558; a reference group of women comprised 71,472 women under the age of 40. An additional subgroup of women aged 45 or older when giving birth was also formed, n = 2229. The obstetric and neonatal data for all the women was derived from national register data.

    Results

    Women of advanced age were more often single, had undergone ART, and more often experienced adverse obstetric outcomes than did younger women. The neonate’s health was also more often adversely affected expressed as being born with low birth weight and Small for Gestational Age (SGA), having lower Apgar scores, and having more health problems during the first week compared to the reference group.

    Conclusions

    Women who are approaching the upper limit of fecundity are at greater risk for having children who are preterm and SGA. The adverse effects of being preterm and SGA may have negative long-term effects, not only on the children but also on the mothers. This needs to be addressed more frequently in a clinical setting when advising women of all ages on pregnancy and ART treatment.

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  • 45.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vikström, Josefin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken inkl beroendekliniken.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Major depressive disorder in women and risk for future generations: population-based three-generation study2019In: BJPsych Open, E-ISSN 2056-4724, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The well-known adverse consequences of maternal depression prompts consideration of the importance of learning more about intergenerational transmission in order to identify individuals at risk of developing depressive disorders. Aims To follow two generations of women with major depressive disorder (MDD) and to examine the risk of MDD in the third-generation children. Method A register-based, retrospective cohort study of all women born in Sweden between 1973 and 1982 who had given birth during the study period, their mothers and their children. All generations were followed until 2013. Data was stratified into two cohorts: women born between 1973 and 1977 and those born between 1978 and 1982. Results Second-generation women were twice as likely to be diagnosed with MDD if their mothers had been diagnosed with MDD. If both previous generations had been diagnosed with depression the likelihood of the third-generation child being diagnosed with MDD was markedly increased (odds ratio (OR) = 5.07, 95% CI 4.06-6.34 and OR = 7.20, 95% CI 4.41-11.77 in cohort 1 and cohort 2, respectively). Conclusions There is a strong intergenerational impact in the transmission of MDD. The risk of MDD is especially high in individuals with MDD in both previous maternal generations.

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  • 46.
    Isaksson, Stina
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Södra Älvsborg Hospital, Department of Research, Borås, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Department of Womens and Childrens Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Department of Womens and Childrens Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Managing absence and presence of child-parent resemblance: a challenge for heterosexual couples following sperm donation2019In: Reproductive biomedicine and society online, ISSN 2405-6618, Vol. 8, p. 38-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative interview study sought to gather and better understand heterosexual parents experiences of managing resemblance and non-resemblance between child and parent in an identity-release donor programme. The study is part of the prospective longitudinal Swedish Study on Gamete Donation (SSGD), including all fertility clinics performing gamete donation in Sweden. A sample of participants in the SSGD, consisting of 30 heterosexual parents with children aged 7-8?years following identity-release sperm donation, participated in individual semi-structured interviews. This study concerns a secondary analysis of the interview data. The results show how donor-conceiving parents experience the presence and absence of child-parent resemblance, and how they navigate between the importance of genetic connectedness and of doing parenthood through social interactions. The analysis resulted in three categories: resemblance through nature or nurture, non-resemblance brings the donor to the front and feelings about and coping with resemblance talk. The first two categories deal with the intrapersonal aspects of physical and non-physical resemblance, while the last category includes aspects of resemblance in relation to persons outside the core family. The presence or absence of parent-child resemblance regarding both physical and non-physical characteristics appears to constitute a considerable challenge for heterosexual couples with school-aged children following sperm donation.

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  • 47.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Mental health in young mothers, single mothers and their children2019In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, article id 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parenthood is a life transition that can be especially demanding for vulnerable individuals. Young maternal age and maternal single status have been reported to increase the risk for adverse outcomes for both mother and child. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of young maternal age and maternal single status on maternal and child mental health and child development at age 3. Methods: A birth-cohort of 1723 mothers and their children were followed from birth to age 3. Sixty-one mothers (3.5%) were age 20 or younger, and 65 (4.0%) reported single status at childbirth. The mothers filled out standardized instruments and medical information was retrieved from the standardized clinical assessment of the children at Child Welfare Centers, (CWC). Results: Young maternal age was associated with symptoms of postpartum depression whereas single status was not. Young mothers were more prone to report internalizing and externalizing problems in their children, while there was no association between single status and child behavioral problems. No differences were seen on child development (CWC scores). School drop-out was, however, a more influential factor on depressive symptoms postpartum than maternal age. Conclusion: Young mothers are at increased risk for symptoms of postpartum depression which indicates the need for attention in pre- and postnatal health care programs. Single mothers and their children were not found to be at increased risk for adverse outcomes. The importance of schooling was demonstrated, indicating the need for societal support to encourage adolescents to remain in school.

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  • 48.
    Möller, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gunnervik, Christina
    Värnamo Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproduction, fear of childbirth and obstetric outcomes in women treated for fear of childbirth in their first pregnancy: A historical cohort2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 374-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction About 8% of the pregnant women in Sweden receive counseling for fear of childbirth (FOC) during pregnancy. Little is known about the long-term reproductive and obstetric outcomes after counseling for FOC: Therefore, the objective of this historical cohort study was to compare the long-term reproductive and obstetric outcomes in women treated for FOC in their first pregnancy to women without FOC. Material and methods All nulliparas consecutively referred for treatment of severe FOC between 2001 and 2007 (n = 608) were compared with all other nulliparas giving birth on the same day (n = 431). Women who were not fluent in Swedish, missing a postal address, had moved out of the area, given birth at another hospital or had a late spontaneous abortion were excluded (n = 555). A total of 235 women agreed to participate in the study, 63 (39%) women in the index group and 172 (53%) in the reference group. The women were contacted by letter in 2015, ie 7-14 years after first childbirth, and asked to permit access to their medical charts from pregnancies and childbirths and to fill out a study specific questionnaire. Based on data from the medical charts and questionnaire, the mode of delivery, birth experience, obstetric complications, FOC, counseling for FOC and number of childbirths were compared in the two groups. Results Women in the index group less often gave birth more than twice compared with the reference group (8.2% vs 22.0%, P = 0.012). We found no significant differences in complications during subsequent pregnancies and deliveries. Women in the index group more often gave birth by CS in their first (P = 0.002) and second childbirth (P = 0.001), more often had a less positive birth experience (index group NRS: median 6.0, interquartile range 6 vs reference group NRS: 7.0, interquartile range 5, P = 0.004) in their first delivery and more often received counseling for FOC (58.7% vs 12.5%, P amp;lt; 0.001) in subsequent pregnancies. Women in the index group more often experienced FOC (18% vs 5.3%, P = 0.001) 7-14 years after first childbirth. Conclusions FOC is not easily treated. Despite treatment and exposure to childbirth many women received treatment in their next pregnancy and still suffered from FOC 7-14 years after the first childbirth.

  • 49.
    Möller, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gunnervik, Christina
    Värnamo Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproduction, fear of childbirth and obstetric outcomes in women treated for fear of childbirth in their first pregnancy: A historical cohort2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 374-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction About 8% of the pregnant women in Sweden receive counseling for fear of childbirth (FOC) during pregnancy. Little is known about the long-term reproductive and obstetric outcomes after counseling for FOC: Therefore, the objective of this historical cohort study was to compare the long-term reproductive and obstetric outcomes in women treated for FOC in their first pregnancy to women without FOC. Material and methods All nulliparas consecutively referred for treatment of severe FOC between 2001 and 2007 (n = 608) were compared with all other nulliparas giving birth on the same day (n = 431). Women who were not fluent in Swedish, missing a postal address, had moved out of the area, given birth at another hospital or had a late spontaneous abortion were excluded (n = 555). A total of 235 women agreed to participate in the study, 63 (39%) women in the index group and 172 (53%) in the reference group. The women were contacted by letter in 2015, ie 7-14 years after first childbirth, and asked to permit access to their medical charts from pregnancies and childbirths and to fill out a study specific questionnaire. Based on data from the medical charts and questionnaire, the mode of delivery, birth experience, obstetric complications, FOC, counseling for FOC and number of childbirths were compared in the two groups. Results Women in the index group less often gave birth more than twice compared with the reference group (8.2% vs 22.0%, P = 0.012). We found no significant differences in complications during subsequent pregnancies and deliveries. Women in the index group more often gave birth by CS in their first (P = 0.002) and second childbirth (P = 0.001), more often had a less positive birth experience (index group NRS: median 6.0, interquartile range 6 vs reference group NRS: 7.0, interquartile range 5, P = 0.004) in their first delivery and more often received counseling for FOC (58.7% vs 12.5%, P amp;lt; 0.001) in subsequent pregnancies. Women in the index group more often experienced FOC (18% vs 5.3%, P = 0.001) 7-14 years after first childbirth. Conclusions FOC is not easily treated. Despite treatment and exposure to childbirth many women received treatment in their next pregnancy and still suffered from FOC 7-14 years after the first childbirth.

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  • 50.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Törnblom, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Nelson Follin, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Heal