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  • 1.
    Engstroem, Gunnar
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Dekkers, Koen
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lin, Yi-Ting
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Kaohsiung Med Univ, Taiwan.
    Ahlm, Kristin
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Ahlstroem, Hakan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden; Antaros Med AB, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bergstroem, Goeran
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Brandberg, John
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Cederlund, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Eriksson, Maria J.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Fall, Tove
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Gigante, Bruna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gummesson, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sweden.
    Hagstroem, Emil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hamrefors, Viktor
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hedner, Jan
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Johnson, Linda
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Mannila, Maria
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Sweden.
    Persson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Persson, Margaretha
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ramnemark, Anna
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Annika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Univ, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Caroline
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skoglund Larsson, Linn
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Skoeld, C. Magnus
    Karolinska Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Soederberg, Stefan
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Toren, Kjell
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Waldenstroem, Anders
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Wollmer, Per
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Zaigham, Suneela
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ekholmen. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sundstroem, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Pulmonary function and atherosclerosis in the general population: causal associations and clinical implications2024In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduced lung function is associated with cardiovascular mortality, but the relationships with atherosclerosis are unclear. The population-based Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage study measured lung function, emphysema, coronary CT angiography, coronary calcium, carotid plaques and ankle-brachial index in 29,593 men and women aged 50-64 years. The results were confirmed using 2-sample Mendelian randomization. Lower lung function and emphysema were associated with more atherosclerosis, but these relationships were attenuated after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Lung function was not associated with coronary atherosclerosis in 14,524 never-smokers. No potentially causal effect of lung function on atherosclerosis, or vice versa, was found in the 2-sample Mendelian randomization analysis. Here we show that reduced lung function and atherosclerosis are correlated in the population, but probably not causally related. Assessing lung function in addition to conventional cardiovascular risk factors to gauge risk of subclinical atherosclerosis is probably not meaningful, but low lung function found by chance should alert for atherosclerosis.

  • 2.
    Johannesen, Kasper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Siverskog, Jonathan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Groenqvist, Erik
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Implementation of Ticagrelor Reduced Mortality in Routine Clinical Care: Evidence From a Natural Experiment Including 109 995 Patients With Myocardial Infarction in Sweden2023In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 12, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundEffectiveness estimates from observational studies on ticagrelor use in routine clinical care are conflicting, with some contrary to the results of the pivotal randomized controlled trial of ticagrelor in acute coronary syndrome. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of implementing and using ticagrelor in routine clinical care in patients with myocardial infarction using a natural experimental approach. Methods and ResultsThis is a retrospective cohort study including patients hospitalized for myocardial infarction in Sweden between 2009 and 2015. The study exploited differences in the timing and speed of ticagrelor implementation between treatment centers as a source of random treatment assignment. The effect of implementing and using ticagrelor was estimated based on the admitting centers likelihood of treating patients with ticagrelor, measured as the proportion of patients treated in the 90 days before patient admission. The main outcome was 12-month mortality. The study included 109 955 patients, of whom 30 773 were treated with ticagrelor. Being admitted to a treatment center with higher past ticagrelor use was associated with a reduction in 12-month mortality (2.5 percentage points for 100% versus 0% past use [95% CI, 0.2-4.8]). The results are in line with the findings from the ticagrelor pivotal trial. ConclusionsUsing a natural experiment, this study finds that the implementation and use of ticagrelor in routine clinical care has reduced 12-month mortality in patients admitted to the hospital with myocardial infarction in Sweden and supports the external validity of randomized evidence on ticagrelor effectiveness.

  • 3.
    Skibniewski, Mikolaj
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Venetsanos, Dimitrios
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Batra, Gorav
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hofmann, Robin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nielsen, Susanne J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jeppsson, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Long-term antithrombotic therapy after coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with preoperative atrial fibrillation. A nationwide observational study from the SWEDEHEART registry2023In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 257, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To provide data guiding long-term antithrombotic therapy after coronar y arter y by-pass grafting (CABG) in patients with preoperative atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods and results From the SWEDEHEART registry, we included all patients, between January 2006 and September 2016, with preoperative AF and CHA2DS2-VASC score >2, undergoing CABG. Based on dispensed prescriptions 12 to 18 months after CABG, patients were divided in 3 groups: use of platelet inhibitors (PI) only, oral anticoagulant (OAC) only or a combination of OAC + PI. Outcomes were: Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE, [all-cause death, myocardial infarction, or stroke]), net adverse clinical events (NACE, [MACCE or bleeding]) and the individual components of NACE. Inverse probability of treatment weighting was used to adjust for the non-randomized study design. Among 2,564 patients, 1,040 (41%) were treated with PI alone, 1,064 (41%) with OAC alone, and 460 (18%) with PI + OAC. Treatment with PI alone was associated with higher risk for MACCE (adjusted HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.09-1.88), driven by higher risk for stroke and MI, compared with OAC alone. Treatment with PI + OAC, was associated with higher risk for NACE (adjusted HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.06-1.85), driven by higher risk for bleeds, compared with OAC alone. Conclusion In this real-world observational study, a high proportion of patients with AF, undergoing CABG, did not receive a long-term OAC therapy. Treatment with OAC alone was associated with a net clinical benefit, compared with PI alone or PI + OAC. (Am Heart J 2023;257:69-77.)

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  • 4.
    Persson Lindell, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Operations management PVC.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Muhr, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Clinical decision support for familial hypercholesterolemia (CDS-FH): Rationale and design of a cluster randomized trial in primary care2022In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 247, p. 132-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an underdiagnosed and undertreated genetic disorder with high risk of premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and death. Clinical decision support (CDS) systems have the potential to aid in the identification and management of patients with FH. Prior studies using computer-based systems to screen patients for FH have shown promising results, but there has been no randomized controlled trial conducted. The aim of the current cluster randomized study is to evaluate if a CDS can increase the identification of FH. Methods: We have developed a CDS integrated in the electronic health records that will be activated in patients with elevated cholesterol levels (total cholesterol > 8 mmol/L or low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol > 5.5 mmol/L, adjusted for age, ongoing lipid lowering therapy and presence of premature coronar y arter y disease) at increased risk for FH. When activated, the CDS will urge the physician to send an automatically generated referral to the local lipid clinic for further evaluation. To evaluate the effects of the CDS, all primary care clinics will be cluster randomized 1:1 to either CDS intervention or standard care in a Swedish region with almost 500,000 inhabitants. The primary endpoint will be the number of patients diagnosed with FH at 30 months. Resource use and long-term health consequences will be estimated to assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Conclusion : Despite increasing awareness of FH, the condition remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. The present study will investigate whether a CDS can increase the number of patients being diagnosed with FH.

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  • 5.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. FoU-enheten, NU-sjukvården, Sverige.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet, Sverige.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    institutionen för neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle, Karolinska institutet, Sverige; de två sista Tema inflammation och åldrande, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sverige.
    de Geer, Lina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, ANOPIVA US. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    sektionen för geriatrik, Helsingborgs lasarett; institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper Helsingborg, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    institutionen för neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle, arbetsterapi, Karolinska institutet; Tema kvinnohälsa och hälsoprofessioner, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Sverige.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Clinical frailty scale – skörhet ärett sätt att skatta biologisk ålder: [Clinical Frailty Scale - a proxy estimate of biological age]2022In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 119, article id 22040Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term frailty denotes a multi-dimensional syndrome characterised by reduced physiological reserves and increased vulnerability. Frailty may be used as a marker of biological age, distinct from chronological age. There are several instruments for frailty assessment. The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) is probably the most commonly used in the acute care context. It is a 9-level scale, derived from the accumulated deficit model of frailty, which combines comorbidity, disability, and cognitive impairment. The CFS assessment is fast and easy to implement in daily clinical practice. The CFS is relevant for risk stratification, and may also be used as a screening instrument to identify frail patients suitable for further geriatric evaluation, i.e. a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). By providing information on long-term prognosis, it may improve informed decision-making on an individual basis.

  • 6.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Therese
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Vial, Dominique
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Long term risk and costs of bleeding in men and women treated with triple antithrombotic therapy: An observational study2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 3, article id e0248359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Bleeding is the most common non-ischemic complication in patients with coronary revascularisation procedures, associated with prolonged hospitalisation and increased mortality. Many factors predispose for bleeds in these patients, among those sex. Anyhow, few studies have characterised the population receiving triple antithrombotic therapy (TAT) as well as long term bleeds from a sex perspective. We investigated the one year rate of bleeds in patients receiving TAT, potential sex disparities and premature discontinuation of TAT. We also assessed health care costs in bleeders vs non-bleeders. Setting Three hospitals in the County of ostergotland, Sweden during 2009-2015. Participants All patients discharged with TAT registered in the SWEDEHEART registry. Primary and secondary outcome measures All bleeds receiving medical attention during one-year follow-up were collected by retrieving relevant information about each patient from medical records. Resource use associated with bleeds was assigned unit cost to estimate the health care costs associated with bleeding episodes. Results Among 272 patients, 156 bleeds occurred post-discharge, of which 28.8% were gastrointestinal. In total 54.4% had at least one bleed during or after the index event and 40.1% bled post discharge of whom 28.7% experienced a TIMI major or minor bleeding. Women discontinued TAT prematurely more often than men (52.9 vs 36.1%, p = 0.01) and bled more (48.6 vs. 37.1%, p = 0.09). One-year mean health care costs were EUR 575 and EUR 5787 in non-bleeding and bleeding patients, respectively. Conclusion The high bleeding incidence in patients with TAT, especially in women, is a cause of concern. There is a need for an adequately sized randomised, controlled trial to determine a safe but still effective treatment for these patients.

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  • 7.
    Sigvant, B.
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden; Cent Hosp Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hasvold, P.
    AstraZeneca NordicBalt, Sweden.
    Thuresson, M.
    Statisticon AB, Sweden.
    Jernberg, T.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nordanstig, J.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease: Treatment patterns and long-term outcome in men and women results from a Swedish nationwide study2021In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 28, no 13, p. 1426-1434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Differences in comorbidity, pharmacotherapy, cardiovascular (CV) outcome, and mortality between myocardial infarction (MI) patients and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients are not well documented. Aim The aim of this study was to compare comorbidity, treatment patterns, CV outcome, and mortality in MI and PAD patients, focusing on sex differences. Methods This observational, population-based study used data retrieved from mandatory Swedish national registries. The risks of MI and death were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Secondary preventive drug use was characterized. Cox proportional risk hazard modelling was used to determine the risk of specific events. Results Overall, 91,808 incident MI patients and 52,408 PAD patients were included. CV mortality for MI patients at 12, 24, and 36 months after index was 12.3%, 19.3%, and 25.4%, and for PAD patients it was 15.5%, 23.4%, and 31.0%. At index, 89% of MI patients and 65% of PAD patients used aspirin and 74% and 53%, respectively, used statins. Unlike MI women, women with PAD had a lower rate of other CV-related comorbidities and a lower risk of CV events (age-adjusted hazard ratio 0.81, 95% confidence interval 0.79-0.84), CV death (0.78, 0.75-0.82), and all-cause death (0.78, 0.76-0.80) than their PAD male counterparts. Conclusion PAD patients were less intensively treated and had a higher CV mortality than MI patients. Women with PAD were less likely than men to present with established polyvascular disease, whereas the opposite was true of women with MI. This result indicates that the lower-limb vasculature may more often be the index site for atherosclerosis in women.

