liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Haglund, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Investigating On-Site Production in Construction Using Decoupling Thinking2023In: Advances in Production Management Systems: Production Management Systems for Responsible Manufacturing, Service, and Logistics Futures, Part III / [ed] Alfnes, E., Romsdal, A., Strandhagen, J.O., von Cieminski, G., Romero, D., Cham: Springer, 2023, Vol. 691, p. 126-139Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On-site activities are typically performed when the end-product is immovable once it has been assembled and/or due to weight and space constraints in the production and transportation system. It is primarily a customer order driven type of production with a high level of customization. However, some customer order driven and/or customization activities can, or should, be performed off-site, but these aspects are typically treated in isolation of each other. There is therefore a need to make a combined assessment of on-site activities, customer order driven production, and customization activities. The purpose of this paper is thus to develop a typology that provides a holistic view of on-site activities in relation to customer order driven and customization activities. A flow-based three-dimensional typology is developed to assess combinations of three dimensions: flow driver, flow differentiation, and flow location. The property of each dimension is determined using decoupling points. The typology represents how on-site activities impact the feasibility of customer order driven and customization activities. “On-site” is defined as pursuing activities at the site where the final delivery is made. The findings show that forecast driven activities are risky to perform on-site and these should instead be performed before delivery to the site (off-site). The typology is applied to three case companies to illustrate its applicability to building construction. Future studies should extend the typology application to other types of construction and ETO industries to enable benchmarking of site-based production to other contexts with similar challenges related to on-site/off-site production.

  • 2.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    An ontology for flow thinking based on decoupling points - unravelling a control logic for lean thinking2018In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 433-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous flow is the guiding star for lean thinking and considered the ideal state for value streams. Despite this objective, it is seldom possible to obtain a state of continuous flow in a wider context. Decision makers face dynamic environments, and variable internal preconditions require a flow-thinking approach that provides support in response to these challenges. In the present study, the underlying logic of flow thinking is first identified as the key management layer, and thereafter the effectiveness of flow is targeted. The vision of continuous flow is challenged by different exogenous requirements that result in flow discontinuities. Flow thinking is then used to identify 10 decision categories based on these discontinuities, each related to a type of decoupling point and classified as time-based (exogenous) or conversion-based (endogenous). The flow-thinking approach is finally applied in three different contexts: a time-phased product structure, a modularized approach for planning and control, and a mixed-model value stream.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Yang, Biao
    University of Sussex, England.
    Yang, Ying
    Newcastle University, England.
    Williams, Sharon J.
    Swansea University, Wales.
    Decoupling thinking in service operations: a case in healthcare delivery system design2017In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 387-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of decoupling thinking has been well established in the manufacturing operations and supply chain management literature. This paper explores how this decoupling thinking can be applied in service operations and in particular in health care. It first reviews the relevant literature on decoupling fundamentals, the front- and back-office distinction, and new emerging decoupling thinking in service operations. Subsequently, a flow-based framework including content and process is developed for decoupling thinking in service operations. The framework provides an integrated perspective on customer contact, flow driver and flow differentiation (level of customisation). The framework hence, through flow differentiation, introduces the concept of standardisation versus customisation in a service context. This is followed by a health care case example to illustrate how the framework can be applied. The managerial implications are primarily in terms of a modularised approach to system design and management. The framework offers potential for benchmarking with other service systems as well as with manufacturing systems based on the shared foundation in decoupling thinking. Finally, suggestions are provided for further research opportunities derived from this research.

  • 4.
    Naim, Mohamed M.
    et al.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Spiegler, Virginia L.
    University of Kent, England.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Towill, Denis R.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Identifying the causes of the bullwhip effect by exploiting control block diagram manipulation with analogical reasoning2017In: European Journal of Operational Research, ISSN 0377-2217, E-ISSN 1872-6860, Vol. 263, no 1, p. 240-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Senior managers when solving problems commonly use analogical reasoning, allowing a current target problem situation to be compared to a valid previous experienced source problem from which a potential set of candidate solutions may be identified. We use a single-echelon of the often-quoted Forrester (1961) production-distribution system as a case target model of a complex production and inventory control system that exhibits bullwhip. Initial analogical reasoning based on surface similarity would presuppose a classic control engineering source model consisting of a phase-lag feedback system for which it is difficult to derive the transfer function. Simulation alone would have to be relied on to mitigate the bullwhip effect. By using z-transform block diagram manipulation, the model for a single echelon, consisting of 17 difference equations with five feedback loops is shown to have exact analogy to Burns and Sivazlians (1978) second order system that has no feedback. Therefore, this more appropriate source model is based on a deeper understanding of the behavioral similarities which indicates that the bullwhip effect is not in the case of the target model due to feedback control but due to a first-order derivative, phase advance, term in the feed forward numerator path. Hence a more appropriate candidate solution can be found via the use of a recovery filter. An interdisciplinary framework for exploiting control engineering block diagram manipulation, utilizing analogical reasoning, in a practical setting is presented, as is an example in a contemporary supply chain situation. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Naim, Mohamed M.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Spiegler, Virginia L. M.
    University of Kent, England.
    Lin, Junyi
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    IOBPCS based models and decoupling thinking2017In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 194, p. 153-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inventory and order based production control system (IOBPCS) is mainly a model of a forecast driven production system where the production decision is based on the forecast in combination with the deviation between target inventory and actual inventory. The model has been extended in various directions by including e.g. WIP feedback but also by interpreting the inventory as an order book and hence representing a customer order driven system. In practice a system usually consists of one forecast driven subsystem in tandem with a customer order driven subsystem and the interface between the two subsystems is represented by information flows and a stock point associated with the customer order decoupling point (CODP). The CODP may be positioned late in the flow, as in make to stock systems, or early, as in make to order systems, but in any case the model should be able to capture the properties of both subsystems in combination. A challenge in separating forecast driven from customer order driven is that neither the inventory nor the order book should be allowed to take on negative values, and hence non-linearities are introduced making the model more difficult to solve analytically unless the model is first linearized. In summary the model presented here is based on two derivatives of IOBPCS that are in tandem, and interfaces between them related to where the demand information flow is decoupled and the position of the CODP.

  • 6.
    Noroozi, Sayeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sales and operations planning in the process industry: A literature review2017In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 188, p. 139-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a systematic literature review of Sales and Operations Planning (S&OP) in process industries. The aim is to investigate the present state of S&OP in process industries in comparison to discrete manufacturing industries and to identify the desired future state of the S&OP process based on the specific characteristics of process industries. The findings of this paper show that this issue has not received much attention in the academic world. Hence there is a need for conceptual models with focus on process industries’ specific characteristics. Process industries are actually hybrids of continuous production and discrete production (respectively, upstream and downstream of the discretization point) and the specific characteristics of process industries are related to the continuous production part. Thus, in this paper, the characteristics upstream of the discretization point are investigated and the integration of them in the S&OP process of the process industries is stressed.

  • 7.
    Noroozi, Sayeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    S&OP related key performance measures with integration of sustainability: a decoupling point based and modularized view on supply chains2017In: International manufacturing strategy in a time of great flux / [ed] Louis Brennan, Alessandra Vecchi, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 197-233Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Key performance measures (KPMs) play an important role in the management of supply chains. An important integrator of the supply chain management is Sales and Operations Planning (S&OP) that connects the strategic and operational plans. S&OP usually impacts supply chain performance through the management of resources and customer satisfaction. This paper suggests a new classification for S&OP-related KPMs. The classification follows a typology of decision categories which are based on decoupling points. The typology supports a modularized approach to supply chain design and provides the possibility to select the KPMs according to the decision criteria of each module. The KPMs are further linked to the SCOR performance attributes to provide the link to the companies’ strategic directives and the strategic conflicts which appear in the modules of the typology are discussed. The sustainable KPMs have also been included in order to provide opportunities for improved sustainable performance. The integration of sustainable KPMs helps in creating competitive advantages for companies through development of capabilities which are beneficial but hard to replicate by competitors. The paper ends with an example that illustrates how the classification can be applied to a case company.

  • 8.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Noroozi, Sayeh
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A modularised typology for flow design based on decoupling points - a holistic view on process industries and discrete manufacturing industries2016In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 27, no 16, p. 1344-1355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management of production activities covers a wide range of decisions. In this paper, a modularised approach is suggested that, through configuration, generates a case-specific flow design. The approach is based on identification of decision categories that are generic and fundamental in the flow design, covering both discrete manufacturing industries and process industries. Each decision category identifies a unique property of the flow which changes at a particular point: this is termed a decoupling point. A three-dimensional modularised typology is developed by combining three different decision categories. Cases from the steel industry and the tooling industry are used to illustrate how the typology can be applied. The modularised approach provides a typology for the application of both qualitative and quantitative methods for flow management, including planning, control and performance management.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Noroozi, Sayeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A modularized framework for sales and operations planning with focus on process industries2016In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 65-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests a modularized sales and operations planning (S&OP) framework, consisting of content and process. The framework’s content is based on a typology of decoupling points in which the effect of decoupling points on the decision variables in S&OP is studied. The framework’s process takes a step back and addresses the need for a more elaborate design to precede the operational use of S&OP content for different production contexts. The framework supports both process industries (PIs) and discrete manufacturing industries (DIs), and recognizes their specific requirements and reflects them in their S&OP. The differentiating characteristics of PIs and DIs are emphasized through three different decoupling points, namely: discretization decoupling point, control mode decoupling point, and customer order decoupling point. The suggested framework aims to fill the gap in the literature regarding the lack of aggregate planning processes that match the PIs’ specific requirements by reflecting the differentiating characteristics of PIs in S&OP.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Spiegler, Virginia L. M.
    et al.
    Brunel University, England.
    Naim, Mohamed M.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Towill, Denis R.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A technique to develop simplified and linearised models of complex dynamic supply chain systems2016In: European Journal of Operational Research, ISSN 0377-2217, E-ISSN 1872-6860, Vol. 251, no 3, p. 888-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need to identify and categorise different types of nonlinearities that commonly appear in supply chain dynamics models, as well as establishing suitable methods for linearising and analysing each type of nonlinearity. In this paper simplification methods to reduce model complexity and to assist in gaining system dynamics insights are suggested. Hence, an outcome is the development of more accurate simplified linear representations of complex nonlinear supply chain models. We use the highly cited Forrester production-distribution model as a benchmark supply chain system to study nonlinear control structures and apply appropriate analytical control theory methods. We then compare performances of the linearised model with numerical solutions of the original nonlinear model and with other previous research on the same model. Findings suggest that more accurate linear approximations can be found. These simplified and linearised models enhance the understanding of the system dynamics and transient responses, especially for inventory and shipment responses. A systematic method is provided for the rigorous analysis and design of nonlinear supply chain dynamics models, especially when overly simplistic linear relationship assumptions are not possible or appropriate. This is a precursor to robust control system optimisation. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Lindholm, Anna
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Johnsson, Charlotta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Quttineh, Nils-Hassan
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lidestam, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Henningsson, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tang, Ou
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nytzén, Nils-Petter
    Perstorp AB, Sweden.
    Forsman, Krister
    Perstorp AB, Sweden.
    Hierarchical Scheduling and Utility Disturbance Management in the Process Industry2013In: Proceedings for IFAC Conference on Manufacturing Modelling, Management and Control (MIM2013), 2013, Elsevier, 2013, p. 140-145Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The integration of scheduling and control in the process industry is a topic that has been frequently discussed during the recent years, but many challenges remain in order to achieve integrated solutions that can be implemented for large-scale industrial sites. In this paper we consider production control under disturbances in the supply of utilities at integrated sites together with the integration towards production scheduling. Utilities, such as steam and cooling water, are often shared between the production areas of a site, which enables formulation of an optimization problem for determining the optimal supply of utilities to each area at the occurrence of a disturbance. Optimization in two timescales is suggested to handle the scheduling and disturbance management problems in a hierarchical fashion. The suggested structure has been discussed with companies within the chemical process industry. A simple example is provided to show how the structure may be used

  • 12.
    Spiegler, Virginia L M
    et al.
    Cardiff University, Wales .
    Naim, Mohamed M
    Cardiff University, Wales .
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A control engineering approach to the assessment of supply chain resilience2012In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 50, no 21, p. 6162-6187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no consensus on the supply chain management definition of resilience. To aid in evaluating the dynamic behaviour of such systems we need to establish clearly elucidated performance criteria that encapsulate the attributes of resilience. A literature review establishes the latter as readiness, responsiveness and recovery. We also identify robustness as a necessary condition that would complement resilience. We find that the Integral of the Time Absolute Error (ITAE) is an appropriate control engineering measure of resilience when it is applied to inventory levels and shipment rates. We use the ITAE to evaluate an often used benchmark model of make-to-stock supply chains consisting of three decision parameters. We use both linear and nonlinear forms of the model in our evaluation. Our findings suggest that optimum solutions for resilience do not yield a system that is robust to uncertainties in lead-time. Hence supply chains will experience drastic changes in their resilience performance when lead-time changes.

  • 13.
    Naim, M.M.
    et al.
    Cardiff University, Wales .
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Grubbström, Robert W.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A net present value assessment of make-to-order and make-to-stock manufacturing systems2007In: Omega: The International Journal of Management Science, ISSN 0305-0483, E-ISSN 1873-5274, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 524-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper shows the impact of using the net present value (NPV) on parameter selection in the ordering policy of a production planning and control system. Using a well understood and documented model, the net present value is used as an objective function to determine the discounted future variance costs resulting from the model's dynamics. The NPV of the variance (NPVv) is defined and applied to the model under make-to-order and make-to-stock conditions. We show that the cost structure of the manufacturing system defines the NPVv and hence aids in identifying the most appropriate control strategy to apply. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Analysis of smoothing techniques: Application to production-inventory systems2006In: Kybernetes, ISSN 0368-492X, E-ISSN 1758-7883, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 1323-1347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - To provide an overview of how a number of frequently used smoothing-based forecasting techniques can be modelled for use in dynamic analysis of production-inventory systems. Design/methodology/approach - The smoothing techniques are modelled using transfer functions and state space representation. Basic control theory is used for analysing the dynamic properties. Findings - A set of expressions are derived for the smoothing techniques and dynamic properties are identified. Practical implications - Dynamic properties are important in many applications. It is shown that the different smoothing techniques can have very different influences on the dynamic behaviour and therefore should be considered as a factor when smoothing parameters are decided on. Originality/value - Dynamic behaviour of production-inventory systems can be analysed using control theory based on, e.g. transfer functions or state space models. In this paper a set of models for five common smoothing techniques are analysed and their respective dynamic properties are highlighted. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 15.
    Olhager, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics .
    Selldin, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics .
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Decoupling the value chain2006In: International Journal of Value Chain Management, ISSN 1741-5357, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 19-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All value chains are not designed the same way. A major determinant is the type of product that is to be supplied through the chain or network, calling for different types of value chains. An interesting model for this selection is the one developed by Fisher, arguing that products can be characterised as being either functional or innovative, and that supply chains are either physically efficient or market-responsive. Certain combinations of products and supply chains are assumed to provide matches whereas other combinations lead to mismatches. This paper combines this approach with the concept of a customer order decoupling point. We distinguish between a product supply decoupling point and a demand mediation decoupling point. A decoupling point divides the value chain into two distinct parts, one upstream with certain characteristics and one downstream with distinctly different characteristics. In this paper we specifically explore how the Fisher model can be used to characterise the role and features of upstream versus downstream value chain operations relative to the product supply decoupling point and the demand mediation decoupling point. Copyright © 2006 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  • 16.
    Rudberg, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Miltenburgs ramverk för produktionsstrategi2006In: Produktionsstrategi, Vol. 2, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Dynamic analysis of a production-inventory model2005In: Kybernetes, ISSN 0368-492X, E-ISSN 1758-7883, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 803-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - A production-inventory system based on a model proposed by Axsäter is examined with the purpose of understanding the dynamic properties of the model. Design/methodology/approach - The information flow concept is discussed and a dynamic analysis using a system simplification approach is carried out to achieve an understanding of the dynamic behaviour of the system. Finally, the information flow is examined and analysed from a hierarchical perspective. Findings - The model is extended to include an order decision rule and a production unit and it is shown that the extended model has the capability to represent the dynamics of a number of different system management principles. The three different model instances of base stock, kanban and material requirements planning character are analysed. Originality/value - Dynamic modelling of production-inventory and supply chain models are usually analysed at an aggregate level not involving any complex relations of materials or capacities. In this paper, this line of research is merged with an approach based on multiple information channels using matrix representation and it is shown how a system simplification approach can be used for this purpose. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 18.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Integrating production and engineering perspectives on the customer order decoupling point2005In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 623-641Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Wikner, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Introducing a customer order decoupling zone in logistics decision-making2005In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 211-224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Rudberg, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Mass customization in terms of the customer order decoupling point2004In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 445-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years the customer order decoupling point (CODP) has gained increased acceptance as an important concept when organizing value-adding activities in production and logistics. The CODP, which is defined as the point in the value-adding material flow that separates decisions made under uncertainty from decisions made under certainty concerning customer demand, is however normally only used for production- and distribution- related activities. Here we adjust the typical CODP typology and show how the engineering resources can be integrated with the production process so as to take the features of mass customization environments into account. This paper also examines existing mass customization frameworks and offers a more thorough and nuanced typology for classifying various levels of mass customization. Finally, the adjusted CODP typology is used as a foundation for developing a reliable order promise process for mass customizers.

  • 21.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Continuous-time dynamic modelling of variable lead times2003In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 2787-2798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic modelling of production-inventory systems usually involves lead time models since this is one of the most important aspects of these systems. Many different models are possible and this paper presents an overview and some ideas for how the models may be interpreted. Three different approaches to continuous-time dynamic modelling of variable lead times based on Control Theory are discussed. Two of the models can easily be incorporated into linear models based on the Laplace transform. The models are shown to be three instances of a generic delay model, which by careful selection of two parameters can be adapted to a wide variety of systems. Also the relation between waiting line theory concepts and the generic delay model is analysed, establishing an interpretation of the models as generating the concept of expected dynamic behaviour.

  • 22.
    Olhager, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Rudberg, Martin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Long-term capacity management: Linking the perspectives from manufacturing strategy and sales and operations planning2001In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 215-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient long-term capacity management is vital to any manufacturing firm. It has implications on competitive performance in terms of cost, delivery speed, dependability and flexibility. In a manufacturing strategy, capacity is a structural decision category, dealing with dynamic capacity expansion and reduction relative to the long-term changes in demand levels. Sales and operations planning (S&OP) is the long-term planning of production levels relative to sales within the framework of a manufacturing planning and control system. Within the S&OP, resource planning is used for determining the appropriate capacity levels in order to support the production plan. Manufacturing strategy and sales and operations planning provide two perspectives on long-term capacity management, raising and treating different issues. In this paper, we compare and link them in a framework for long-term capacity management.

  • 23.
    Olhager, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics .
    Wikner, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Production Economics.
    Production planning and control tools2000In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 210-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are numerous tools available to be used for production planning and control purposes. The number of tools is ever increasing, and so are the levels of sophistication as well as complexity. For the specific manufacturing firm, the task of selecting the most appropriate set of tools is not trivial. However, in recent years, the understanding of the relationship between tools and manufacturing environments for which they are suitable has increased. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of production planning and control tools available today, as well as new trends, issues and ideas.

1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf