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  • 1.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Ingemansson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Bureychak, Tetyana
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Norlin, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Mantorp. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Jones, Michael P.
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Defecation symptoms in primary health care patients with irritable bowel syndrome2024In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 16-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The objectives of the present study were to (a) measure the prevalence of defecation symptoms in IBS, (b) investigate the relationship between stool consistency and defecation symptoms in IBS, and (c) investigate the association of defecation symptoms with health-related quality of life (HRQL) and self-reported stress in patients with IBS cared for in a primary health care setting. Methods: Ten primary health care centres joined the study. 282 patients with IBS as well as 372 non-IBS controls filled in gastrointestinal symptom diaries prospectively for two weeks as well as the Perceived Stress Scale-14 (PSS14) and the EuroQol barometer to measure perceived stress and HRQL, respectively. Results: Incomplete evacuation was present in 51% vs. 21% of the stools among the IBS patients and the non-IBS controls, respectively. The need to strain during defecation was existing in 41% vs. 33% of the stools for the IBS patients and the non-IBS controls, respectively. Urgency was experienced in 37% of the stools in the IBS patients compared with 18% of the stools in the non-IBS controls. Patients with IBS experienced in a significant higher degree of overlapping symptoms per stool (p < 0.001 to p = 0.007). The occurrence of all defecation symptoms in the same patient was related to decreased HRQL, and increased stress (p = 0.001 to p < 0.001). Conclusions: An overlap between IBS and symptoms from the anorectal region related to defecation was found in a primary health care population. Defecation symptoms are very common in primary care IBS-patients, it co-occurs with increased self-perceived stress, and decreased HRQL.

    The full text will be freely available from 2024-08-23 00:00
  • 2.
    Ingemansson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Jones, Michael P.
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Defecation Symptoms in Relation to Stool Consistency Significantly Reflect the Dyssynergic Pattern in High-resolution Anorectal Manometry in Constipated Patients2024In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, ISSN 0192-0790, E-ISSN 1539-2031, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Goals: To evaluate the usefulness of a 2-week patient-completed bowel habit and symptom diary as a screening tool for disordered rectoanal coordination (DRC).Background: DRC is an important subgroup of chronic constipation that benefits from biofeedback treatment. Diagnosis of DRC requires a dyssynergic pattern (DP) of attempted defecation in high-resolution anorectal manometry (HRAM) and at least 1 other positive standardized examination, such as the balloon expulsion test or defecography. However, HRAM is generally limited to tertiary gastroenterology centres and finding tools for selecting patients for referral for further investigations would be of clinical value.Study: Retrospective data from HRAM and a 2-week patient-completed bowel habit and symptom diary from 99 chronically constipated patients were analyzed.Results: Fifty-seven percent of the patients had a DP pattern during HRAM. In the DP group, 76% of bowel movements with loose or normal stool resulted in a sense of incomplete evacuation compared with 55% of the non-DP group (P=0.004). Straining and sensation of incomplete evacuation with the loose stool were significantly more common in the DP group (P=0.032). Hard stool was a discriminator for non-DP (P=0.044). Multiple logistic regression including incomplete evacuation and normal stool predicted DP with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 50%.Conclusions: The sensation of incomplete evacuation with loose or normal stool could be a potential discriminator in favor of DP in chronically constipated patients. The bowel habit and symptom diary may be a useful tool for stratifying constipated patients for further investigation of suspected DRC.