  • 8.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sex differences in platelet reactivity in patients with myocardial infarction treated with triple antiplatelet therapy-results from assessing platelet activity in coronary heart disease (APACHE)2021In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 524-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    )Several earlier studies have reported increased risk of bleeding in women with myocardial infarction, (MI) compared to men. The reasons for the observed difference are incompletely understood, but one suggested explanation has been excess dosing of antithrombotic drugs in women. The aim of this prospective observational study was to assess sex differences in platelet activity in patients treated with three different platelet inhibitors. We recruited 125 patients (37 women and 88 men) with MI, scheduled for coronary angiography. All patients received clopidogrel and aspirin. A subgroup of patients received glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa-inhibitor. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was assessed at several time points, using impedance aggregometry. SolubleP-selectin was measured 3 days after admission. There were no significant differences between women and men in baseline features or comorbidities except higher frequency of diabetes, lower hemoglobin value, and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate, in women on admission. We observed significantly more in-hospital bleeding events in women compared to men (18.9% vs. 6.8%,p= .04). There were no differences in platelet aggregation using three different agonists, reflecting treatment effect of GPIIb/IIIa-inhibitors, clopidogrel, and aspirin, 6-8 hours, 3 days, 7-9 days, or 6 months after loading dose. Moreover, there was no significant difference in solubleP-selectin. The main finding of this study was a consistent lack of difference between the sexes in platelet aggregation, using three different agonists at several time-points. Our results do not support excess dosing of anti-platelet drugs as a major explanation for increased bleeding risk in women.

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  • 9.
    Henriksson, Lilian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The transluminal attenuation gradient does not add diagnostic accuracy to coronary computed tomography2021In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, p. 867-874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A method for improving the accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is highly sought after as it would help to avoid unnecessary invasive coronary angiographies. Measurement of the transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG) has been proposed as an alternative to other existing methods, i.e. CT perfusion and CT fractional flow reserve (FFR). Purpose To evaluate the incremental value of three types of TAG in high-pitch spiral CCTA with invasive FFR measurements as reference. Material and Methods TAG was measured using two semi-automatic methods and one manual method. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was made to determine the usefulness of TAG alone as well as TAG combined with CCTA for detection of significant coronary artery stenoses defined by an invasive FFR value <= 0.80. Results A total of 51 coronary vessels in 37 patients were included in this retrospective study. Hemodynamically significant stenoses were found in 13 vessels according to FFR. The ROC analysis TAG alone resulted in areas under the curve (AUCs) of 0.530 and 0.520 for the semi-automatic TAG and 0.557 for the manual TAG. TAG and CCTA combined resulted in AUCs of 0.567, 0.562 for semi-automatic TAG, and 0.569 for the manual TAG. Conclusion The results from our study showed no incremental value of TAG measured in single heartbeat CCTA in determining the severity of coronary artery stenosis degrees.

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  • 10.
    Venetsanos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Skibniewski, Mikolaj
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Boehm, Felix
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Henareh, Loghman
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Andell, Pontus
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Lars O.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Simonsson, Moa
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Voelz, Sebastian
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Uninterrupted Oral Anticoagulant Therapy in Patients Undergoing Unplanned Percutaneous Coronary Intervention2021In: JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, ISSN 1936-8798, E-ISSN 1876-7605, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 754-763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES This study sought to compare interrupted and uninterrupted oral anticoagulant therapy (I-OAC vs. U-OAC) in patients on OAC undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. BACKGROUND There is a paucity of data regarding the optimal peri-procedural management of OAC-treated patients. METHODS In the SWEDEHEART registry, all patients on OAC who were admitted acutely and underwent percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary angiography with a diagnostic procedure, from 2005 to 2017, were included. Outcomes were major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE; death, myocardial infarction, or stroke) and bleeds at 120 days. Propensity score was used to adjust for the nonrandomized treatment selection. RESULTS The study included 6,485 patients: 3,322 in the I-OAC group and 3,163 in the U-OAC group. The cumulative incidence of MACCE was 8.2% (269 events) versus 8.2% (254 events) in the I-OAC and the U-OAC groups, respectively. The adjusted risk for MACCE did not differ between the groups (I-OAC vs. U-OAC hazard ratio: 0.89; 95% confidence interval: 0.71 to 1.12). Similarly, no difference was found in the risk for MACCE or bleeds (12.6% vs. 12.9%, adjusted hazard ratio: 0.87; 95% confidence interval: 0.70 to 1.07). The risk for major or minor in-hospital bleeds did not differ between the groups. However, U-OAC was associated with a significantly shorter duration of hospitalization: 4 (3 to 7) days versus 5 (3 to 8) days; p < 0.01. CONCLUSIONS I-OAC and U-OAC were associated with equivalent risk for MACCE and bleeding complications. An U-OAC strategy was associated with shorter length of hospitalization. These data support U-OAC as the preferable strategy in patients on OAC undergoing coronary intervention. (c) 2021 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  • 11.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Omar, Kime
    Vastmanland Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Csog, Jozsef
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Venetsanos, Dimitrios
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Bleeding complications with clopidogrel or ticagrelor in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients: A real life cohort study of two treatment strategies2020In: IJC Heart & Vasculature, E-ISSN 2352-9067, Vol. 27, article id 100495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), including potent P2Y12 inhibition after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is recommended in clinical guidelines. However, bleeding complications are common, and associated with worse outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of bleeding events with a clopidogrel-based compared to a ticagrelor-based DAPT strategy, in a real world population. Secondary aims were to assess ischemic complications and mortality.

    Methods and Results

    We identified 330 consecutive STEMI patients with a clopidogrel-based and 330 with a ticagrelor-based DAPT strategy. Patientś medical records were searched for bleeding and ischemic complications, over 6 months follow-up.

    The two groups were well balanced in baseline characteristics, age (69 years inboth groups), sex (31% vs 32% females), history of diabetes (19% vs 21%), hypertension (43% in both) and MI (17% vs 15%). There was no difference in CRUSADE bleeding score (28 vs 29). After discharge, there were more than twice as many bleeding events with a ticagrelor-based compared with a clopidogrel-based strategy (13.3% vs. 6.5%, p = 0.005). Bleeding events included significantly more severe bleeding complications (TIMI major/minor [5.8 vs 1.0, p = 0.001]) during the ticagrelor-based period. There was no significant difference in the composite of death, MI or stroke (7.8% vs 7.1%, p = 0.76).

    Conclusions

    In this observational study, a ticagrelor-based DAPT strategy was associated with significantly more bleeding complications, without any significant change in death, MI or stroke. Larger studies are needed to determine whether bleeding complications off-sets benefits with a more potent DAPT strategy in older and more comorbid real-life patients.

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  • 12.
    Tavenier, Anne H.
    et al.
    Isala, Netherlands.
    Hermanides, Renicus S.
    Isala, Netherlands.
    Fabris, Enrico
    Univ Trieste, Italy.
    Lapostolle, Frederic
    Hosp Avicenne, France.
    Silvain, Johanne
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    ten Berg, Jurrien M.
    St Antonius Hosp, Netherlands.
    Lassen, Jens F.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Bolognese, Leonardo
    Azienda Osped, Italy.
    Cantor, Warren J.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Cequier, Angel
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Chettibi, Mohamed
    CHU Frantz Fanon, Algeria.
    Goodman, Shaun G.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Hammett, Christopher J.
    Royal Brisbane and Womens Hosp, Australia.
    Huber, Kurt
    Sigmund Freud Univ, Austria.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Merkely, Bela
    Semmelweis Univ, Hungary.
    Storey, Robert F.
    Univ Sheffield, England.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum Ludwigshafen, Germany; Inst Herzinfarktforsch, Germany.
    Ecollan, Patrick
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Collet, Jean-Phillipe
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Willems, Frank F.
    Rijnstate Hosp, Netherlands.
    Diallo, Abdourahmane
    Paris VII Univ, France.
    Vicaut, Eric
    Paris VII Univ, France.
    Hamm, ChristianW.
    Univ Giessen, Germany.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    van t Hof, Arnoud W. J.
    Isala, Netherlands; Zuyderland Med Ctr, Netherlands; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Efficacy and Safety of Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Inhibitors on Top of Ticagrelor in STEMI: A Subanalysis of the ATLANTIC Trial2020In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, E-ISSN 2567-689X, Vol. 120, no 1, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPIs) in combination with clopidogrel improve clinical outcome in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI); however, finding a balance that minimizes both thrombotic and bleeding risk remains fundamental. The efficacy and safety of GPI in addition to ticagrelor, a more potent P2Y12-inhibitor, have not been fully investigated. Methods 1,630 STEMI patients who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were analyzed in this subanalysis of the ATLANTIC trial. Patients were divided in three groups: no GPI, GPI administration routinely before primary PCI, and GPI administration in bailout situations. The primary efficacy outcome was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, urgent target revascularization, and definite stent thrombosis at 30 days. The safety outcome was non-coronary artery bypass graft (CABG)-related PLATO major bleeding at 30 days. Results Compared with no GPI ( n = 930), routine GPI ( n = 525) or bailout GPI ( n = 175) was not associated with an improved primary efficacy outcome (4.2% no GPI vs. 4.0% routine GPI vs. 6.9% bailout GPI; p = 0.58). After multivariate analysis, the use of GPI in bailout situations was associated with a higher incidence of non-CABG-related bleeding compared with no GPI (odds ratio [OR] 2.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32-6.64; p = 0.03). However, routine GPI use compared with no GPI was not associated with a significant increase in bleeding (OR 1.78, 95% CI 0.88-3.61; p = 0.92). Conclusion Use of GPIs in addition to ticagrelor in STEMI patients was not associated with an improvement in 30-day ischemic outcome. A significant increase in 30-day non-CABG-related PLATO major bleeding was seen in patients who received GPIs in a bailout situation.

  • 13.
    Sandstedt, Mårten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Lilian
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nyberg, Gusten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    de Geer, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Evaluation of an AI-based, automatic coronary artery calcium scoring software2020In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 1671-1678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To evaluate an artificial intelligence (AI)–based, automatic coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring software, using a semi-automatic software as a reference.

    Methods

    This observational study included 315 consecutive, non-contrast-enhanced calcium scoring computed tomography (CSCT) scans. A semi-automatic and an automatic software obtained the Agatston score (AS), the volume score (VS), the mass score (MS), and the number of calcified coronary lesions. Semi-automatic and automatic analysis time were registered, including a manual double-check of the automatic results. Statistical analyses were Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (⍴), intra-class correlation (ICC), Bland Altman plots, weighted kappa analysis (κ), and Wilcoxon signed-rank test.

