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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Truong, Anh H. T.
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Du Rietz, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kokil, Ganesh R.
    Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Boyd, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dang, Tram T.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles with Entrapped Gadolinium for High T-1 Relaxivity and ROS-Scavenging Purposes2022In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 7, no 24, p. 21337-21345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gadolinium chelates are employed worldwide today as clinical contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Until now, the commonly used linear contrast agents based on the rare-earth element gadolinium have been considered safe and well-tolerated. Recently, concerns regarding this type of contrast agent have been reported, which is why there is an urgent need to develop the next generation of stable contrast agents with enhanced spin-lattice relaxation, as measured by improved T-1 relaxivity at lower doses. Here, we show that by the integration of gadolinium ions in cerium oxide nanoparticles, a stable crystalline 5 nm sized nanoparticulate system with a homogeneous gadolinium ion distribution is obtained. These cerium oxide nanoparticles with entrapped gadolinium deliver strong T-1 relaxivity per gadolinium ion (T-1 relaxivity, r(1) = 12.0 mM(-1) s(-1)) with the potential to act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The presence of Ce3+ sites and oxygen vacancies at the surface plays a critical role in providing the antioxidant properties. The characterization of radial distribution of Ce3+ and Ce4+ oxidation states indicated a higher concentration of Ce3+ at the nanoparticle surfaces. Additionally, we investigated the ROS-scavenging capabilities of pure gadolinium-containing cerium oxide nanoparticles by bioluminescent imaging in vivo, where inhibitory effects on ROS activity are shown.

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  • 2.
    Selegård, Linnéa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Saab AB, Business Area Aeronaut, SE-58188 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Poot, Thirza
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    In-situ growth of cerium nanoparticles for chrome-free, corrosion resistant anodic coatings2021In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 410, article id 126958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chrome-based anodization and sealing combined is a cost-effective solution for developing good corrosion protective coatings on aluminum (Al) and its alloys. The toxicity of hexavalent chromium, however, requires new, sustainable, environmentally friendly, and efficient chromate-free sealing procedures. Herein, a combination of cerium (Ce) sealing and hydrothermal sealing (HTS) is employed to improve the corrosion resistance of the commonly used alloy AA2024-T3 anodized by tartaric sulfuric acid (TSA). The morphologies and components of the resulting surfaces are systematically studied. Characterization technologies such as SEM, TEM, EDX, XRD, and XPS demonstrate the in-situ growth of Ce oxide nanoparticles all through the porous structures of the anodic coating and closing of the pores by additional HTS treatment. The results from the standardized corrosion test (ASTM B895) demonstrate an improved corrosion resistance obtained by the utilized chrome-free process.

  • 3.
    Malusek, Alexandr
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Lilian
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Medical Radiation Physics and Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    On The Possibility To Resolve Gadolinium- And Cerium-Based Contrast Agents From Their CT Numbers In Dual-Energy Computed Tomography2021In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 195, no 3-4, p. 225-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles with integrated gadolinium have been proved to be useful as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Of question is their performance in dual-energy computed tomography. The aims of this work are to determine (1) the relation between the computed tomography number and the concentration of the I, Gd or Ce contrast agent and (2) under what conditions it is possible to resolve the type of contrast agent. Hounsfield values of iodoacetic acid, gadolinium acetate and cerium acetate dissolved in water at molar concentrations of 10, 50 and 100 mM were measured in a water phantom using the Siemens SOMATOM Definition Force scanner; gadolinium- and cerium acetate were used as substitutes for the gadolinium-integrated cerium oxide nanoparticles. The relation between the molar concentration of the I, Gd or Ce contrast agent and the Hounsfield value was linear. Concentrations had to be sufficiently high to resolve the contrast agents.

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  • 4.
    Assenhöj, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Eriksson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Donnes, Pierre
    SciCross AB, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Marcusson-Stahl, Maritha
    Res Inst Sweden RISE, Sweden.
    Du Rietz, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    Res Inst Sweden RISE, Sweden.
    Protein interaction, monocyte toxicity and immunogenic properties of cerium oxide crystals with 5% or 14% gadolinium, cobalt oxide and iron oxide nanoparticles - an interdisciplinary approach2021In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 1035-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in both consumer products and medical applications, but the knowledge regarding exposure-related health effects is limited. However, it is challenging to investigate nanoparticle interaction processes with biological systems. The overall aim of this project was to improve the possibility to predict exposure-related health effects of metal oxide nanoparticles through interdisciplinary collaboration by combining workflows from the pharmaceutical industry, nanomaterial sciences, and occupational medicine. Specific aims were to investigate nanoparticle-protein interactions and possible adverse immune reactions. Four different metal oxide nanoparticles; CeOx nanocrystals with 5% or 14% Gd, Co3O4, and Fe2O3, were characterized by dynamic light scattering and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Nanoparticle-binding proteins were identified and screened for HLA-binding peptides in silico. Monocyte interaction with nanoparticle-protein complexes was assessed in vitro. Herein, for the first time, immunogenic properties of nanoparticle-binding proteins have been characterized. The present study indicates that especially Co3O4-protein complexes can induce both danger signals, verified by the production of inflammatory cytokines and simultaneously bind autologous proteins, which can be presented as immunogenic epitopes by MHC class II. The clinical relevance of these findings should be further evaluated to investigate the role of metal oxide nanoparticles in the development of autoimmune disease. The general workflow identified experimental difficulties, such as nanoparticle aggregate formation and a lack of protein-free buffers suitable for particle characterization, protein analyses, as well as for cell studies. This confirms the importance of future interdisciplinary collaborations.

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  • 5.
    Bunnfors, Kalle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kilpijarvi, Joni
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Eriksson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Juuti, Jari
    Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Halonen, Niina
    Univ Oulu, Finland.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nanoparticle activated neutrophils-on-a-chip: A label-free capacitive sensor to monitor cells at work2020In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, SENSORS AND ACTUATORS B-CHEMICAL, Vol. 313, article id 128020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant white blood cells in mammals and vital components of the immune system. They are involved in the early phase of inflammation and in generation of reactive oxygen species. These rapid cell-signaling communicative processes are performed in the time frame of minutes. In this work, the activity and the response of neutrophil granulocytes are monitored when triggered by cerium-oxide based nanoparticles, using capacitive sensors based on Lab-on-a-chip technology. The chip is designed to monitor activation processes of cells during nanoparticle exposure, which is for the first time recorded on-line as alteration of the capacitance. The complementary metal oxide semiconductor engineering chip design is combined with low temperature co-fired ceramic, LTCC, packaging technology. The method is label free and gently measures cells on top of an insulating surface in a weak electromagnetic field, as compared to commonly used four-point probes and impedance spectroscopy electric measurements where electrodes are in direct contact with the cells. In summary, this label free method is used to measure oxidative stress of neutrophil granulocytes in real time, minute by minute and visualize the difference in moderate and high cellular workload during exposure of external triggers. It clearly shows the capability of this method to detect cell response during exposure of external triggers. In this way, an informationally dense non-invasive method is obtained, to monitor cells at work.

  • 6. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Eriksson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles and Gadolinium Integration: Synthesis, Characterization and Biomedical Applications2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenging task, in the area of magnetic resonance imaging is to develop contrast enhancers with built-in antioxidant properties. Oxidative stress is considered to be involved in the onset and progression of several serious conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, and the possibility to use cerium-contained nanoparticles to modulate such inflammatory response has gained a lot of interest lately. The rare earth element gadolinium is, due to its seven unpaired f-electrons and high symmetry of the electronic state, a powerful element for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging. Chelates based on gadolinium are the most commonly used contrast agents worldwide. When introducing external contrast agents there is always a risk that it may trigger inflammatory responses, why there is an urgent need for new, tailor-made contrast agents.

    Small sized cerium oxide nanoparticles have electronic structures that allows coexistence of oxidation states 3+ and 4+ of cerium, which correlates to applicable redox reactions in biomedicine. Such cerium oxide nanoparticles have recently shown to exhibit antioxidant properties both in vitro and in vivo, via the mechanisms involving enzyme mimicking activity.

    This PhD project is a comprehensive investigation of cerium oxide nanoparticles as scaffold materials for gadolinium integration. Gadolinium is well adopted into the crystal structure of cerium oxide, enabling the combination of diagnostic and therapeutic properties into a single nanoparticle. The main focus of this thesis project is to design cerium oxide nanoparticles with gadolinium integration. A stepwise approach was employed as follows: 1) synthesis with controlled integration of gadolinium, 2) material characterization by means of composition crystal structure, size, and size distribution and 3) surface modification for stabilization. The obtained nanoparticles exhibit remarkable antioxidant capability in vitro and in vivo. They deliver strongly enhanced contrast per gadolinium in magnetic resonance imaging, compared to commercially available contrast agents.

    A soft shell of dextran is introduced to encapsulate the cerium oxide nanoparticles with integrated gadolinium, which protects and stabilizes the hard core and to increases their biocompatibility. The dextran-coating is clearly shown to reduce formation of a protein corona and it improves the dispersibility of the nanoparticles in cell media. Functionalization strategies are currently being studied to endow these nanoparticles with specific tags for targeting purposes. This will enable guidance of the nanoparticles to a specific tissue, for high local magnetic resonance contrast complemented with properties for on-site reduced inflammation.

    In conclusion, our cerium oxide nanoparticles with integrated gadolinium, exhibit combined therapeutic and diagnostic, i.e. theragnostic capabilities. This type of nanomaterial is highly promising for applications in the field of biomedical imaging.

    List of papers
    1. Cerium oxide nanoparticles with antioxidant capabilities and gadolinium integration for MRI contrast enhancement
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerium oxide nanoparticles with antioxidant capabilities and gadolinium integration for MRI contrast enhancement
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6999Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The chelating gadolinium-complex is routinely used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -contrast enhancer. However, several safety issues have recently been reported by FDA and PRAC. There is an urgent need for the next generation of safer MRI-contrast enhancers, with improved local contrast and targeting capabilities. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) are designed with fractions of up to 50% gadolinium to utilize the superior MRI-contrast properties of gadolinium. CeNPs are well-tolerated in vivo and have redox properties making them suitable for biomedical applications, for example scavenging purposes on the tissue-and cellular level and during tumor treatment to reduce in vivo inflammatory processes. Our near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) studies show that implementation of gadolinium changes the initial co-existence of oxidation states Ce3+ and Ce4+ of cerium, thereby affecting the scavenging properties of the nanoparticles. Based on ab initio electronic structure calculations, we describe the most prominent spectral features for the respective oxidation states. The as-prepared gadolinium-implemented CeNPs are 3-5 nm in size, have r(1)-relaxivities between 7-13 mM(-1) s(-1) and show clear antioxidative properties, all of which means they are promising theranostic agents for use in future biomedical applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Nature Publishing Group, 2018
    National Category
    Other Physics Topics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147910 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-25390-z (DOI)000431293100003 ()29725117 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046679522 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [621-2013-5357]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU) [2009-00971]; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation [2012.0083 CTS 15:507]; Centre in Nano Science and Nano technology at LiTH (CeNano) at Linkoping University; CoTXS; Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation [14.Y26.31.0005, K2-2017-080, 211]

    Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
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  • 7.
    Eriksson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tal, Alexey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skallberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brommesson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Boyd, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Olovsson, Weine
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fairley, Neal
    Casa Software Ltd, Bay House, Teignmouth, United Kingdom.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Modeling and Development Laboratory, National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Moscow, Russia.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, SAR, China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cerium oxide nanoparticles with antioxidant capabilities and gadolinium integration for MRI contrast enhancement2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 6999Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chelating gadolinium-complex is routinely used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -contrast enhancer. However, several safety issues have recently been reported by FDA and PRAC. There is an urgent need for the next generation of safer MRI-contrast enhancers, with improved local contrast and targeting capabilities. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) are designed with fractions of up to 50% gadolinium to utilize the superior MRI-contrast properties of gadolinium. CeNPs are well-tolerated in vivo and have redox properties making them suitable for biomedical applications, for example scavenging purposes on the tissue-and cellular level and during tumor treatment to reduce in vivo inflammatory processes. Our near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) studies show that implementation of gadolinium changes the initial co-existence of oxidation states Ce3+ and Ce4+ of cerium, thereby affecting the scavenging properties of the nanoparticles. Based on ab initio electronic structure calculations, we describe the most prominent spectral features for the respective oxidation states. The as-prepared gadolinium-implemented CeNPs are 3-5 nm in size, have r(1)-relaxivities between 7-13 mM(-1) s(-1) and show clear antioxidative properties, all of which means they are promising theranostic agents for use in future biomedical applications.

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  • 8.
    Hu, Zhang-Jun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yang, Guanqing
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hu, Jiwen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Hui
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Eriksson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Ruilong
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Zhongping
    Anhui Univ, Peoples R China.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Real-time visualizing the regulation of reactive oxygen species on Zn2+ release in cellular lysosome by a specific fluorescent probe2018In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 264, p. 419-425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulating the release of free zinc ions (Zn2+) in cellular lysosome is closely related to various pathways of cellular signal transduction, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Directly visualizing Zn2+ release in lysosome is essential for in-depth understanding these physiological processes, and is still an atelic challenge. In this work, we successfully fabricate a lysosome-specific Zn2+ fluorescent probe and achieve the visualization of ROS-induced Zn2+ release in lysosome of inflammatory cells. The as-prepared probe combines a green fluorophore, an ionophore with five-dentate sites, and a morpholine as the lysosome-specific localization moiety. The fluorescence of the fluorophore in the free probe is suppressed by a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process from nitrogen atoms in the ionophore. Upon the addition of Zn2+, the fluorescence can be promoted immediately, achieving the real-time detection. Meanwhile, the probe is sensitive and selective to Zn2+, which provides the capability to detect low-concentration of free Zn2+ in lysosomes. Accordingly, the Zn2+ release was clearly observed in lysosome with the increase of ROS levels when the inflammation occurred in living cells. (c) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.

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