  • 3.
    Bureychak, Tetyana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Norlin, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Mantorp.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Symptoms and health experience in irritable bowel syndrome with focus on men2022In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 34, no 11, article id e14430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disorder with a predominance in women; IBS in men is less studied. The present study evaluated symptoms as well as health and social experiences of men with IBS. Methods This cross-sectional study included 293 patients with IBS (64 men) and 363 non-IBS controls (62 men). Gastrointestinal symptom diaries were filled in prospectively, and data on comorbidities and healthcare-seeking behavior were assessed by questionnaires. Men with IBS were compared with men without IBS and women with IBS. Key results Compared with women with IBS, men with IBS had fewer contacts with the healthcare system, fewer psychiatric comorbidities, fewer sleeping problems, and less chronic pain. Urgency to defecate and nausea were less common, and stool frequency was higher in men with IBS. There was no difference between men with and without IBS in terms of educational level, satisfaction with household economy, or living with a partner. In contrast, women with IBS more often lived alone, were more often dissatisfied with household economy, and had a lower educational level than women without IBS. Men with IBS had the same proportion of full-time employment as men without IBS but in contrast, the proportion of women with IBS in full-time employment was only 34%, compared to 50% of the women without IBS. Conclusion and inferences The present study improves the understanding of mens experiences of IBS and suggests that sex and gender may be integrated into the biopsychosocial model of IBS.

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  • 4.
    Walter, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Jones, Michael P.
    Macquarie Univ, Australia.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Stjernman, Henrik
    Ryhov Hosp Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Andreasson, Anna
    Macquarie Univ, Australia; Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Measuring the impact of gastrointestinal inconvenience and symptoms on perceived health in the general population - validation of the Short Health Scale for gastrointestinal symptoms (SHS-GI)2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 1406-1413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are intimately related to our wellbeing. The Short Health Scale for GI symptoms (SHS-GI) is a simple questionnaire to measure the impact of GI inconvenience and symptoms on quality of life. The aim was to validate the SHS-GI in a general population sample and to compare it with SHS-data across different patient groups. Method A subsample of 170 participants from a population-based colonoscopy study completed the Rome II questionnaire, GI diaries, psychological questionnaire (hospital anxiety and depression scale) and SHS-GI at follow-up investigation. Psychometric properties of SHS-GI as an overall score were determined by performing a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Spearman correlation between SHS total score and symptoms was calculated in the general population sample. SHS-GI data was compared with SHS data from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and fecal incontinence (FI). Results As expected, the general population rated their impact of GI inconvenience on quality of life as better than the patient populations in terms of all aspects of the SHS-GI. The CFA showed a good model fit meeting all fit criteria in the general population. Cronbachs alpha for the total scale was 0.80 in the general population sample and ranged from 0.72 in the FI sample to 0.88 and 0.89 in the IBD samples. Conclusions SHS-GI demonstrated appropriate psychometric properties in a sample of the normal population. We suggest that SHS-GI is a valid simple questionnaire suitable for measuring the impact of GI symptoms and inconvenience on quality of life in both general and patient populations.

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  • 5.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gutke, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ghaffari, Ghazaleh
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Response of the muscles in the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during the Active Straight Leg Raise in women with and without pelvic girdle pain: An experimental study2016In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 35, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The relationship between activation of the stabilizing muscles of the lumbopelvic region during the Active Straight Leg Raise test and pelvic girdle pain remains unknown. Therefore, the aim was to examine automatic contractions in relation to pre-activation in the muscles of the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during leg lifts, performed as the Active Straight Leg Raise test, in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Methods: Sixteen women with pelvic girdle pain and eleven pain-free women performed contralateral and ipsilateral leg lifts, while surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor and unilaterally from the lower lateral abdominal wall. As participants performed leg lifts onset time was calculated as the time from increased muscle activity to leg lift initiation. Findings: No significant differences were observed between the groups during the contralateral leg lift. During the subsequent ipsilateral leg lift, pre-activation in the pelvic floor muscles was observed in 36% of women with pelvic girdle pain and in 91% of pain-free women (P = 0.01). Compared to pain-free women, women with pelvic girdle pain also showed significantly later onset time in both the pelvic floor muscles (P = 0.01) and the muscles of the lower lateral abdominal wall (P amp;lt; 0.01). Interpretation: We suggest that disturbed motor activation patterns influence womens ability to stabilize the pelvis during leg lifts. This could be linked to provocation of pain during repeated movements. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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  • 6.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Johansson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingemansson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ryn, Ann-Katrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Combination therapy with biofeedback, loperamide, and stool-bulking agents is effective for the treatment of fecal incontinence in women - a randomized controlled trial2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 965-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Biofeedback and medical treatments have been extensively used for moderate fecal incontinence (FI). There is limited data comparing and combining these two treatments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of biofeedback and medical treatments, separately and in combination. Material and methods. Sixty-four consecutive female patients, referred to a tertiary centre for FI, were included. The patients were randomized to start with either biofeedback (4-6 months) or medical treatment with loperamide and stool-bulking agents (2 months). Both groups continued with a combination of treatments, i.e. medical treatment was added to biofeedback and vice versa. A two-week prospective bowel symptom diary and anorectal physiology were evaluated at baseline, after single-and combination treatments. Results. Fifty-seven patients completed the study. Median number of leakage episodes during two weeks decreased from 6 to 3 (p less than 0.0001) from baseline to completion. The patients showed a significant (1) decrease in number of leakages without forewarning (p = 0.04); (2) decrease in number of stools with urgency (p = 0.001); (3) decrease in number of loose stool consistency; and (4) an increase in rectal sensory thresholds, both for maximum tolerable rectal pressure and first sensation (less than 0.01). The combination treatment was superior to both single treatments in terms of symptoms and functions. There was no significant difference between the two groups at any time point. Conclusions. The combination therapy with biofeedback and medical treatment is effective for symptom relief in FI. The symptom improvement was associated with improved fecal consistency, reduced urgency, and increased rectal sensory thresholds.

