liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Machado, Isabel
    et al.
    SOMAprobes, Spain.
    Garrido, Victoria
    CSIC UPNa Gobierno Navarra, Spain.
    Hernandez, Luiza
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. SOMAprobes, Spain.
    Botero, Juliana
    SOMAprobes, Spain.
    Bastida, Nora
    SOMAprobes, Spain.
    San-Roman, Beatriz
    CSIC UPNa Gobierno Navarra, Spain.
    Grillo, Maria-Jesus
    CSIC UPNa Gobierno Navarra, Spain.
    Hernandez, Frank
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rapid and specific detection of Salmonella infections using chemically modified nucleic acid probes2019In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 1054, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salmonella is a leading source of bacterial foodborne illness in humans, causing gastroenteritis outbreaks with bacteraemia occurrences that can lead to clinical complications and death. Eggs, poultry and pig products are considered as the main carriers of the pathogenic Salmonella for humans. To prevent this relevant zoonosis, key changes in food safety regulations were undertaken to improve controls in the food production chain. Despite these measures, large outbreaks of salmonellosis were reported worldwide in the last decade. Thus, new strategies for Salmonella detection are a priority for both, food safety and public health authorities. Such detection systems should provide significant reduction in diagnostic time (hours) compared to the currently available methods (days). Herein, we report on the discovery and characterization of nucleic acid probes for the sensitive and specific detection of live Salmonella within less than 8 h of incubation. We are the first to postulate the nuclease activity derived from Salmonella as biomarker of infection and its utility to develop innovative detection strategies. Our results have shown the screening and identification of two oligonucleotide sequences (substrates) as the most promising probes for detecting Salmonella - Sal-3 and Sal-5. The detection limits for both probes were determined with the reference Salmonella Typhimurium (STM 1) and Salmonella Enteritidis (SE 1) cultures. Sal-3 has reported LOD values around 10(5) CFU mL(-1) for STM 1 and 10(4) CFU mL(-1) for SE 1, while Sal-5 proves to be a slightly better probe, with LODs of 10(4) CFU mL(-1) for STM 1 and 10(4) CFU mL(-1) for SE 1. Both selected probes have shown the capability to recognize 49 out of 51 different Salmonella serotypes tested in vitro and the most frequent serotypes in porcine mesenteric lymph nodes as a standard sample used in fattening-pig salmonellosis baseline studies. Notably, our results showed 100% correlation between nuclease detection and the PCR-InvA or ISO-6579 standard method, underlining the great potential of this innovative nucleic acids technology to be implemented as a rapid method for food safety testing. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-21 15:32
  • 2.
    Hernandez, Luiza I
    et al.
    Biodonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Machado, Isabel
    POLYMAT, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Schäfer, Thomas
    POLYMAT, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Hernandez, Frank J
    Biodonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain; POLYMAT, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, San Sebastian, Spain.
    Aptamers overview: selection, features and applications.2015In: Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 1568-0266, E-ISSN 1873-4294, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 1066-1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apatamer technology has been around for a quarter of a century and the field had matured enough to start seeing real applications, especially in the medical field. Since their discovery, aptamers rapidly emerged as key players in many fields, such as diagnostics, drug discovery, food science, drug delivery and therapeutics. Because of their synthetic nature, aptamers are evolving at an exponential rate gaining from the newest advances in chemistry, nanotechnology, biology and medicine. This review is meant to give an overview of the aptamer field, by including general aspects of aptamer identification and applications as well as highlighting certain features that contribute to their quick deployment in the biomedical field.

  • 3.
    Hernandez, Frank J
    et al.
    POLYMAT, University of of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Avda. Tolosa 72, 20018 Donostia-San-Sebastián, Spain.
    Hernandez, Luiza I.
    Nanobiz Ltd., METU Technopark, Ankara 06800, Turkey.
    Kavruk, Murat
    Test and Calibration Center, Turkish Standards Institute (TSE), Gebze Kocaeli 41400, Turkey.
    Arica, Yakup M.
    Biochemical Processing and Biomaterial Research Laboratory, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara, Turkey.
    Bayramoǧlu, Gülay
    Biochemical Processing and Biomaterial Research Laboratory, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara, Turkey.
    Borsa, Baris A.
