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  • 1.
    Otterbring, Tobias
    et al.
    Univ Agder, Norway.
    Flodin Arsenovic, Jasenko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Peter
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Malodia, Suresh
    MICA, India.
    Dhir, Amandeep
    Univ Agder, Norway; Jaipuria Institute of Management, Noida, India; University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
    Going the Extra Mile, Now or After a While: The Impact of Employee Proactivity in Retail Service Encounters on Customers Shopping Responses2023In: British Journal of Management, ISSN 1045-3172, E-ISSN 1467-8551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employee proactivity has been discussed as a key predictor of firm success and organizational performance. However, previous proactivity research has rarely focused on customers, and the few available proactivity studies from retail settings are either cross-sectional, solely based on subjective outcomes (e.g. customer satisfaction) or restricted to aggregated data of objective outcomes (e.g. profits per store). We investigate the causal effect of employee proactivity in retail service encounters on customers actual purchase behaviour and satisfaction ratings at the fine-grained level of individual customers. By integrating theories on social perception with prior proactivity findings, we find that employee proactivity positively predicts customers shopping responses. This finding extends from correlational to experimental designs across sample types and paradigms, is replicated in actual retail settings, and is mediated by customers perceptions of employee warmth and competence. Furthermore, the effect generalizes across several focal outcomes, including behavioural variables (spending and purchase likelihood), and is moderated by the time to employee-initiated contact in a way that goes against customers own beliefs. In sum, the present research quantifies the financial consequences of employee proactivity and indicates that in ordinary retail service encounters, high proactivity can compensate for delays, thus counteracting the aversive aspects of waiting.

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  • 2.
    Otterbring, Tobias
    et al.
    Univ Agder, Norway; Inst Retail Econ, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Peter
    Serv Res Ctr, Sweden; Serv Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Flodin Arsenovic, Jasenko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Elbaek, Christian T.
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Folwarczny, Michal
    Reykjavik Univ, Iceland.
    Shortsighted sales or long-lasting loyalty? The impact of salesperson-customer proximity on consumer responses and the beauty of bodily boundaries2023In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 1854-1885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Previous research on salesperson-customer proximity has yielded mixed results, with some studies documenting positive proximity effects on shopping responses and others demonstrating the reverse. To reconcile such mixed findings, this paper aims to test whether and how salesperson proximity influences a series of key customer outcomes in actual retail settings using sample sizes that are considerably larger than most former investigations. Design/methodology/approach We conducted two high-powered field studies (N = 1,312) to test whether salesperson-customer proximity influences consumers purchase behavior and store loyalty. Moreover, we investigated whether the short-term effects on purchase behavior were moderated by the extent to which the consumption context had a clear connection to consumers own bodies. Findings Salesperson proximity increased purchase incidence and spending in consumption contexts with a bodily basis (e.g. clothes, beauty, health), suggesting that consumers "buy their way out" in these contexts when a salesperson is violating their personal space. If anything, such proximity had a negative impact on consumers purchase behavior in contexts that lacked a clear bodily connection (e.g. building materials, furniture, books). Moreover, the link between proximity and consumer responses was mediated by discomfort, such that a salesperson standing close-by (vs farther away) increased discomfort, with negative downstream effects on shopping responses. Importantly, the authors found opposite proximity effects on short-term metrics (purchase incidence and spending) and long-term outcomes (store loyalty). Research limitations/implications Drawing on the nonverbal communication literature and theories on processing fluency, the current work introduces a theoretically relevant boundary condition for the effects of salesperson-customer proximity on consumers purchase behavior. Specifically, the bodily basis of the consumption context is discussed as a novel moderator, which may help to explain the mixed findings in this stream of research. Practical implications Salesperson-customer proximity may serve as a strategic sales tactic to improve short-term revenue in settings that are closely tied to consumers own bodies and characterized by one-time purchases. However, as salesperson proximity was found to be associated with lower store loyalty, irrespective of whether the shopping setting had a bodily basis, the risk of violating consumers personal space may have costly consequences from a long-term perspective. Originality/value The present field studies make three central contributions. First, we introduce a novel moderator for proximity effects in various sales and service settings. Second, we test the focal hypotheses with much higher statistical power than most existing proximity studies. Finally, we document that salesperson-customer proximity ironically yields opposite results on short-term metrics and long-term outcomes, thus underscoring the importance of not solely focusing on sales effectiveness when training frontline employees.

  • 3.
    Vakulenko, Yulia
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    SDA Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    Hellström, Daniel
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Shams, Poja
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Does delivery service differentiation matter?: Comparing rural to urban e-consumer satisfaction and retention2022In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 142, p. 476-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of continuously growing e-commerce and the rising global count of e-consumers, e-retailers and logistics service providers need to differentiate and tailor their offerings to refine their operations and meet e- consumers’ needs. This study investigates how e-consumers’ residential-area type affects the satisfaction with delivery services and reuse intentions in relation to e-consumers’ ability to choose between delivery options. The aim was to explore and compare rural e-consumers to urban ones and conclude whether the service fitting can be performed without satisfaction loss. The results showed that for e-consumers from rural residential areas, the availability of different delivery options did not translate into greater satisfaction with the delivery service and reuse intention, while for urban residents, service diversity was linked to greater satisfaction.

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  • 4.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    SDA Bocconi, Milan, Italy.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Service Research Centre, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; 4 5 SDA Bocconi, Milan, Italy Service Research Centre, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden Inland Norway University of Applied Science, Elverum, Norway.
    Otterbring, Tobias
    Department of Management, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway; Institute of Retail Economics, Regeringsgatan 60, 103 29 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Service Research Centre, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; 4 5 SDA Bocconi, Milan, Italy Service Research Centre, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Inland Norway University of Applied Science, Elverum, Norway.
    Money for Nothing: The Impact of Compensation on Customers’ Bad-Mouthing in Service Recovery Encounters2022In: Marketing letters, ISSN 0923-0645, E-ISSN 1573-059X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 69-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As one of the retailer’s most potent recovery tactics to offset disgruntled customers, firms invest heavily in compensation to increase customer satisfaction and improve loyalty. How- ever, the effectiveness of this tactic remains unclear. This study examines whether firm-offered compensation affects customers’ emotional responses and bad-mouthing behavior (i.e., tell- ing others about a particular problem). Importantly, the study investigates whether the level of collaboration during the recovery encounter moderates the link between compensation and customers’ emotional responses, and whether collaborative efforts influence the effectiveness of compensation. The findings indicate that collaboration during the recovery encounter is nec- essary if compensation is to mitigate negative emotional responses, with downstream effects on bad-mouthing behavior. In confirming the importance of collaboration during recovery encounters, the findings have critical managerial and financial implications.

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  • 5.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Karlstad University, CTF, Service Research Center, Sweden.
    De Keyser, Arne
    EDHEC Business School, Department of Marketing, France.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, CTF, Service Research Center, Sweden; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Karlstad University, CTF, Service Research Center, Sweden; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Gruber, Thorsten
    Loughborough University, Centre for Service Management (CSM), United Kingdom.
    Justice (is not the same) for all: The role of relationship activity for post-recovery outcomes2021In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 134, p. 342-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the widespread adoption of the justice framework in service recovery literature, research findings vary as to what dimension - distributive, interactional, procedural - is most important. This paper contributes to this debate by considering how an easily accessible variable like relationship activity (i.e., the frequency of visiting and purchasing from a company) moderates the impact of the justice dimensions on post-recovery customer outcomes. Findings show that distributive justice is the only dimension impacting word-of-mouth (WOM) and repurchase behavior for low- and medium-relationship-activity customer segments. For a high-relationship- activity segment, all justice dimensions have a positive and balanced impact on WOM and/or repurchase behavior. This research demonstrates the potential of a segmented approach for recovery, while also providing managers with valuable insights into how they can use readily available information to adapt their service re- covery efforts.

  • 6.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    Karlstads universitet, Centrum för tjänsteforskning (from 2013).
    Proactivity in Service Failure and Service Recovery2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although service failure and service recovery have been extensively researched, service employees struggle to recover an increasing number of customer complaints. The overall aim of this thesis is to explain the role of customer and employee proactivity in service failure and service recovery. Through a series of studies, this thesis examines how employee and customer proactivity influence customer responses after a service failure and in service recovery. In doing so, this thesis contributes to the service recovery literature in two ways.

    First, by reconceptualizing service failure to include failures not necessarily linked to the core-service offering, this research contributes to the theory formation stressing the importance of seemingly “small details”. Doing so makes it possible to examine how seemingly minor interpersonal interaction can influence customer responses in the service environment and provide managers with a set of tools to manage failures of such seemingly minor interpersonal interaction. Introducing employee proactivity as a recovery tactic, this thesis demonstrates that when an employee shows a high level of proactivity during a service encounter, they can reduce the adverse effects that stem from the absence of expected interpersonal “small details” from earlier in the service encounter. As such, potentially serve to address a portion of the “silent mass” of customers who choose to stay silent.

    Second, findings contrast lay belief that customers prefer the service providers to deal with service failures while they sit back and relax. Introducing service recovery collaboration as a potential service recovery response made it possible to document the benefits of including the customer as a proactive collaborator in the service recovery. Findings reveal that proactive customer behaviors in service recovery are particularly critical for customers with established relationships and in situations where compensation is the primary means of recovery.

  • 7.
    Arsenovic, Jasenko
    et al.
    Centrum för Tjänsteforskning (CTF), Service Research Center, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden;.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Centrum för Tjänsteforskning (CTF), Service Research Center, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden;;Department of Marketing, Inland Norway University of Applied Science, 2411 Elverum, Norway;.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Centrum för Tjänsteforskning (CTF), Service Research Center, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden;;Department of Marketing, Inland Norway University of Applied Science, 2411 Elverum, Norway.
    Moving Toward Collaborative Service Recovery: A Multiactor Orientation2019In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service recovery research has traditionally beenfirm-centric, focusing primarilyon the time and effort expended byfirms in addressing service failures. The subsequentshift to a customer-centric orientation addressed the customer’s role in recovery situations,and the recent dyadic orientation has explored the effectiveness of their joint efforts.However, earlier conceptualizations failed to take adequate account of the complexity ofservice recovery encounters in which multiple actors collaborate and integrate resources.This study explores how multiactor collaborations influence the customer’s experience ofservice recovery by adopting a multiactor orientation and by applying service-dominantlogic. After reviewing the customer experience literature, a collaborative recovery expe-rience framework is developed that emphasizes the joint efforts of multiple actors andcustomers to achieve a favorable recovery experience. In a contextualization, the usefulnessof the new framework to explain customer experiences in collaborative service processes isshown. Finally, further research avenues are proposed.

1 - 7 of 7
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