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  • 1.
    Strakosas, Xenofon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Biesmans, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrahamsson, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hellman, Karin
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Silverå Ejneby, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Donahue, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekstrom, Peter
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ek, Fredrik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Savvakis, Marios
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hjort, Martin
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bliman, David
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; IRLAB Therapeut AB, Sweden.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindholm, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gerasimov, Jennifer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Simon, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Olsson, Roger
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Metabolite-induced in vivo fabrication of substrate-free organic bioelectronics2023In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 379, no 6634, p. 795-802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interfacing electronics with neural tissue is crucial for understanding complex biological functions, but conventional bioelectronics consist of rigid electrodes fundamentally incompatible with living systems. The difference between static solid-state electronics and dynamic biological matter makes seamless integration of the two challenging. To address this incompatibility, we developed a method to dynamically create soft substrate-free conducting materials within the biological environment. We demonstrate in vivo electrode formation in zebrafish and leech models, using endogenous metabolites to trigger enzymatic polymerization of organic precursors within an injectable gel, thereby forming conducting polymer gels with long-range conductivity. This approach can be used to target specific biological substructures and is suitable for nerve stimulation, paving the way for fully integrated, in vivo-fabricated electronics within the nervous system.

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  • 2.
    Wu, Hanyan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yang, Chiyuan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Li, Qifan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kolhe, Nagesh B.
    Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA; Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Strakosas, Xenofon
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stoeckel, Marc-Antoine
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Ziang
    Korea Univ, South Korea.
    Jin, Wenlong
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Savvakis, Marios
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kroon, Renee
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tu, Deyu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Woo, Han Young
    Korea Univ, South Korea.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. N Ink AB, Tekn Ringen 7, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Jenekhe, Samson A.
    Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA; Univ Washington, WA 98195 USA.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. N Ink AB, Tekn Ringen 7, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Influence of Molecular Weight on the Organic Electrochemical Transistor Performance of Ladder-Type Conjugated Polymers2022In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 34, no 4, article id 2106235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) hold promise for developing a variety of high-performance (bio-)electronic devices/circuits. While OECTs based on p-type semiconductors have achieved tremendous progress in recent years, n-type OECTs still suffer from low performance, hampering the development of power-efficient electronics. Here, it is demonstrated that fine-tuning the molecular weight of the rigid, ladder-type n-type polymer poly(benzimidazobenzophenanthroline) (BBL) by only one order of magnitude (from 4.9 to 51 kDa) enables the development of n-type OECTs with record-high geometry-normalized transconductance (g(m,norm) approximate to 11 S cm(-1)) and electron mobility x volumetric capacitance (mu C* approximate to 26 F cm(-1) V-1 s(-1)), fast temporal response (0.38 ms), and low threshold voltage (0.15 V). This enhancement in OECT performance is ascribed to a more efficient intermolecular charge transport in high-molecular-weight BBL than in the low-molecular-weight counterpart. OECT-based complementary inverters are also demonstrated with record-high voltage gains of up to 100 V V-1 and ultralow power consumption down to 0.32 nW, depending on the supply voltage. These devices are among the best sub-1 V complementary inverters reported to date. These findings demonstrate the importance of molecular weight in optimizing the OECT performance of rigid organic mixed ionic-electronic conductors and open for a new generation of power-efficient organic (bio-)electronic devices.

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  • 3.
    Mousa, Abdelrazek H.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bliman, David
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Betancourt, Lazaro Hiram
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hellman, Karin
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ekström, Peter
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Savvakis, Marios
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strakosas, Xenofon
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Marko-Varga, György
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hjort, Martin
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ek, Fredrik
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Olsson, Roger
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Method Matters: Exploring Alkoxysulfonate-Functionalized Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and Its Unintentional Self-Aggregating Copolymer toward Injectable Bioelectronics2022In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 2752-2763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Injectable bioelectronics could become an alternative or a complement to traditional drug treatments. To this end, a new self-doped p- type conducting PEDOT-S copolymer (A5) was synthesized. This copolymer formed highly water-dispersed nanoparticles and aggregated into a mixed ion-electron conducting hydrogel when injected into a tissue model. First, we synthetically repeated most of the published methods for PEDOT-S at the lab scale. Surprisingly, analysis using high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectroscopy showed that almost all the methods generated PEDOT-S derivatives with the same polymer lengths (i.e., oligomers, seven to eight monomers in average); thus, the polymer length cannot account for the differences in the conductivities reported earlier. The main difference, however, was that some methods generated an unintentional copolymer P(EDOT-S/EDOT-OH) that is more prone to aggregate and display higher conductivities in general than the PEDOT-S homopolymer. Based on this, we synthesized the PEDOT-S derivative A5, that displayed the highest film conductivity (33 S cm(-1)) among all PEDOT-S derivatives synthesized. Injecting A5 nanoparticles into the agarose gel cast with a physiological buffer generated a stable and highly conductive hydrogel (1-5 S cm(-1)), where no conductive structures were seen in agarose with the other PEDOT-S derivatives. Furthermore, the ion-treated A5 hydrogel remained stable and maintained initial conductivities for 7 months (the longest period tested) in pure water, and A5 mixed with Fe3O4 nanoparticles generated a magnetoconductive relay device in water. Thus, we have successfully synthesized a water-processable, syringe-injectable, and self-doped PEDOT-S polymer capable of forming a conductive hydrogel in tissue mimics, thereby paving a way for future applications within in vivo electronics.

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