    School of Medicine, Istanbul Kemerburgaz University, 34217 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Öktem, Hüseyin A.
    Nanobiz Ltd., METU Technopark, Ankara 06800, Turkey.
    Schäfer, Thomas
    POLYMAT, University of of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Avda. Tolosa 72, 20018 Donostia-San-Sebastián, Spain.
    Özalp, Veli C.
    School of Medicine, Istanbul Kemerburgaz University, 34217 Istanbul, Turkey.
    NanoKeepers: stimuli responsive nanocapsules for programmed specific targeting and drug delivery2014In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 50, no 67, p. 9489-9492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial resistance is a high priority clinical issue worldwide. Thus, an effective system that rapidly provides specific treatment for bacterial infections using controlled dose release remains an unmet clinical need. Herein, we report on the NanoKeepers approach for the specific targeting of S. aureus with controlled release of antibiotics based on nuclease activity. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  • 4.
    Hernandez, Frank J
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Huang, Lingyan
    Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT), Coralville, IA, United States.
    Olson, Michael E.
    Department of Microbiology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Powers, Kristy M.
    Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT), Coralville, IA, United States.
    Hernandez, Luiza I.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Meyerholz, David K.
    Department of Pathology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Thedens, Daniel R.
    Department of Radiology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Behlke, Mark A.
    Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT), Coralville, IA, United States.
    Horswill, Alexander R.
    Department of Microbiology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Mcnamara II, James O.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Noninvasive imaging of Staphylococcus aureus infections with a nuclease-activated probe2014In: Nature Medicine, ISSN 1078-8956, E-ISSN 1546-170X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 301-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technologies that enable the rapid detection and localization of bacterial infections in living animals could address an unmet need for infectious disease diagnostics. We describe a molecular imaging approach for the specific, noninvasive detection of S. aureus based on the activity of the S. aureus secreted nuclease, micrococcal nuclease (MN). Several short synthetic oligonucleotides, rendered resistant to mammalian serum nucleases by various chemical modifications and flanked with a fluorophore and quencher, were activated upon degradation by purified MN and in S. aureus culture supernatants. A probe consisting of a pair of deoxythymidines flanked by several 2′-O-methyl-modified nucleotides was activated in culture supernatants of S. aureus but not in culture supernatants of several other pathogenic bacteria. Systemic administration of this probe to mice bearing S. aureus muscle infections resulted in probe activation at the infection sites in an MN-dependent manner. This new bacterial imaging approach has potential clinical applicability for infections with S. aureus and several other medically important pathogens. © 2014 Nature America, Inc.

  • 5.
    Dassie, Justin P.
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Hernandez, Luiza I.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Thomas, Gregory S.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Long, Matthew E.
    Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States; Inflammation Program, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Rockey, William M.
    Department of Radiation Oncology, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Howell, Craig A.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Chen, Yani
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Hernandez, Frank J
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Liu, Xiu Y.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Wilson, Mary E.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States; Department of Microbiology, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Allen, Lee-Ann
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States; Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States; Inflammation Program, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States; Department of Microbiology, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Vaena, Daniel A.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Meyerholz, David K.
    Department of Pathology, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Giangrande, Paloma H.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, 375 Newton Rd, 5202 MERF, Iowa City, IA, United States; Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States.
    Targeted inhibition of prostate cancer metastases with an RNA aptamer to prostate-specific membrane antigen2014In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 1910-1922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell-targeted therapies (smart drugs), which selectively control cancer cell progression with limited toxicity to normal cells, have been developed to effectively treat some cancers. However, many cancers such as metastatic prostate cancer (PC) have yet to be treated with current smart drug technology. Here, we describe the thorough preclinical characterization of an RNA aptamer (A9g) that functions as a smart drug for PC by inhibiting the enzymatic activity of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). Treatment of PC cells with A9g results in reduced cell migration/invasion in culture and metastatic disease in vivo. Importantly, A9g is safe in vivo and is not immunogenic in human cells. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies in mice confirm target specificity and absence of non-specific on/off-target effects. In conclusion, these studies provide new and important insights into the role of PSMA in driving carcinogenesis and demonstrate critical endpoints for the translation of a novel RNA smart drug for advanced stage PC. © The American Society of Gene amp; Cell Therapy.

  • 6.