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  • 7.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gutke, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Predictors for long-term disability in women with persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain2013In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 1665-1673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The majority of prognostic studies on postpartum lumbopelvic pain have investigated factors during pregnancy. Since the majority of women recover within the first few months of delivery, it is unknown if the same predictors are valid for long-term consequences. It is also important to investigate predictors within subgroups of patients with pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain due to their different clinical courses. The aim of this study was to identify predictors for disability 15 months postpartum in women with persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain (PGP).

    Methods

    Data were obtained by clinical tests and questionnaires 3 months postpartum. The outcome 15 months postpartum was disability measured with the Oswestry Disability Index.

    Results

    A multiple linear regression analysis identified two significant two-way interaction effects that were predictive of disability 15 months postpartum: (a) age + trunk flexor endurance, and (b) disability + hip extensor strength.

    Conclusions

    Age, muscle function and disability seem to influence the long-term outcome on disability in women with persistent postpartum PGP. It may be important to consider the possibility of different variables impact on each other when predicting long-term disability. In addition, further studies are needed to investigate the impact of interaction effects on long-term consequences in women with persistent postpartum PGP.

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  • 8. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain and its relation to muscle function2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain affects approximately 50% of all pregnant women. For the majority the pain disappears during the first  months after delivery; however, for a significant number of women, the pain is persistent, with little improvement for more than three months after delivery. Moreover, women who experience persistent lumbopelvic pain three months postpartum are at substantial risk for new episodes or for chronic lumbopelvic pain later in life. Hence, pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain should be considered a major public health issue. In order to develop and offer specific treatment strategies, it is important to identify different subgroups of lumbopelvic pain based on different clinical presentations. Pelvic girdle pain (PGP) is one of the major subgroups of pain related to pregnancy. There is no consensus regarding the underlying mechanisms although instability in the pelvis has been proposed as one of the possible mechanism; thus, further studies are necessary to determine how to treat these women. The local lumbopelvic muscle system, including the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) is thought to contribute to the stabilization of the pelvis and they are also the target for many treatment strategies for lumbopelvic pain.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to improve rehabilitation for women with persistent postpartum PGP by investigating three areas, including: 1) the postural response of the PFM, 2) the effect of home-based specific stabilizing exercises (SSE) that target the local lumbopelvic muscle system and, 3) predictors for disability at 15 months postpartum.

    The thesis comprises three studies: A) a methodological study, B) an experimental study, and C) a clinical randomized controlled trial (RCT). The data is mainly based on muscle function, including recordings of electromyographic (EMG) activation, muscle endurance, and muscle strength. We also collected subjective ratings of disability, healthrelated quality of life, and pain.

