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  • 1.
    Hanczyc, Piotr
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Alfarano, Serena Rosa
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Bolisetty, Sreenath
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Zhou, Jiangtao
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Peydayesh, Mohammad
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland; Indian Inst Technol Bhilai, India.
    Lutz-Bueno, Viviane
    PSI, Switzerland.
    Diaz, Ana
    PSI, Switzerland.
    Goswami, Shrestha Roy
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Beerepoot, Maarten T. P.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway.
    Alam, Mohammad Mehboob
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway; Indian Inst Technol Bhilai, India.
    Wang, Lei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Guangdong Univ Petrochem Technol, Peoples R China.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Szymanska, Iwona
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci WULS SGGW, Poland.
    Mezzenga, Raffaele
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland; Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Photonics of Hydrothermally Treated ß-Lactoglobulin Amyloids2024In: SMALL SCIENCE, ISSN 2688-4046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased temperature and high pressure are applied to beta-lactoglobulin fibrils in the autoclave, resulting in the acquisition of a composite material comprised of partially disassembled amyloid fibrils and carbon dots. Confirmation of the preservation of the beta-sheet motif attributed to amyloids in the hydrothermally treated fibrils is obtained through wide-angle X-ray scattering and ThT assay. Z-scan analysis reveals a two-photon absorption (2PA) enhancement in the low-lying transition band (La) of tyrosine, while quantum chemical calculations demonstrate a correlation between the yield of 2PA and the interspace distance between aromatic residues. Overall, the intrinsic optical properties of amyloid fibrils treated in a subcritical water environment are found to be linked with the pi-conjugation of tyrosine units and their through-space coupling. The resulting composite material is employed as a coating for a commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diode lamp, showcasing the potential utility of sustainable biomaterials with improved optical properties for photonics applications. By subjecting beta-lactoglobulin fibrils to elevated temperature and pressure in autoclave, partially disassembled fibrils are generated. The study reveals a correlation between fluorescence and two-photon absorption and the spacing of aromatic residues, shedding light on the mechanism behind the improved optical properties of amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, the hydrothermally treated beta-lactoglobulin fibrils are utilized to coat ultraviolet light-emitting diode lamps. image (c) 2024 WILEY-VCH GmbH

  • 2.
    Fernandez-Benito, Amparo
    et al.
    CSIC, Spain.
    Martinez-Lopez, Juan Carlos
    CSIC, Spain.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Martinez Gil, Jose Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Garcia-Gimenez, Daniel
    CSIC, Spain.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biophysics and bioengineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Carretero-Gonzalez, Javier
    CSIC, Spain.
    Green and Scalable Biopolymer-Based Aqueous Polyelectrolyte Complexes for Zinc-Ion Charge Storage Devices2023In: ChemElectroChem, E-ISSN 2196-0216, Vol. 10, no 2, article id e202300327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green and scalable materials are essential to fulfill the need of electrification for transitioning into a fossil-fuels free society, and sustainability is a requirement for all new technologies. Rechargeable batteries are one of the most important elements for electrification, enabling the transition to mobile electronics, electrical vehicles and grid storage. We here report synthesis and characterization of polyelectrolyte complexes of alginate and chitosan, both biopolymers deriving from the sea, for transport of zinc ions in hydrogel electrolytes. We have used vibrational spectroscopy, thermal measurements and microscopy, as well as transport measurements with ohmic or blocking contacts. The transference number for zinc ions is close to 1, the conductivity is approximate to 10 mS/cm, with stability at Zn interfaces seen through 7000 cycles in symmetric zinc//zinc cell. A zinc ion aqueous electrolyte was prepared from blends of chitosan and alginate, by using a simple and scalable route. These green zinc ion electrolytes exhibit a stability window up to 2 V, a zinc ion transference number close to 1, and electrochemical cyclability over 7000 cycles at interfaces to zinc. This biologically derived polyelectrolyte complex offers many possibilities for optimizing transport and stability at electrode interfaces.image

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  • 3.
    Wang, Lei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Lianlian
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ionovoltaic electricity generation over graphene-nanoplatelets: protein-nanofibril hybrid materials2023In: Nanoscale Advances, E-ISSN 2516-0230, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 820-829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous harvesting of electricity from the ambient environment has attracted great attention as a facile approach to green and sustainable energy. Natural water evaporation-driven electricity generators with active materials from economical and environment-friendly sources are highly sought after. Herein, we present devices made from a combination of protein nanofibrils (PNFs) and low-cost graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) that can be employed for electricity generation, simply by partly inserting the device into evaporating standing water. The origin of the electricity generation can be explained by the ionovoltaic effect where ionic motion, driven by evaporating water, leads to movement of charge carriers in the electrically conductive GNP-phase. Moreover, the device performance can be improved by adding a small amount of salt to the active layer. A device, composed of GNP:PNF:AlCl3, produces a sustained voltage of about 0.48 V, and a current of 89 nA. Furthermore, the device can tolerate saline water, with only a modest decrease of voltage, which provides potential for harvesting electricity from both evaporating saline water and fresh water.

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  • 4.
    Liu, Lianlian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Masich, Sergej
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Björk, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Black Charcoal for Green and Scalable Wooden Electrodes for Supercapabatteries2022In: Energy Technology, ISSN 2194-4288, Vol. 10, no 3, article id 2101072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A green, though black, sustainable and low-cost carbon material-charcoal produced from wood-is developed for electricity storage. Charcoal electrodes are fabricated by ball-milling charcoal and adding protein nanofibril binders. The charcoal electrode presents a capacitance of 360 F g(-1) and a conductivity of 0.2 S m(-1). A pair of redox peaks is observed in the cyclic voltammetry and assigned to originate from quinone groups. Compared with other wooden electrodes, these charcoal electrodes display better cycling stability with 88% capacity retention after 1000 cycles. Their discharge capacity is 2.5 times that of lignosulfonate/graphite hybrid electrodes.

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  • 5.
    Xin, Binbin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Lei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Le Febvrier, Arnaud
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elsukova, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Paul, Biplab
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mechanically Flexible Thermoelectric Hybrid Thin Films by Introduction of PEDOT:PSS in Nanoporous Ca3Co4O92022In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 7, no 27, p. 23988-23994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoporous Ca3Co4O9 exhibits high thermoelectric properties and low thermal conductivity and can be made mechanically flexible by nanostructural design. To improve the mechanical flexibility with retained thermoelectric properties near room temperature, however, it is desirable to incorporate an organic filler in this nanoporous inorganic matrix material. Here, double-layer nanoporous Ca3Co4O9/PEDOT:PSS thin films were synthesized by spin-coating PEDOT:PSS into the nanopores. The obtained hybrid films exhibit high Seebeck coefficient (~+130 mu V/K) and thermoelectric power factor (0.75 mu W cm(-1) K-2) at room temperature with no deterioration in electrical properties after cyclic bending tests (98% preservation of electrical conductivity after 1000 cycles bending to a bending radius of 3 mm). Compared with the nanoporous Ca3Co4O9 thin film, the mechanical flexibility of the hybrid film can be effectively improved after hybrid with PEDOT:PSS with only a slight decrease of the thermoelectric properties.

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  • 6.
    Yuan, Yusheng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Lei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Porcheddu, Andrea
    Univ Cagliari, Italy.
    Colacino, Evelina
    Univ Montpellier, France.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mechanochemical Preparation of Protein: hydantoin Hybrids and Their Release Properties2022In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 15, no 2, article id e202102097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanochemistry is a versatile methodology that can be employed both for covalent bond formation in organic synthesis as well as a mediator to allow preparation novel colloidal dispersions for drug delivery. Herein, ball-milling was employed for the solid-state preparation of fluorescent hydrophobic hydantoins, followed by the unprecedented mechanochemically-mediated complexation of hydrophobic hydantoins within hydrophilic protein beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) and BLG nanofibrils (BLGNFs). These hydantoin:protein materials were in turn incorporated into hydrogels. The effect of incorporation of hydantoins into proteins, as well as the effect of protein structure, on the release properties were then investigated. The conversion of BLG to BLGNFs led to a more sustained release demonstrating that heat treatment of BLG into BLGNFs could be employed to modify release properties. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example where protein : hydantoin complexes were prepared by mechanochemical methodology and mechanochemistry was combined with self-assembly in order to prepare protein nanomaterials for drug-delivery applications. In addition, the use of the developed protein materials is not limited to delivery of drugs but can for example be employed as components of smart food (delivery of nutrients) or release systems of pesticides.

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  • 7.
    Yuan, Yusheng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Protein-Based Flexible Conductive Aerogels for Piezoresistive Pressure Sensors2022In: ACS Applied Bio Materials, E-ISSN 2576-6422, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 3360-3370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gelatin is an excellent gelling agent and is widely employed for hydrogel formation. Because of the poor mechanical properties of gelatin when dry, gelatin-aerogels are comparatively rare. Herein we demonstrate that protein nanofibrils can be employed to improve the mechanical properties of gelatin aerogels, and the materials can moreover be functionalized with a an electrically conductive polyelectrolyte resulting in formation of an elastic electrically conductive aerogel that can be employed as a piezoresistive pressure sensor. The aerogel sensor shows a good linear relationship in a wide pressure range (1.8-300 kPa) with a sensitivity of 1.8 kPa(-1). This work presents a convenient way to produce electrically conductive elastic aerogels from low-cost protein precursors.

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  • 8.
    Yuan, Yusheng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Protein-based luminescent aerogels with elastic properties2022In: Green Chemistry Letters and Reviews, ISSN 1751-8253, E-ISSN 1751-7192, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 508-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gelatin is a famous gel-forming proteinaceous material with excellent hydrogelation properties. Herein, we report that protein nanofibrils (PNFs) can be employed to form hybrids with gelatin that can be converted to aerogels with attractive mechanical properties. Moreover, we are able to influence the gelation behavior of PNFs by mechanochemical processing. A combination of mechanochemistry and aqueous self-assembly is employed to prepare PNFs functionalized with hydrophobic dyes. These materials are then mixed with gelatin and converted into aerogels by freeze drying. We find that PNFs functionalized with PNFs lead to the formation of aerogels with more robust mechanical properties. Mechanochemical methodology as a green and scalable method can thus be employed for influencing the properties of protein-based aerogels. This represents a new and highly flexible and novel strategy for tuning both properties and functionality of protein materials. This work opens a simple and feasible way to produce nontoxic and biodegradable aerogel materials with favorable mechanical strength.

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  • 9.
    Liu, Lianlian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Lei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Quinones from Biopolymers and Small Molecules Milled into Graphite Electrodes2022In: Advanced Materials Technologies, E-ISSN 2365-709X, Vol. 7, no 2, article id 2001042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The redox reactions of quinones can be used in electrical energy storage systems. Biopolymers are one of the important sources for quinones due to sustainability and low cost. In this work, biomass materials that contain a large fraction of potential quinone groups are used to directly fabricate biomass/graphite hybrid material electrodes, without extraction or separation of the redox active components from other elements. Among these biomass electrodes based on barks, the bark from holm oak (Quercus ilex) and graphite hybrid electrode exhibits a discharge capacity of 20 mAh g(-1), with 68% capacity retention after 1000 cycles. Moreover, various quinone chemicals from the biological world are used to generate the quinone/graphite hybrid material electrodes that display higher quinone loadings at the carbon electrodes. The alizarin/graphite hybrid material electrode presents a capacity of 70 mAh g(-1), which is approximate to 30 times higher than that of the graphite electrode. It is demonstrated that barks and quinones are capable of exfoliating graphite into few-layer graphene sheets with reduced crystallite size. Processing into electrodes is facilitated by the use of another biopolymer, proteins in the form of misfolded protein fibrils, which also help to improve the available charge in electrodes formed from biomass or quinones.

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  • 10.
    Yuan, Yusheng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Water Processable Bioplastic Films from Functionalized Protein Fibrils2022In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 9, no 27, article id 2200926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A combination of mechanochemistry and aqueous self-assembly is employed to prepare protein nanofibrils (PNFs) functionalized with perylene diimide (PDI) dyes. These materials are then mixed with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and casted into bioplastic films. The functionalization process not only results in luminescent hybrid materials, but the presence of the dye modifies the physical properties of the PNFs. Films formed from PNFs functionalized with PDIs display anisotropic organization, which enables emission of polarized light. Crucially, the presence of PDI dyes improves the stability of PNF-PVA films in water and moreover the films are processable when wet. By applying water, films can be glued together or self-healed by applying water. Mechanochemical methodology can thus be employed for modifying properties of protein materials. This represents a new highly flexible and novel strategy for tuning both properties and functionality of protein materials.

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  • 11.
    Wang, Lei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Yusheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nagamani, Selvakumaran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Alagappa Univ, India.
    Hanczyc, Piotr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Sznitko, Lech
    Wroclaw Univ Sci & Technol, Poland.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Air-Water Interface Assembly of Protein Nanofibrils Promoted by Hydrophobic Additives2021In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 9, no 28, p. 9289-9299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we demonstrate a novel way of modifying the colloidal stability of proteins by the presence of hydrophobic molecules. A protein capable of self-assembly into protein nanofibrils (PNFs) is milled with a hydrophobic molecular material. Upon dissolution in acidic water followed by heating, the proteins are converted into PNFs containing hydrophobic dyes. When aqueous dispersions of such PNFs are heated, films are formed at the air-water interface. The films contain ordered, optically anisotropic domains, and the shape of the reaction vessel can influence the PNF packing. We demonstrate the generality of the process by employing PNFs derived from the three proteins bovine insulin (INS), beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in combination with the dyes alpha-sexithiophene (6T) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). As individual dye molecules are oriented along the long PNF axis, whole ensembles of dyes become aligned and, as a result, display emission of polarized light. Moreover, in the case of PNFs stained with DCM, stimulated emission is demonstrated.

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  • 12.
    Nadhom, Hama
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Yusheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rouf, Polla
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Area selective deposition of iron films using temperature sensitive masking materials and plasma electrons as reducing agents2021In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 39, no 4, article id 043411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of area-selective deposition (ASD) with a newly developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, which utilizes plasma electrons as reducing agents for deposition of metal-containing films, is demonstrated using temperature sensitive polymer-based masking materials. The masking materials tested were polydimethylsiloxane, polymethylmethacrylate, polystyrene, parafilm, Kapton tape, Scotch tape, and office paper. The masking materials were all shown to prevent film growth on the masked area of the substrate without being affected by the film deposition process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirms that the films deposited consist mainly of iron, whereas no film material is found on the masked areas after mask removal. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films deposited with nonadhesive masking materials show that film growth extended for a small distance underneath the masking material, indicating that the CVD process with plasma electrons as reducing agents is not a line-of-sight deposition technique. The reported methodology introduces an inexpensive and straightforward approach for ASD that opens for exciting new possibilities for robust and less complex area-selective metal-on-metal deposition.

  • 13.
    Liu, Lianlian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bio Based Batteries2021In: Advanced Energy Materials, ISSN 1614-6832, E-ISSN 1614-6840, Vol. 11, no 43, article id 2003713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expanding use of electrical power generated from wind turbines and solar photovoltaic plants is enabled by the decreasing cost of electrical energy from sun and wind. With the advent of electrical energy from the intermittent solar and wind energy resources comes the requirement that electricity must be stored for use over time. The huge demand for materials for such storage systems will require a considerable energy input in extraction, processing and materials formulation, and new and sustainable electrochemical systems need to be developed. Storing electrical energy in bio based batteries is one of the options for handling the rapid expansion of renewable and variable electrical energy generated in wind turbines and in solar photovoltaic systems, from small to large. With projected needs for storage at 300 GWh for the coming decade, there are many niches for new technologies and possibilities. A supply line of materials for energy storage materials could be ultimately based on photosynthesis, in the form of materials derived from plants. Redox activity is possible in lignin, humic acid, and polyphenolic macromolecules, sometimes by electrochemical activation of redox groups.

  • 14.
    Xin, Binbin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Le Febvrier, Arnaud
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Lei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Paul, Biplab
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Growth and optical properties of CaxCoO2 thin films2021In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 210, article id 110033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The layered cobaltates A(x)CoO(2) (A = Li, Na, Ca, Ba, Sr) are of interest for energy applications such as thermoelectrics and batteries. However, it is challenging to obtain these phases in pure from as thin films. Here, phase-pure CaxCoO2 (x similar to 0.5) thin films were obtained by annealing of Ca(OH)(2)/Co3O4 multilayers made by moisture treatment of sputter-deposited CaO/Co3O4 multilayer films. The pure CaxCoO2 thin films exhibit an average optical transmittance of approximately 36% in the visible region and greater than 70% in the near-infrared (NIR) region. In addition, the electrical conductivity can be increased by incorporating a secondary Ca3Co4O9 phase into the CaxCoO2 thin film without large changes in optical properties and Seebeck coefficient. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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  • 15.
    Yuan, Yusheng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mechanochemical Preparation and Self-Assembly of Protein: Dye Hybrids for White Luminescence2021In: ACS Applied Polymer Materials, ISSN 2637-6105, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 4825-4836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein nanofibrils (PNFs) functionalized with multiple dyes are prepared by a combination of mechanochemistry and liquid-phase self-assembly. The three employed dyes are Fluorescent Brightener 378 (F378), 2-butyl-6-(butylamino)-1H-benzo[de]isoquinoline-1,3(2H)-dione (Fluorol 555), and Nile red (NR). F378 acts as the donor with Fluorol 555 as the acceptor. F555 in turn acts as the donor and NR as the acceptor. This enables a FRET cascade that enables conversion of UV light to white light. The efficiency of FRET can be influenced by the details of the self-assembly process. If proteins milled with different dyes are mixed prior to self-assembly, nanofibrils are formed containing all three dyes, thus favoring FRET processes. By tuning the ratio of the three luminescent dyes, PNF dispersions are obtained that display bright white light emission. Moreover, the PNF dispersions can be converted into white luminescent films and gels where the PNFs may help to organize dye molecules. Additionally, the PNF materials can be employed as coatings on commercial LEDs, enabling emission of white light.

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  • 16.
    Lendel, Christofer
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Protein nanofibrils and their use as building blocks of sustainable materials2021In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 11, no 62, p. 39188-39215Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development towards a sustainable society requires a radical change of many of the materials we currently use. Besides the replacement of plastics, derived from petrochemical sources, with renewable alternatives, we will also need functional materials for applications in areas ranging from green energy and environmental remediation to smart foods. Proteins could, with their intriguing ability of self-assembly into various forms, play important roles in all these fields. To achieve that, the code for how to assemble hierarchically ordered structures similar to the protein materials found in nature must be cracked. During the last decade it has been demonstrated that amyloid-like protein nanofibrils (PNFs) could be a steppingstone for this task. PNFs are formed by self-assembly in water from a range of proteins, including plant resources and industrial side streams. The nanofibrils display distinct functional features and can be further assembled into larger structures. PNFs thus provide a framework for creating ordered, functional structures from the atomic level up to the macroscale. This review address how industrial scale protein resources could be transformed into PNFs and further assembled into materials with specific mechanical and functional properties. We describe what is required from a protein to form PNFs and how the structural properties at different length scales determine the material properties. We also discuss potential chemical routes to modify the properties of the fibrils and to assemble them into macroscopic structures.

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  • 17.
    Hu, Jiwen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Lei
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Xin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yu, Weibin
    Tongji Univ, Peoples R China.
    Gao, Hong-Wen
    Tongji Univ, Peoples R China.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selective colorimetric detection of copper (II) by a protein-based nanoprobe2021In: Spectrochimica Acta Part A - Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, ISSN 1386-1425, E-ISSN 1873-3557, Vol. 252, article id 119462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we report a novel protein-based nanoprobe (PNP) that can be employed for quantitative analysis of Cu2+ in pure water medium and real samples. Structurally, the proposed nanoprobe comprises a biofriendly protein (hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL)) and a Cu2+-specific chromogenic agent, where HEWL acts as a nanocarrier encapsulating a structurally tailored rhodamine B derivate. The resulting PNP exhibits a hydrodynamic diameter of similar to 106 nm and efficiently disperses in water, enabling the detection of Cu2+ in pure aqueous systems without the aid of any organic co-solvents. The high sensitivity and selectivity of PNP allow the colorimetric detection of Cu2+ in the presence of other metal interferents with a low detection limit of 160 nM. The satisfying recovery of trace level Cu2+ in environmental samples demonstrate the great potential of employing PNP for the determination of Cu2+ in actual applications. Most importantly, the simple co-grinding method employing proteins and chromogenic agents provides a novel strategy to generate sensing systems that are useful detection of pollutants in aqueous samples. (C) 2021 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Liu, Lianlian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-discharge study of lignin/graphite hybrid material electrodes2021In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 371, article id 137836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin has been proposed as electricity storage materials due to the redox activity of quinone (Q) and hydroquinone (QH(2)) groups, which can be formed in lignin. Scalable and low-cost lignosulfonate (LS)/graphite hybrid material electrodes have been developed. It is important to investigate the self discharge mechanism for these electrodes since a high self-discharge rate was observed, which results in loss of energy density and power density. In this work, self-discharge measurements and models are applied to clarify the self-discharge mechanism of the LS/graphite electrodes. A combination of diffusion controlled, activation controlled and charge equilibration mechanisms are indicated during the self discharge process at different charging voltages, due to the faradaic reactions of the Q/QH(2) confined in the electrodes. Our work contributes deeper understanding of the structure and the self-discharge mechanisms of the biopolymer/graphite hybrid electrodes. (C) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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  • 19.
    Kim, Jung Yong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jimma Univ, Ethiopia.
    Nagamani, Selvakumaran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Lianlian
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    El Ghazaly, Ahmed
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A DNA and Self-Doped Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Assembled for Organic Optoelectronics and Bioelectronics2020In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 1214-1221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and a self-doped conjugated polyelectrolyte, poly(4-(2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b]-[1,4]dioxin-2-yl-methoxy)-1-butanesulfonic acid (PEDOT-S), are assembled for organic optoelectronics and bioelectronics. The DNAs helix-coil phase transition in water is studied as a function of composition by thermo-optical analysis. DNA and PEDOT-S are functionalized by using a surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTMA), and DNA:CTMA, PEDOT-S:CTMA, and DNA:CTMA:PEDOT-S:CTMA complexes were characterized regarding thermal, optical, morphological, and structural properties. Finally, DNA and DNA:PEDOT-S mixtures are processed in water for fabricating organized films through brushing. The electrical properties of these films are characterized using an interdigitated electrode. The films show an electronic conductivity of similar to 10(-6)-10(-5) S/cm in a range of semiconductors.

  • 20.
    Wang, Lei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Xin, Binbin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elsukova, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Electronic and photonic materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mechanochemical Formation of Protein Nanofibril: Graphene Nanoplatelet Hybrids and Their Thermoelectric Properties2020In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 8, no 47, p. 17368-17378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrids between biopolymeric materials and low-cost conductive carbon-based materials are interesting materials for applications in electronics, potentially reducing the need for materials that generate environmentally harmful electronic waste. Herein we investigate a scalable ball-milling method to form graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) by milling graphite flakes with aqueous dispersions of proteins or protein nanofibrils (PNFs). Aqueous GNP dispersions with high concentrations (up to 3.2 mg mL(-1)) are obtained under appropriate conditions. The PNFs/proteins help to exfoliate graphite and stabilize the resulting GNP dispersions by electrostatic repulsion. PNFs are prepared from hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG). The GNP dispersions can be processed into free-standing films having an electrical conductivity of up to 110 S m(-1). Alternatively, the GNP dispersions can be drop-cast on PET substrates, resulting in mechanically flexible films having an electrical conductivity of up to 65 S m(-1). The drop-cast films are investigated regarding their thermoelectric properties, having Seebeck coefficients of about 50 mu V K-1. By annealing drop-cast films and thus carbonizing residual PNFs, an increase of electrical conductivity, coupled with a modest decrease in Seebeck coefficient, is obtained resulting in materials displaying power factors of up to 4.6 mu W m(-1) K-2.

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  • 21.
    Liu, Lianlian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Biocarbon Meets Carbon-Humic Acid/Graphite Electrodes Formed by Mechanochemistry2019In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, MATERIALS, Vol. 12, no 24, article id 4032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humic acid (HA) is a biopolymer formed from degraded plants, making it a ubiquitous, renewable, sustainable, and low cost source of biocarbon materials. HA contains abundant functional groups, such as carboxyl-, phenolic/alcoholic hydroxyl-, ketone-, and quinone/hydroquinone (Q/QH(2))-groups. The presence of Q/QH(2) groups makes HA redox active and, accordingly, HA is a candidate material for energy storage. However, as HA is an electronic insulator, it is essential to combine it with conductive materials in order to enable fabrication of HA electrodes. One of the lowest cost types of conductive materials that can be considered is carbon-based conductors such as graphite. Herein, we develop a facile method allowing the biocarbon to meet carbon; HA (in the form of a sodium salt) is mixed with graphite by a solvent-free mechanochemical method involving ball milling. Few-layer graphene sheets are formed and the HA/graphite mixtures can be used to fabricate HA/graphite hybrid material electrodes. These electrodes exhibit a conductivity of up to 160 Sm-1 and a discharge capacity as large as 20 mAhg(-1). Our study demonstrates a novel methodology enabling scalable fabrication of low cost and sustainable organic electrodes for application as supercapacitors.

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  • 22.
    Liu, Lianlian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Scalable lignin/graphite electrodes formed by mechanochemistry2019In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, RSC ADVANCES, Vol. 9, no 68, p. 39758-39767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin is a promising candidate for energy storage because of its abundance, wide geographic distribution, and low cost as it is mainly available as a low value product from processing of wood into paper pulp. Lignin contains large amounts of potential quinone groups, which can be oxidized and reduced in a two electron process. This redox reaction makes lignin suitable for charge storage. However, lignin is insulating and therefore conductive materials are necessary in lignin electrodes, for whom the cost of the conductive materials hinders the scalable application. Among the organic conductive materials, graphite is one of the cheapest and is easily acquired from nature. In this work, we combine graphite and lignosulfonate (LS) and fabricate LS/graphite organic electrodes under a solvent-free mechanical milling method, without additives. The graphite is sheared into small particles with a size range from 50 nm to 2000 nm. Few-layer graphene is formed during the ball milling process. The LS/graphite hybrid material electrodes with primary stoichiometry of 4/1 (w/w) gives a conductivity of 280 S m(-1) and discharge capacity of 35 mA h g(-1). It is a promising material for the scalable production of LS organic electrodes.

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  • 23.
    Wang, Lei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preparation of functionalized protein materials assisted by mechanochemistry2018In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 53, no 19, p. 13719-13732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we investigate the suitability of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) as a protein matrix for dispersal of various hydrophobic dyes. Moreover, we investigate the use of a mixer mill for grinding operation as an alternative to hand grinding by mortar and pestle. HEWL and various dyes are mixed by mechanochemistry, and the resulting composite material is dissolved in aqueous acid. The samples are then exposed to conditions promoting self-assembly of HEWL into protein nanofibrils (PNFs). The effect of PNF formation on dye photophysics is investigated by spectroscopic examination by absorption and luminescence spectroscopy, and product morphology is examined by scanning electron microscopy. The self-assembly process results in protein nanofibrils functionalized with luminescent dyes. Such structures may find future applications in various devices for light emission. In addition, we demonstrate that the anticancer drug camptothecin can be incorporated into protein nanofibrils giving materials that can find application as drug delivery agents.

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  • 24.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fatima
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Babenko, Viktoria
    University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Dzwolak, Wojciech
    University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conducting microhelices from self-assembly of protein fibrils2017In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 13, no 25, p. 4412-4417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we utilize insulin to prepare amyloid based chiral heliceswith either right or left handed helicity. We demonstrate that thehelices can be utilized as structural templates for the conductingpolymer alkoxysulfonate poly(ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT-S).The chirality of the helical assembly is transferred to PEDOT-S asdemonstrated by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and CircularDichroism (CD). Analysis of the helices by conductive atomic force(c-AFM) shows significant conductivity. In addition the morphologyof the template structure is stabilized by PEDOT-S. Theseconductive helical structures represent promising candidates in ourquest for THz resonators.

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  • 25.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Highly Stable Conjugated Polyelectrolytes for Water-Based Hybrid Mode Electrochemical Transistors2017In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 29, no 19, article id 1605787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrophobic, self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) are introduced as highly stable active materials for organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs). The hydrophobicity of CPEs renders films very stable in aqueous solutions. The devices operate at gate voltages around zero and show no signs of degradation when operated for 10(4) cycles under ambient conditions. These properties make the produced OECTs ideal devices for applications in bioelectronics.

  • 26.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ambrogi, Martina
    Max Planck Institute Colloids and Interfaces, Germany.
    Ayalneh Tiruye, Girum
    IMDEA Energy Institute, Spain.
    Cordella, Daniela
    University of Liege ULg, Belgium.
    Fernandes, Ana M.
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Grygiel, Konrad
    Max Planck Institute Colloids and Interfaces, Germany.
    Isik, Mehmet
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Patil, Nagaraj
    University of Liege ULg, Belgium.
    Porcarelli, Luca
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Rocasalbas, Gillem
    KIOMedPharma, Belgium.
    Vendramientto, Giordano
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Zeglio, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Antonietti, Markus
    Max Planck Institute Colloids and Interfaces, Germany.
    Detrembleur, Cristophe
    University of Liege ULg, Belgium.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jerome, Christine
    University of Liege ULg, Belgium.
    Marcilla, Rebeca
    IMDEA Energy Institute, Spain.
    Mecerreyes, David
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain; Basque Fdn Science, Spain.
    Moreno, Monica
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Taton, Daniel
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Jiayin
    Max Planck Institute Colloids and Interfaces, Germany.
    Innovative polyelectrolytes/poly(ionic liquid)s for energy and the environment2017In: Polymer international, ISSN 0959-8103, E-ISSN 1097-0126, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 1119-1128Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the work carried out within the European project RENAISSANCE-ITN, which was dedicated to the development of innovative polyelectrolytes for energy and environmental applications. Within the project different types of innovative polyelectrolytes were synthesized such as poly(ionic liquid)s coming from renewable or natural ions, thiazolium cations, catechol functionalities or from a new generation of cheap deep eutectic monomers. Further, macromolecular architectures such as new poly(ionic liquid) block copolymers and new (semi)conducting polymer/polyelectrolyte complexes were also developed. As the final goal, the application of these innovative polymers in energy and the environment was investigated. Important advances in energy storage technologies included the development of new carbonaceous materials, new lignin/conducting polymer biopolymer electrodes, new iongels and single-ion conducting polymer electrolytes for supercapacitors and batteries and new poly(ionic liquid) binders for batteries. On the other hand, the use of innovative polyelectrolytes in sustainable environmental technologies led to the development of new liquid and dry water, new materials for water cleaning technologies such as flocculants, oil absorbers, new recyclable organocatalyst platforms and new multifunctional polymer coatings with antifouling and antimicrobial properties. All in all this paper demonstrates the potential of poly(ionic liquid)s for high-value applications in energy and enviromental areas. (c) 2017 Society of Chemical Industry

  • 27.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Martina M.
    Chemistry I—Applied Functional Polymers University of Bayreuth Bayreuth, Germany.
    Thelakkat, Mukundan
    Chemistry I—Applied Functional Polymers University of Bayreuth Bayreuth, Germany.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blend as Photonic Probe of Biomembrane Organization2016In: ChemistrySelect, ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 1, no 14, p. 4340-4344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the following report, a conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) blend has been introduced for the first time as a fluorescent probe of membrane organization. Insertion of the blend into the lipid double layer has been rendered possible through formation of a hydrophobic complex by counterion exchange. Changes in membrane physical state from liquid-disordered (Ldis) to liquid-ordered (Lord), and to solid-ordered (Sord) result in red shifts of blend excitation (up to Δλex=+90 nm) and emission (up to Δλnm=+37 nm) maxima attributable to backbone planarization of CPEs. We found that blend stoichiometry can be adjusted to attain the best interplay among single polyelectrolytes properties, such as sensitivity and luminescence. The resulting probes therefore allow a bimodal detection of membrane physical state: changes in absorption permit a direct visualization of membrane organization, while variations in emission spectra demonstrate that CPE-blends are a promising probes that can be used for imaging applications.

  • 28.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik G.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pallbo, Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Controlling Amyloid Fibril Formation by Partial Stirring2016In: Biopolymers, ISSN 0006-3525, E-ISSN 1097-0282, Vol. 105, no 5, p. 249-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many proteins undergoes self-assembly into fibrillar structures known as amyloid fibrils. During the self-assembly process related structures, known as spherulites, can be formed. Herein we report a facile method where the balance between amyloid fibrils and spherulites can be controlled by stirring of the reaction mixture during the initial stages of the self-assembly process. Moreover, we report how this methodology can be used to prepare non-covalently functionalized amyloid fibrils. By stirring the reaction mixture continuously or for a limited time during the lag phase the fibril length, and hence the propensity to form liquid crystalline phases, can be influenced. This phenomena is utilized by preparing films consisting of aligned protein fibrils incorporating the laser dye Nile red. The resulting films display polarized Nile red fluorescence.

  • 29.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Casado, N.
    University of Basque Country, Spain.
    Rebis, Tomasz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mecerreyes, D.
    University of Basque Country, Spain; Ikerbasque, Spain.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    High performance PEDOT/lignin biopolymer composites for electrochemical supercapacitors2016In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 1838-1847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing sustainable organic electrode materials for energy storage applications is an urgent task. We present a promising candidate based on the use of lignin, the second most abundant biopolymer in nature. This polymer is combined with a conducting polymer, where lignin as a polyanion can behave both as a dopant and surfactant. The synthesis of PEDOT/Lig biocomposites by both oxidative chemical and electrochemical polymerization of EDOT in the presence of lignin sulfonate is presented. The characterization of PEDOT/Lig was performed by UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy, FTIR infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge. PEDOT doped with lignin doubles the specific capacitance (170.4 F g(-1)) compared to reference PEDOT electrodes (80.4 F g(-1)). The enhanced energy storage performance is a consequence of the additional pseudocapacitance generated by the quinone moieties in lignin, which give rise to faradaic reactions. Furthermore PEDOT/Lig is a highly stable biocomposite, retaining about 83% of its electroactivity after 1000 charge/discharge cycles. These results illustrate that the redox doping strategy is a facile and straightforward approach to improve the electroactive performance of PEDOT.

  • 30.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Trinh, Xuan thang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nguyen, Son Tien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 18, p. 6385-6393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes, having semiconducting and metallic behaviors, respectively, have been blended from aqueous solutions in order to produce materials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. The intimate blend of two anionic conjugated polyelectrolytes combine the electrical and optical properties of these, and can be tuned by blend stoichiometry. In situ conductance measurements have been done during doping of the blends, while UV vis and EPR spectroelectrochemistry allowed the study of the nature of the involved redox species. We have constructed an accumulation/depletion mode organic electrochemical transistor whose characteristics can be tuned by balancing the stoichiometry of the active material.

  • 31.
    Johansson, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jullesson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liin, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zeglio, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electronic polymers in lipid membranes2015In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 11242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium: lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes.

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  • 32.
    Elfwing, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Protein nanowires with conductive properties2015In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 3, no 25, p. 6499-6504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we report on the investigation of self-assembled protein nanofibrils functionalized with metallic organic compounds. We have characterized the electronic behaviour of individual nanowires using conductive atomic force microscopy. In order to follow the self assembly process we have incorporated fluorescent molecules into the protein and used the energy transfer between the internalized dye and the metallic coating to probe the binding of the polyelectrolyte to the fibril.

  • 33.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik G.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tuning the aqueous self-assembly process of insulin by a hydrophobic additive2015In: RSC ADVANCES, ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, no 112, p. 92254-92262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomolecular self-assembly is an efficient way of preparing soft-matter based materials. Herein we report a novel method, based on the use of insoluble additives in aqueous media, for influencing the self-assembly process. Due to their low solubility, the use of hydrophobic additives in aqueous media is problematic; however, by mixing the additive with the biomolecule in the solid state, prior to solvation, this problem can be circumvented. In the investigated self-assembly system, where bovine insulin self-assembles into spherical structures, the inclusion of the hydrophobic material α-sexithiophene (6T) results in significant changes in the self-assembly process. Under our reaction conditions, in the case of materials prepared from insulin-only the growth of spherulites typically stops at a diameter of 150μm. However, by adding 2 weight % of hydrophobic material, spherulite growth continues up to diameters in the mm-range. The spherulites incorporate 6T and are thus fluorescent. The method reported herein should be of interest to all scientists working in the field of self-assembly as the flexible materials preparation, based simply on co-grinding of commercially available materials, adds another option to influence the structure and properties of products formed by  self-assembly reactions.

  • 34.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wigenius, Jens
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Fredrik
    Chalmers, Sweden .
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Amyloid fibrils as dispersing agents for oligothiophenes: control of photophysical properties through nanoscale templating and flow induced fibril alignment2014In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 2, no 37, p. 7811-7822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we report that protein fibrils formed from aggregated proteins, so called amyloid fibrils, serve as an excellent dispersing agent for hydrophobic oligothiophenes such as alpha-sexithiophene (6T). Furthermore, the protein fibrils are capable of orienting 6T along the fibril long axis, as demonstrated by flow-aligned linear dichroism spectroscopy and polarized fluorescence microscopy. The materials are prepared by solid state mixing of 6T with a protein capable of self-assembly. This results in a water soluble composite material that upon heating in aqueous acid undergoes self-assembly into protein fibrils non-covalently functionalized with 6T, with a typical diameter of 5-10 nm and lengths in the micrometre range. The resulting aqueous fibril dispersions are a readily available source of oligothiophenes that can be processed from aqueous solvent, and we demonstrate the fabrication of macroscopic structures consisting of aligned 6T functionalized protein fibrils. Due to the fibril induced ordering of 6T these structures exhibit polarized light emission.

  • 35.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development and Application of Methodology for Rapid Screening of Potential Amyloid Probes2014In: ACS COMBINATORIAL SCIENCE, ISSN 2156-8952, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 721-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we demonstrate that it is possible to rapidly screen hydrophobic fluorescent aromatic molecules with regards to their properties as amyloid probes. By grinding the hydrophobic molecule with the amyloidogenic protein insulin, we obtained a water-soluble composite material. When this material is dissolved and exposed to conditions promoting amyloid formation, the protein aggregates into amyloid fibrils incorporating the hydrophobic molecule. As a result, changes in the fluorescence spectra of the hydrophobic molecule can be correlated to the formation of amyloid fibrils, and the suitability of the hydrophobic molecular skeleton as an amyloid probe can thus be assessed. As a result, we discovered two new amyloid probes, of which one is the well-known laser dye DCM. The grinding method can also be used for rapid preparation of novel composite materials between dyes and proteins, which can be used in materials science applications such as organic electronics and photonics.

  • 36.
    Andersson, Viktor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Masich, Sergej
    Department of cell and molecular biology, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Morphology of organic electronic materials imaged via electron tomography2012In: Journal of Microscopy, ISSN 0022-2720, E-ISSN 1365-2818, Vol. 247, no 3, p. 277-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several organic materials and blends have been studied with the use of electron tomography. Tomography reconstructions of active layers of organic solar cells, where various preparation techniques have been used, have been analysed and compared to device behaviour. In addition, materials with predefined structures, including contrast enhancing features, have been studied and double tilt data collection has been employed to improve reconstructions. Small changes in preparation procedures may lead to large differences in morphology and device performance, and the results also indicate a complex relation between these.

  • 37.
    Andersson, Viktor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preparation of amyloidlike fibrils containing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Effect of protein aggregation on proton relaxivity2012In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 419, no 4, p. 682-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method to prepare amyloid-like fibrils functionalized with magnetic nanoparticles has been developed. The amyloid-like fibrils are prepared in a two step procedure, where insulin and magnetic nanoparticles are mixed simply by grinding in the solid state, resulting in a water soluble hybrid material. When the hybrid material is heated in aqueous acid, the insulin/nanoparticle hybrid material self assembles to form amyloid-like fibrils incorporating the magnetic nanoparticles. This results in magnetically labeled amyloid-like fibrils which has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and electron tomography. The influence of the aggregation process on proton relaxivity is investigated. The prepared materials have potential uses in a range of bio-imaging applications.

  • 38.
    Solin, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Protein Nanofibrils Balance Colours in Organic White-Light-Emitting Diodes2012In: Israel Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 0021-2148, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 529-539Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review we discuss our efforts in using protein nanowires (amyloid fibrils) as structural templates for use in organic electronics applications, mainly focusing on organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). We discuss different ways of functionalising amyloid fibrils. In one method, the amyloid fibril is used to organise luminescent polymers. We also discuss an alternative preparative method, resulting in amyloid-like materials functionalised with phosphorescent organometallic complexes. We discuss the incorporation of such materials in organic electronics devices, such as OLEDs. When amyloid fibrils are integrated into the OLED active layer, consisting of an electroluminescent blue-emitting polyfluorene, the efficiency of the device increases by a factor of 10. Furthermore, when amyloid fibrils incorporating phosphorescent metal complexes are used, the phosphorescent guest functions more efficiently than in the corresponding case where naked metal complexes are used. By preparing amyloid fibrils incorporating green- and red-emitting phosphorescent complexes, and combining these with blue-emitting polyfluorene, we can fabricate devices for white-light emission. The origin of the effects of the biomaterial on device performance is discussed.

  • 39.
    Solin, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Preparation of amyloid-like materials functionalized with hydrophobic molecules2011In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 242, p. 526-ORGN-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When exposed to acid and heat, insulin is known to self into fibril-like structures known as amyloid. These nanowires can be used as templates in materials science applications. We have developed methods that allow us to functionalize such nanowires with phosphorescent metal-complexes (Chem. Eur. J. 2010, 16, 4190). The method involves mixing the metal complex and the protein in the solid state, followed by self assembly of the resulting composite material. We were able to succesfully incorporate these materials into white OLEDs (Nano Lett. 2010, 10, 2225). We have now developed the method further to include various types of materials and molecules. We have also found that certain molecules might have dramatic effect on the self-assembly process, resulting in novel amyloid-based materials.

  • 40.
    Tang, Qun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hybrid bioinorganic insulin amyloid fibrils2010In: CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, ISSN 1359-7345, Vol. 46, no 23, p. 4157-4159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we report a method to functionalize in vitro grown insulin amyloid fibrils with various inorganic materials. The counterion of the positively charged amyloid fibril is exchanged with anions from various salts; subsequent addition of appropriate cations results in functionalization of the amyloid fibril. We demonstrate the formation of apatite and platinum complex structures ordered by the amyloid template.

  • 41.
    Rizzo, Aurora
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preparation of Phosphorescent Amyloid-Like Protein Fibrils2010In: CHEMISTRY-A EUROPEAN JOURNAL, ISSN 0947-6539, Vol. 16, no 14, p. 4190-4195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 42.
    Rizzo, Aurora
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindgren, Lars J
    Chalmers.
    Andersson, Mats R
    Chalmers.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    White Light with Phosphorescent Protein Fibrils in OLEDs2010In: NANO LETTERS, ISSN 1530-6984, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 2225-2230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Red and yellow phosphorescent insulin amyloid fibrils are used as guest-emitting species within a blue-emitting polyfluorene matrix in light-emitting diodes. The integration of the phosphorescent Ir-complex into the amyloid structures strongly improves the triplet exciton confinement and allows the fabrication of white-emitting device with a very low loading of phosphorescent complex. The overall performances of the devices are improved in comparison with the corresponding bare Ir-complexes. This approach opens a way to explore novel device architectures and to understand the exciton/charge transfer dynamics in phosphorescent light emitting diodes.

  • 43.
    Solin, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Han, Lu
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University.
    Che, Schunai
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University.
    Terasaki, Osamu
    Stockholm University.
    An amphoteric mesoporous silica catalyzed aldol reaction2009In: Catalysis communications, ISSN 1566-7367, E-ISSN 1873-3905, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 1386-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A bi-functional mesoporous silica material, containing both carboxylic acid and amino groups, acts as a catalyst for the reaction between aldehydes and carbon nucleophiles. We demonstrate reaction conditions under which even aldehydes containing deactivating electron donating groups, or sterically demanding substituents, undergo the catalyzed reaction with acetone, affording primarily the condensation products. Moreover, we demonstrate that acetophenone and ethyl methyl ketone can replace acetone as nucleophile. The bi-functional mesoporous silica is a convenient catalyst, as it is simple to remove from the reaction media, thereby facilitating workup. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 44.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik Gustaf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fátima Nadia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Convection Induced Air-Water Interface Assembly of Amyloid FibrilsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report that hydrophobically modified amyloid fibrils form macroscopic films at the air-water interface. The hydrophobically modified fibrils are prepared in a two step process. First bovine insulin is ground with a hydrophobic compound. The resulting material is dissolved in acidic water and heated to induce assembly into fibrils incorporating the hydrophobic compounds. Upon dilution followed by asymmetric heating, resulting in convection flow, the fibrills form highly ordered films with thicknesses from 80 nm and up. The thickness of the film can be controlled by the fibril concentration and/or reaction time. The films contain anisotropic domains spanning several square centimeters. In addition, the films contains ordered assemblies of dyes that display emission of polarized light.

  • 45.
    Bäcklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fatimá Nadia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Babenko, Viktoria
    Department of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Dzwolak, Wojciech
    Department of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre, University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    PEDOT-S coated protein fibril microhelicesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We show here the preparation and characterization of micrometer sized conductive helices. We utilize protein fibrils as structural templates to create chiral helices with either right or left handed helicity. The helices are coated with the conductive polymer alkoxysulfonate poly(ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT-S) to create micrometer sized conductive helices. The coating acts as a stabilizer for the template structure, facilitates the preparation of solid state films and shows significant conductivity. The helices have been investigated using Circular Dichroism (CD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the conductivity have been measured for solid state films.

1 - 45 of 45
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