    Hernandez, Luiza I.
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Flenker, Katie S.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Hernandez, Frank J
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.
    Department of Microbiology, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    McNamara, James O.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Giangrande, Paloma H.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Methods for evaluating cell-specific, cell-internalizing RNA aptamers2013In: Pharmaceuticals, ISSN 1424-8247, E-ISSN 1424-8247, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 295-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent clinical trials of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) highlight the need for robust delivery technologies that will facilitate the successful application of these therapeutics to humans. Arguably, cell targeting by conjugation to cell-specific ligands provides a viable solution to this problem. Synthetic RNA ligands (aptamers) represent an emerging class of pharmaceuticals with great potential for targeted therapeutic applications. For targeted delivery of siRNAs with aptamers, the aptamer-siRNA conjugate must be taken up by cells and reach the cytoplasm. To this end, we have developed cell- based selection approaches to isolate aptamers that internalize upon binding to their cognate receptor on the cell surface. Here we describe methods to monitor for cellular uptake of aptamers. These include: (1) antibody amplification microscopy, (2) microplate- based fluorescence assay, (3) a quantitative and ultrasensitive internalization method (QUSIM) and (4) a way to monitor for cytoplasmic delivery using the ribosome inactivating protein-based (RNA-RIP) assay. Collectively, these methods provide a toolset that can expedite the development of aptamer ligands to target and deliver therapeutic siRNAs in vivo. © 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  • 7.
    Hernandez, Frank J
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Hernandez, Luiza I.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Pinto, Alessandro
    NanoBioSeparations Group, POLYMAT, University of of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Avda. Tolosa 72, Donostia-San-Sebastián, Spain.
    Schäfer, Thomas
    NanoBioSeparations Group, POLYMAT, University of of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Avda. Tolosa 72, Donostia-San-Sebastián, Spain; Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao, Spain.
    Özalp, Veli C.
    Nanobiz Ltd. Metu Technopolis, 06800 Ankara, Turkey; Middle East Technical University, Biological Sciences, 06800 Ankara, Turkey.
    Targeting cancer cells with controlled release nanocapsules based on a single aptamer2013In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 49, no 13, p. 1285-1287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular gates have received considerable attention as drug delivery systems. More recently, aptamer-based gates showed great potential in overcoming major challenges associated with drug delivery by means of nanocapsules. Based on a switchable aptamer nanovalves approach, we herein report the first demonstration of an engineered single molecular gate that directs nanoparticles to cancer cells and subsequently delivers the payload in a controllable fashion. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  • 8.
    Thiel, Kristina W.
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Hernandez, Luiza I.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Dassie, Justin P.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Thiel, William H.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Liu, Xiuying
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Stockdale, Katie R.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Rothman, Alissa M.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Hernandez, Frank J
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    McNamara, James O.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Giangrande, Paloma H.
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.
    Delivery of chemo-sensitizing siRNAs to HER2+-breast cancer cells using RNA aptamers2012In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 40, no 13, p. 6319-6337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression in breast cancer is associated with an aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis, making it an appealing therapeutic target. Trastuzumab, an HER2 antibody-based inhibitor, is currently the leading targeted treatment for HER2+-breast cancers. Unfortunately, many patients inevitably develop resistance to the therapy, highlighting the need for alternative targeted therapeutic options. In this study, we used a novel, cell-based selection approach for isolating cell-type specific, cell-internalizing RNA ligands (aptamers) capable of delivering therapeutic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to HER2-expressing breast cancer cells. RNA aptamers with the greatest specificity and internalization potential were covalently linked to siRNAs targeting the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl-2. We demonstrate that, when applied to cells, the HER2 aptamer-Bcl-2 siRNA conjugates selectively internalize into HER2+-cells and silence Bcl-2 gene expression. Importantly, Bcl-2 silencing sensitizes these cells to chemotherapy (cisplatin) suggesting a potential new therapeutic approach for treating breast cancers with HER2+-status. In summary, we describe a novel cell-based selection methodology that enables the identification of cell-internalizing RNA aptamers for targeting therapeutic siRNAs to HER2-expressing breast cancer cells. The future refinement of this technology may promote the widespread use of RNA-based reagents for targeted therapeutic applications. © 2012 The Author(s).

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf