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  • 1.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Linnea
    Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, MAP Unit, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lemon, Nina
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Daniel
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Sweden.
    An Interactive Visualization Tool for Collaborative Construction Logistics Planning-Creating a Sustainable Project Vicinity2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 24, article id 17032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intensity of urban development is presently high, creating a construction boom. The number of transports per project is a major consideration in urban goods transport and emissions from a project. Presently, the stakeholders take part in a "blame game" in assigning fault for the emissions from construction transport and the disturbances to society in the vicinity of construction sites. Incorporation of logistics into urban planning requires an increased understanding of the interaction between construction transport flows and urban land use, and the inclusion of different stakeholders. The purpose of the study is to support collaborative planning of construction transport in urban planning, and specifically to explore how a planning tool based on interactive visualization could be designed. An action research process has generated two prototypes of an interactive visualization tool for collaborative planning of construction transport. The prototype facilitates a "shared deliberation space" by identifying alternatives and assessing predicted consequences, which supports a collaborative urban planning process. Based on the research conducted, we claim that the responsibility of construction transport planning should be taken by the municipality, i.e., the urban planning and traffic planning functions.

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  • 2.
    Enlund, Desirée
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ringdahl, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Börütecene, Ahmet
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Angelakis, Vangelis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The role of sensors in the production of smart city spaces2022In: Big Data and Society, E-ISSN 2053-9517, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 20539517221110218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart cities build on the idea of collecting data about the city in order for city administration to be operated more efficiently. Within a research project gathering an interdisciplinary team of researchers ? engineers, designers, gender scholars and human geographers ? we have been working together using participatory design approaches to explore how paying attention to the diversity of human needs may contribute to making urban spaces comfortable and safe for more people. The project team has deployed sensors collecting data on air quality, sound and mobility in a smart city testbed in Norrköping, Sweden. While these sensors are meant to capture an accurate ?map? of the street and what is going on along it, our interdisciplinary conversations around the sensors have revealed the heterogeneity both of smart city planning and spatial formulations of the city. The discussions have given rise to questions regarding the work that goes into constructing the sensor box itself, as well as the work of deploying it, and how these influence the ?map? that the sensors produce. In this paper, we draw on Lefebvre to explore how the sensors themselves produce smart spaces. We analyze how the box depends on perceived space to function (e.g. requiring electricity), and simultaneously it produces conceptualizations of space that are influenced by the materiality of the box itself (e.g. sensors being affected by heat and noise). Further, we explore how the (in)visibility of sensor technology influences lived space.

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  • 3.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    Media Technology and Interaction Design, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Characterizing Interaction Design by Its Ideals: A Discipline in Transition2021In: She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation, ISSN 2405-8726 , Vol. 7, no 1, p. 24-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a way to capture a broadly acceptable high-level characterization of design, we focus on the guiding values or ideals of the discipline. We first reason from the notion of engineering interfaces for usability and utility up to the 1990s to the current ideal of designing interfaces for experience and meaning. Next, we identify three recent technical and societal developments that are challenging the existing ideals of interaction design, namely the move towards hybrid physical/digital materials, the emergence of an increasingly complex and fluid digital ecology, and the increasing proportion of autonomous or partially autonomous systems changing their behavior over time and with use. These challenges in turn motivate us to propose three directions in which new ideals for interaction design might be sought: the first is to go beyond the language-body divide that implicitly frames most of our current understandings of experience and meaning, the second is to extend the scope of interaction design from individual interfaces to the complex sociotechnical fabric of human and nonhuman actors, and the third is to go beyond predictability by learning to design with machine learning.

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  • 4.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Designing the user experience of musical sonification in public and semi-public spaces2021In: SoundEffects, E-ISSN 1904-500X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 125-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sonification refers to sonic expression of data or information. It is often thought of as an auditory complement, providing additional information about data which can reveal patterns and facilitate interpretation and understanding of the data. Hence, the listening space created by a sonifi cation is always a hybrid where auditory augmentation complements other information modalities and, in some cases, also spatial qualities. In this work, we focus on sonifi cation in public and semi-public spaces, and specifi cally on musical sonifi cation – the use of musical sounds to create a sonic environment, augmenting or complementing a physical shared space. We draw upon established approaches in interaction design to focus our work on the user experience of musical sonifi cation in public and semi-public spaces. Specifi cally, we fi rst identify the experiential qualities of sonic atmosphere and performativity as important aspects of sonifi cation in public and semi-public spaces, then use those experiential qualities generatively in the speculative design of a musical sonifi cation sketch. The design sketch comprises a dynamic musical sonifi cation of air quality data, intending to give citizens an awareness and an enhanced individual and interpersonal understanding of air quality in their city.

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  • 5.
    Harrison, Katherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Börütecene, Ahmet
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Enlund, Desirée
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ringdahl, Rasmus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Angelakis, Vangelis
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sustainability Means Inclusivity: Engaging Citizens in Early-Stage Smart City Development2021In: IEEE technology & society magazine, ISSN 0278-0097, E-ISSN 1937-416X, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of how cities can be designed and developed in an inclusive and sustainable direction is monumental. Smart city technologies currently offer the most promising solution for long-term sustainability, but the impact of such solutions will be significantly reduced without long-term, widespread adoption by citizens.

