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  • 1.
    Trulsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ahlgren, Weimar
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Hosp Eksjo, Sweden.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sandström, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Attitudes and perceptions of healthcare professionals related to family participation in surgical cancer care - A mixed method study2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 2530-2539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThis study investigated healthcare professionals attitudes and perceptions towards the familys participation in surgical cancer care. DesignA prospective mixed method study. MethodsThe study was conducted at three hospitals in Sweden with registered nurses, assistant nurses and surgeons. Data included 43 completed Families Importance in Nursing Care (FINC-NA) questionnaires answered by registered nurses and qualitative data from 14 interviews with surgeons and assistant nurses. Data analysis was performed according to the Creswell convergent parallel mixed method. ResultsBoth quantitative and qualitative data demonstrated that the family was an important resource in nursing care, was highly valued as a conversational partner and had resources that should be considered. Each family should be supported in determining their role and as implements for maintaining a functioning family constellation and increasing their participation. Patient or Public ContributionNo patient or public contribution.

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  • 2.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Engstrom, My
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jangland, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Malmstrom, Marlene
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    Malmo Univ, Sweden.
    Factors related to a successful professional development for specialist nurses in surgical care: a cross-sectional study2023In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundA high level of competence among staff is necessary for providing patient-safe surgical care. Knowledge regarding what factors contribute to the professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care and why they choose to remain in the workplace despite high work requirements is needed. To investigate and describe the organizational and social work environment of specialist nurses in surgical care as part of studying factors that impact on professional development.MethodThis was a cross-sectional study with a strategic convenience sampling procedure that recruited 73 specialist nurses in surgical care in Sweden between October to December 2021. The study was guided by STROBE Statement and checklist of cross-sectional studies. The validated Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was used, and additional demographic data. Descriptive statistics were performed and the comparison to the population benchmarks was presented as the mean with a 95% confidence interval. To study potential differences among the demographic and professional characteristics, pairwise t tests were used with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons with a significance level of 5%.ResultsFive domains were identified as factors related to success, as they received higher scores in relation to population benchmarks: quality of leadership, variation of work, meaning of work and work engagement as well as job insecurity. There was also a significant association between a having a manager with low nursing education and job insecurity (p = 0.021).ConclusionsQuality of leadership is important for the professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care. Strategic work seems to include managers with a higher nursing education level to prevent insecure professional working conditions.

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  • 3.
    Paul, Rebecca
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Olbers, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Frisk, Jessica
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Övr Regionledningskontoret. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Ellen
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Motherhood and motivations for bariatric surgery - a qualitative study2023In: Human Fertility, ISSN 1464-7273, E-ISSN 1742-8149, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 257-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity and its concomitant comorbidities have a myriad of detrimental effects on health, fertility, and quality of life. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for inducing weight loss and reduction of obesity-related comorbidities including subfertility. The aim of this study was to explore the expectations and experiences of women with a desire to have children as a motivation for undergoing bariatric surgery. An inductive qualitative design was used. Fourteen women were interviewed, and transcriptions were analysed with thematic analysis. Two themes emerged: (i) Motherhood and Femininity and (ii) A Normal Life. Participants found no other solution than to seek bariatric surgery to be able to become pregnant and carry a child to term. Coping physically with pregnancy and being an active mother were important factors. Overall, postoperative expectations were met, and the women experienced the effects of normalised sex hormone levels, were more physically mobile, and were released from the previous social hindrances that obesity caused them. This study has clinical implications for providing support and information to women with subfertility considering bariatric surgery and to better understand their experiences of life after bariatric surgery.

  • 4.
    Blomquist, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Motivation and Life Circumstances Affecting Living Habits Prior to Gastrointestinal Cancer Surgery- An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis2023In: Inquiry, ISSN 0046-9580, E-ISSN 1945-7243, Vol. 60, article id 00469580231170544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to explore the patients experiences to get insights into their living habits prior to gastrointestinal cancer surgery. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) approach was used. Six in-depth interviews with participants recruited from a hospital in southeast Sweden. The IPA analysis identified 3 themes: The influence of the cancer diagnosis on awareness and motivation, Life circumstances affecting living habits, and Activities bringing mental strength. The participants expressed their motivation level and circumstances in life. Various types of activities and support promoted physical and mental health. Motivation level and circumstances in life both influence living habits. Various kinds of activities and support promote patients physical and mental health. Nurses need to investigate patients experiences when developing person-centered support to achieve health-promoting behavior prior to cancer surgery.

