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  • 1.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Iakimov, Tihomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphens AB, Teknikringen 1F, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphens AB, Teknikringen 1F, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphens AB, Teknikringen 1F, SE-58330 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bioelectrocatalysis on Anodized Epitaxial Graphene and Conventional Graphitic Interfaces2019In: CHEMELECTROCHEM, ISSN 2196-0216, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 3791-3796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphitic materials exhibit significant anisotropy due to the difference in conductivity in a single layer and between adjacent layers. This anisotropy is manifested on epitaxial graphene (EG), which can be manipulated on the nanoscale in order to provide tailor-made properties. Insertion of defects into the EG lattice was utilized here for controllable surface modification with a model biocatalyst and the properties were quantified by both electrochemical and optical methods. A comparative evaluation of the electrode reaction kinetics on the enzyme-modified 2D material vs conventional carbon electrode materials revealed a significant enhancement of mediated bioelectrocatalysis at the nanoscale.

  • 2.
    Håkansson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shahi, Maryam
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
    Brill, Joseph W.
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conducting-Polymer Bolometers for Low-Cost IR-Detection Systems2019In: ADVANCED ELECTRONIC MATERIALS, ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 5, no 6, article id 1800975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Semiconducting polymers are promising materials for manufacturing optoelectronic devices, such as large-area solar cells or small light-emitting diodes, through the use of printing technologies. In their oxidized form, pi-conjugated polymers become good electrical conductors and their optical absorption shifts to the infrared region. It is demonstrated that conducting polymers can be integrated in bolometers for IR detection. A bolometer is a thermally isolated thin device that absorbs IR radiation and translates a temperature change into a change in electrical resistance. While commercial bolometers are usually made of complex architectures comprising several materials (that is, an IR absorbing layer, a conducting layer, and a thermally insulating layer), the first polymer bolometer is demonstrated with a freestanding layer of poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene) having high IR absorption, low thermal conductivity, and good thermistor action in one single layer. The solution processability of conducting polymers, their compatibility with high-resolution printing technologies, and their unique combination of optoelectronic properties can lead to a breakthrough for low-cost uncooled IR cameras, which are in high demand for security and safety applications.

  • 3.
    Håkansson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Han, Shaobo
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Suhao
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Braun, Slawomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effect of (3-Glycidyloxypropyl)Trimethoxysilane (GOPS) on the Electrical Properties of PEDOT:PSS Films2017In: Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics, ISSN 0887-6266, E-ISSN 1099-0488, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 814-820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been reported as a successful functional material in a broad variety of applications. One of the most important advantages of PEDOT:PSS is its water-solubility, which enables simple and environmental friendly manufacturing processes. Unfortunately, this also implies that pristine PEDOT:PSS films are unsuitable for applications in aqueous environments. To reach stability in polar solvents, (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GOPS) is typically used to cross-link PEDOT:PSS. Although this strategy is widely used, its mechanism and effect on PEDOT:PSS performance have not been articulated yet. Here, we present a broad study that provides a better understanding of the effect of GOPS on the electrical and electronic properties of PEDOT:PSS. We show that the GOPS reacts with the sulfonic acid group of the excess PSS, causing a change in the PEDOT:PSS film morphology, while the oxidation level of PEDOT remains unaffected. This is at the origin of the observed conductivity changes. (c) 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 4.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, USA.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Håkansson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Iakimov, Tihomir
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, Linköping, Sweden.
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, Linköping, Sweden.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Graphensic AB, Teknikringen 1F, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Monitoring of epitaxial graphene anodization2017In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 238, p. 91-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anodization of a graphene monolayer on silicon carbide was monitored with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Structural and functional changes of the material were observed by Raman spectroscopy and voltammetry. A 21 fold increase of the specific capacitance of graphene was observed during the anodization. An electrochemical kinetic study of the Fe(CN)(6)(3) (/4) redox couple showed a slow irreversible redox process at the pristine graphene, but after anodization the reaction rate increased by several orders of magnitude. On the other hand, the Ru(NH3) (3+/2+)(6) redox couple proved to be insensitive to the activation process. The results of the electron transfer kinetics correlate well with capacitance measurements. The Raman mapping results suggest that the increased specific capacitance of the anodized sample is likely due to a substantial increase of electron doping, induced by defect formation, in the monolayer upon anodization. The doping concentration increased from less than 1 x 10(13) of the pristine graphene to 4-8 x 10(13) of the anodized graphene. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Vagin, Mikhail Yu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lindgren, Petter
    Håkansson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Syväjärve, Mikael
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Direct bioelectrocatalysis on anodized epitaxial graphene2015In: Program of the XXIII International Symposium on Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics of the Bioelectrochemical Society14-18 June, 2015Malmö, Sweden, Lausanne: Bioelectrochemical Society , 2015, p. 170-170Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene as a nanomaterial consisting of a single layer sheets of atoms of carbon in hexagonal arrangement is making a significant impact in variety of technologies such as energy storage and chemical analysis. The significant attention paid to this thinnest nanomaterial resulted in thousands of patent applications is due to its staggering properties. Due to the planar conjugation of the sp2bonds in graphene, two-dimensional electrical conduction is highly efficient. On the contrary, the efficiency of electron exchange at the out-of-plane of the graphene sheet is small. The significant difference of the densities of electronic states at in-plane and out-of-plane of graphene sheet determines two distinct structural contributions (basal and edge plane respectively) to the behavior of all graphitic materials yielding the chemical and electrochemical anisotropy. Being the simplest building block of graphitic materials, graphene offers the possibility to study the behavior on the simplest level of structural organization. However, the major effort of the recent electrochemical studies of graphene were done using a bulk materials based on graphene flakes possessing the domination of edges of high reactivity. The planar orientation of graphene sheets with controllable exposure of basal plane is achievable via the growth by chemical vapor deposition or by epitaxial flash annealing on crystalline structures of silicon carbide. The slow growth of graphene onto crystalline support during annealing in the inert atmosphere results in a development of a high quality graphene monolayer attached to the solid insulating support. The creation of sp3-type reactive defects on the basal plane of graphite can be achieved by anodization at high anodic potentials.

    We developed the procedure for the real-time monitoring of epitaxial graphene anodization. The changes of electrochemical properties of graphene monolayer with anodization have been comparatively investigated by electrochemical methods. The estimation of specific capacitance in pure electrolyte and in conditions of Faradaic process has been carried out. Finally, the direct electrocatalysis of laccase (Trametes versicolor) has been used as an electrode reaction to probe the reactivities of anodized epitaxial graphene and conventional carbon materials.

1 - 5 of 5
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