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  • 1.
    Sultana, Ayesha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alam, Md Mehebub
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The enhanced ionic thermal potential by a polarized electrospun membrane2024In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by thermally sensitive ion channels in human skin, a polarized membrane composed of a ferroelectric polymer fiber matrix is used to double the heat-induced potential in ionic thermoelectric devices. The comparison of the thermal potentials between different directions of polarization and temperature gradient indicates the importance of cation-dipole interactions for the enhancement. Adding a polarized membrane to ionic thermoelectric devices induces dipole-ion interaction and enhances the thermal voltage by more than double.

  • 2.
    Liao, Mingna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Banerjee, Debashree
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hallberg, Tomas
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, Dept Electroopt Syst, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Åkerlind, Christina
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, Dept Electroopt Syst, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Alam, Md Mehebub
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Qilun
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kariis, Hans
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, Dept Electroopt Syst, S-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Zhao, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cellulose-Based Radiative Cooling and Solar Heating Powers Ionic Thermoelectrics2023In: Advanced Science, E-ISSN 2198-3844, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 2206510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose opens for sustainable materials suitable for radiative cooling thanks to inherent high thermal emissivity combined with low solar absorptance. When desired, solar absorptance can be introduced by additives such as carbon black. However, such materials still shows high thermal emissivity and therefore performs radiative cooling that counteracts the heating process if exposed to the sky. Here, this is addressed by a cellulose-carbon black composite with low mid-infrared (MIR) emissivity and corresponding suppressed radiative cooling thanks to a transparent IR-reflecting indium tin oxide coating. The resulting solar heater provides opposite optical properties in both the solar and thermal ranges compared to the cooler material in the form of solar-reflecting electrospun cellulose. Owing to these differences, exposing the two materials to the sky generated spontaneous temperature differences, as used to power an ionic thermoelectric device in both daytime and nighttime. The study characterizes these effects in detail using solar and sky simulators and through outdoor measurements. Using the concept to power ionic thermoelectric devices shows thermovoltages of >60 mV and 10 degrees C temperature differences already at moderate solar irradiance of approximate to 400 W m(-2).

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  • 3.
    Sultana, Ayesha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alam, Md Mehebub
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pavlopoulou, Eleni
    Fdn Res & Technol Hellas, Greece.
    Solano, Eduardo
    ALBA Synchrotron Light Source, Spain.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Toward High-Performance Green Piezoelectric Generators Based on Electrochemically Poled Nanocellulose2023In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 1568-1578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet-of-Everything (IoE) is defined as networked connections of things, people, data, and processes. IoE nodes, preferably shaped as printed flexible systems, serve as the frontier outpost of the Internet and comprise devices to record and regulate states and functions. To power distributed IoE nodes in an ecofriendly manner, a technology to scavenge energy from ambience and self-powered devices is developed. For this, piezoelectricity is regarded as a key property; however, the current technology typically based on polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) copolymers is expensive and produced via toxic protocols. We report piezoelectric characteristics of electrochemically poled cellulose nanofiber (CNF) thin films processed from water dispersions. Poling these films under humid conditions causes breaking and reorientation of CNF segments, which results in enhanced crystal alignment rendering the resulting material piezoelectric. Generators based on poled CNF show similar piezoelectric voltage and coefficient, here measured as d(33) = 46 pm V-1, to devices including PVDF copolymer layers of similar thickness. Our findings promise low-cost and printable ecofriendly piezoelectric-powered IoE nodes.

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  • 4.
    Dastidar, Subham
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alam, Md Mehebub
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Janus cellulose for self-adaptive solar heating and evaporative drying2022In: Cell Reports Physical Science, E-ISSN 2666-3864, Vol. 3, no 12, article id 101196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous cellulose can be tuned dynamically between reflecting and transparent states through reversible wetting with liquids like water while remaining non-absorptive in both states. By combining porous cellulose with an underlying cellulose-carbon nanotube layer, we here report a Janus cellulose that instead switches between reflect-ing and absorptive states. While the material is reflective and low absorbing in its dry state, exposure to water increases the optical transparency of the top layer and enables the bottom layer to absorb solar light and generate heat. In turn, this initiates a self -adaptive process that drives water evaporation and dries the struc-ture, making it reflective again. In situ measurements of scattering intensity, temperature, and water evaporation reveal an intriguing dynamic relationship between the optical and thermal properties of the Janus cellulose. This study highlights the use of cellulose sys-tems for solar and thermal management, demonstrating solar -induced self-adaptive heating, evaporative drying, and thermal regulation.

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  • 5.
    Sultana, Ayesha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alam, Md Mehebub
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Enhanced ionic transport in ferroelectric polymer fiber mats2021In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, E-ISSN 2050-7496, Vol. 9, no 39, p. 22418-22427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The limited ionic conductivity is the main issue for the application of solid-state ionic conductors. In this work, we have shown that increasing the ferroelectric phase content in a polymer matrix could enhance the molar ionic conductivity of the incorporated ionic liquid by two orders of magnitude compared to the original films with the same composition. The ferroelectric polymer fiber mats were prepared through electrospinning to induce the ferroelectric phase that ensure the polarization of the dipoles. After analyzing the ferroelectric phase content and polarization of the fiber mats and films containing different ion concentration with FTIR spectroscopy and piezoelectric characterization, a detailed mechanism explaining the improved conductivity in the ferroelectric fiber mats was proposed. Benefiting from the good flexibility, improved ionic conductivity and high temperature coefficient of the fiber mats, we fabricated an organic ionic thermistor. The temperature tracking and mapping function of the ionic thermistor was demonstrated by using two devices with 4 and 16 pixels.

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  • 6.
    Gamage, Sampath
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Banerjee, Debashree
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alam, Md Mehebub
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hallberg, Tomas
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, Dept Electroopt Syst, S-58111 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Åkerlind, Christina
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, Dept Electroopt Syst, S-58111 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sultana, Ayesha
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shanker, Ravi
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kariis, Hans
    FOI Swedish Def Res Agcy, Dept Electroopt Syst, S-58111 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Zhao, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Reflective and transparent cellulose-based passive radiative coolers2021In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 28, p. 9383-9393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiative cooling passively removes heat from objects via emission of thermal radiation to cold space. Suitable radiative cooling materials absorb infrared light while they avoid solar heating by either reflecting or transmitting solar radiation, depending on the application. Here, we demonstrate a reflective radiative cooler and a transparent radiative cooler solely based on cellulose derivatives manufactured via electrospinning and casting, respectively. By modifying the microstructure of cellulose materials, we control the solar light interaction from highly reflective (> 90%, porous structure) to highly transparent (approximate to 90%, homogenous structure). Both cellulose materials show high thermal emissivity and minimal solar absorption, making them suitable for daytime radiative cooling. Used as coatings on silicon samples exposed to sun light at daytime, the reflective and transparent cellulose coolers could passively reduce sample temperatures by up to 15 degrees C and 5 degrees C, respectively.

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1 - 6 of 6
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