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  • 5.
    Demir, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hakansson, Elin
    Reg Hosp Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Nurses experiences of moral distress and how it affects daily work in surgical care-a qualitative study2023In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe nurses and specialist nurses experiences of moral distress and how it affects daily work in surgical care.Design: A qualitative descriptive study design was used.Methods: A qualitative study with 12 interviews with nurses and specialist nurses working in surgical care. All interviews were conducted during October and November 2022 in two hospitals in southeastern Sweden. Data were analysed using conventional qualitative content analysis.Findings: Three categories and seven subcategories generated from the data analysis. The three categories generated from the analysis were Experiences that lead to moral distress, Perceived consequences of moral distress and Strategies in case of moral distress. The results show that a lack of personnel in combination with people with complex surgical needs is the main source of moral distress. Both high demands on nurses as individuals and the teamwork are factors that generate moral distress and can have severe consequences for the safety of patients, individual nurses and future care.Conclusions: The results show that moral distress is a problem for todays nurses and specialist nurses in surgical care. Action is necessary to prevent nurses from leaving surgical care. Prioritizing tasks is perceived as challenging for the profession, and moral distress can pose a patient safety risk.Impact: Surgical care departments should design support structures for nurses, give nurses an authentic voice to express ethical concerns and allow them to practice surgical nursing in a way that does not violate their core professional values. Healthcare organizations should take this seriously and work strategically to make the nursing profession more attractive.Patient or Public Contribution: There was no patient or public contribution.

  • 6.
    Johansen, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ghorbani, Poya
    Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Lundgren, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gilg, Stefan
    Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sparrelid, Ernesto
    Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Symptoms and life changes after total pancreatectomy: a qualitative study2023In: HPB, ISSN 1365-182X, E-ISSN 1477-2574, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 269-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Total pancreatectomy (TP) is a major surgical procedure that involves lifelong exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Qualitative evidence is sparse regarding patients' experiences after the operation. The aim of this study was to explore patients' experiences of symptoms that occur after TP and how these symptoms affect their health and life situations.

    METHODS: A qualitative design with prospective consecutive sampling and an inductive thematic analysis was used. Semistructured interviews were postoperatively performed at 6-9 months with 20 patients undergoing TP in two university hospitals in Sweden.

    RESULTS: Two main themes emerged from the analysis: "Changes in everyday life" and "Psychological journey". Patients experienced symptoms related to diabetes as the major life change after the operation, and they were also limited by symptoms of exocrine insufficiency, difficulties with food intake and physical weakness. In the psychological journey that patients underwent, the support received from family, friends and the health care system was important. Moreover, patients experienced a general need for more extensive information, especially regarding diabetes.

    CONCLUSION: Patients experience a lack of sufficient support and education after TP, particularly concerning their diabetes. Further efforts should be undertaken to improve information and the organization of diabetes care for this patient group.

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  • 7.
    Jakobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jangland, Eva
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Nursing Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engström, My
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Surgery Sahlgrenska, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Malmström, Marlene
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Surgery and Gastroenterology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö/Lund, Sweden.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Work conditions influencing professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care explored using the Job Demand-Resources theory: A qualitative study2023In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 79, no 7, p. 2610-2621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to explore the work conditions that influence the opportunities for professional development of specialist nurses in surgical care.

    DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design was used.

    METHODS: With a purposeful sampling procedure, 14 specialist nurses in surgical care were included. Four focus-group interviews were conducted during November to December 2021 and deductively analysed using the Job Demand-Resource theory as a guiding framework. Reporting adheres to COREQ guidelines.

    FINDINGS: Work conditions that were identified as job demands and that inhibited nurses' opportunities for professional development were mainly found at an organizational and leadership level. Primarily, those conditions included role ambiguity and time constraints caused by uncompensated nursing shortages that restricted the nurses from exercising their role. Such conditions could also discourage other nurses from further education. Job demands were seen as largely compensated for by work conditions identified as job resources and located mainly at an individual level, for example finding the work interesting and multifaceted. Most prominent was the participants' inner motivation to work with surgical patients and to continue to develop themselves and other nurses professionally.

    CONCLUSIONS: A prerequisite for professional development is that the specialist role is clearly defined in collaboration with representatives from the nursing profession and universities. Hence, hospital organizations need to reflect on how to utilize the competence. Also, it is important that nurse leaders promote the specialist nurses' motivation by supporting them in the exercise of their role.

    IMPACT: Findings from this study revealed work conditions that need to be acknowledged during hospital organizations' endeavours to maintain and enhance nursing competence.

    PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Patient or public contribution was not applicable since the study focused on specialist nurses' working conditions.