    The methodological study showed that the designed protocol, which included limb movements performed at a comfortable speed in both standing and supine positions, was useful for detecting a postural response in the PFM. The experimental study demonstrated that women with persistent postpartum PGP and those free of pain exhibited a feed-forward mechanism in the PFM that responded in anticipation to leg lifts performed in a supine position. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that women with difficulties in transferring load between the trunk and legs (i.e., those with functional pelvic instability) might have a different postural response in the PFM. In the present study, one woman with persistent postpartum PGP failed to present a feed-forward mechanism in the PFM, in agreement with previous studies on other parameters of the PFM from other similar groups.

    The clinical RCT demonstrated that the concept of home-based SSE with visits every second week with the treating physiotherapist was not more effective than the clinical natural course for improving subjective ratings or muscle function in women with persistent postpartum PGP.

    A linear regression analysis revealed a complex picture that suggests that disability 15 months postpartum in women with persistent PGP could be partially predicted by two interaction effects comprising factors from different dimensions: biological, physical functioning, and self-rated function. The proposed association between muscle function and PGP was strengthen. New approaches are most likely needed to further identify subgroups of patients with persistent postpartum PGP that can be considered homogeneous for treatment.

    List of papers
    1. The postural response of the pelvic floor muscles during limb movements: A methodological electromyography study in parous women without lumbopelvic pain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The postural response of the pelvic floor muscles during limb movements: A methodological electromyography study in parous women without lumbopelvic pain
    2009 (English)In: CLINICAL BIOMECHANICS, ISSN 0268-0033, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 183-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain is common. More than 30% of women have persistent pain 3 months after giving birth. There is no consensus regarding the pathology. However, coordination of muscle activity by appropriate timing and amplitude is necessary for maintaining adequate stability in the lumbopelvic area. The aim was to develop a method using surface electromyography to detect a feed-forward response in the pelvic floor muscles during limb movements performed at a comfortable speed applicable in future studies for women with lumbopelvic pain.

    Methods: Ten parous women with no lumbopelvic pain in the past 12 months were included. Surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor muscles and unilaterally from transversus abdominis/internal oblique, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, hip adductors, rectus femoris and deltoid. The subjects performed leg lift in supine and arm lift from standing. The electromyographic onset was related to the initiation of the movement.

    Findings: In the majority of the women the electromyographic onsets of the pelvic floor muscles occurred before the movement was initiated, regardless of whether it was a leg or an arm lift. In addition. electromyographic onsets for the other muscles, except the rectus abdominis during the arm lift, also occurred prior to the movements.

    Interpretation: The findings suggest a feed-forward response in the pelvic floor muscles during leg and arm lifts in women who had previously given birth and were without lumbopelvic pain. Movements performed at a comfortable speed seem to be useful in order to detect such a response.

    Keywords
    Low back stability, Feed-forward, Abdominal muscles, Temporal parameters
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17289 (URN)10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2008.11.004 (DOI)
    Note
    Original Publication: Jenny Sjödahl, Joanna Kvist, Annelie Gutke and Birgitta Öberg, The postural response of the pelvic floor muscles during limb movements: A methodological electromyography study in parous women without lumbopelvic pain, 2009, CLINICAL BIOMECHANICS, (24), 2, 183-189. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2008.11.004 Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. http://www.elsevier.com/ Available from: 2009-07-02 Created: 2009-03-16 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
    2. The Postural response of the pelvic floor muscles during the active straight leg raise test in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain: an experimental study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Postural response of the pelvic floor muscles during the active straight leg raise test in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain: an experimental study
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypothesis was that women with pelvic girdle pain (PGP) would lack a feedforward mechanism in the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) in relation to a functional instability problem. Eight women with PGP and 10 pain-free women were included. A clinical examination was performed to verify that participants with PGP fulfilled the diagnostic criteria used in this study. Surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the PFM and unilaterally from abdominal muscles and the rectus femoris muscle. Participants performed leg lifts (performed as Active Straight Leg Raise (ASLR) tests), first with one leg and then with the other. The lift was also performed with an extra weight strapped on one leg. Median onset of PFM activity occurred before the initiation of the lifts in both groups. One woman experienced more severe PGP/dysfunction demonstrated by a higher score on the ASLR test during the clinical examination. This woman presented onset of PFM activity after the initiation of the lifts. The findings suggest that a feed-forward response of the PFM is present during leg lifts in women with and without postpartum PGP. However, one can speculate that a lack of feed-forward in the PFM may be associated with a load transfer problem.

    Keywords
    Low back pain; joint instability; electromyography
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60188 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-10-07 Created: 2010-10-07 Last updated: 2023-12-28
    3. Specific muscle stabilizing as home exercises for persistent pelvic girdle pain after pregnancy: a randomized, controlled clinical trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Specific muscle stabilizing as home exercises for persistent pelvic girdle pain after pregnancy: a randomized, controlled clinical trial
    2010 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 10, p. 929-935Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of home-based specific stabilizing exercises focusing on the local stabilizing muscles as the only intervention in the treatment of persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain (PGP).

    Design: A prospective, randomized, single-blinded, clinically controlled study.

    Subjects: Eighty-eight women with PGP were recruited 3 months after delivery.

    Methods: The treatment consisted of specific stabilizing exercises targeting the local trunk muscles. The reference group had one telephone contact with a physiotherapist. Primary outcome was disability measured with Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcomes were pain, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), symptom satisfaction, and muscle function.

    Results: No significant differences between groups could be found at 3- or 6-month follow-up regarding primary outcome in disability. Within-group comparisons showed some improvement in both groups in terms of disability, pain, symptom satisfaction and muscle function compared to baseline although the majority still experienced PGP.

    Conclusion: Treatment with this home-training concept of specific stabilizing exercises targeting the local muscles was no more effective in improving consequences of persistent postpartum PGP than the clinically natural course. Regardless of treatment with specific stabilizing exercises or not, the majority still experiences some back pain almost a year after pregnancy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Foundation for Rehabilitation Information, 2010
    Keywords
    Low back pain; postpartum; physical therapy; exercise therapy, pelvic floor; specific stabilizing exercises; trunk muscles
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60189 (URN)10.2340/16501977-0615 (DOI)000284748600006 ()
    Note
    Original Publication: Annelie Gutke, Jenny Sjödahl and Birgitta Öberg, Specific muscle stabilizing as home exercises for persistent pelvic girdle pain after pregnancy: a randomized, controlled clinical trial, 2010, Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, (42), 10, 929-935. http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-0615 Copyright: Foundation for Rehabilitation Information http://www.medicaljournals.se/jrm/ Available from: 2010-10-07 Created: 2010-10-07 Last updated: 2023-12-28
    4. Predictors for disability in women with persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors for disability in women with persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of studies on postpartum lumbopelvic pain have investigated predictors for women experiencing lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy. Since the majority of women recover within the first months of delivery it is unknown if the same predictors are valid for disability in women with persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain (PGP). The aim of this study was to identify predictors for disability in women with persistent PGP 15 months postpartum. Factors were obtained by clinical tests and questionnaires 3 months postpartum. Outcome 15 months postpartum was disability measured with Oswestry Disability Index. A multiple linear regression analysis identified two significant two-way interaction effects that predicted for disability in women with persistent PGP at 15 months postpartum: a) age + trunk flexor endurance, b) disability + hip extensor strength.

    Keywords
    Muscle function; pregnancy-related low back pain; prognostic factor
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60190 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-10-07 Created: 2010-10-07 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
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    Pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain and its relation to muscle function
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  • 9.
    Gutke, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Specific muscle stabilizing as home exercises for persistent pelvic girdle pain after pregnancy: a randomized, controlled clinical trial2010In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 10, p. 929-935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of home-based specific stabilizing exercises focusing on the local stabilizing muscles as the only intervention in the treatment of persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain (PGP).

    Design: A prospective, randomized, single-blinded, clinically controlled study.

    Subjects: Eighty-eight women with PGP were recruited 3 months after delivery.