    Results

    The correlation and agreement for the AS, VS, and MS were  = 0.935, 0.932, 0.934 (p < 0.001), and ICC = 0.996, 0.996, 0.991, respectively (p < 0.001). The correlation and agreement for the number of calcified lesions were  = 0.903 and ICC = 0.977 (p < 0.001), respectively. The Bland Altman mean difference and 1.96 SD upper and lower limits of agreements for the AS, VS, and MS were − 8.2 (− 115.1 to 98.2), − 7.4 (− 93.9 to 79.1), and − 3.8 (− 33.6 to 25.9), respectively. Agreement in risk category assignment was 89.5% and κ = 0.919 (p < 0.001). The median time for the semi-automatic and automatic method was 59 s (IQR 35–100) and 36 s (IQR 29–49), respectively (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions

    There was an excellent correlation and agreement between the automatic software and the semi-automatic software for three CAC scores and the number of calcified lesions. Risk category classification was accurate but showing an overestimation bias tendency. Also, the automatic method was less time-demanding.

    Key Points

    • Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring is an excellent candidate for artificial intelligence (AI) development in a clinical setting.

    • An AI-based, automatic software obtained CAC scores with excellent correlation and agreement compared with a conventional method but was less time-consuming.

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  • 14.
    Johannesen, Kasper
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Subcategorizing the Expected Value of Perfect Implementation to Identify When and Where to Invest in Implementation Initiatives2020In: Medical decision making, ISSN 0272-989X, E-ISSN 1552-681X, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 327-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. Clinical practice variations and low implementation of effective and cost-effective health care technologies are a key challenge for health care systems and may lead to suboptimal treatment and health loss for patients. The purpose of this work was to subcategorize the expected value of perfect implementation (EVPIM) to enable estimation of the absolute and relative value of eliminating slow, low, and delayed implementation. Methods. Building on the EVPIM framework, this work defines EVPIM subcategories to estimate the expected value of eliminating slow, low, or delayed implementation. The work also shows how information on regional implementation patterns can be used to estimate the value of eliminating regional implementation variation. The application of this subcategorization is illustrated by a case study of the implementation of an antiplatelet therapy for the secondary prevention after myocardial infarction in Sweden. Incremental net benefit (INB) estimates are based on published cost-effectiveness assessments and a threshold of SEK 250,000 (22,300) pound per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Results. In the case study, slow, low, and delayed implementation was estimated to represent 22%, 34%, and 44% of the total population EVPIM (2941 QALYs or SEK 735 million), respectively. The value of eliminating implementation variation across health care regions was estimated to 39% of total EVPIM (1138 QALYs). Conclusion. Subcategorizing EVPIM estimates the absolute and relative value of eliminating different parts of suboptimal implementation. By doing so, this approach could help decision makers to identify which parts of suboptimal implementation are contributing most to total EVPIM and provide the basis for assessing the cost and benefit of implementation activities that may address these in future implementation of health care interventions.

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  • 15.
    Fabris, Enrico
    et al.
    Cardiology Department, Isala Heart Center, the Netherlands, Cardiovascular Department, University of Trieste, Italy.
    van 't Hof, Arnoud
    Isala Heart Center, Maastricht University Medical Center, Zuyderland Hospital, the Netherlands.
    Hamm, Christian W
    Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Germany.
    Lapostolle, Frédéric
    Hôpital Avicenne, France.
    Lassen, Jens F
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Goodman, Shaun G
    Canadian Heart Research Centre, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Ten Berg, Jurriën M
    St Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, the Netherlands.
    Bolognese, Leonardo
    Cardiovascular and Neurological Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Arezzo, Italy.
    Cequier, Angel
    Heart Disease Institute, University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Chettibi, Mohamed
    Centre Hospito-universitaire Frantz Fanon, Algeria.
    Hammett, Christopher J
    Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Australia.
    Huber, Kurt
    Wilhelminen Hospital, Austria, Sigmund Freud Private University, Austria.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Merkely, Béla
    Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Storey, Robert F
    Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease, University of Sheffield, UK.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum Ludwigshafen and Institut für Herzinfarktforschung, Germany.
    Cantor, Warren J
    Southlake Regional Health Centre, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Tsatsaris, Anne
    Astra Zeneca, UK.
    Kerneis, Mathieu
    ACTION Study Group, Sorbonne Université Paris 6, France.
    Diallo, Abdourahmane
    ACTION Study Group, Hospital Lariboisiere, France.
    Vicaut, Eric
    ACTION Study Group, Hospital Lariboisiere, France.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    ACTION Study Group, Sorbonne Université Paris 6, France.
    Clinical impact and predictors of complete ST segment resolution after primary percutaneous coronary intervention: A subanalysis of the ATLANTIC Trial2019In: European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care, ISSN 2048-8726, E-ISSN 2048-8734, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 208-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In the ATLANTIC (Administration of Ticagrelor in the catheterization laboratory or in the Ambulance for New ST elevation myocardial Infarction to open the Coronary artery) trial the early use of aspirin, anticoagulation, and ticagrelor coupled with very short medical contact-to-balloon times represent good indicators of optimal treatment of ST-elevation myocardial infarction and an ideal setting to explore which factors may influence coronary reperfusion beyond a well-established pre-hospital system.

    METHODS: This study sought to evaluate predictors of complete ST-segment resolution after percutaneous coronary intervention in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients enrolled in the ATLANTIC trial. ST-segment analysis was performed on electrocardiograms recorded at the time of inclusion (pre-hospital electrocardiogram), and one hour after percutaneous coronary intervention (post-percutaneous coronary intervention electrocardiogram) by an independent core laboratory. Complete ST-segment resolution was defined as ≥70% ST-segment resolution.

    RESULTS: Complete ST-segment resolution occurred post-percutaneous coronary intervention in 54.9% ( n=800/1456) of patients and predicted lower 30-day composite major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (odds ratio 0.35, 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.65; p<0.01), definite stent thrombosis (odds ratio 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.88; p=0.03), and total mortality (odds ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.97; p=0.04). In multivariate analysis, independent negative predictors of complete ST-segment resolution were the time from symptoms to pre-hospital electrocardiogram (odds ratio 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.85-0.98; p<0.01) and diabetes mellitus (odds ratio 0.6, 95% confidence interval 0.44-0.83; p<0.01); pre-hospital ticagrelor treatment showed a favorable trend for complete ST-segment resolution (odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 0.99-1.51; p=0.06).

    CONCLUSIONS: This study confirmed that post-percutaneous coronary intervention complete ST-segment resolution is a valid surrogate marker for cardiovascular clinical outcomes. In the current era of ST-elevation myocardial infarction reperfusion, patients' delay and diabetes mellitus are independent predictors of poor reperfusion and need specific attention in the future.

  • 16.
    Lindholm, Daniel
    et al.
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden.
    Sarno, Giovanna
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hasvold, Lars Pal
    AstraZeneca, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    James, Stefan K.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Combined association of key risk factors on ischaemic outcomes and bleeding in patients with myocardial infarction2019In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 105, no 15, p. 1175-1181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective In patients with myocardial infarction (MI), risk factors for bleeding and ischaemic events tend to overlap, but the combined effects of these factors have scarcely been studied in contemporary real-world settings. We aimed to assess the combined associations of established risk factors using nationwide registries. Methods Using the Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies registry, patients with invasively managed MI in 2006-2014 were included. Six factors were assessed in relation to cardiovascular death (CVD)/MI/stroke, and major bleeding: age amp;gt;= 65, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, multivessel disease, prior bleeding and prior MI. Results We studied 100 879 patients, of whom 20 831 (20.6%) experienced CVD/MI/stroke and 5939 (5.9%) major bleeding, during 3.6 years median follow-up. In adjusted Cox models, all factors were associated with CVD/MI/stroke, and all but prior MI were associated with major bleeding. The majority (53.5%) had amp;gt;= 2 risk factors. With each added risk factor, there was a marked but gradual increase in incidence of the CVD/MI/stroke. This was seen also for major bleeding, but to a lesser extent, largely driven by prior bleeding as the strongest risk factor. Conclusions The majority of patients with MI had two or more established risk factors. Increasing number of risk factors was associated with higher rate of ischaemic events. When excluding patients with prior major bleeding, bleeding incidence rate increased only minimally with increasing number of risk factors. The high ischaemic risk in those with multiple risk factors highlights an unmet need for additional preventive measures.

  • 17.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Sunnerud, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlén, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    From guidelines to the sidelines: implementation of cardiovascular preparticipation evaluation in sports clubs is lagging.2019In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 18.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Daniel
    Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Hasvold, Lars Pal
    AstraZeneca Nord, Norway.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Bodegard, Johan
    AstraZeneca Nord, Norway.
    Andersson, Karolina Sundell
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden.
    Thuresson, Marcus
    Statisticon, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Impact of ischaemic heart disease severity and age on risk of cardiovascular outcome in diabetes patients in Sweden: a nationwide observational study2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e027199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To compare short-term cardiovascular (CV) outcome in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients without ischaemic heart disease (IHD), with IHD but no prior myocardial infarction (MI), and those with prior MI; and assess the impact on risk of age when initiating first-time glucose-lowering drug (GLD). Design Cohort study linking morbidity, mortality and medication data from Swedish national registries. Participants First-time users of GLD during 2007-2016. Outcomes Predicted cumulative incidence for the CV outcome (MI, stroke and CV mortality) was estimated. A Cox model was developed where age at GLD start and CV risk was modelled. Results 260 070 first-time GLD users were included, 221 226 (85%) had no IHD, 16 294 (6%) had stable IHD-prior MI and 22 550 (9%) had IHD+ MI. T2D patients without IHD had a lower risk of CV outcome compared with the IHD populations (+/- prior MI), (3-year incidence 4.78% vs 5.85% and 8.04%). The difference in CV outcome was primarily driven by a relative greater MI risk among the IHD patients. For T2D patients without IHD, an almost linear association between age at start of GLD and relative risk was observed, whereas in IHD patients, the younger (amp;lt; 60 years) patients had a relative greater risk compared with older patients. Conclusions T2D patients without IHD had a lower risk of the CV outcome compared with the T2D populations with IHD, primarily driven by a greater risk of MI. For T2D patients without IHD, an almost linear association between age at start of GLD and relative risk was observed, whereas in IHD patients, the younger patients had a relative greater risk compared with older patients. Our findings suggest that intense risk prevention should be the key strategy in the management of T2D patients, especially for younger patients.

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  • 19.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry.
    Individual long-term variation of platelet reactivity in patients with dual antiplatelet therapy after myocardial infarction.2019In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 572-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment, and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in those with high residual platelet reactivity (HPR). Less is known about individual variation over time. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate intra-individual variation in platelet reactivity. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was assessed in 77 patients, at 3 days, 8 days and 6 months after admission for acute myocardial infarction and loading dose of clopidogrel. All patients were treated with aspirin and clopidogrel through 6-month follow-up. We found a significant increase in median ADP-stimulated aggregation from third to eighth day (195 vs. 250 AU*min, p-value = 0.001) but not from day 8 to 6 months (250 vs. 223 AU*min, p-value = 0.666). There was no significant change in the overall rate of HPR (15.6% vs 20.8%, p-value 0.503) or low platelet reactivity (LPR) (37.7% vs 33.8%, p-value = 0.609) from day 8 to 6-month follow-up. In contrast, more than one in four changed HPR status, 15.6% from non-HPR to HPR and 10.4% HPR to non-HPR. A shift in LPR status appeared even more frequent, occurring in about one of three patients. In spite of similar median aggregation and rate of HPR during 6-month follow-up, about one in four of the patients changed HPR status and one in three changed LPR status. This may be important information for a concept of risk stratification based on a single aggregation value early after an acute coronary syndromes.

  • 20.
    Sandstedt, Mårten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    De Geer, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Henriksson, Lilian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Long-term prognostic value of coronary computed tomography angiography in chest pain patients.2019In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is increasingly used to detect coronary artery disease (CAD), but long-term follow-up studies are still scarce. Purpose To evaluate the prognostic value of CCTA in patients with suspected CAD. Material and Methods A total of 1205 consecutive CCTA patients with chest pain were classified as normal coronary arteries, non-obstructive CAD, or obstructive CAD. The primary outcome was major adverse cardiac event (MACE), defined as a composite outcome including cardiac death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina pectoris, or late revascularization (after >90 days). Results Over 7.5 years follow-up (median = 3.1 years), Kaplan-Meier estimates demonstrated a MACE in 1.0%, 4.6%, and 20.7% in normal coronary arteries, non-obstructive CAD, and obstructive CAD, respectively. Log rank test for pairwise comparisons showed significant differences between non-obstructive CAD and normal coronary arteries ( P = 0.023) and between obstructive CAD and normal coronary arteries ( P < 0.001). In a multivariable analysis, adjusting for classical risk factors, non-obstructive CAD and obstructive CAD were independent predictors of MACE, with hazard ratios (HR) of 3.22 ( P = 0.041) and 25.18 ( P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusion Patients with normal coronary arteries have excellent long-term prognosis, but the risk for MACE increases with non-obstructive and obstructive CAD. Both non-obstructive and obstructive CAD are independently associated with future ischemic events.

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  • 21.
    Lapostolle, Frédéric
    et al.
    UF Recherche-Enseignement-Qualité, Université Paris, Hôpital Avicenne, Bobigny, France..
    Van't Hof, Arnoud W
    Department of Cardiology, Isala Clinics, Zwolle, The Netherlands, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Hamm, Christian W
    Department of Cardiology, Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Bad Nauheim, Germany.
    Stibbe, Olivier
    Service Médical d'Urgence, Brigade de Sapeurs-Pompiers de Paris, Paris, France.
    Ecollan, Patrick
    Sorbonne Université, ACTION Study Group, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière , Paris, France.
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    Sorbonne Université, ACTION Study Group, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière , Paris, France.
    Silvain, Johanne
    Sorbonne Université, ACTION Study Group, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière , Paris, France.
    Lassen, Jens Flensted
    Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Heutz, Wim M J M
    Regionale Ambulance Voor ziening Gelderland-Midden, Arnhem, The Netherlands.
    Bolognese, Leonardo
    Cardiovascular and Neurological Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Arezzo, Arezzo, Italy.
    Cantor, Warren J
    Southlake Regional Health Centre, University of Toronto, Newmarket, ON, Canada.
    Cequier, Angel
    Heart Disease Institute, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
    Chettibi, Mohamed
    Centre Hospito-universitaire Frantz Fanon, Blida, Algeria.
    Goodman, Shaun G
    Division of Cardiology, Canadian Heart Research Centre, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Hammett, Christopher J
    Department of Cardiology, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
    Huber, Kurt
    3rd Department of Medicine, Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Wilhelminenhospital, Sigmund Freud University, Medical School, Vienna, Austria.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Merkely, Béla
    Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Storey, Robert F
    Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Ten Berg, Jur
    Department of Cardiology, St Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum Ludwigshafen and Institut für Herzinfarktforschung Ludwigshafen, Ludwigshafen, Germany.
    Licour, Muriel
    AstraZeneca, Rueil Malmaison, France.
    Tsatsaris, Anne
    AstraZeneca, Rueil Malmaison, France.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Sorbonne Université, ACTION Study Group, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), 47 boul de l'Hôpital, Paris, France.
    Morphine and Ticagrelor Interaction in Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: ATLANTIC-Morphine2019In: American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs, ISSN 1175-3277, E-ISSN 1179-187X, Vol. 19, p. 173-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Morphine adversely impacts the action of oral adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor blockers in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients, and is possibly associated with differing patient characteristics. This retrospective analysis investigated whether interaction between morphine use and pre-percutaneous coronary intervention (pre-PCI) ST-segment elevation resolution in STEMI patients in the ATLANTIC study was associated with differences in patient characteristics and management.

    METHODS: ATLANTIC was an international, multicenter, randomized study of treatment in the acute ambulance/hospital setting where STEMI patients received ticagrelor 180 mg ± morphine. Patient characteristics, cardiovascular history, risk factors, management, and outcomes were recorded.

    RESULTS: Opioids (97.6% morphine) were used in 921 out of 1862 patients (49.5%). There were no significant differences in age, sex or cardiovascular history, but more morphine-treated patients had anterior myocardial infarction and left-main disease. Time from chest pain to electrocardiogram and ticagrelor loading was shorter with morphine (both p = 0.01) but not total ischemic time. Morphine-treated patients more frequently received glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (p = 0.002), thromboaspiration and stent implantation (both p < 0.001). No significant difference between the two groups was found regarding pre-PCI ≥ 70% ST-segment elevation resolution, death, myocardial infarction, stroke, urgent revascularization and definitive acute stent thrombosis. More morphine-treated patients had an absence of pre-PCI Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) 3 flow (85.8% vs. 79.7%; p = 0.001) and more had TIMI major bleeding (1.1% vs. 0.1%; p = 0.02).

    CONCLUSIONS: Morphine-treatment was associated with increased GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor use, less pre-PCI TIMI 3 flow, and more bleeding. Judicious morphine use is advised with non-opioid analgesics preferred for non-severe acute pain.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01347580.

  • 22.
    Fabris, Enrico
    et al.
    Cardiology Department, Isala Heart Center, Zwolle, the Netherlands, , Cardiovascular Department, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
    Van't Hof, Arnoud
    Cardiology Department, Isala Heart Center, Zwolle, the Netherlands, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands, Zuyderland Hospital, Heerlen, the Netherlands.
    Hamm, Christian W
    Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Bad Nauheim, Germany.
    Lapostolle, Frédéric
    SAMU 93 Hôpital Avicenne, Bobigny, France.
    Lassen, Jens Flensted
    Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Goodman, Shaun G
    Canadian Heart Research Centre, Division of Cardiology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Ten Berg, Jurriën M
    Department of Cardiology, St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands.
    Bolognese, Leonardo
    Cardiovascular and Neurological Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Arezzo, Arezzo, Italy.
    Cequier, Angel
    Heart Disease Institute, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Chettibi, Mohamed
    Centre Hospito-universitaire Frantz Fanon, Blida, Algeria.
    Hammett, Christopher J
    Department of Cardiology, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Huber, Kurt
    3rd Department of Medicine, Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Wilhelminen hospital and Sigmund Freud University, Medical School, Vienna, Austria..
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Merkely, Béla
    Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Storey, Robert F
    Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum Ludwigshafen and Institut für Herzinfarktforschung, Ludwigshafen, Germany.
    Cantor, Warren J
    Southlake Regional Health Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Kerneis, Mathieu
    Sorbonne Université, ACTION Study Group, Hospital Pitie-Salpetriere (AP-HP), Paris, France.
    Diallo, Abdourahmane
    Hospital Lariboisiere, ACTION Study Group, Paris, France.
    Vicaut, Eric
    Hospital Lariboisiere, ACTION Study Group, Paris, France.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Sorbonne Université, ACTION Study Group, Hospital Pitie-Salpetriere (AP-HP), Paris, France.
    Pre-hospital administration of ticagrelor in diabetic patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary angioplasty: A sub-analysis of the ATLANTIC trial2019In: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions, ISSN 1522-1946, E-ISSN 1522-726X, Vol. 93, no 7, p. E369-E377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated, in the contemporary era of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treatment, the influence of diabetes mellitus (DM) on cardiovascular outcomes, and whether pre-hospital administration of ticagrelor may affect these outcomes in a subgroup of STEMI patients with DM.

    BACKGROUND: DM patients have high platelet reactivity and a prothrombotic condition which highlight the importance of an effective antithrombotic regimen in this high-risk population.

    METHODS: In toal 1,630 STEMI patients enrolled in the ATLANTIC trial who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were included. Multivariate analysis was used to explore the association of DM with outcomes and potential treatment-by-diabetes interaction was tested.

    RESULTS: A total of 214/1,630 (13.1%) patients had DM. DM was an independent predictor of poor myocardial reperfusion as reflected by less frequent ST-segment elevation resolution (≥70%) after PCI (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.43-0.82, P < 0.01) and was an independent predictor of the composite 30-day outcomes of death/new myocardial infarction (MI)/urgent revascularization/definite stent thrombosis (ST) (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.62-4.85, P < 0.01), new MI or definite acute ST (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.08-5.61, P = 0.03), and definite ST (OR 10.00, 95% CI 3.54-28.22, P < 0.01). No significant interaction between pre-hospital ticagrelor vs in-hospital ticagrelor administration and DM was present for the clinical, electrocardiographic and angiographic outcomes as well as for thrombolysis in myocardial infarction major bleeding.

    CONCLUSIONS: DM remains independently associated with poor myocardial reperfusion and worse 30-day clinical outcomes. No significant interaction was found between pre-hospital vs in-hospital ticagrelor administration and DM status. Further approaches for the treatment of DM patients are needed.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01347580.

  • 23.
    Karlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    A clinical decision support tool for improving adherence to guidelines on anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation at risk of stroke: A cluster-randomized trial in a Swedish primary care setting (the CDS-AF study)2018In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 15, no 3, article id e1002528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with substantial morbidity, in particular stroke. Despite good evidence for the reduction of stroke risk with anticoagulant therapy, there remains significant undertreatment. The main aim of the current study was to investigate whether a clinical decision support tool (CDS) for stroke prevention integrated in the electronic health record could improve adherence to guidelines for stroke prevention in patients with AF.

    Methods and findings

    We conducted a cluster-randomized trial where all 43 primary care clinics in the county of Östergötland, Sweden (population 444,347), were randomized to be part of the CDS intervention or to serve as controls. The CDS produced an alert for physicians responsible for patients with AF and at increased risk for thromboembolism (according to the CHA2DS2-VASc algorithm) without anticoagulant therapy. The primary endpoint was adherence to guidelines after 1 year. After randomization, there were 22 and 21 primary care clinics in the CDS and control groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in baseline adherence to guidelines regarding anticoagulant therapy between the 2 groups (CDS group 70.3% [5,186/7,370; 95% CI 62.9%–77.7%], control group 70.0% [4,187/6,009; 95% CI 60.4%–79.6%], p = 0.83). After 12 months, analysis with linear regression with adjustment for primary care clinic size and adherence to guidelines at baseline revealed a significant increase in guideline adherence in the CDS (73.0%, 95% CI 64.6%–81.4%) versus the control group (71.2%, 95% CI 60.8%–81.6%, p = 0.013, with a treatment effect estimate of 0.016 [95% CI 0.003–0.028]; number of patients with AF included in the final analysis 8,292 and 6,508 in the CDS and control group, respectively). Over the study period, there was no difference in the incidence of stroke, transient ischemic attack, or systemic thromboembolism in the CDS group versus the control group (49 [95% CI 43–55] per 1,000 patients with AF in the CDS group compared to 47 [95% CI 39–55] per 1,000 patients with AF in the control group, p = 0.64). Regarding safety, the CDS group had a lower incidence of significant bleeding, with events in 12 (95% CI 9–15) per 1,000 patients with AF compared to 16 (95% CI 12–20) per 1,000 patients with AF in the control group (p = 0.04). Limitations of the study design include that the analysis was carried out in a catchment area with a high baseline adherence rate, and issues regarding reproducibility to other regions.

    Conclusions

    The present study demonstrates that a CDS can increase guideline adherence for anticoagulant therapy in patients with AF. Even though the observed difference was small, this is the first randomized study to our knowledge indicating beneficial effects with a CDS in patients with AF.

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  • 24.
    Varenhorst, Christoph
    et al.
    Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hasvold, Pal
    AstraZeneca Nord Baltic, Sweden; AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden.
    Johansson, Saga
    Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden; AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Albertsson, Per
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leosdottir, Margret
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hambraeus, Kristina
    Falun Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    James, Stefan
    Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala, Sweden; Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Solna Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Culprit and Nonculprit Recurrent Ischemic Events in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: Data From SWEDEHEART (Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies)2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e007174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Long-term disease progression after myocardial infarction (MI) is inadequately understood. We evaluated the pattern and angiographic properties (culprit lesion [CL]/non-CL [NCL]) of recurrent MI (re-MI) in a large real-world patient population. Methods and Results-Our observational study used prospectively collected data in 108 615 patients with first-occurrence MI enrolled in the SWEDEHEART (Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies) between July 1, 2006 and November 29, 2014. During follow-up (median, 3.2 years), recurrent hospitalization for MI occurred in 11 117 patients (10.2%). Of the patients who underwent coronary angiography for the index MI, a CL was identified in 44 332 patients. Of those patients, 3464 experienced an re-MI; the infarct originated from the NCL in 1243 patients and from the CL in 655 patients. In total, 1566 re-MIs were indeterminate events and could not be classified as NCL or CL re-MIs. The risk of re-MI within 8 years related to the NCL was 0.06 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.06), compared with 0.03 (95% CI, 0.02-0.03) for the CL. There were no large differences in baseline characteristics of patients with subsequent NCL versus CL re-MIs. Independent predictors of NCL versus CL re-MI were multivessel disease (odds ratio, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.87-2.82), male sex (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.09-1.71), and a prolonged time between the index and re-MI (odds ratio, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.10-1.22). Conclusions-In a large cohort of patients with first-occurrence MI undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, the risk of re-MI originating from a previously untreated lesion was twice higher than the risk of lesions originating from a previously stented lesion.

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  • 25.
    Bagai, Akshay
    et al.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Goodman, Shaun G.
    Univ Toronto, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Cantor, Warren J.
    Univ Toronto, England.
    Vicaut, Eric
    Hop Lariboisiere, France.
    Bolognese, Leonardo
    Azienda Osped Arezzo, Italy.
    Cequier, Angel
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Chettibi, Mohamed
    Ctr Hosp Univ Frantz Fanon, Algeria.
    Hammett, Christopher J.
    Royal Brisbane and Womens Hosp, Australia.
    Huber, Kurt
    Wilhelminenhosp, Austria; Sigmund Freud Private Univ, Austria.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lapostolle, Frederic
    Hop Avicenne, France.
    Lassen, Jens Flensted
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Merkely, Bela
    Semmelweis Univ, Hungary.
    Storey, Robert F.
    Univ Sheffield, England.
    ten Berg, Jurrien M.
    St Antonius Hosp Nieuwegein, Netherlands.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum Ludwigshafen, Germany; Inst Herzinfarktforsch Ludwigshafen, Germany.
    Diallo, Abdourahmane
    Hop Lariboisiere, France; Hop Fernand Widal, France.
    Hamm, Christian W.
    Kerckhoff Klin, Germany.
    Tsatsaris, Anne
    AstraZeneca, France.
    El Khoury, Jad
    AstraZeneca, England.
    vant Hof, Arnoud W.
    Maastricht Hart Vaat Ctr MUMC, Netherlands.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Sorbonne Univ Paris 6, France.
    Duration of ischemia and treatment effects of pre- versus in-hospital ticagrelor in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: Insights from the ATLANTIC study2018In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 196, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Among patients with STEMI in the ATLANTIC study, pre-hospital administration of ticagrelor improved post-PCI ST-segment resolution and 30-day stent thrombosis. We investigated whether this clinical benefit with pre-hospital ticagrelor differs by ischemic duration. Methods In a post hoc analysis we compared absence of ST-segment resolution post-PCI and stent thrombosis at 30 days between randomized treatment groups (pre-versus in-hospital ticagrelor) stratified by symptom onset to first medical contact (FMC) duration [amp;lt;= 1 hour (n = 773), amp;gt;1 to amp;lt;= 3 hours (n = 772), and amp;gt;3 hours (n = 311)], examining the interaction between randomized treatment strategy and duration of symptom onset to FMC for each outcome. Results Patients presenting later after symptom onset were older, more likely to be female, and have higher baseline risk. Patients with symptom onset to FMC amp;gt;3 hours had the greatest improvement in post-PCI ST-segment elevation resolution with pre-versus in-hospital ticagrelor (absolute risk difference: amp;lt;= 1 hour, 2.9% vs. amp;gt;1 to amp;lt;= 3 hours, 3.6% vs. amp;gt;3 hours, 12.2%; adjusted p for interaction = 0.13), while patients with shorter duration of ischemia had greater improvement in stent thrombosis at 30 days with pre-versus in-hospital ticagrelor (absolute risk difference: amp;lt;= 1 hour, 1.3% vs. amp;gt;1 hour to amp;lt;= 3hours, 0.7% vs. amp;gt;3 hours, 0.4%; adjusted p for interaction = 0.55). Symptom onset to active ticagrelor administration was independently associated with stent thrombosis at 30 days (adjusted OR 1.89 per 100 minute delay, 95% CI 1.20-2.97, P amp;lt; .01), but not post-PCI ST-segment resolution (P = .41). Conclusions The effect of pre-hospital ticagrelor to reduce stent thrombosis was most evident when given early within 3 hours after symptom onset, with delay in ticagrelor administration after symptom onset associated with higher rate of stent thrombosis. These findings re-emphasize the need for early ticagrelor administration in primary PCI treated STEMI patients.

  • 26.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. NU NAL Uddevalla Hosp Grp, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alexander, Karen
    Duke Clin Res Inst, NC USA.
    Andersson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Eriksson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Frailty as an instrument for evaluation of elderly patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: A follow-up after more than 5 years2018In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 25, no 17, p. 1813-1821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There is a growing body of evidence on the relevance of using frailty measures also in a cardiovascular context. The estimated time to death is crucial in clinical decision-making in cardiology. However, data on the importance of frailty in long-term mortality are very scarce. The aim of the study was to assess the prognostic value of frailty on mortality at long-term follow-up of more than 5 years in patients 75 years or older hospitalised for non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. We hypothesised that frailty is independently associated with long-term mortality. Design This was a prospective, observational study conducted at three centres. Methods and results Frailty was assessed according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging clinical frailty scale (CFS). Of 307 patients, 149 (48.5%) were considered frail according to the study instrument (degree 5-7 on the scale). The long-term all-cause mortality of more than 5 years (median 6.7 years) was significantly higher among frail patients (128, 85.9%) than non-frail patients (85, 53.8%), (P amp;lt; 0.001). In Cox regression analysis, frailty was independently associated with mortality from the index hospital admission to the end of follow-up (hazard ratio 2.06, 95% confidence interval 1.51-2.81; P amp;lt; 0.001) together with age (P amp;lt; 0.001), ejection fraction (P = 0.012) and Charlson comorbidity index (P = 0.018). Conclusions In elderly non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients, frailty was independently associated with all-cause mortality at long-term follow-up of more than 6 years. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may be the ultimate risk prediction concept in the context of cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

  • 27.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Carlén, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Sunnerud, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hjärtscreening av elitidrottare: Låg följsamhet till RF:s rekommendationer2018In: Idrottsmedicin, ISSN 1103-7652, Vol. 1/18, p. 16-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Sunnerud, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlén, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Låg följsamhet till rekommenderad hjärtscreening av elitidrottare - Lägesanalys i Östergötland2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115, p. 185-187, article id EWLMArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low adherence to recommended pre-participation cardiac evaluation of Swedish athletes Pre-participation cardiac evaluation of athletes is recommended by international organizations like the European Society of Cardiology and the American Heart Association, as well as by the Swedish Sports Confederation. The purpose of the evaluation is to prevent sudden cardiac death in athletes by early identification of individuals at risk. To our knowledge, no previous study has been made regarding the implementation of pre-participation cardiac evaluation of athletes in Sweden. We performed an electronical survey addressing sports clubs in one out of 21 districts in which the Swedish Sports Confederation is geographically divided. Only four out of 22 responding clubs with elite athletes preformed cardiac evaluation. Lack of knowledge about the recommendations as well as how to perform the evaluation were mentioned as reasons not to evaluate the athletes. Our results indicate the need for more information about pre-participation cardiac evaluation of athletes in Sweden.

  • 29.
    Venetsanos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cequier, Angel
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Chettibi, Mohamed
    CHU Frantz Fanon, Algeria.
    Goodman, Shaun G.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    vant Hof, Arnoud W.
    Isala Clin, Netherlands.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Sorbonne University, France.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Association between gender and short-term outcome in patients with ST elevation myocardial infraction participating in the international, prospective, randomised Administration of Ticagrelor in the catheterisation Laboratory or in the Ambulance for New ST elevation myocardial Infarction to open the Coronary artery (ATLANTIC) trial: a prespecified analysis2017In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 9, article id e015241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To evaluate gender differences in outcomes in patents with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) planned for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). Settings A prespecified gender analysis of the multicentre, randomised, double-blind Administration of Ticagrelor in the catheterisation Laboratory or in the Ambulance for New ST elevation myocardial Infarction to open the Coronary artery. Participants Between September 2011 and October 2013, 1862 patients with STEMI and symptom duration amp;lt;6 hours were included. Interventions Patients were assigned to prehospital versus in-hospital administration of 180 mg ticagrelor. Outcomes The main objective was to study the association between gender and primary and secondary outcomes of the main study with a focus on the clinical efficacy and safety outcomes. Primary outcome: the proportion of patients who did not have 70% resolution of ST-segment elevation and did not meet the criteria for Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow 3 at initial angiography. Secondary outcome: the composite of death, MI, stent thrombosis, stroke or urgent revascularisation and major or minor bleeding at 30 days. Results Women were older, had higher TIMI risk score, longer prehospital delays and better TIMI flow in the infarct-related artery. Women had a threefold higher risk for all-cause mortality compared with men (5.7% vs 1.9%, HR 3.13, 95% CI 1.78 to 5.51). After adjustment, the difference was attenuated but remained statistically significant (HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.03 to 4.20). The incidence of major bleeding events was twofold to threefold higher in women compared with men. In the multivariable model, female gender was not an independent predictor of bleeding (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes major HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.73 to 2.86, TIMI major HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.47 to 3.48, Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 3-5 HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.72 to 2.91). There was no interaction between gender and efficacy or safety of randomised treatment. Conclusion In patients with STEMI planned for PPCI and treated with modern antiplatelet therapy, female gender was an independent predictor of short-term mortality. In contrast, the higher incidence of bleeding complications in women could mainly be explained by older age and clustering of comorbidities.