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  • 8.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Experiences of Symptoms and Impact on Daily Life and Health in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients: A Meta-synthesis of Qualitative Research.2022In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 430-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of hepatocellular cancer (HCC) has continually increased. To achieve optimal supportive cancer care for HCC patients, it is important to consider patients' experiences and preferences.

    OBJECTIVE: This meta-synthesis aims to critically interpret how patients with HCC experience symptoms and the impact of the disease on daily life and health.

    METHODS: Searches were performed in the following bibliographic databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library. In addition, searches were performed using Open Gray to identify relevant studies in the gray literature. The search was limited to studies published in English from 2009 to 2019. Five studies (124 participants) were identified, appraised, and ultimately interpreted and synthesized.

    RESULTS: Receiving an HCC diagnosis was overwhelming and affected the patients' entire lives. Three themes were identified based on the meta-synthesis: (1) disrupted life, (2) living with uncertainty, and (3) a changed body. Patients with HCC experience disrupted lives because of the cancer's effect on health and multidimensional symptoms.

    CONCLUSION: Available research on the experiences of HCC patients is limited. This meta-synthesis of available studies shows that being given a diagnosis of HCC is an overwhelming event. Our study findings show that an HCC diagnosis affected the individual's entire life.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: It is important to identify the patients' physical, psychological, social, and existential needs during the investigation of their condition, during any curative treatment, and at the palliative stage of the disease.

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  • 9.
    Stahlgren, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Forsell, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Information needs in patients with bladder cancer undergoing radical cystectomy - A qualitative review with thematic synthesis2022In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 61, article id 102231Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Worldwide, bladder cancer is the eleventh most common cancer. Self-care is significant after surgery and optimal information needs to be individualized. This will help the patient to understand and become involved in their own care. This study investigated experiences of information needs in patients with bladder cancer un-dergoing radical cystectomy.Methods: A qualitative review study with a thematic synthesis according to the PRISMA Statement Guidelines was performed. Results: Thirteen peer-reviewed original articles were included. This review highlighted that patient experienced unmet information needs about postoperative care and self-care. Patients also experienced receiving too much information in a limited time. This led to difficulties in understanding and processing the information. Patients also experienced limited information about sexual and psychological support and requested more information about physical activity.Conclusion: Information is essential but needs to be adapted and based on person-centred care principles related to the patients needs and wishes. Unmet needs impact patients lives and are associated with misunderstandings and insecurity, which need to be considered in cancer nursing.Clinical trial registration: The review was not registered.

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  • 10.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa. Linköping University.
    Nordén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Patient preferences and experiences of participation in surgical cancer care2022In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Quality cancer care necessitates opportunities for patient participation, supposedly recognizing the individuals preferences and experiences for being involved in their health and healthcare issues. Previous research shows that surgical cancer patients wish to be more involved, requiring professionals to be sensitive of patients needs. Aims To explore preference-based patient participation in surgical cancer care. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted. The Patient Preferences for Patient Participation tool (4Ps) was used, which includes 12 attributes of preferences for and experiences of patient participation. Data were analyzed with descriptive and comparative statistical methods. Results The results are based on a total of 101 questionnaires. Having reciprocal communication and being listened to by healthcare staff were commonly deemed crucial for patient participation. While 60% of the patients suggested that taking part in planning was crucial for their participation, they had experienced this only to some extent. Learning to manage symptoms and phrasing personal goals were items most often representing insufficient conditions for preference-based patient participation. Linking Evidence to Action To support person-centered surgical care, further efforts to suffice preference-based participation are needed, including opportunities for patients to share their experiences and engage in the planning of healthcare activities.

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  • 11.
    Amin, Awin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nordén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa. Linköping University.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.
    Patient-reported participation in hepatopancreatobiliary surgery cancer care: A pilot intervention study with patient-owned fast-track protocols2022In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 31, no 3, article id e13570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Fast-track concepts have been implemented in hepatopancreatobiliary surgery cancer care to improve postoperative recovery. For optimal postoperative care, patient participation is also required. The aim was to investigate and analyse whether an intervention with patient-owned fast-track protocols (PFTPs) may lead to increased patient participation and improve information for patients who underwent surgery for hepatopancreatobiliary cancer. Methods A quantitative comparative design with a control and intervention group was used. The participants in the intervention group followed a PFTP during their admission. After discharge, the patients answered a questionnaire regarding patient participation. Data analyses were performed with descriptive statistics and ANCOVA. Results The results are based on a total of 222 completed questionnaires: 116 in the control group and 106 in the intervention group. It is uncertain whether the PFTP increased patient participation and information, but its use may indicate an improvement for the patient group. Conclusion A successful implementation strategy for the use of PFTP, with daily reconciliations, could be part of the work required to improve overall satisfaction with patient participation.

