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  • 1.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Facilitating the Movement of Knowledge in Occupational Health Services: Building and Aligning Relationships2023In: Science & Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2243-4690, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 43-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the establishment and maintenance of structures and relationships within interorganizational collaborations, specifically focusing on occupational health services in Sweden. It investigates how these collaborations are adjusted to existing structures to facilitate the movement of knowledge. The study draws attention to the gaps or seams (Vertesi, 2014) that arise when occupational health services providers and employers have different interests and objectives concerning occupational health and safety, and explores the continuous and often unnoticed relational work (Zelizer, 2012) undertaken by occupational health services providers to make their expertise and services relevant and appealing to customers and employers. This article contributes to the ongoing discussion on alignment work (Kruse, 2021, 2023) by highlighting its current limitations and underscoring the importance of relational work in creating the necessary conditions for moving knowledge.

  • 2.
    Kruse, Corinna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gleisner, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Introduction: Alignment Work for the Movement of Knowledge2023In: Science and Technology Studies, E-ISSN 2243-4690, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 3-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Kruse, Corinna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gleisner, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alignmentarbete: Det kontinuerliga arbetet för kunskapsförflyttning2021Book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kimmelman, Jonathan
    Studies for Translation, Research Ethics, and Medicine (STREAM), Biomedical Ethics Unit/Social Studies of Medicine, McGill University.
    How do researchers decide early clinical trials?2016In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Launch of clinical investigation represents a substantial escalation in commitment to a particular clinical translation trajectory; it also exposes human subjects to poorly understood interventions. Despite these high stakes, there is little to guide decision-makers on the scientific and ethical evaluation of early phase trials. In this article, we review policies and consensus statements on human protections, drug regulation, and research design surrounding trial launch, and conclude that decision-making is largely left to the discretion of research teams and sponsors. We then review what is currently understood about how research teams exercise this discretion, and close by laying out a research agenda for characterizing the way investigators, sponsors, and reviewers approach decision-making in early phase research.

  • 5.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Can Risks be Offset by the Prospect of Benefit in Trial Design?2015In: American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience, ISSN 2150-7759, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 61-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Grankvist, Hannah
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Making Doable Problems within Controversial Science: U.S. and Swedish Scientists’ Experience of Gene Transfer Research2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores how scientists within the controversial scientific field of gene  transfer make their research doable. Based on in-depth interviews with gene transfer scientists and key individuals from different regulatory agencies and advisory boards in Sweden and the U.S.A., the study focuses on how scientists describe and reason about how they handle the various problems that confront them as they work in a technically advanced and highly controversial field of research.

    Drawing upon Clarke and Fujimura’s concepts of situatedness and doability, Latour’s concepts of enrollment and translation, Strauss’concepts of articulation work and alignment as well as Gieryn’s concept of boundary-work, the study analyzes how doable problems are constructed within gene transfer, from basic science to clinical application on human subjects. Doable problems were constructed by enrolling allies on different levels, translating interests and creating alignment of interests and activities of the allies enrolled. The study covers how scientists handle questions of funding, research cooperation and choice of scientific material as well as the ethical complications involved in gene transfer research and its applications. For the U.S. scientists an essential part of creating doable problems consisted of boundary-work in relation to regulatory demands and interventions, something that did not concern the Swedish scientists to the same extent.

    Gene transfer, due to its controversial character, has raised public fears and concerns. Using Goffman’s concept of frames, the study also analyzes how gene transfer scientists attempt to gain public acceptance by framing gene transfer as an ordinary kind of therapy, while simultaneously heralding it as a revolutionary new technology, in order to obtain the external funding necessary for an expensive and extensive research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Making Doable Problems within Controversial Science: U.S. and Swedish Scientists’ Experience of Gene Transfer Research
    Download (pdf)
    omslag
  • 7.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gene Therapy2010In: Encyclopedia of Science and Technology Communication / [ed] Priest, S.H., Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2010, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Juengst, Eric T
    Center for Genetic Research, Ethics and Law Case Western Reserve University.
    Ethical issues in human gene transfer: a historical overview2007In: Principles of health care ethics / [ed] Richard Edmund Ashcroft, Angus Dawson, Heather Draper,Ashcroft, Richard E, Chichester, West Sussex, England: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd , 2007, 2, p. 789-796Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Edited by four leading members of the new generation of medical and healthcare ethicists working in the UK, respected worldwide for their work in medical ethics, Principles of Health Care Ethics, Second Edition  is a standard resource for students, professionals, and academics wishing to understand current and future issues in healthcare ethics. With a distinguished international panel of contributors working at the leading edge of academia, this volume presents a comprehensive guide to the field, with state of the art introductions to the wide range of topics in modern healthcare ethics, from consent to human rights, from utilitarianism to feminism, from the doctor–patient relationship to xenotransplantation. This volume is the Second Edition of the highly successful work edited by Professor Raanan Gillon, Emeritus Professor of Medical Ethics at Imperial College London and former editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics, the leading journal in this field. Developments from the First Edition include:   The focus on ‘Four Principles Method’ is relaxed to cover more different methods in health care ethics. More material on new medical technologies is included, the coverage of issues on the doctor/patient relationship is expanded, and material on ethics and public health is brought together into a new section.

  • 9.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Tales from the Frontier - Balancing scientific research, health and the profit motif: a U.S. case study2006In: The 8th World Congress of Bioethics,2006, 2006, p. 110-111Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    The Future of Gene Therapy - Should Germ Line Interventions be avoided?2005In: XIXth European Conference on Philosphy of Medicine and Health Care,2005, 2005, p. 34-35Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Welin, Stellan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Germ line gene therapy - why not!2004In: XVIIIth European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care,2004, 2004, p. 48-49Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Grankvist, Hannah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Borén, Kristina
    IFM Institutionen för Kemi.
    Hammarström, Per
    IFM Institutionen för Kemi.
    Carlsson, Uno
    IFM Institutionen för Kemi.
    Reshaping the folding energy landscape by chloride salt: Impact on molten-globule formation and aggregation behavior of carbonic anhydrase2004In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 566, no 1-3, p. 95-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During chemical denaturation different intermediate states are populated or suppressed due to the nature of the denaturant used. Chemical denaturation by guanidine-HCl (GuHCl) of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) leads to a three-state unfolding process (Cm,NI=1.0 and Cm,IU=1.9 M GuHCl) with formation of an equilibrium molten-globule intermediate that is stable at moderate concentrations of the denaturant (1-2 M) with a maximum at 1.5 M GuHCl. On the contrary, urea denaturation gives rise to an apparent two-state unfolding transition (Cm=4.4 M urea). However, 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) binding and decreased refolding capacity revealed the presence of the molten globule in the middle of the unfolding transition zone, although to a lesser extent than in GuHCl. Cross-linking studies showed the formation of moderate oligomer sized (300 kDa) and large soluble aggregates (>1000 kDa). Inclusion of 1.5 M NaCl to the urea denaturant to mimic the ionic character of GuHCl leads to a three-state unfolding behavior (Cm,NI=3.0 and Cm,IU=6.4 M urea) with a significantly stabilized molten-globule intermediate by the chloride salt. Comparisons between NaCl and LiCl of the impact on the stability of the various states of HCA II in urea showed that the effects followed what could be expected from the Hofmeister series, where Li+ is a chaotropic ion leading to decreased stability of the native state. Salt addition to the completely urea unfolded HCA II also led to an aggregation prone unfolded state, that has not been observed before for carbonic anhydrase. Refolding from this state only provided low recoveries of native enzyme. © 2004 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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