  • 6.
    Tran Luciani, Danwei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Designing fine-grained interactions for automation in air traffic control2020In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 685-701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our work aims to explore novel approaches to the challenge of designing the interaction between people and automation. Through a case study within the domain of air traffic control, we focus on designing fine-grained human–automation interactions. We design a concept and develop an interactive lo-fi prototype of an assisted sketching system to enable air traffic controllers to interact with automation in a fine-grained manner and to externalize mental images. Assisted sketching seems to offer a possible way to communicate different degrees of predictive certainty using visual cues and interaction. Our insights further suggest that externalization through assisted sketching could encourage exploration of future scenarios, and support communication and collaboration between air traffic controllers and between air traffic controllers and pilots. The explorative benefits for the individual decision-making process might be more evident in situations where air traffic controllers have more time for reflection, for example during planning or debriefing and in educational settings.

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  • 7.
    Besançon, Lonni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tennant, Jonathan P.
    Southern Denmark University Library, Odense, Denmark; Universite de Paris, Rue Charles V, Paris, France; Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education, Ubud, Indonesia.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Open up: a survey on open and non-anonymized peer reviewing2020In: BMC Research Integrity and Peer Review, ISSN 2058-8615, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Our aim is to highlight the benefits and limitations of open and non-anonymized peer review. Our argument is based on the literature and on responses to a survey on the reviewing process of alt.chi, a more or less open review track within the so-called Computer Human Interaction (CHI) conference, the predominant conference in the field of human-computer interaction. This track currently is the only implementation of an open peer review process in the field of human-computer interaction while, with the recent increase in interest in open scientific practices, open review is now being considered and used in other fields.

    Methods

    We ran an online survey with 30 responses from alt.chi authors and reviewers, collecting quantitative data using multiple-choice questions and Likert scales. Qualitative data were collected using open questions.

    Results

    Our main quantitative result is that respondents are more positive to open and non-anonymous reviewing for alt.chi than for other parts of the CHI conference. The qualitative data specifically highlight the benefits of open and transparent academic discussions. The data and scripts are available on https://osf.io/vuw7h/, and the figures and follow-up work on http://tiny.cc/OpenReviews.

    Conclusion

    While the benefits are quite clear and the system is generally well-liked by alt.chi participants, they remain reluctant to see it used in other venues. This concurs with a number of recent studies that suggest a divergence between support for a more open review process and its practical implementation.

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  • 8.
    Lindvall, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sectra AB.
    Sanner, Alexander
    Sectra AB, Research Department, Linköping, Sweden.
    Petré, Fredrik
    Sectra AB, Research Department, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindman, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Treanor, Darren
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology. University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Lundström, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sectra AB.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    TissueWand, a rapid histopathology annotation tool2020In: Journal of Pathology Informatics, ISSN 2229-5089, E-ISSN 2153-3539, Vol. 11, no 27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent advancements in machine learning (ML) bring great possibilities for the development of tools to assist with diagnostic tasks within histopathology. However, these approaches typically require a large amount of ground truth training data in the form of image annotations made by human experts. As such annotation work is a very time-consuming task, there is a great need for tools that can assist in this process, saving time while not sacrificing annotation quality. Methods: In an iterative design process, we developed TissueWand – an interactive tool designed for efficient annotation of gigapixel-sized histopathological images, not being constrained to a predefined annotation task. Results: Several findings regarding appropriate interaction concepts were made, where a key design component was semi-automation based on rapid interaction feedback in a local region. In a user study, the resulting tool was shown to cause substantial speed-up compared to manual work while maintaining quality. Conclusions: The TissueWand tool shows promise to replace manual methods for early stages of dataset curation where no task-specific ML model yet exists to aid the effort.

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  • 9.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Exploranation: A New Science Communication Paradigm2018In: IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, ISSN 0272-1716, E-ISSN 1558-1756, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 13-20Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Science communication is facing a paradigm shift, based on the convergence of exploratory and explanatory visualization. In this article, we coin the term exploranation to denote the way in which visualization methods from scientific exploration can be used to communicate results and how methods in explanatory visualization can enrich exploration.

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  • 10.
    Lindvall, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sectra AB.
    Molin, Jesper
    Sectra AB.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    From machine learning to machine teaching: the importance of UX2018In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 52-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Arvola, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Indiana University, USA.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    What we mean by interactive form2018In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The following blog post is edited from an email conversation between the authors about the concept of interactive form, which incidentally is the name of a course given at Linköping University. If you do teach a course, it might be a good idea to understand the meaning of the course name.

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  • 12.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    On the significance of making in interaction design research2016In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 13.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Technical communication practices in the collaborative mediascape: A case study in media structure transformation2016In: Communication Design Quarterly Review, ISSN 2166-1200, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional practices in technical communication are increasingly being challenged by the emergence of collaborative media that enable users to access technical information created by non- professionals. At the same time, these technologies also allow technical communicators to provide a continually expanding audience with knowledge and skills needed now more than ever. Through a co-design case study, researchers developed a new and innovative platform for producing and distributing technical information including user-generated content. Moreover, the events of the case included market strategies in which a professional organization moved from a reactive to a more proactive position on collaborative media. In so doing, they outlined a set of new professional roles for technical communicators including editors, curators, facilitators, and community managers.

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  • 14.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The RTD Community and the Big Picture2015In: Constructivist Foundations, ISSN 1782-348X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 28-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Research Through Design (RTD) conferences represent important steps towards more meaningful academic practices, not only within the field of research through design but potentially for many related academic fields. In order to realize this potential, I would like to take a step back and look at the RTD community in the context of a larger academic landscape.

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