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  • 12.
    Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Vilhelmsson, Mattias
    Reg Hosp Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Fomichov Casaballe, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Patient involvement in surgical care-Healthcare personnel views and behaviour regarding patient involvement2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background All professions in surgical care have a responsibility to include patients in their health care. By Swedish law, all care should be done in dialogue with the patient. The essential part of health care is the meeting between patient and healthcare professional. In the interaction, a decision can be made, and needs can be identified to a safer care. Previous studies on patient participation have focussed on patients perspectives in surgical care, but there is a paucity of studies about the personnels perspective of estimated patient involvement in surgical care. Aim The aim of this study was to identify and describe healthcare personnels view and behaviour regarding patient involvement in surgical care. Method A quantitative study with various professions was conducted. A validated questionnaire was used, remaining questions grouped under following areas: patient involvement, acute phase, hospital time, discharge phase and questions on employment and workplace. Results A total of 140 questionnaires were sent out to a surgical clinic in Sweden, and 102 questionnaires were answered. All professionals stated that clear information is an important part of patient involvement in surgical care. Statistically significant differences existed between the professions in the subscale information. Physicians rated their information higher than the Registered Nurses (p = 0.005) and the practical nurses did (p = 0.001). Hindrances to involving patients were lack of time and other priority tasks. Conclusions Professionals in surgical care graded information to be the most important thing for patient involvement. Participation in important decisions, including the possibility to express personal views and ask questions, is important factors for patient involvement. Barriers against patient involvement are lack of time and prioritisation of other work activities.

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  • 13.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Jessica
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Patient-reported recovery in upper abdominal cancer surgery care: A prospective study2021In: Science Progress, ISSN 0036-8504, E-ISSN 2047-7163, Vol. 104, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to describe and analyse patient-reported recovery in patients after upper abdominal cancer surgery. This study had a quantitative design and patients were consecutively included in a university hospital in southern Sweden. Twenty-four patients answered the Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP) questionnaire at three measurement points. All five dimensions were affected. In the physical symptoms dimension, the majority of patients reported a lack of energy upon discharge. High levels of anxiety were reported. Over 50% of patients reported some degree of depressed mood at all three measurement points. In the social dimension, the majority of patients reported some degree of being dependent on help from others in everyday life at 4?weeks after discharge. Few patients are fully recovered at 4?weeks after discharge. Individual patient-reported recovery estimates may be valuable in identifying and planning interventions tailored to each patients needs throughout the care process.

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  • 14.
    Ibrahim, Farzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    In the Shadows of Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer: An Interview Study with Next of Kin about Their Experiences Participating in Surgical Cancer Care2020In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 579-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to explore the experiences of participation among the next of kin of patients who had surgery for upper abdominal tumours. This study had a qualitative research design and data were analysed by thematic analysis. Eleven qualitative interviews were conducted with next of kin to patients who had surgery for liver, bile duct or pancreatic malignancy. The following themes emerged:from the shadows to an important roleandan inviting and inhibiting environment for participation.Next of kin were a central part of their loved ones care but often in the shadows. The next of kin described how they were not always invited and often they had to struggle to get involved. Next of kin often have a major psychosocial role to supporting the patient during and after discharge, and therefore need to be invited and involved in the whole care process.

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  • 15.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences and Reproductive Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sense of coherence and health-related quality of life in patients with neurotoxicity after cancer chemotherapy: Assessment from a real-time mobile phone-based system2020In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 107-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    In the present study, we aimed to assess sense of coherence (SOC) and health‐related quality of life (HRQOL) during and after adjuvant chemotherapy by mobile phone‐based reporting in patients with colorectal cancer experiencing neurotoxicity.

    Methods

    In this prospective descriptive cohort study, a mobile phone‐based system was used to receive a series of real‐time longitudinal patient‐reported assessments of SOC (13‐item), HRQOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy‐General (FACT‐G) 27‐item), and neurotoxicity (OANQ 29‐item) from 43 patients with colorectal cancer after being treated with chemotherapy including oxaliplatin. Measurements were conducted during the whole treatment period (mean 5 cycles) and up to 12 months after completing chemotherapy.

    Results

    In total, 817 questionnaire responses (226 SOC, 221 FACT‐G, 370 OANQ) answered during and after chemotherapy treatment were available for analysis. Even though all patients experienced neurotoxicity during the treatment period, HRQOL was stable over time. Over time, the ratings of physical wellbeing tended to increase, while the subscale of social wellbeing tended to decrease. Overall SOC, including the three components comprehensibility, manageability, and meaningfulness was stable during the entire study period. No internal data was missing due to the mobile phone‐based system.

    Conclusions

    All patients had neurotoxicity during the treatment period that seemed to affect the social wellbeing component of HRQOL, but SOC seemed unaffected. Real‐time patient‐reported assessment using mobile phone technology could be valuable in the clinical setting to provide continuous individualised monitoring to help identify patients who need further evaluation to maintain or improve their psychosocial health.

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  • 16.
    Ibrahim, Farzana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Sandström, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    'I want to know why and need to be involved in my own care…': a qualitative interview study with liver, bile duct or pancreatic cancer patients about their experiences with involvement in care.2019In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 2561-2567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Patients’ involvement in their own care is important for those with upper abdominal tumours. Care is often conducted according to standardized fast-track care programs (FTCP), and a shorter hospital stay is one of the goals. However, there is no research providing an in-depth perspective on patients’ experiences of involvement in care. In this qualitative study, we explored experiences of involvement among patients who had surgery for upper abdominal tumours and were cared for according to an FTCP.

    Methods

    Qualitative in-depth face-to-face interviews about patient involvement in care were conducted with 20 patients who had surgery for the liver, bile duct, or pancreatic cancer using an open-interview guide.

    Results

    The most important findings are that customized information and active dialogue about care decisions stimulate patient involvement. We identified three themes from the analysed data: involvement depended on the quality of information, communication and involvement during the care period, and safety at discharge.

    Conclusions

    Individualized care and continuous information about treatment and care goals in the FTCP during the care process create trust between patients and healthcare professionals and increase patient experiences of involvement.

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  • 17.
    Larnebratt, Anton
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Lindhoff Larsson, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Information is the key to successful participation for patients receiving surgery for upper gastrointestinal cancer2019In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, no 2, article id e12959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fast-track programmes are aimed at improving perioperative care. The purpose of this study was to identify and explore patient participation among patients who had surgery for liver, bile duct or pancreatic cancer and followed a fast-track programme. A total of 116 questionnaires to investigate patient participation were analysed. Information was important for the patients, as was having the opportunity to ask questions and express personal views. The results showed differences by sex; men responded to a greater extent that they did not want to make decisions as a patient (p = 0.044) and that they had been motivated to take more responsibility for their future health (p = 0.011). Patients with pancreatic cancer discussed treatment goals with doctors to a greater extent than did patients with liver cancer (p = 0.041). Half of the patients perceived that they had not been involved in their care planning after discharge but had a desired to be involved. This seems to be an important point to improve in future care, and also that professionals should be aware of patients' needs for information and participation, especially at discharge.

  • 18.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxic Side Effects and Their Impact on Daily Activities2019In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 42, no 6, p. E40-E48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oxaliplatin (OXA) is frequently used in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, and OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects are common. Reports on real-time patient-reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on the patient's daily activities are sparse in existing studies. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify and assess patient-reported OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects and their impact on the patient's daily activities, during and after chemotherapy. Methods: In a multicenter prospective longitudinal study, 46 chemo-naïve patients with colorectal cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant OXA-based chemotherapy were monitored during treatment and at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-ups. Patients were recruited from September 2013 to June 2016. In total, 370 Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire responses were available for analysis. A mobile phone-based system was used to receive real-time assessments. Results: All patients reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on daily activities during treatment. The side effects changed in character and body location over time and had an impact on the daily activities. Conclusions: The high prevalence of OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects significantly interfered with the patients' daily activities. We found significant differences between baseline data and follow-up time points for neurotoxicity, and the patients had not returned to baseline after 1 year. Implications for Practice: The real-time assessment using mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity and interventions for tailored care. Effectively identifying neurotoxicity and its impact on the patient's daily activities is important in supportive cancer care.

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  • 19. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neurotoxic side effects and impact on daily life in patients with colorectal cancer with adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers globally. Chemotherapeutic drugs are frequently used in postoperative treatment. The platinum compound oxaliplatin (OXA) is an option for adjuvant treatment of patients with resected CRC, and has been shown to improve survival. OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects are common (e.g. sensitivity to cold, numbness). Neurotoxicity can interfere with the patient’s daily living and affect ability to carry out activities. Because there is no evidence for effective treatment in terms of eliminating neurotoxic side effects, the most successful approaches include early identification, reduction of dose and interruption of treatment. Current research has identified a need for patient-oriented evidence in terms of long-term follow-up of neurotoxicity.

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to explore OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects in patients with colorectal cancer, and the influence on patients’ daily lives during and post OXA treatment.

    Methods: The thesis is based on four studies, and includes an analysis of medical records, as well as prospective quantitative and qualitative approaches with longitudinal data collection through a mobile phone-based system. The studies were performed at oncology departments in four hospitals in Sweden. Inclusion criteria were that patients should be at least 18 years of age, and should have been treated with chemotherapy, including OXA (FOLFOX, XELOX), in an adjuvant setting for CRC stages II-III. Study I had a retrospective design, and data involved (n=61) medical records. A structured protocol was used to evaluate the documentation of patients’ neurotoxic side effects. In studies II and III, ten patients were recruited using a strategy of purposeful and consecutive selection according to the inclusion criteria, where OXA-related neurotoxic side effects were assessed. A total of 10 interviews were carried out when neurotoxic side effects appeared (II), and after completed OXA treatment (3, 6 and 12 month’s follow-up) 25 repeated interviews were conducted (III). The prospective longitudinal study IV aimed to identify and assess patient-reported outcomes in terms of neurotoxic side effects, and their impact on patients’ daily activities (n=46). An Oxaliplatin-associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (OANQ) was administered in real time to indicate patientreported outcomes. In total, 370 questionnaire responses were available for analysis.

    Results: The results from the retrospective study (I) showed that a free description of the degree of neurotoxic side effects was given in the patients’ medical records. No formal assessment had been used in the documentation. The findings of the two qualitative studies contribute knowledge about how patients endure neurotoxic side effects early in the treatment phase, and how they learn to live with neurotoxicity in the long-term perspective. Patients coped with their side effects by developing different self-care strategies to restore normality in their daily lives (II-III). Neurotoxic side effects interferes with the patient’s daily activities in a variety of ways. These side effects change in terms of their character and their location in the body over time. The most frequent side effects during treatment were cold-precipitated tingling in the upper extremities and in the mouth/throat. At the end of treatment, neurotoxicity in the lower extremities was considered high and interfered with the patients’ daily activities. The results show significant differences between baseline data, and nine of the patients had not returned to baseline after one year (IV).

    Conclusion: Neurotoxic side effects affect patients’ daily activities in different ways, with an impact on their physical, psychological, emotional and social life. Patients endured and coped with their side effects in different ways involving self-care strategies to restore normality. The patients’ daily lives were affected by numbness and tingling in the legs and tingling in upper extremity, and they had learned to live with these side effects. The neurotoxic side effects changed character and localisation over time. These results should be taken into account when patients are informed about treatment, and in the dialogue about the benefits and risks.

    List of papers
    1. Oxaliplatin induced neurotoxicity among patients with colorectal cancer: documentation in medical records - a pilot study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxaliplatin induced neurotoxicity among patients with colorectal cancer: documentation in medical records - a pilot study
    2014 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, p. 265-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) can have chemotherapy with oxaliplatin postoperatively.Oxaliplatin can cause acute and chronic neurotoxicity. It is important to be aware of neurotoxicside effects so they can be documented and action taken at an early stage. The study aimed toidentify and explore neurotoxic side effects documented in the medical records of patients withcolorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Data in this study weremedical records; presenting documentation about patients treated at the University Hospital inthe south of Sweden between 2009 and 2010. A summative content analysis approach was used toexplore the neurotoxic side effects. Identification and quantification of the content of medical recordswere carried out by using a study-specific protocol. “Cold sensitivity” and “tingling in thehands” were the most frequently documented neurotoxicity-related terms in the medical records.This identification was followed by interpretation. Three categories were identified in the interpretivepart of the study: acute, chronic, and degree of neurotoxicity. The results show the importanceof awareness of neurotoxic side effects so that they can be documented and action taken atan early stage. The documentation could be more reliable if patient-reported structured measurementswere used, combined with free descriptions in the medical records. Being able to followthe progression of the symptoms during and after treatment would improve patient’s safety andalso quality of life. The protocol that we developed and used in this review of medical records maybe helpful to structure the documentation in the electronic system for documentation of neurotoxicityside effects.

     

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Scientific Research Publishing, 2014
    Keywords
    Adjuvant Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy, Colorectal Cancer, Medical Record Review, Neurotoxicity
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105867 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2014.44031 (DOI)
    Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2018-05-15Bibliographically approved
    2. The trajectory of neurotoxic side effects' impact on daily life: a qualitative study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The trajectory of neurotoxic side effects' impact on daily life: a qualitative study
    2016 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3455-3461Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxic side effects among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and how these side effects influenced their daily lives over time.

    METHODS:

    To assess neurotoxic side effects, ten patients were repeatedly interviewed. The patients were recruited from two hospitals in south of Sweden, had stage II-III CRC, and had been treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin postoperatively, from November 2013 to October 2015. They had received FOLFOX and XELOX, with a mean total dose of 791 mg oxaliplatin. After completed chemotherapy, at 3, 6, and 12 months into the post-treatment phase, 25 interviews were conducted and thematic analysis was used according to Braun and Clarke.

    RESULTS:

    Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity affects patients in several ways in the long term. Four themes were identified: Expectation of cure, Dubiety, Normalization, and Learn to live with neurotoxicity. The findings of this study describe the trajectory of neurotoxicity and its impact on these patients' life situation. The findings confirmed that neurotoxicity is multi-faceted and that the experience of it changes over time.

    CONCLUSION:

    The desire to survive stimulates adaptations and strategies to manage daily life, and patients learn to live with the neurotoxic side effects. This study provides evidence that these patients need individual attention and support during the trajectory of neurotoxic side effects. Current care provision is inadequate due to a lack of knowledge of the ways in which neurotoxicity impacts the patient's daily life. This study provides insights that could be used to develop a more person-centered care.

    Keywords
    Adjuvant chemotherapy; Colorectal cancer; Neurotoxicity; Oxaliplatin; Qualitative interviews; Thematic analysis
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126626 (URN)10.1007/s00520-016-3179-1 (DOI)000378884400030 ()26992409 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies:We thank all patients for their participation in this study. We also thank the Swedish Cancer Society, the Department of Oncology and Surgery, Linkoping University Hospital, and the Division of Nursing Science at the Department of Medical and Health Sciences for the financial support. Further thanks go to all the health professionals in the oncology clinics who were involved in the study in different ways.

    Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2018-05-15
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  • 20.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neurotoxic Side Effects Early in the Oxaliplatin Treatment Period in Patients With Colorectal Cancer2018In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 690-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To identify and describe experiences of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) who have neurotoxic side effects early in the oxaliplatin treatment period, and how neurotoxicity affects their daily lives.

    PARTICIPANTS & SETTING: 10 patients with stage II-III CRC were included. All were treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin postoperatively and assessed neurotoxicity via a platform-independent mobile phone-based system. Patients were recruited from two hospitals in southern Sweden from November 2013 to August 2014.

    METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: Qualitative interview study conducted through open-ended, face-to-face, qualitative interviews. Thematic analysis was used.

    FINDINGS: A main theme was identified.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Nurses have an obligation to communicate the importance of early detection of neurotoxicity. Mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity to improve communication and supportive care.

  • 21.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Neurotoxiska biverkningar vid cytostatika behandling2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patienters upplevelser av neurotoxiska biverkningar och påverkan på dagligt liv2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vilhelmsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Experiences with a self-reported mobile phone-based system among patients with colorectal cancer: a qualitative study2016In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 182-190, article id e66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In cancer care, mobile phone-based systems are becoming more widely used in the assessment, monitoring, and management of side effects.

    Objective: To explore the experiences of patients with colorectal cancer on using a mobile phone-based system for reporting neurotoxic side effects.

    Methods: Eleven patients were interviewed (ages 44-68 years). A semistructured interview guide was used to perform telephone interviews. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The patients' experiences of using a mobile phone-based system were identified and constructed as: “being involved,” “pacing oneself,” and “managing the questions.” “Being involved” refers to their individual feelings. Patients were participating in their own care by being observant of the side effects they were experiencing. They were aware that the answers they gave were monitored in real time and taken into account by health care professionals when planning further treatment. “Pacing oneself” describes how the patients can have an impact on the time and place they choose to answer the questions. Answering the questionnaire was easy, and despite the substantial number of questions, it was quickly completed. “Managing the questions” pointed out that the patients needed to be observant because of the construction of the questions. They could not routinely answer all the questions. Patients understood that side effects can vary during the cycles of treatment and need to be assessed repeatedly during treatment.

    Conclusions: This mobile phone-based system reinforced the patients’ feeling of involvement in their own care. The patients were comfortable with the technology and appreciated that the system was not time consuming.

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  • 24.
    Gustafsson, E.
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Litström, Emma
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Drott, Jenny
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Reliability testing of oxaliplatin-associated neurotoxicity questionnaire (OANQ), a pilot study2016In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 747-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of this study was to test the reliability of the Swedish version of the Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (OANQ) administrated throughout a self-reported mobile phone-based system, a pilot study.

    METHODS:

    Twenty-three patients from two university hospitals and two regional hospitals who had been treated with oxaliplatin were included through purposive sampling between autumn 2013 to autumn 2014. A test-retest was performed through a mobile phone-based system, with a recall period of 1 h to determine the reliability of the questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    Internal consistency was strong for the three domains of the scale (α > 0.840). The statistical analyses for the test-retest indicated that the OANQ was stable. Intraclass correlation (ICC) for symptom items and effect on daily activities items showed an overall excellent reproducibility at 69 and 83 %, respectively. The weighted kappa for symptom items and daily activities items showed an overall almost perfect agreement at 59 and 52 %, respectively. A paired samples t test did not reveal any significant differences between the two measures.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The OANQ was tested and considered a reliable assessment for capturing the oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neurotoxicity (OIPN) in patients receiving oxaliplatin. However, further reliability testing of the OANQ is needed.

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  • 25.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The trajectory of neurotoxic side effects' impact on daily life: a qualitative study2016In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3455-3461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxic side effects among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and how these side effects influenced their daily lives over time.

    METHODS:

    To assess neurotoxic side effects, ten patients were repeatedly interviewed. The patients were recruited from two hospitals in south of Sweden, had stage II-III CRC, and had been treated with adjuvant oxaliplatin postoperatively, from November 2013 to October 2015. They had received FOLFOX and XELOX, with a mean total dose of 791 mg oxaliplatin. After completed chemotherapy, at 3, 6, and 12 months into the post-treatment phase, 25 interviews were conducted and thematic analysis was used according to Braun and Clarke.

    RESULTS:

    Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity affects patients in several ways in the long term. Four themes were identified: Expectation of cure, Dubiety, Normalization, and Learn to live with neurotoxicity. The findings of this study describe the trajectory of neurotoxicity and its impact on these patients' life situation. The findings confirmed that neurotoxicity is multi-faceted and that the experience of it changes over time.

    CONCLUSION:

    The desire to survive stimulates adaptations and strategies to manage daily life, and patients learn to live with the neurotoxic side effects. This study provides evidence that these patients need individual attention and support during the trajectory of neurotoxic side effects. Current care provision is inadequate due to a lack of knowledge of the ways in which neurotoxicity impacts the patient's daily life. This study provides insights that could be used to develop a more person-centered care.

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  • 26.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmson, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kolorektal cancer patienters upplevelser av att besvara symtom via ett mobiltelefonbaserat system2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmsson, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Mobiltelefon - Framtidens sätt att följa cancerpatienter? Kolorektal cancer patienters upplevelser av att besvara symtom via ett mobiltelefonbaserat system2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Gustafsson, Elin
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Litström, Emma
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Drott, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Reliability testing of Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (OANQ)2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Identifying Oxaliplatin induced Neurotoxicity in Medical records - strengthening compassion2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Oxaliplatin induced neurotoxicity among patients with colorectal cancer: documentation in medical records - a pilot study2014In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, p. 265-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) can have chemotherapy with oxaliplatin postoperatively.Oxaliplatin can cause acute and chronic neurotoxicity. It is important to be aware of neurotoxicside effects so they can be documented and action taken at an early stage. The study aimed toidentify and explore neurotoxic side effects documented in the medical records of patients withcolorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Data in this study weremedical records; presenting documentation about patients treated at the University Hospital inthe south of Sweden between 2009 and 2010. A summative content analysis approach was used toexplore the neurotoxic side effects. Identification and quantification of the content of medical recordswere carried out by using a study-specific protocol. “Cold sensitivity” and “tingling in thehands” were the most frequently documented neurotoxicity-related terms in the medical records.This identification was followed by interpretation. Three categories were identified in the interpretivepart of the study: acute, chronic, and degree of neurotoxicity. The results show the importanceof awareness of neurotoxic side effects so that they can be documented and action taken atan early stage. The documentation could be more reliable if patient-reported structured measurementswere used, combined with free descriptions in the medical records. Being able to followthe progression of the symptoms during and after treatment would improve patient’s safety andalso quality of life. The protocol that we developed and used in this review of medical records maybe helpful to structure the documentation in the electronic system for documentation of neurotoxicityside effects.

     

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  • 31.
    Drott, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Neurotoxiska symtom vid adjuvant cytostatikabehandling hos patienter med kolorektalcancer2012Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 31 of 31
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