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  • 1.
    Bohlin, Gustav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Göransson, Andreas C.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Insights from introducing natural selection to novices using animations of antibiotic resistance2018In: Journal of Biological Education, ISSN 0021-9266, E-ISSN 2157-6009, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 314-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistance is typically used to justify education about evolution, as evolutionary reasoning improves our understanding of causes of resistance and possible countermeasures. It has also been promoted as a useful context for teaching natural selection, because its potency as a selection factor, in combination with the very short generation times of bacteria, allows observation of rapid selection. It is also amenable to animations, which have potential for promoting conceptual inferences. Thus, we have explored the potential benefits of introducing antibiotic resistance as a first example of natural selection, in animations, to novice pupils (aged 13–14 years). We created a series of animations that pupils interacted with in groups of 3–5 (total n = 32). Data were collected at individual (pre-/post- test) and group (collaborative group questions) levels. In addition, the exercise was video-recorded and the full transcripts were analysed inductively. The results show that most of the pupils successfully applied basic evolutionary reasoning to predict antibiotic resistance development in tasks during and after the exercise, suggesting that this may be an effective approach. Pedagogical contributions include the identification of certain characteristics of the bacterial context for evolution teaching, including common misunderstandings, and factors to consider when designing animations.

  • 2.
    Bohlin, Gustav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Göransson, Andreas C.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A conceptual characterization of online videos explaining natural selection2017In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 26, no 7-9, p. 975-999Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational videos on the Internet comprise a vast and highly diverse source of information. Online search engines facilitate access to numerous videos claiming to explain natural selection, but little is known about the degree to which the video content match key evolutionary content identified as important in evolution education research. In this study, we therefore analyzed the content of 60 videos accessed through the Internet, using a criteria catalog with 38 operationalized variables derived from research literature. The variables were sorted into four categories: (a) key concepts (e.g. limited resources and inherited variation), (b) threshold concepts (abstract concepts with a transforming and integrative function), (c) misconceptions (e.g. that evolution is driven by need), and (d) organismal context (e.g. animal or plant). The results indicate that some concepts are frequently communicated, and certain taxa are commonly used to illustrate concepts, while others are seldom included. In addition, evolutionary phenomena at small temporal and spatial scales, such as subcellular processes, are rarely covered. Rather, the focus is on population-level events over time scales spanning years or longer. This is consistent with an observed lack of explanations regarding how randomly occurring mutations provide the basis for variation (and thus natural selection). The findings imply, among other things, that some components of natural selection warrant far more attention in biology teaching and science education research.

  • 3.
    Bohlin, Gustav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Göransson, Andreas C.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höst, Gunnar E.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tibell, Lena A. E.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evolving germs – Introducing novice pupils to the evolution of bacterial resistance to antibiotics2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a dual relationship between antibiotic resistance and biological evolution. Antibiotic resistance is typically used as a motivation for why we need an efficient evolution education given that evolutionary reasoning improves our understanding of causes and suggested countermeasures. On the other hand, antibiotic resistance has also been suggested as a useful context in which evolution can be taught, based primarily but not solely on the quick generation times of bacteria. In the present study, we explore the potential benefits with using antibiotic resistance as an example when introducing evolution to novice pupils (aged 13-14). We created a series of animations that pupils interacted with in groups of 3-5 (total n=32). Data was collected on both individual (pre-posttest) and group (collaborative group questions) level. In addition, the exercise was video-taped and the full transcripts were analyzed inductively. The results show that a majority of the pupils succeeded in applying basic evolutionary reasoning to make predictions on antibiotic resistance during and after the exercise, suggesting that this may be a successful approach. Cautions to be aware of include pupils’ use of teleological and antropomorphic reasoning, especially in discussions on submicroscopical phenomena such as genetic processes. Implications for teaching include both lessons from the design of animations as well as the identification of common misunderstandings. The analysis also identifies and points toward several possible future research endeavours.

  • 4.
    Bohlin, Gustav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Göransson, Andreas C.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Department of Biology.
    Tibell, Lena A. E.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    NTA-Digital – Tema Kroppen2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tema Kroppen är ett nytt digitalt tema inom NTA (Naturvetenskap och Teknik för Alla) som erbjuds årskurs 4-7 i alla anslutna skolor och kommuner. Det sjösätts tillsammans med ett nyproducerat tema om rymden under 2016 efter ett utvecklingsarbete som pågått sedan 2013. Sedan temat öppnade i slutet av våren har drygt 8 000 konton skapats. Projektledningen gav ”Visuellt lärande och kommunikation” (vid LiU och Norrköpings Visualiseringscenter) i uppdrag att, under ledning av Lena Tibell och Marie Rådbo, utforma en web-plattform samt innehåll och struktur för de två temana. Projektet har möjliggjorts genom ekonomiskt stöd från Marcus och Amalia Wallenbergs minnesfond.

    I tema Kroppen arbetar eleverna sig framåt i en historia genom att lösa uppgifter kopplade till ett antal av kroppens fysiologiska system (cirkulations-systemet, andning, matspjälkning, hormoner och nervsystemet). Till sin hjälp har de en interaktiv tredimensionell modell av människokroppen med integrerat faktamaterial och ett flertal simulatorer. För att lösa uppdragen krävs en kombination av arbete inne i portalen och fysiska laborationer som de utför i klassrummet. Utöver detta finns en inbyggd digital infrastruktur inom vilken eleverna lämnar in svar på uppgifter och kan kommunicera med sin lärare.

    Utvecklingsarbetet har utgått från tanken att kroppens system inte är isolerade från varandra utan står i ständig samverkan och påverkan. Ett flertal didaktiska hänsyn och frågeställningar har präglat arbetet; däribland lärande med modeller och representationer, att röra sig mellan olika skalnivåer, begreppssvårigheter och skildring av dynamiska förlopp.

    Vi kommer både visa upp exempel på hur temat och modellerna fungerar samt diskutera lärdomar och svårigheter som uppstått i utvecklingsarbetet. 

  • 5.
    Göransson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stenlund, Jörgen
    Örebro University.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A Novel Computer Application for Teaching Evolutionary Mechanisms: Visual Analogies of Randomness and Natural Selection2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bohlin, Gustav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Göransson, Andreas C.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tibell, Lena A. E.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Diverse use of threshold concepts - A content analysis of online dynamic visualizations describing evolution.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an abundance of dynamic visualizations (animations, videos and simulations) that claim to explain evolution available on the Internet. The present study explores what aspects of evolution that are represented in these potential learning tools. A criteria catalogue covering 40 operationalized variables was used as a content analysis grid in the analysis of 71 dynamic visualizations. The concepts, derived from research literature, were operationalized into variables sorted into four different categories: (a) content-specific concepts (such as limited resources or inherited variation), (b) threshold concepts (core concepts that transform and integrate understanding within a subject), (c) alternative conceptions (such as teleological explanations or anthropomorphism), and (d) model organism. The results indicate that some concepts are dominantly communicated while others are seldom or never included in online visualizations. Regarding the proposed threshold concepts, evolutionary events happening on small time- and spatial scales, such as subcellular processes, were seldom observed. Rather, the focus was on events happening at a population level in time scales spanning from years and longer. This echoes with an observed lack of explanations regarding randomly occurring mutations providing the basis for variation. Implications include that there are components of evolution that would benefit from being addressed with an increased focus in biology teaching and science education research. The results may also serve as a useful toolkit in the design of new educational material.

  • 7.
    Göransson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology.
    Orraryd, Daniel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology.
    Searching for threshold concepts in evolution by using an open response instrument2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite decades of research evolution remains a challenge to teachers and learners. Student reasoning about evolutionary processes tend to lack important key concepts and exhibits a range of well documented alternative conceptions. New research in the domain of conceptual change has generated the notion of threshold concepts. Threshold concepts focus on abstract concepts thought to underlie difficult content in a discipline. The hope is that this research will contribute to better teaching practises as well as understanding of what makes certain discipline content difficult. Earlier research has revealed candidate threshold concepts underlying understanding of evolution. Our aim of this study was to pilot ways to assess if and which threshold concept student use in response to different items as well if different contexts facilitates integration of threshold concepts in explanations. We used a published evolution test instrument to assess the presence of evolution key concepts, threshold concepts. The test instrument was piloted on 113 Swedish upper secondary and university students. Analysis revealed the presence of evolution key concepts as well as threshold concepts and alternative conceptions. The context of the question seem to affect what threshold concepts are used by students. We also found indications of a relation between evolution key concepts and threshold concepts usage. Implications for future research as well as teaching are briefly discussed.

  • 8.
    Göransson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stenlund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tibell, Lena
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology.
    An interactive visualization for communicating troublesome concepts of natural selection.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Troublesome concepts such as randomness, probability and temporal scale have been suggested as important for understanding evolution. I e earlier research has shown that learners often fail to grasp the random component of natural selection and tend to conceptualize adaptation as directed or driven by the needs of the organism. There is some evidence in the literature that interventions targeting randomness in evolution might contribute to better understanding of natural selection. Since external representations such as visualizations has the potential help learners grasp difficult concepts in science, we designed an interactive visualization that focus on some of the troublesome concepts of evolution. The aim of the present pilot study was to explore possible effects of the application on students reasoning as part of a guided group exercise. In particular, we were interested in whether the aspects focused on in the application were discussed and if the students were able to transfer the symbolism in the application to the process of natural selection. The empirical data (recorded interviews and written answers) were collected during a biology course for primary teachers (n=14) and subjected to qualitative content analysis. We found that students’ engagement with the task and in the discussions was high. The transcripts revelead frequent analogies between the visualization and examples from evolution. Accumulated and gradual change over time  also was a recurrent theme. Thus, our preliminary results add support to reports suggesting that using interactive visualizations in combination with pre-worked tasks and peer-discussion can facilitate students’ cognitive development of troublesome concepts.

  • 9.
    Bohlin, Gustav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Göransson, Andreas C.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tibell, Lena A. E.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evolution on the set – A conceptual characterization of online dynamic visualizations.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its recognized importance, the theory of evolution presents severe problems to learners. A common approach in science education research involves the division of evolution in conceptual constructs, lately also including the role of threshold concepts. These are seminal ideas that open up new ways of thinking about and interpreting previously known processes. For understanding of evolution, threshold concepts consist of, for example, randomness, probability and wide-stretched spatio-temporal scales. An abundance of dynamic visualizations (animations, videos and simulations), attempting to explain evolution, are available on the Internet. The aim with our study was to map what aspects of evolution that are represented in these visualizations. A criteria catalogue covering 42 operationalized variables was used as a content analysis grid in the analysis of a sample selection including 71 dynamic visualizations. The variables include evolution content concepts (such as limited resources and differential survival) and proposed threshold concepts (such as explicit mentioning of factors influenced by randomness or level of organization in space and time, including connections between submicro- and macro aspects). Furthermore, it includes common alternative conceptions (such as anthropomorphism or that evolution is driven by need). Two raters conducted the analysis with an overlapping reliability sample covering 23 visualizations. Intercoder reliability was calculated using Krippendorff’s alpha. The results indicate that some concepts are dominantly communicated while others are seldom or never included in online visualizations. Regarding the proposed threshold concepts, evolutionary events happening on small time- and spatial scales, such as subcellular processes, were seldom observed. Rather, the focus was on events happening at a population level in time scales spanning from years and longer. Implications include that there are components of evolution that would benefit from being addressed more explicit. The results may also serve as a useful toolkit in the design of new educational material.

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