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  • 1.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Simulation to Teach Nursing Students About End-of-Life Care2016In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 512-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is minimal education on death and dying in undergraduate nursing programs, leaving the students unprepared to provide sufficient care to dying patients and their families. This article describes a teaching innovation on how end-of-life care simulation can provide a successful and appreciated learning situation for nursing students, teaching them communication skills in challenging situations. Modifications in the setup of the simulation might help the students to focus more on communication and existential issues instead of mostly practical ones.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gisela
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Olsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Ethical Dilemmas Around the Dying Patient With Stroke: A Qualitative Interview Study With Team Members on Stroke Units in Sweden2014In: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, ISSN 0888-0395, E-ISSN 1945-2810, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 162-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, individuals affected by severe stroke are treated in specialized stroke units. In these units, patients are attended by a multiprofessional team with a focus on care in the acute phase of stroke, rehabilitation phase, and palliative phase. Caring for patients with such a large variety in condition and symptoms might be an extra challenge for the team. Today, there is a lack of knowledge in team experiences of the dilemmas that appear and the consequences that emerge. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to study ethical dilemmas, different approaches, and what consequences they had among healthcare professionals working with the dying patients with stroke in acute stroke units. Forty-one healthcare professionals working in a stroke team were interviewed either in focus groups or individually. The data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. The ethical dilemmas that appeared were depending on nondecisions about palliative care or discontinuation of treatments. The lack of decision made the team members act based on their own individual skills, because of the absence of common communication tools. When a decision was made, the healthcare professionals had problems holding to the decision. The devised and applied plans could be revalued, which was described as a setback to nondecisions again. The underlying problem and theme was communication barriers, a consequence related to the absence of common skills and consensus among the value system. This study highlights the importance of palliative care knowledge and skills, even for patients experiencing severe stroke. To make a decision and to hold on to that is a presupposition in creating a credible care plan. However, implementing a common set of values based on palliative care with symptom control and quality of life might minimize the risk of the communication barrier that may arise and increases the ability to create a healthcare that is meaningful and dignified.

  • 3.
    Olsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hopp hos döende patienter med cancer i palliativ hemsjukvård2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hope is meaningful and very important for people – even for people at the last days of their lives. Health professionals can sometimes describe hope in terms of hope for a cure, which may lead to feelings of hopelessness or empty hope for a patient with an incurable disease. In research, there is very little written about hope in the palliative home care context, even more so from the patient’s perspective. The aim of this project was to study how hope changes over time in cancer patients at the palliative phase, and to study the strategies used to cope with these changes. This was studied from the patients’ own perspective and in a home care context, but with the ambition of developing the results into a model or theory.

    Grounded Theory was the chosen research approach. Two sets of tape-recorded interviews were made with 11 patients in specialized palliative home care – a total of 20 interviews. The patients were also asked to write diaries about changes in their everyday feelings of hope within a 4-week period. Measurements of hope (HHI-S) and symptoms (ESAS) were also made at three occasions. Constant comparison of data was made during the analysis.

    The results showed that patients’ hope changed over time. Hope was described as a process involving a glimmering core of hope untouched by external circumstances (Study I). Hope was described in different processes, creation of a convinced hope, creation of simulated hope, collection and maintaining moments of hope and gradually extinct hope. The dying patient’s hope can be described as a gradual and successive adaptation process. Strategies for maintaining life were expressed to preserve the meaning in life, to communicate with others about life and death, to involve "fellow travelers" and to change focus. The strategy of preparing for death involved; taking responsibility for the future and seeing possibilities of living on even after death (Study II). The strategies were parallel to, and dependent on each other. It is important that health professionals understand the patient’s own strategies for maintaining life/hope, as well as the patient’s own preparations for death, so that hope is never taken away despite preparations at the end of life.

    In summary, hope can be interpreted as a changing process over time – a process that can change quickly, but is based on an inviolable core that is not easily moved by external circumstances. It is important that the health care personnel realize that patients simultaneously prepare for their deaths even as they try to maintain hope. Deeper understanding of what hope can mean for a patient can decrease the risk of hope being taken away during one’s final days.

    List of papers
    1. The Glimmering Embers: Experiences of hope among cancer patients in palliative home care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Glimmering Embers: Experiences of hope among cancer patients in palliative home care
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    2011 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The experience of hope among cancer patients in palliative care is important knowledge for health care providers, but research is sparse. The aim of this paper was to explore how cancer patients admitted to palliative home care experienced the significance of hope and used hope during six weeks throughout the last phase of their life and to assess their symptoms and hope status during six weeks throughout the last phase of their lives.

    Eleven adult patients with cancer participated in twenty interviews and completed seven diaries. The participants were recruited from two palliative care units in South-East of Sweden. The methods used were Grounded Theory (GT), and analysis was based on the constant comparative method.

    The core category, glimmering embers, was generated from four processes: (1) The creation of “convinced” hope, with a focus on positive events, formed in order to have something to look forward to; (2) The creation of “simulated hope”, including awareness of the lack of realism, but including attempts to believe in unrealistic reasons for hope; (3) The collection of and maintaining of moments of hope, expressing a wish to “seize the day” and hold on to moments of joy and pleasure; and (4) “Gradually extinct” hope, characterized by a lack of energy and a sense of time running out. The different processes of hope helped the patients to continue to live when they were close to death. Hope should be respected and understood by the professionals giving them support.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press, 2011
    Keywords
    Hope, meaning, grounded theory, cancer, palliative care
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65794 (URN)10.1017/S1478951510000532 (DOI)
    Available from: 2011-02-21 Created: 2011-02-21 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Maintaining hope when close to death: insight from cancer patients in palliative home care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maintaining hope when close to death: insight from cancer patients in palliative home care
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 607-612Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports the social and psychological processes that 11 cancer patients receiving palliative home care used to keep their hope alive. Method: The patients described their ways of dealing with hope in interviews and diaries, and it was from these accounts that the processes were extracted, using a grounded theory methodology. Results: Two main processes emerged: maintaining life and preparing for death. When the patients focused on maintaining life, they tried to preserve its meaning and to communicate with others about life and death. They found it helpful to shift their focus and to involve fellow 'travellers' in their journey. To prepare for death was to take responsibility for the future and to see possibilities of living on even after death. Conclusion: This paper revealed two parallel and interdependent processes used by patients in the palliative care phase to maintain hope and respond to living close to death.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Mark Allen group, 2010
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65406 (URN)10.12968/ijpn.2010.16.12.607 (DOI)
    Note

    The original title of this article was "Strategies for maintaining hope when close to death: aninterview study of cancer patients in palliative home care"

    Available from: 2011-02-07 Created: 2011-02-07 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
  • 4.
    Olsson, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Society, Diversity, Identity. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet, FoUU, Stockholms sjukhem, Mariebergsgatan 22, SE 112 35 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jeppsson Grassman, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    The Glimmering Embers: Experiences of hope among cancer patients in palliative home care2011In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experience of hope among cancer patients in palliative care is important knowledge for health care providers, but research is sparse. The aim of this paper was to explore how cancer patients admitted to palliative home care experienced the significance of hope and used hope during six weeks throughout the last phase of their life and to assess their symptoms and hope status during six weeks throughout the last phase of their lives.

    Eleven adult patients with cancer participated in twenty interviews and completed seven diaries. The participants were recruited from two palliative care units in South-East of Sweden. The methods used were Grounded Theory (GT), and analysis was based on the constant comparative method.

    The core category, glimmering embers, was generated from four processes: (1) The creation of “convinced” hope, with a focus on positive events, formed in order to have something to look forward to; (2) The creation of “simulated hope”, including awareness of the lack of realism, but including attempts to believe in unrealistic reasons for hope; (3) The collection of and maintaining of moments of hope, expressing a wish to “seize the day” and hold on to moments of joy and pleasure; and (4) “Gradually extinct” hope, characterized by a lack of energy and a sense of time running out. The different processes of hope helped the patients to continue to live when they were close to death. Hope should be respected and understood by the professionals giving them support.

  • 5.
    Olsson, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Society, Diversity, Identity. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jeppsson Grassman, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Society, Diversity, Identity. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Maintaining hope when close to death: insight from cancer patients in palliative home care2010In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 607-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports the social and psychological processes that 11 cancer patients receiving palliative home care used to keep their hope alive. Method: The patients described their ways of dealing with hope in interviews and diaries, and it was from these accounts that the processes were extracted, using a grounded theory methodology. Results: Two main processes emerged: maintaining life and preparing for death. When the patients focused on maintaining life, they tried to preserve its meaning and to communicate with others about life and death. They found it helpful to shift their focus and to involve fellow 'travellers' in their journey. To prepare for death was to take responsibility for the future and to see possibilities of living on even after death. Conclusion: This paper revealed two parallel and interdependent processes used by patients in the palliative care phase to maintain hope and respond to living close to death.

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