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  • 30.
    Karlsson, Lars O.
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Clinical decision support for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (CDS-AF): Rationale and design of a cluster randomized trial in the primary care setting2017In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 187, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with substantial morbidity, in particular stroke. Despite good evidence for the reduction of stroke risk with anticoagulant therapy, there remains a significant undertreatment. The main aim of the current study is to investigate whethera clinical decision support tool for stroke prevention (CDS) integrated in the electronic health record can improve adherence to guidelines for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Methods We will conduct a cluster randomized trial where 43 primary care clinics in the county of Ostergotland, Sweden (population 444,347), will be randomized to be part of the CDS intervention or serve as controls. The CDS will alert responsible physicians of patients with AF and increased risk for thromboembolism according to the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc (Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age 74 years, Diabetes mellitus, previous Stroke/TIA/thromboembolism, Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, Sex category (i.e. female sex)) algorithm without anticoagulant therapy. The primary end point will be adherence to guidelines after 1 year. Conclusion The present study will investigate whether a clinical decision support system integrated in an electronic health record can increase adherence to guidelines regarding anticoagulant therapy in patients with AF.

  • 31.
    Fabris, Enrico
    et al.
    Isala Clinics, Zwolle, the Netherlands, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
    Van't Hof, Arnoud
    Isala Clinics, Zwolle, the Netherlands.
    Hamm, Christian W
    Kerckhoff Heart and Thorax Center, Bad Nauheim, Germany.
    Lapostolle, Frédéric
    Hôpital Avicenne, Bobigny, France.
    Lassen, Jens Flensted
    Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Goodman, Shaun G
    St. Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Ten Berg, Jurriën M
    Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands.
    Bolognese, Leonardo
    Cardiovascular and Neurological Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Arezzo, Arezzo, Italy.
    Cequier, Angel
    University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Chettibi, Mohamed
    Centre Hospitalo Universitaire Frantz Fanon, Blida, Algeria.
    Hammett, Christopher H
    Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Huber, Kurt
    Wilhelminen Hospital and Sigmund Freud Private University, Medical School, Vienna, Austria.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Merkely, Béla
    Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Storey, Robert F
    University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum Ludwigshafen and Institut für Herzinfarktforschung, Ludwigshafen, Germany.
    Cantor, Warren J
    University of Toronto, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada;.
    Rousseau, Hélène
    Hospital Lariboisiere, ACTION Study Group, Paris, France.
    Vicaut, Eric
    Hospital Lariboisiere, ACTION Study Group, Paris, France.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    Sorbonne Université Paris 6, ACTION Study Group, Hospital Pitie-Salpetriere (AP-HP), Paris, France.
    Impact of presentation and transfer delays on complete ST-segment resolution before primary percutaneous coronary intervention: insights from the ATLANTIC trial.2017In: EuroIntervention, ISSN 1774-024X, E-ISSN 1969-6213, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 69-77, article id EIJ-D-16-00965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to identify predictors of complete ST-segment resolution (STR) pre-primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients enrolled in the ATLANTIC trial.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: ECGs recorded at the time of inclusion (pre-hospital [pre-H]-ECG) and in the catheterisation laboratory before angiography (pre-PCI-ECG) were analysed by an independent core laboratory. Complete STR was defined as ≥70%. Complete STR occurred pre-PCI in 12.8% (204/1,598) of patients and predicted lower 30-day composite MACCE (OR=0.10, 95% CI: 0.002-0.57, p=0.001) and total mortality (OR=0.16, 95% CI: 0.004-0.95, p=0.035). Independent predictors of complete STR included the time from index event to pre-H-ECG (OR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.89-1.00, p=0.035), use of heparins before pre-PCI-ECG (OR=1.75, 95% CI: 1.25-2.45, p=0.001) and time from pre-H-ECG to pre-PCI-ECG (OR=1.09, 95% CI: 1.03-1.16, p=0.005). In the pre-H ticagrelor group, patients with complete STR had a significantly longer delay between pre-H-ECG and pre-PCI-ECG compared to patients without complete STR (median 53 [44-73] vs. 49 [38.5-61] mins, p=0.001); however, this was not observed in the control group (in-hospital ticagrelor) (50 [40-67] vs. 49 [39-61] mins, p=0.258).

    CONCLUSIONS: Short patient delay, early administration of anticoagulant and ticagrelor if a long transfer delay is expected may help to achieve reperfusion prior to PCI. Pre-H treatment may be beneficial in patients with longer transfer delays, allowing the drug to become biologically active.

  • 32.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Reaching agreement in uncertain circumstances: the practice of evidence-based policy in the case of the Swedish National Guidelines for heart diseases2017In: Evidence and Policy: A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice, ISSN 1744-2648, no 4, p. 687-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the practice of evidence-based policy in a Swedish healthcare context. The study focused on how policymakers in the specific working group, the Priority-Setting Group (PSG), handled the various forms of evidence and values and their competing rationalities, when producing the Swedish National Guidelines for heart diseases that are based on both clinical and economic evidence and are established to support explicit priority-setting in healthcare. The study contributes to the theoretical and practical debate on evidence-based policy (EBP) by illustrating how the practical tensions of coming to agreement were managed, to a large extent, through deliberation and by creativity.

  • 33.
    Wallentin, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lindhagen, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Arnstrom, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Husted, Steen
    Hospital Unit West, Denmark.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Paaske Johnsen, Soren
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Kontny, Frederic
    Stavanger University Hospital, Norway; Drammen Heart Centre, Norway.
    Kempf, Tibor
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Stahle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wollert, Kai C.
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Early invasive versus non-invasive treatment in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (FRISC-II): 15 year follow-up of a prospective, randomised, multicentre study2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, no 10054, p. 1903-1911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The FRISC-II trial was the first randomised trial to show a reduction in death or myocardial infarction with an early invasive versus a non-invasive treatment strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. Here we provide a remaining lifetime perspective on the effects on all cardiovascular events during 15 years follow-up. Methods The FRISC-II prospective, randomised, multicentre trial was done at 58 Scandinavian centres in Sweden, Denmark, and Norway. Between June 17, 1996, and Aug 28, 1998, we randomly assigned (1:1) 2457 patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome to an early invasive treatment strategy, aiming for revascularisation within 7 days, or a non-invasive strategy, with invasive procedures at recurrent symptoms or severe exercise-induced ischaemia. Plasma for biomarker analyses was obtained at randomisation. For long-term outcomes, we linked data with national health-care registers. The primary endpoint was a composite of death or myocardial infarction. Outcomes were compared as the average postponement of the next event, including recurrent events, calculated as the area between mean cumulative count-of-events curves. Analyses were done by intention to treat. Findings At a minimum of 15 years follow-up on Dec 31, 2014, data for survival status and death were available for 2421 (99%) of the initially recruited 2457 patients, and for other events after 2 years for 2182 (89%) patients. During follow-up, the invasive strategy postponed death or next myocardial infarction by a mean of 549 days (95% CI 204-888; p= 0.0020) compared with the non-invasive strategy. This effect was larger in non-smokers (mean gain 809 days, 95% CI 402-1175; p(interaction) = 0.0182), patients with elevated troponin T (778 days, 357-1165; p (interaction) = 0.0241), and patients with high concentrations of growth differentiation factor-15 (1356 days, 507-1650; p (interaction) = 0.0210). The difference was mainly driven by postponement of new myocardial infarction, whereas the early difference in mortality alone was not sustained over time. The invasive strategy led to a mean of 1128 days (95% CI 830-1366) postponement of death or next readmission to hospital for ischaemic heart disease, which was consistent in all subgroups (pamp;lt; 0.0001). Interpretation During 15 years of follow-up, an early invasive treatment strategy postponed the occurrence of death or next myocardial infarction by an average of 18 months, and the next readmission to hospital for ischaemic heart disease by 37 months, compared with a non-invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. This remaining lifetime perspective supports that an early invasive treatment strategy should be the preferred option in most patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome.

  • 34.
    Montalescot, Gilles
    et al.
    University of Paris 06, France.
    vant Hof, Arnoud W.
    Isala Clin, Netherlands.
    Bolognese, Leonardo
    Azienda Osped Arezzo, Italy.
    Cantor, Warren J.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Cequier, Angel
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Chettibi, Mohamed
    Centre Hospital University of Frantz Fanon, Algeria.
    Collet, Jean-Philippe
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Goodman, Shaun G.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Hammett, Christopher J.
    Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Australia.
    Huber, Kurt
    Wilhelminenhosp, Austria.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Lapostolle, Frederic
    SAMU 93 Hop Avicenne, France.
    Flensted Lassen, Jens
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Licour, Muriel
    AstraZeneca, France.
    Merkely, Bela
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Salhi, Nejoua
    AstraZeneca, England.
    Silvain, Johanne
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Storey, Robert F.
    University of Sheffield, England.
    ten Berg, Jurrien M.
    St Antonius Hospital, Netherlands.
    Tsatsaris, Anne
    AstraZeneca, France.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum Ludwigshafen, Germany; Institute Herzinfarktforsch Ludwigshafen, Germany.
    Vicaut, Eric
    University of Paris 07, France.
    Hamm, Christian W.
    Kerckhoff Heart Centre, Germany.
    Effect of Pre-Hospital Ticagrelor During the First 24 h After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction The ATLANTIC-H-24 Analysis2016In: JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, ISSN 1936-8798, E-ISSN 1876-7605, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 646-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this landmark exploratory analysis, ATLANTIC-H-24, was to evaluate the effects of pre-hospital ticagrelor during the first 24 h after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the ATLANTIC (Administration of Ticagrelor in the cath Lab or in the Ambulance for New ST elevation myocardial infarction to open the Coronary artery) study. BACKGROUND The ATLANTIC trial in patients with ongoing ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction showed that pre-hospital ticagrelor was safe but did not improve pre-PCI coronary reperfusion compared with in-hospital ticagrelor. We hypothesized that the effect of pre-hospital ticagrelor may not have manifested until after PCI due to the rapid transfer time (31 min). METHODS The ATLANTIC-H-24 analysis included 1,629 patients who underwent PCI, evaluating platelet reactivity, Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction flow grade 3, &gt;= 70% ST-segment elevation resolution, and clinical endpoints over the first 24 h. RESULTS Following PCI, largest between-group differences in platelet reactivity occurred at 1 to 6 h; coronary reperfusion rates numerically favored pre-hospital ticagrelor, and the degree of ST-segment elevation resolution was significantly greater in the pre-hospital group (median, 75.0% vs. 71.4%; p = 0.049). At 24 h, the composite ischemic endpoint was lower with pre-hospital ticagrelor (10.4% vs. 13.7%; p = 0.039), as were individual endpoints of definite stent thrombosis (p = 0.0078) and myocardial infarction (p = 0.031). All endpoints except death (1.1% vs. 0.2%; p = 0.048) favored pre-hospital ticagrelor, with no differences in bleeding events. CONCLUSIONS The effects of pre-hospital ticagrelor became apparent after PCI, with numerical differences in platelet reactivity and immediate post-PCI reperfusion, associated with reductions in ischemic endpoints, over the first 24 h, whereas there was a small excess of mortality. (Administration of Ticagrelor in the cath Lab or in the Ambulance for New ST elevation myocardial infarction to open the Coronary artery [ATLANTIC, NCT01347580]) (C) 2016 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  • 35.
    Janzon, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hasvold, Pål
    AstraZeneca Nordic-Baltic, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Hans
    Nyköping Hospital, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Thuresson, Marcus
    Statisticon AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Long-term resource use patterns and healthcare costs after myocardial infarction in a clinical practice setting - results from a contemporary nationwide registry study2016In: European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, ISSN 2058-5225, Vol. 2, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Long-term contemporary nationwide data on resource use and healthcare costs after myocardial infarction (MI) in a clinical practice setting are not widely studied, and the aim of this study was to investigate resource use patterns and healthcare costs in patients with MI in a nationwide clinical practice setting.

    Methods and results This retrospective cohort study included all patients identified in the compulsory Swedish nationwide patient register with a diagnosis of MI between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2011. Cardiovascular hospitalization and outpatient visits data from the patient register were combined with data from the cause of death register and the drug utilization register. For a subset of patients, data were also available from a primary care register. Healthcare resource use patterns and annual costs [reported in 2014 euros (€) converted from Swedish kronor (SEK) using the exchange rate €1 = SEK 9.33)] were estimated for the year prior to the occurrence of MI as well as for a maximum follow-up period of 6 years post-MI. The study included 97 252 patients with a diagnosis of MI with a total number of 285 351 observation years. The majority of healthcare consumption occurred within the first year of MI where patients were on average hospitalized 1.55 times, made 1.08 outpatient care visits, and 3.80 primary care visits. In the long term, for the majority of resource use categories, average consumption was higher in the years after MI compared with the year prior to MI. Healthcare costs at 6 years of follow-up were approximately €20 000 of which €12 460 occurred in the first year, and the major part was attributed to hospitalizations.

    Conclusion For patients with 6 years of follow-up after MI, healthcare costs were approximately €20 000. The major part of costs occurred in the first year after MI and was driven by hospitalizations

  • 36.
    De Geer, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sandstedt, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Björkholm, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Software-based on-site estimation of fractional flow reserve using standard coronary CT angiography data.2016In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 1186-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The significance of a coronary stenosis can be determined by measuring the fractional flow reserve (FFR) during invasive coronary angiography. Recently, methods have been developed which claim to be able to estimate FFR using image data from standard coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) exams.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the accuracy of non-invasively computed fractional flow reserve (cFFR) from CCTA.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 23 vessels in 21 patients who had undergone both CCTA and invasive angiography with FFR measurement were evaluated using a cFFR software prototype. The cFFR results were compared to the invasively obtained FFR values. Correlation was calculated using Spearman's rank correlation, and agreement using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for significant stenosis (defined as both FFR ≤0.80 and FFR ≤0.75) were calculated.

    RESULTS: The mean cFFR value for the whole group was 0.81 and the corresponding mean invFFR value was 0.84. The cFFR sensitivity for significant stenosis (FFR ≤0.80/0.75) on a per-lesion basis was 0.83/0.80, specificity was 0.76/0.89, and accuracy 0.78/0.87. The positive predictive value was 0.56/0.67 and the negative predictive value was 0.93/0.94. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient was ρ = 0.77 (P < 0.001) and ICC = 0.73 (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: This particular CCTA-based cFFR software prototype allows for a rapid, non-invasive on-site evaluation of cFFR. The results are encouraging and cFFR may in the future be of help in the triage to invasive coronary angiography.

  • 37.
    Rapsomaniki, Eleni
    et al.
    Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, University College London, London, UK.
    Thuresson, Marcus
    Statisticon AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Yang, Erru
    Retrospective Observational Studies, Evidera, Lexington, MA, USA.
    Blin, Patrick
    University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
    Hunt, Phillip
    Retrospective Observational Studies, Evidera, Lexington, MA, USA.
    Chung, Sheng-Chia
    Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, University College London, London, UK.
    Stogiannis, Dimitris
    University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar
    Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, University College London, London, UK.
    Timmis, Adam
    Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, University College London, London, UK.
    Denaxas, Spiros C
    Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, University College London, London, UK.
    Danchin, Nicolas
    Hopital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France.
    Stokes, Michael
    Retrospective Observational Studies, Evidera, Lexington, MA, USA.
    Thomas-Delecourt, Florence
    Epidemiology, AstraZeneca Rueil-Malmaison, Rueil-Malmaison, France.
    Emmas, Cathy
    Astra Zeneca Luton, Luton, UK.
    Hasvold, Pål
    Medical Department, AstraZeneca Nordic-Baltic, Oslo, Norway.
    Jennings, Em
    Global Payer Evidence and Pricing, AstraZeneca R&D, Cambridge, UK.
    Johansson, Saga
    Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Mo¨ lndal, Sweden.
    Cohen, David J
    Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, MO, USA.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Moore, Nicholas
    University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Hemingway, Harry
    Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, University College London, London, UK.
    Using big data from health records from four countries to evaluate chronic disease outcomes: a study in 114 364 survivors of myocardial infarction2016In: European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, ISSN 2058-5225, E-ISSN 2058-1742, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 172-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To assess the international validity of using hospital record data to compare long-term outcomes in heart attack survivors.

    Methods and results We used samples of national, ongoing, unselected record sources to assess three outcomes: cause death; a composite of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and all-cause death; and hospitalized bleeding. Patients aged 65 years and older entered the study 1 year following the most recent discharge for acute MI in 2002–11 [n = 54 841 (Sweden), 53 909 (USA), 4653 (England), and 961 (France)]. Across each of the four countries, we found consistent associations with 12 baseline prognostic factors and each of the three outcomes. In each country, we observed high 3-year crude cumulative risks of all-cause death (from 19.6% [England] to 30.2% [USA]); the composite of MI, stroke, or death [from 26.0% (France) to 36.2% (USA)]; and hospitalized bleeding [from 3.1% (France) to 5.3% (USA)]. After adjustments for baseline risk factors, risks were similar across all countries [relative risks (RRs) compared with Sweden not statistically significant], but higher in the USA for all-cause death [RR USA vs. Sweden, 1.14 (95% confidence interval 1.04–1.26)] and hospitalized bleeding [RR USA vs. Sweden, 1.54 (1.21–1.96)].

    Conclusion The validity of using hospital record data is supported by the consistency of estimates across four countries of a high adjusted risk of death, further MI, and stroke in the chronic phase after MI. The possibility that adjusted risks of mortality and bleeding are higher in the USA warrants further study.

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  • 38.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasvold, Pål
    AstraZeneca NordicBalt, Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Martin
    AstraZeneca NordicBalt, Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Hans
    Nykoping Hosp, Nykoping, Sweden.
    Thuresson, Marcus
    Statisticon AB, S-75322 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cardiovascular risk in post-myocardial infarction patients: nationwide real world data demonstrate the importance of a long-term perspective.2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, no 19, p. 1163-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Long-term disease progression following myocardial infarction (MI) is not well understood. We examined the risk of subsequent cardiovascular events in patients discharged after MI in Sweden.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: This was a retrospective, cohort study linking morbidity, mortality, and medication data from Swedish national registries. Of 108 315 patients admitted to hospital with a primary MI between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2011 (index MI), 97 254 (89.8%) were alive 1 week after discharge and included in this study. The primary composite endpoint of risk for non-fatal MI, non-fatal stroke, or cardiovascular death was estimated for the first 365 days post-index MI and Day 366 to study completion. Risk and risk factors were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling, respectively. Composite endpoint risk was 18.3% during the first 365 days post-index MI. Age [60-69 vs. <60 years: HR (95% CI): 1.37 (1.30-1.45); 70-79 vs. <60 years: 2.13 (2.03-2.24); >80 vs. <60 years: 3.96 (3.78-4.15)], prior MI [1.44 (1.40-1.49)], stroke [1.49 (1.44-1.54)], diabetes [1.37 (1.34-1.40)], heart failure [1.57 (1.53-1.62)] and no index MI revascularisation [1.88 (1.83-1.93)] were each independently associated with a higher risk of ischaemic events or death. For patients without a combined endpoint event during the first 365 days, composite endpoint risk was 20.0% in the following 36 months.

    CONCLUSIONS: Risk of cardiovascular events appeared high beyond the first year post-MI, indicating a need for prolonged surveillance, particularly in patients with additional risk factors.

  • 39.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Comment: Including Both Costs and Effects - The Challenge of Using Cost-Effectiveness Data in National-Level Policy-Making: A Response to Recent Commentaries2015In: International Journal of Health Policy and Management, ISSN 2322-5939, E-ISSN 2322-5939, Vol. 4, no 8, p. 565-566Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 40.
    Cowper, Patricia A.
    et al.
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Pan, Wenqin
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Anstrom, Kevin J.
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Kaul, Padma
    University of Alberta, Canada.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Davidson-Ray, Linda
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Lundborg, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cannon, Christopher P.
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA 02115 USA.
    Harrington, Robert A.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Mark, Daniel B.
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Economic Analysis of Ticagrelor Therapy From a US Perspective2015In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 65, no 5, p. 465-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Based on results of the PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes) trial comparing ticagrelor with clopidogrel therapy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved ticagrelor in 2011 for reducing thrombotic cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with the proviso that it be taken with low-dose aspirin. OBJECTIVES This study sought to assess the cost and cost effectiveness of ticagrelor therapy relative to clopidogrel in treating ACS patients from the perspective of the U.S. health care system. METHODS We estimated within-trial resource use and costs using U.S. low-dose aspirin patients in PLATO (n = 547). Quality-adjusted life expectancy was estimated using the total PLATO population (n = 18,624), combined with baseline risk and long-term survival data from an external ACS patient cohort. Study drugs were valued at current costs. Cost effectiveness was assessed, as was the sensitivity of results to sampling and methodological uncertainties. RESULTS One year of ticagrelor therapy, relative to that of generic clopidogrel, cost $29,665/quality-adjusted life-year gained, with 99% of bootstrap estimates falling under a $100,000 willingness-to-pay threshold. Results were robust to extensive sensitivity analyses, including variations in clopidogrel cost, exclusion of costs in extended years of life, and a recalibrated estimate of survival reflecting a lower underlying mortality risk in the United States. CONCLUSIONS For PLATO-eligible ACS patients, a U.S. perspective comparison of the current standard of dual antiplatelet therapy of aspirin with clopidogrel versus aspirin plus ticagrelor showed that the ticagrelor regimen increased life expectancy at an incremental cost well within accepted benchmarks of good value for money. (C) 2015 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  • 41.
    Janzon, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    James, S
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cannon, C P
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Thrombolysis Myocardial Infarct TIMI Study Grp, Boston, MA 02115 USA Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA .
    Storey, R F
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Mellström, C
    AstraZeneca R&D, Molndal, Sweden.
    Nicolau, J C
    Univ Sao Paulo Med Sch, Heart Inst InCor, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Wallentin, L
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Clin Res Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. AstraZeneca Nord Balt, Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Health economic analysis of ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndromes intended for non-invasive therapy2015In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 119-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cost effectiveness of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) study who were scheduled for non-invasive management.