    Methods: The treatment consisted of specific stabilizing exercises targeting the local trunk muscles. The reference group had one telephone contact with a physiotherapist. Primary outcome was disability measured with Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcomes were pain, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), symptom satisfaction, and muscle function.

    Results: No significant differences between groups could be found at 3- or 6-month follow-up regarding primary outcome in disability. Within-group comparisons showed some improvement in both groups in terms of disability, pain, symptom satisfaction and muscle function compared to baseline although the majority still experienced PGP.

    Conclusion: Treatment with this home-training concept of specific stabilizing exercises targeting the local muscles was no more effective in improving consequences of persistent postpartum PGP than the clinically natural course. Regardless of treatment with specific stabilizing exercises or not, the majority still experiences some back pain almost a year after pregnancy.

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  • 10.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gutke, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The postural response of the pelvic floor muscles during limb movements: A methodological electromyography study in parous women without lumbopelvic pain2009In: CLINICAL BIOMECHANICS, ISSN 0268-0033, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 183-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain is common. More than 30% of women have persistent pain 3 months after giving birth. There is no consensus regarding the pathology. However, coordination of muscle activity by appropriate timing and amplitude is necessary for maintaining adequate stability in the lumbopelvic area. The aim was to develop a method using surface electromyography to detect a feed-forward response in the pelvic floor muscles during limb movements performed at a comfortable speed applicable in future studies for women with lumbopelvic pain.

    Methods: Ten parous women with no lumbopelvic pain in the past 12 months were included. Surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor muscles and unilaterally from transversus abdominis/internal oblique, rectus abdominis, erector spinae, hip adductors, rectus femoris and deltoid. The subjects performed leg lift in supine and arm lift from standing. The electromyographic onset was related to the initiation of the movement.

    Findings: In the majority of the women the electromyographic onsets of the pelvic floor muscles occurred before the movement was initiated, regardless of whether it was a leg or an arm lift. In addition. electromyographic onsets for the other muscles, except the rectus abdominis during the arm lift, also occurred prior to the movements.

    Interpretation: The findings suggest a feed-forward response in the pelvic floor muscles during leg and arm lifts in women who had previously given birth and were without lumbopelvic pain. Movements performed at a comfortable speed seem to be useful in order to detect such a response.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 11.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gutke, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Predictors for disability in women with persistent postpartum pelvic girdle painManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of studies on postpartum lumbopelvic pain have investigated predictors for women experiencing lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy. Since the majority of women recover within the first months of delivery it is unknown if the same predictors are valid for disability in women with persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain (PGP). The aim of this study was to identify predictors for disability in women with persistent PGP 15 months postpartum. Factors were obtained by clinical tests and questionnaires 3 months postpartum. Outcome 15 months postpartum was disability measured with Oswestry Disability Index. A multiple linear regression analysis identified two significant two-way interaction effects that predicted for disability in women with persistent PGP at 15 months postpartum: a) age + trunk flexor endurance, b) disability + hip extensor strength.

  • 12.
    Sjödahl, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gutke, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    The Postural response of the pelvic floor muscles during the active straight leg raise test in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain: an experimental studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The hypothesis was that women with pelvic girdle pain (PGP) would lack a feedforward mechanism in the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) in relation to a functional instability problem. Eight women with PGP and 10 pain-free women were included. A clinical examination was performed to verify that participants with PGP fulfilled the diagnostic criteria used in this study. Surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the PFM and unilaterally from abdominal muscles and the rectus femoris muscle. Participants performed leg lifts (performed as Active Straight Leg Raise (ASLR) tests), first with one leg and then with the other. The lift was also performed with an extra weight strapped on one leg. Median onset of PFM activity occurred before the initiation of the lifts in both groups. One woman experienced more severe PGP/dysfunction demonstrated by a higher score on the ASLR test during the clinical examination. This woman presented onset of PFM activity after the initiation of the lifts. The findings suggest that a feed-forward response of the PFM is present during leg lifts in women with and without postpartum PGP. However, one can speculate that a lack of feed-forward in the PFM may be associated with a load transfer problem.

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