    METHODS: A previously developed cost effectiveness model was used to estimate long-term costs and outcomes for patients scheduled for non-invasive management. Healthcare costs, event rates and health-related quality of life under treatment with either ticagrelor or clopidogrel over 12 months were estimated from the PLATO study. Long-term costs and health outcomes were estimated based on data from PLATO and published literature sources. To investigate the importance of different healthcare cost structures and life expectancy for the results, the analysis was carried out from the perspectives of the Swedish, UK, German and Brazilian public healthcare systems.

    RESULTS: Ticagrelor was associated with lifetime quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gains of 0.17 in Sweden, 0.16 in the UK, 0.17 in Germany and 0.13 in Brazil compared with generic clopidogrel, with increased healthcare costs of €467, €551, €739 and €574, respectively. The cost per QALY gained with ticagrelor was €2747, €3395, €4419 and €4471 from a Swedish, UK, German and Brazilian public healthcare system perspective, respectively. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses indicated that the cost per QALY gained with ticagrelor was below conventional threshold values of cost effectiveness with a high probability.

    CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of patients with ACS scheduled for 12 months' non-invasive management with ticagrelor is associated with a cost per QALY gained below conventional threshold values of cost effectiveness compared with generic clopidogrel.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT000391872.

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  • 42.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Large early variation of residual platelet reactivity in Acute Coronary Syndrome patients treated with clopidogrel: Results from Assessing Platelet Activity in Coronary Heart Disease (APACHE).2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 335-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in patients with high residual platelet reactivity (HRPR), but the optimal time-point for testing is not established. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal time-point for aggregometry testing and the risk of major adverse cardiac events associated with HRPR.

    METHOD AND RESULTS: We included 125 patients with ACS (73 with STEMI, and 71 received abciximab). The prevalence of HRPR varied substantially over time. The rate of HRPR in patients treated and not treated with abciximab were 43% vs 67% (p=0.01) before, 2% vs 23% (p=0.001) 6-8h after, 8% vs 9% (p=0.749) 3days after, and 23% vs 12% (p=0.138) 7-9 days after loading dose of clopidogrel. We found HRPR in 18% of the patients but only four ischemic events during 6months follow-up, with no significant difference between HRPR patients compared to the rest of the population. There were 3 TIMI major bleedings, all of which occurred in the low residual platelet reactivity (LRPR) group.

    CONCLUSION: There is a large variation in platelet reactivity over time, also depending on adjunctive therapy, which has a large impact on optimal time-point for assessment. We found HRPR in almost 1 in 5 patients, but very few MACE, and not significantly higher in HRPR patients. In a contemporary ACS population, with low risk for stent thrombosis, the predictive value of HRPR for ischemic events will probably be low.

  • 43.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cosedis Nielsen, J.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, A.
    Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, P.
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aronsson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hindricks, G.
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Kongstad, O.
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, S.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Englund, A.
    University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, J.
    Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
    Mortensen, L. S.
    UNI-C, Danish Information Technology Centre for Education and Research, Denmark.
    Hansen, P. S.
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: results on health-related quality of life and symptom burden. The MANTRA-PAF trial2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 215-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial assessed the long-term efficacy of an initial strategy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) vs. antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for patients with PAF. In this substudy, we evaluated the effect of these treatment modalities on the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and symptom burden of patients at 12 and 24 months. Methods and results During the study period, 294 patients were enrolled in the MANTRA-PAF trial and randomized to receive AAD (N = 148) or RFA (N = 146). Two generic questionnaires were used to assess the HRQoL [Short Form-36 (SF-36) and EuroQol-five dimensions (EQ-5D)], and the Arrhythmia-Specific questionnaire in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia (ASTA) was used to evaluate the symptoms appearing during the trial. All comparisons were made on an intention-to-treat basis. Both randomization groups showed significant improvements in assessments with both SF-36 and EQ-5D, at 24 months. Patients randomized to RFA showed significantly greater improvement in four physically related scales of the SF-36. The three most frequently reported symptoms were breathlessness during activity, pronounced tiredness, and worry/anxiety. In both groups, there was a significant reduction in ASTA symptom index and in the severity of seven of the eight symptoms over time. Conclusion Both AAD and RFA as first-line treatment resulted in substantial improvement of HRQoL and symptom burden in patients with PAF. Patients randomized to RFA showed greater improvement in physical scales (SF-36) and the EQ-visual analogue scale.

  • 44.
    Szymanowski, Aleksander
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alfredsson, Joakimjoaal38
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas L.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Swahn, Eva
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Soluble markers of apoptosis in myocardial infarction patients during acute phase and 6-month follow up2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of the study was to investigate circulating markers of apoptosis in the acute phase and at follow8up in patients with ST8elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non8ST8elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI).

    Background

    Myocardial cell death during acute MI results from necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy. An elevated rate of apoptosis can continue for several days after the acute event, contributing to an increased final infarct size. Moreover, a lower but still increased apoptosis can continue for months resulting in left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and heart failure. Few studies have analysed markers of apoptosis longitudinally in MI patients.  Also, it is not known whether STEMI and NSTEMI patients differ in regard to these markers. 

    Methods

    This study is a prespecified substudy of the APACHE trial. We included 61 STEMI and 40 NSTEMI patients. Blood samples for analysis of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR) 1, sTNFR2, sFas, sFas ligand (sFasL) and IL86 were collected at baseline prior to PCI, at 3 days and at 6 months. High sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) was measured at 688 hours and echocardiography was performed at 283 days after admission to hospital.

    Results

    STEMI compared to NSTEMI patients showed very similar temporal patterns for each of the markers of apoptosis analyzed. Levels of sTNFRs increased from baseline to day 3 and the absolute increase as well as day 3 levels correlated significantly with TnT. At 6 months, sTNFR1 had returned to baseline whereas levels of sTNFR2 were still elevated. Soluble Fas and sFasL did not change from baseline to day 3, and both markers were significantly lower in the acute phase compared to 6 months. Indeed, sFas at day 3 correlated negatively with TnT. At all time points, plasma sTNFRs were significantly higher in patients with reduced LV function, whereas no such associations with sFas or sFasL was observed. 

    Conclusions

    The TNF and Fas/FasL pathways of apoptosis, as reflected by soluble markers, show markedly different temporal changes after an acute MI, indicating diverse roles of these two systems. STEMI compared to NSTEMI patients showed very similar temporal patterns for all the analyzed markers, suggesting apoptosis to be equally involved in myocardial damage of either infarct type.

  • 45.
    Aronsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walfridsson, Håkan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Hansen, Peter Steen
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
    Johannessen, Arne
    Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
    Raatikainen, Pekka
    Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
    Hindricks, Gerhard
    Leipzig University Hospital, Germany.
    Kongstad, Ole
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pehrson, Steen
    Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
    Englund, Anders
    University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hartikainen, Juha
    Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
    Mortensen, Leif Spange
    Danish Information Technology Centre for Education and Research, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The cost-effectiveness of radiofrequency catheter ablation as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: results from a MANTRA-PAF substudy.2015In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this prospective substudy was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) with radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) compared with antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A decision-analytic Markov model, based on MANTRA-PAF (Medical Antiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation) study data, was developed to study long-term effects and costs of RFA compared with AADs as first-line treatment. Positive clinical effects were found in the overall population, a gain of an average 0.06 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) to an incremental cost of €3033, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €50 570/QALY. However, the result of the subgroup analyses showed that RFA was less costly and more effective in younger patients. This implied an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €3434/QALY in ≤50-year-old patients respectively €108 937/QALY in >50-year-old patients.

    CONCLUSION: Radiofrequency catheter ablation as first-line treatment is a cost-effective strategy for younger patients with paroxysmal AF. However, the cost-effectiveness of using RFA as first-line therapy in older patients is uncertain, and in most of these AADs should be attempted before RFA (MANTRA-PAF ClinicalTrials.gov number; NCT00133211).

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  • 46.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    et al.
    Hjärtkliniken Stockholm, Sweden.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    [The truth about the clinical reality is in the registries. A register-based randomized clinical trial could provide representative picture].2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    A randomized, controlled clinical trial (RCT) is the best way to compare two treatment options since it eliminates the problem with confounding. However, todays' RCTs are often limited by including selected patients by the use of narrow inclusion criteria and multiple exclusion criteria. In a recent study of myocardial infarction survivors, the median age was 10 years older and the long term risk was 2-3 times higher in »real-world« data from a national registry compared with results from recently performed RCTs. These results raise questions about the generalizability of many RCTs. Our registries should therefore be used more often to evaluate new treatments. Registry-based randomized, controlled clinical trial (R-RCT) is a new concept that may not only lower the costs of randomized studies but also increase the generalizability of the trials.

  • 47.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost consequences of point-of-care troponin T testing in a Swedish primary health care setting2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the safety and cost-effectiveness of point-of-care troponin T testing (POCT-TnT) for the management of patients with chest pain in primary care. Design. Prospective observational study with follow-up. Setting. Three primary health care (PHC) centres using POCT-TnT and four PHC centres not using POCT-TnT in south-east Sweden. Patients. All patients greater than= 35 years of age, contacting one of the PHC centres for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue, with no other probable cause than cardiac, were included. Symptoms must have commenced or worsened during the previous seven days. Main outcome measures. Emergency referral rates, diagnoses of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or unstable angina (UA), and costs were collected for 30 days after the patient sought care at the PHC centre. Results. A total of 196 patients with chest pain were included: 128 in PHC centres with POCT-TnT and 68 in PHC centres without POCT-TnT. Fewer patients from the PHC centres with POCT-TnT (n = 32, 25%) were emergently referred to hospital than from centres without POCT-TnT (n = 29, 43%; p = 0.011). Eight patients (6.2%) from PHC centres with POCT-TnT were diagnosed with AMI or UA compared with six patients (8.8%) from centres without POCT-TnT (p = 0.565). Two patients with AMI or UA were classified as missed cases from PHC centres with POCT-TnT and there were no missed cases from PHC centres without POCT-TnT. SKr290 000 was saved per missed case of AMI or UA. Conclusion. The use of POCT-TnT in primary care may be cost saving but at the expense of missed cases.

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