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  • 1.
    Malmborg, Agota
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A survey of young womens perceptions of the influence of the Levonorgestrel-Intrauterine System or copper-intrauterine device on sexual desire2019In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 21, p. 75-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Few studies, with contradictory results, evaluate intrauterine contraceptives (IUC) and sexual function specifically. This study compares perception of sexual desire related to IUC use and aspects of sexual function in women who use the Lng-IUS with those using the Cu-IUD. Study design: A secondary analysis regarding IUC use based on a larger cross-sectional survey of contraceptive use in Sweden, conducted in 2013. In total, 153 IUC users (103 Cu-IUD and 50 Lng-IUS users) answered the questionnaire. The only inclusion criterion was intrauterine contraceptive use. Main outcome measures: Were self-reported sexual desire changes related to contraceptive method. We also analysed aspects of sexual functioning; sexual desire level, sexual activity, orgasm frequency, satisfaction with sex life and satisfaction of desire level. Results: A negative effect on sexual desire due to contraceptive method was reported by 28% of the Lng-IUS users and by 10.1% of the Cu-IUD users (p amp;lt; 0.05). Results were more marked after adjusting for age, body mass index, depression, parity, switching behaviour, and partnership (OR 5.0; CI: 1.8-13.8). The adjusted odds of reporting low sexual desire level (never or almost never feeling sexual desire) (OR 3.5; CI: 1.1-11.2) as well as low satisfaction with sex life (OR 2.7; CI: 1.2-6.3) was higher in the Lng-IUS group (adjusted for same confounders as above). Conclusions: The women in this study using the Lng-IUS more often report negative sexual desire effects of their contraception as well as lower sexual desire level compared with women using the Cu-IUD.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-06-27 12:46
  • 2.
    Wilhelms, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine.
    Dock, Hua
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brito, Haissa O.
    Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin and Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stojakovic, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zajdel, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    CGRP Is Critical for Hot Flushes in Ovariectomized Mice2019In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, ISSN 1663-9812, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 9, article id 1452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hot flushes are common and troublesome symptoms of menopause. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is increased in plasma during hot flushes but it has not been clear if CGRP is causally involved in the mechanism underpinning the flushes. Here, we examined the effect of interventions with CGRP in a mouse model of hot flushes based on flush-like temperature increases triggered by forced physical activity in ovariectomized mice. Compared to normal mice, ovariectomized mice reacted with an exaggerated, flush-like, temperature increase after physical exercise. This increase was completely blocked by the non-peptide CGRP-antagonist MK-8825 (-0.41 degrees Celsius, 95% CI: -0,83 to 0,012, p amp;lt; 0.0001) at a dose that had no obvious effects on locomotor activity (50 mg/kg). Further, the flush-like temperature increases were strongly attenuated in ovariectomized mice lacking alpha CGRP due to a genetic modification. Collectively, our findings suggest that CGRP is an important mediator of experimentally induced hot flushes and they identify CGRP antagonists as promising treatment candidates for women and possibly also men with hot flushes.

  • 3.
    Liffner, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Pehrson, Isabelle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Garcia-Calvo, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Zalavary, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Diagnostics of DNA fragmentation in human spermatozoa: Are sperm chromatin structure analysis and sperm chromatin dispersion tests (SCD-HaloSpermG2 (R)) comparable?2019In: Andrologia, ISSN 0303-4569, E-ISSN 1439-0272, Vol. 51, no 8, article id e13316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Men affected with idiopathic infertility often display basic spermiogramme values similar to fertile individuals, questioning the diagnostic impact of the World Health Organization (WHO) thresholds used. This study explored sperm DNA fragmentation in single ejaculates from 14 fertile donors and 42 patients with idiopathic infertility providing semen for assisted reproductive techniques in a university fertility clinic. Each ejaculate was simultaneously studied for sperm DNA fragmentation by the flow cytometer-based sperm chromatin structure analysis (SCSA) and the new light-microscopy-based sperm chromatin dispersion assay (SCD-HaloSpermG2 (R)), before and after sperm selection for in vitro fertilisation with a colloid discontinuous gradient. The WHO semen variables did not differ between groups, but DNA fragmentation after SCSA (DFI) or SCD (SDF) was significantly (p amp;lt; 0.05) higher in patients (DFI: 40.2% +/- 3.0 vs. SDF: 40.3% +/- 1.4) than in fertile donors (DFI: 17.1% +/- 2.1 vs. SDF: 20.9% +/- 2.5). Sperm selection led to lower proportions of DNA-fragmented spermatozoa (DFI: 11.9 +/- 1.7 vs. SCD: 10.0 +/- 0.9, p amp;lt; 0.05). The techniques output correlated highly and significantly (r(2) = 0.82). DNA fragmentation is confirmed as a relevant variable for scrutinising patients with idiopathic infertility, beyond the evidently insufficient WHO semen analyses. Since both techniques yielded similar results, the reduced necessity of complex equipment when running SCD ought to be considered for a clinical setting.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-17 10:44
  • 4.
    Berlin, Gösta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Tapper, Linus
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Effects of age, gender and menstrual cycle on platelet function assessed by impedance aggregometry2019In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 473-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelets are needed to prevent or arrest bleeding and aggregate at the site of injury upon vascular damage. Platelets express receptors for estrogens which might affect the function of the platelets and their hemostatic ability. The aim was to identify possible differences in platelet function related to age, gender, and phases of the menstrual cycle by use of impedance aggregometry with Multiplate. In the first part of the study, platelet function was assessed in 60 healthy individuals (30 men and 30 women) in each of three age groups (20-25, 40-45, and 60-65 years). In the second part of the study, the platelet function was analyzed on four occasions during the menstrual cycle in women without oral contraceptives (OCs) (n = 17) and compared to 19 women on OCs and 18 men of similar age (20-40 years). For the women on OCs, aggregation was analyzed once during the tablet-free week and once late during the period with OCs. The men were sampled once. Women of younger age (amp;lt;45 years) had significantly higher agonist-induced aggregation response than both men and post-menopausal women (60-65 years). The agonist-induced aggregation response did not differ between phases of the menstrual cycle or OC use. The results suggest that estradiol and/or progesterone affect spontaneous aggregation since it was found to be lowest in the mid-luteal phase. Spontaneous aggregation was significantly lower in women on OCs than in both men and women without OCs. Our findings indicate that fertile age is associated with higher aggregation response capacity of the platelets, possibly to prevent excessive bleeding during menstruation, but this response capacity is not altered during the menstrual cycle or by use of OCs.

  • 5.
    Berin, Emilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Nygatan, Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Resistance training for hot flushes in postmenopausal women: A randomised controlled trial2019In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 126, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of 15 weeks of resistance training on the frequency of moderate to severe hot flushes in postmenopausal women. Study design: Postmenopausal women with at least 4 moderate or severe hot flushes or night sweats per day day were randomized to a 15-week resistance training intervention or unchanged physical activity. Participants did not exercise regularly at baseline and had not used any therapy for hot flushes two months prior to study entry. The resistance training was performed three times per week and the program contained 8 exercises performed with 8-12 repetitions in 2 sets. Loads were set individually from eight-repetition maximum-strength tests and increased progressively. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was change in mean moderate or severe hot flushes per day from baseline to week 15, assessed with symptom diaries. Secondary outcomes included change in hot flush score and time spent on physical activity. Results: Between November 19, 2013, and October 26, 2016, 65 women were enrolled; 58 completed the trial and were included in the analyses. The mean age was 55 and the mean number of moderate or severe hot flushes per day at baseline was 7.1; there were no baseline differences between groups. The frequency of hot flushes decreased more in the intervention group than in the control group (mean difference -2.7, 95% CI -4.2 to -1.3). The mean percentage change was -43.6% (-56.0 to -31.3) in the intervention group and -2.0% (16.4-12.4) in the control group. Conclusion: A 15-week resistance-training program decreased the frequency of moderate and severe hot flushes among postmenopausal women and could be an effective and safe treatment option to alleviate vasomotor symptoms.

  • 6.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum, Sweden.
    Nelson Follin, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Self-reported mental health and cortisol activity at 27-28 years of age in individuals born with very low birthweight2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To assess mental health outcomes of very low birthweight (VLBW, <1500 g) subjects to adulthood and to examine salivary cortisol and hair cortisol levels and their relation to birth characteristics and mental health.

    Methods

    A Swedish regional cohort of 56 VLBW subjects and 55 full‐term controls were assessed at the ages 27‐28 with adult self‐reported scales and the mean of 2 days diurnal salivary cortisol and hair cortisol. The cohorts had been assessed at 15 years of age with youth self‐reported scales.

    Results

    There were no differences between the groups in youth self‐reported scales and adult self‐reported scores. The 24 participating VLBW girls scored lower on youth self‐reported scales externalising and total problem scores than the control girls. In adulthood, the 21 participating VLBW women had significantly higher morning concentrations of salivary cortisol than control women, P = .014. No significant associations were found between cortisol concentrations and adult self‐reported scales internalising, externalising and total scores.

    Conclusion

    Self‐reported mental health in VLBW subjects was comparable with normal birthweight controls indicating a satisfying transition from adolescence to adulthood. VLBW females had higher morning salivary cortisol concentrations, suggesting a gender difference. We found no correlations between cortisol and mental health.

  • 7.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Use of hormone therapy (HT) among Swedish women with contraindications - A pharmacoepidemiological cohort study2019In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 123, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To assess how women in Sweden with breast cancer (BC), endometrial cancer (EC), and/or pulmonary embolism (PE) were dispensed menopausal hormone therapy (HT). Study design: A retrospective study of Swedish women aged 40 years or more on 31 December 2005 (n = 2,863,643), followed through to December 2011. The study analysed three mandatory national healthcare registries: the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, the National Inpatient Register and the Cancer Register. New users were defined as having a first dispensation after at least a 9-month break, and thus were possible to identify from April 2006. New users with at least one of the diagnoses BC, EC or PE before the first dispensation were classified as having a relative or absolute contraindication for HT. Main outcome measures: The relative risks of having HT dispensed after being diagnosed with BC, EC and/or PE. Results: In total, 171,714 women had at least one of the diagnoses BC, EC or PE. The relative risk of having hormone therapy dispensed (current and new users) after being diagnosed with any of the diagnoses was significantly lower (PE, IRR 0.11, 95% CI 0.10-0.12;/ BC, IRR 0.12, 95% CI 0.11-0.13; EC, IRR 0.43, CI 0.40-0.46) than for women without these diagnoses. Conclusions: One in about 250 women started treatment with HT after being diagnosed with BC, PE or EC. Swedish prescribers seem to be well aware of the recommendations for HT use in women with contraindications. A few women, however, are prescribed HT despite having BC, EC or PE, possibly after careful evaluation of the risks and benefits and giving informed consent. Women with a history of PE were prescribed transdermal HT to a larger extent than women in general, in line with results from observational studies.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-02-23 16:02
  • 8.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Törnblom, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Nelson Follin, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Women born with very low birth weight have similar menstrual cycle pattern, pregnancy rates and hormone profiles compared with women born at term2019In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Individuals born very preterm or with very low birth weight (VLBW) have a reduced likelihood to reproduce according to population-based register studies. Extremely low-birth weight born adults had a lower reproduction rate for both men and women in a follow-up study.

    Aim

    To investigate if being born with VLBW is associated with differences in the reproductive health, i.e. age of menarche, menstrual cycle pattern, pregnancy rates and hormone profile compared with women born at term.

    Methods

    A prospective long-term follow-up of a cohort of live-born VLBW children and their controls studied repeatedly since birth and now assessed at 26–28 years of age. Of the totally 80 girls enrolled from birth 49 women (24 VLBW women and 25 controls) participated in the current follow-up. The women’s anthropometric data and serum hormone levels were analysed.

    Results

    The reproductive hormone levels, including Anti-Mullerian Hormone, did not differ significantly between VLBW women and their controls. Both groups reported menstrual cycle irregularities and pregnancies to the same extent but the VLBW women reported 1.5 years later age of menarche. The VLBW subjects had a catch-up growth within 18 months of birth but remained on average 5 cm shorter in adult height. There were no significant differences in BMI, sagittal abdominal diameter, blood pressure or in their answers regarding life style between the VLBW women and the controls.

    Conclusion

    No differences in the reproductive hormone levels were found between VLBW women and their controls. Although age at menarche was somewhat higher in the VLBW group menstrual cycles and pregnancy rates were similar in the VLBW and control groups. Further follow-up studies are required to elucidate the health outcomes of being born VLBW.

  • 9.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Larsson, Erika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A long-term follow-up study of men born with very low birth weight and their reproductive hormone profile2018In: Systems biology in reproductive medicine, ISSN 1939-6376, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 207-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental factors during the fetal period may adversely affect reproductive functions in men being born with very low birth weight (VLBW, <1500 g). The objective of this prospective, controlled cohort study was to investigate if VLBW men have an altered reproductive hormone profile compared with men born at term. The study group initially consisted of all VLBW boys live-born between 1 February 1987 and 30 April 1988 in the south-east region of Sweden (n = 47). A control child was chosen born at term, at the same hospital, with the same parity, without malformations, and next in order after each VLBW child who survived the first four weeks (n = 45). The present follow-up was performed when the men were 26-28 years of age and included measurements of serum hormone levels, hair testosterone concentration, and anthropometric data. Also life-style questionnaires were collected from 26 VLBW men and 19 controls. The VLBW group (n = 26) had higher median levels of serum estradiol, 84.5 pmol/L than controls (n = 19), 57.5 pmol/L (p = 0.008). There was no significant correlation between serum estradiol and BMI (r = 0.06, p = 0.74). There were no differences in other hormone levels or the reproductive pattern between the groups. In conclusion, even though there was a statistically significant difference in estradiol levels between the groups, both groups had low normal mean levels of questionable clinical significance. The reproductive pattern was similar in the two groups and in this study being born VLBW does not seem to affect these measured aspects of reproduction.

    ABBREVIATIONS: ADHD: attention deficit hyperactive disorder; AGA: average for gestational age; BMI: body mass index; CP: cerebral palsy; DHT: dihydrotestosterone; FSH: follicle stimulating hormone; LBW: low birth weight; LH: luteinizing hormone; SAD: sagittal abdominal diameter; SGA: small for gestational age; SHBG: sex hormone binding globulin; TSH: thyroid stimulating hormone; T3: triiodothyronine; T4: thyroxin; VLBW: very low birth weight.

  • 10.
    Kempe, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Cty Hosp Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Eklund, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallin, Agnes
    Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin and Expt Med, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Immune profile in relation to sex steroid cyclicity in healthy women and women with multiple sclerosis2018In: Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 0165-0378, E-ISSN 1872-7603, Vol. 126, p. 53-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To prospectively study systemic in vivo immunological effects of sex hormones, using different phases of oral combined hormonal contraceptives (CHC), and the natural menstrual cycles in both healthy women and in women with multiple sclerosis (MS), blood samples from sixty female MS patients and healthy controls with and without CHC were drawn in high and low estrogenic/progestogenic phases. Expression of Th-associated genes in blood cells was determined by qPCR and a panel of cytokines and chemokines was measured in plasma. High hormone level phases were associated with increases in Th1 (TBX21) and Th2 (GATA3) associated markers, as well as the B cell-associated chemokine CXCL13, while the inhibitory regulator CTLA-4 was decreased. These changes were not observed in MS patients, of whom most were treated with immunomodulatory drugs. Our data indicate immune activating properties in vivo of high steroid sex hormone levels during both CHC and normal menstrual cyclicity.

  • 11.
    Lindh Falk, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hopwood, Nick
    Univ Technol Sydney, Australia; Univ Stellenbosch, South Africa.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nursing assistants mattersAn ethnographic study of knowledge sharing in interprofessional practice2018In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 25, no 2, article id e12216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interprofessional collaboration involves some kind of knowledge sharing, which is essential and will be important in the future in regard to the opportunities and challenges in practices for delivering safe and effective health care. Nursing assistants are seldom mentioned as a group of health care workers that contribute to interprofessional collaboration in health care practice. The aim of this ethnographic study was to explore how the nursing assistants knowledge can be shared in a team on a spinal cord injury rehabilitation ward. Using a sociomaterial perspective on practice, we captured different aspects of interprofessional collaboration in health care. The findings reveal how knowledge was shared between professionals, depending on different kinds of practice architecture. These specific cultural-discursive, material-economic, and social-political arrangements enabled possibilities through which nursing assistants knowledge informed other practices, and others knowledge informed the practice of nursing assistants. By studying what health care professionals actually do and say in practice, we found that the nursing assistants could make a valuable contribution of knowledge to the team.

  • 12.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Adv MR Analyt AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Thorell, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sweden.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berin, Emilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Adv MR Analyt AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Adv MR Analyt AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Precision of MRI-based body composition measurements of postmenopausal women2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0192495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To determine precision of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based fat and muscle quantification in a group of postmenopausal women. Furthermore, to extend the method to individual muscles relevant to upper-body exercise. Materials and methods This was a sub-study to a randomized control trial investigating effects of resistance training to decrease hot flushes in postmenopausal women. Thirty-six women were included, mean age 56 +/- 6 years. Each subject was scanned twice with a 3.0T MR-scanner using a whole-body Dixon protocol. Water and fat images were calculated using a 6-peak lipid model including R2*-correction. Body composition analyses were performed to measure visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes, lean volumes and muscle fat infiltration (MFI) of the muscle groups thigh muscles, lower leg muscles, and abdominal muscles, as well as the three individual muscles pectoralis, latissimus, and rhomboideus. Analysis was performed using a multi-atlas, calibrated water-fat separated quantification method. Liver-fat was measured as average proton density fat-fraction (PDFF) of three regions-of-interest. Precision was determined with Bland-Altman analysis, repeatability, and coefficient of variation. Results All of the 36 included women were successfully scanned and analysed. The coefficient of variation was 1.1% to 1.5% for abdominal fat compartments (visceral and subcutaneous), 0.8% to 1.9% for volumes of muscle groups (thigh, lower leg, and abdomen), and 2.3% to 7.0% for individual muscle volumes (pectoralis, latissimus, and rhomboideus). Limits of agreement for MFI was within +/- 2.06% for muscle groups and within +/- 5.13% for individual muscles. The limits of agreement for liver PDFF was within +/- 1.9%. Conclusion Whole-body Dixon MRI could characterize a range of different fat and muscle compartments with high precision, including individual muscles, in the study-group of postmenopausal women. The inclusion of individual muscles, calculated from the same scan, enables analysis for specific intervention programs and studies.

  • 13.
    Lundin, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Malmborg, Agota
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Slezak, Julia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bixo, Marie
    Department of Clinical Science, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bengtsdotter, Hanna
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Marions, Lena
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindh, Ingela
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sexual function and combined oral contraceptives: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial2018In: Endocrine Connections, ISSN 2049-3614, E-ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 7, no 11, p. 1208-1216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of combined oral contraceptives (COC) on female sexuality has long been a matter of discussion, but placebo-controlled studies are lacking. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate if an estradiol-containing COC influences sexual function.

    DESIGN: Investigator-initiated, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial where 202 healthy women were randomized to a combined oral contraceptive (1.5 mg estradiol and 2.5 mg nomegestrol acetate) or placebo for three treatment cycles.

    METHODS: Sexual function at baseline and during the last week of the final treatment cycle was evaluated by the McCoy Female Sexuality Questionnaire. Serum and hair testosterone levels were assessed at the same time points.

    RESULTS: Compared to placebo, COC use was associated with a small decrease in sexual interest (COC median change score: -2.0; interquartile range (IQR): -5.0-0.5 vs. placebo: -1.0; IQR: -3.0-2.0, p = 0.019), which remained following adjustment for change in self-rated depressive symptoms B = -0.80 ± 0.30, Wald = 7.08, p = 0.008. However, the proportion of women who reported a clinically relevant deterioration in sexual interest did not differ between COC or placebo users (COC 18 (22.2%) vs. placebo 16 (17.8%), p = 0.47). Change in other measured aspects of sexual function as well as total score of sexual function did not differ between the two treatments.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that use of estradiol-based combined oral contraceptives is associated with reduced sexual interest. However, the changes are minute, and probably not of clinical relevance.

  • 14.
    Lagergren, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The prevalence of primary ovarian insufficiency in Sweden; a national register study2018In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 18, article id 175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe current estimates of the prevalence of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) are very variable, but are in most studies believed to be around 1%. It is also very likely tat the prevalence of POI differs between countries and over time. We therefore aimed to assess the prevalence of primary ovarian insufficiency in Sweden.MethodsAll 1,036,918 women born between 1973 and 1993 in Sweden were included. The prevalence of POI was based on data from the Swedish Patient Register through the diagnosis code or through the Prescribed Drug Register. The number of women below 40years of age diagnosed with the ICD-10 diagnoses E28.3 or E89.4, and women who had been dispensed drugs for treatment of climacteric symptoms were included.ResultsOut of the 1,036,918 women, 19,253 (1.9%) had POI. The prevalence of spontaneous POI was 1.7% and the prevalence of iatrogenic POI was 0.2%. Most women (98.8%) with POI were identified from the Prescribed Drug Register; only 4.1% were found in the Patient Register, whereas 2.9% were identified in both registers.ConclusionsThe total prevalence of POI was 1.9%, 95% CI: 1.7-2.1, indicating a higher prevalence than often previously reported.

  • 15.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Sophia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berin, Emilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Body Composition Analysis Combined with Individual Muscle Measurements using Dixon-MRI2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body composition analysis is increasingly important for diagnosis and follow-up in many patient groups and medical conditions. The combined fat and muscle quantification on global and regional level is not commonly reported. In this study a Dixon-MRI based acquisition and body composition analysis was extended to quantify individual muscles. Test-retest reliability was established in a clinically relevant group of 36 postmenopausal women. This method enables advanced phenotyping combined with measurements of specific muscles to target clinical questions. 

  • 16.
    Liffner, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Men becoming fathers by intracytoplasmic sperm injection were more often born small for gestational to age2017In: Asian Journal of Andrology, ISSN 1008-682X, E-ISSN 1745-7262, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 103-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being born with nonoptimal birth characteristics decreases the chance of becoming a father. Urogenital malformations as well as metabolic syndrome are more common in men born small for gestational age (SGA) and could be contributing factors to the reduced fertility rate seen in these men. It could imply that men becoming fathers by assisted reproductive technology (ART) more often are born with low birth weight (LBW), preterm, and/or SGA than men conceiving without treatment and also that men where intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) had to be performed more often are born with nonoptimal birth characteristics than men where conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) successfully could be used. In this retrospective, case-control study using Swedish national registers, we compared the birth characteristics of 1206 men who have become fathers by ART with a control group consisting of age-matched men who became fathers without treatment. The differences in birth characteristics between men becoming fathers by IVF and ICSI were also assessed. For men becoming fathers by ART, OR of being born with LBW was 1.66 (95% CI = 1.17-2.36) compared with fathers who conceived without treatment. OR of being born prematurely was 1.32 (95% CI = 1.00-1.77). Men becoming fathers via ICSI had a doubled increased likelihood of being born SGA compared with men who became fathers via IVF (OR = 2.12; 95% CI = 1.17-3.83). In conclusion, we have found that men becoming fathers by ICSI treatments had more often been born SGA than men becoming fathers by conventional IVF.

  • 17.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Osher centrum för integrativ medicin, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Institutionen för onkologi-patologi, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, avdelning för onkologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Reduced Need for Rescue Antiemetics and Improved Capacity to Eat in Patients Receiving Acupuncture Compared to Patients Receiving Sham Acupuncture or Standard Care during Radiotherapy.2017In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2017, article id 5806351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate if consumption of emesis-related care and eating capacity differed between patients receiving verum acupuncture, sham acupuncture, or standard care only during radiotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomized to verum (n = 100) or sham (n = 100) acupuncture (telescopic blunt sham needle) (median 12 sessions) and registered daily their consumption of antiemetics and eating capacity. A standard care group (n = 62) received standard care only and delivered these data once. Results. More patients in the verum (n = 73 of 89 patients still undergoing radiotherapy; 82%, Relative Risk (RR) 1.23, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01-1.50) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 79 of 95; 83%, RR 1.24, CI 1.03-1.52) did not need any antiemetic medications, as compared to the standard care group (n = 42 out of 63; 67%) after receiving 27 Gray dose of radiotherapy. More patients in the verum (n = 50 of 89; 56%, RR 1.78, CI 1.31-2.42) and the sham acupuncture group (n = 58 of 94 answering patients; 62%, RR 1.83, CI 1.20-2.80) were capable of eating as usual, compared to the standard care group (n = 20 of 63; 39%). Conclusion. Patients receiving acupuncture had lower consumption of antiemetics and better eating capacity than patients receiving standard antiemetic care, plausible by nonspecific effects of the extra care during acupuncture.

  • 18.
    Vikström, Josefin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health.
    Risk of postnatal depression or suicide after in vitro fertilisation treatment: a nationwide case–control study2017In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 124, no 3, p. 435-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To examine whether women who undergo in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment are at greater risk of postnatal suicide or postnatal depression (PND) requiring psychiatric care, compared with women who conceive spontaneously.

    Design

    Case–control study using data from national registers.

    Setting

    Sweden during the period 2003–2009.

    Population

    Cases were 3532 primiparous women who had given birth following IVF treatment. An aged-matched control group of 8553 mothers was randomly selected from the medical birth register.

    Methods

    Logistic regression analyses were performed with PND as the outcome, and with known risk factors of PND as well as IVF/spontaneous birth as covariates.

    Main outcome measures

    Postnatal depression (PND), defined as diagnoses F32–F39 of the tenth edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD–10), within 12 months of childbirth.

    Results

    Initial analyses showed that PND was more common in the control group than in the IVF group (0.8 versus 0.4%; P = 0.04); however, these differences disappeared when confounding factors were controlled for. A history of any psychiatric illness (P = 0.000; odds ratio, OR = 25.5; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI = 11.7–55.5), any previous affective disorder (P = 0.000; OR = 26.0; 95% CI = 10.5–64.0), or specifically a personality disorder (P = 0.028; OR = 3.8; 95% CI = 1.2–12.7) increased the risk of PND. No woman in either group committed suicide during the first year after childbirth.

    Conclusions

    Whereas mothers who receive IVF treatment are not at increased risk of PND, the risk is increased among mothers with a history of mental illness. Tweetable abstract A Swedish study on 3532 women showed that IVF treatment does not increase the risk of postnatal depression.

  • 19.
    Vikström, Josefin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health.
    Risk of postpartum psychosis after IVF treatment: a nationwide case-control study2017In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 139-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY QUESTION: Is the risk of postpartum psychosis (PPP) increased in women who give birth after IVF treatment compared to after spontaneous conception? SUMMARY ANSWER: The risk of PPP is not higher in the group of women who give birth after IVF treatment compared with women who give birth after spontaneous conception. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Women who conceive using IVF treatment can experience higher levels of pregnancy-specific distress and are at increased risk of pre-eclampsia, an immune-related condition which in turn has been linked to PPP, as well as other pregnancy and delivery complications, which also serve as PPP risk factors. It is not known whether the risk of PPP is increased in women who have conceived using IVF treatment. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A nationwide, register-based, case-control study of all primiparous women who had given birth after IVF treatment between 1988 and 2012. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Information about 10 412 women was collected from the Swedish IVF register. A control group of women who had given birth after spontaneous conception was selected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register (n = 18 624). PPP diagnoses, identified using ICD-10 diagnostic codes F20-31 and F531 the first year postpartum, were collected from the National Patient Register. Associations between PPP and IVF/spontaneous conception were evaluated using chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses while controlling for known risk factors of PPP. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: There were no differences in PPP prevalence between the IVF group and the control group (0.3%, n = 29 versus 0.4%, n = 77) in the chi-square analysis (P = 0.169) or the multiple logistic regression analyses (P = 0.646; odds ratio (OR): 1.178; 95% CI: 586-2.365). No associations between pregnancy or delivery complications and PPP were found. A history of any psychiatric disorder (P amp;lt; 0.001; OR = 40.7; 95% CI = 23.9-69.5), or specifically a psychotic (P amp;lt; 0.001; OR = 324.1; 95% CI = 131.3-800.0), bipolar (P amp;lt; 0.001; OR = 516.1; 95% CI = 264.3-1008.1), depressive (P amp;lt; 0.001; OR = 27.5; 95% CI = 16.2-46.5), anxiety (P amp;lt; 0.001; OR = 12.9; 95% CI = 7.4-22.6) or personality disorder (P amp;lt; 0.001; OR = 27.3; CI = 11.8-63.0), all significantly increased the risk of PPP. LIMITATIONS REASONS FOR CAUTION: PPP is a rare condition, hence the number of individuals was small. Since all women for whom information was available from all registers were included, it was not possible to further increase the power of the study using this design. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Since this study is the first to examine risk of PPP after IVF treatment, more studies are needed to verify these results. The generalizability is restricted to primiparous women in western countries. This study confirms the results of previous studies in showing a history of mental illness to be the major risk factor for PPP.

  • 20.
    Malmborg, Agota
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hormonal contraception and sexual desire: A questionnaire-based study of young Swedish women2016In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 158-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The aim of the study was to determine whether a decrease in sexual desire is more prevalent among women using hormonal contraception than among women using hormone-free contraception, and whether a decrease increases the risk of changing to another contraceptive method. Methods A validated questionnaire was posted to 3740 women (aged 22, 25 or 28 years) living in Sweden. Descriptive statistics were used to present the results; differences between groups were tested using χ(2) analyses. A multiple logistic regression model was used for analysis of possible confounders. Results The response rate was 50%. The majority (81%) of respondents used some kind of contraception, and 88% were generally satisfied with the method used. Regardless of the type of method, 27% of hormonal contraceptive users reported a decrease in sexual desire that they attributed to their use of hormonal contraception, whereas only 12% of women using hormone-free contraception reported a decrease in sexual desire (p<0.01). This twofold risk of a decrease in sexual desire was shown in the multiple regression analysis to be independent of age group, depression, BMI, educational level and parity. However, having a partner was found to be a factor of equal importance: women with partners experienced reduced desire twice as often as women without partners. The observed odds ratio for planning to stop hormonal contraception or to change to a different type due to reduced desire was 8.16 (95% confidence interval 6.65-10.1) among women who had had the same experience during a previous period of hormonal contraceptive use. Conclusions Women using hormonal contraception were more likely to experience reduced sexual desire compared with women using hormone-free contraception. Experiencing reduced desire was a strong predictive factor for women to change contraceptive method.

  • 21.
    Berin, Emilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Resistance training for hot flushes in postmenopausal women: Randomized controlled trial protocol2016In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 85, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Hot flushes and night sweats affect 75% of all women after menopause and is a common reason for decreased quality of life in mid-aged women. Hormone therapy is effective in ameliorating symptoms but cannot be used by all women due to contraindications and side effects. Engagement in regular exercise is associated with fewer hot flushes in observational studies, but aerobic exercise has not proven effective in randomized controlled trials. It remains to be determined whether resistance training is effective in reducing hot flushes and improves quality of life in symptomatic postmenopausal women. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of standardized resistance training on hot flushes and other health parameters in postmenopausal women. Study design: This is an open, parallel-group, randomized controlled intervention study conducted in Linkoping, Sweden. Sixty symptomatic and sedentary postmenopausal women with a mean of at least four moderate to severe hot flushes per day or 28 per week will be randomized to an exercise intervention or unchanged physical activity (control group). The intervention consists of 15 weeks of standardized resistance training performed three times a week under supervision of a physiotherapist. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome is hot flush frequency assessed by self-reported hot flush diaries, and the difference in change from baseline to week 15 will be compared between the intervention group and the control group. Conclusion: The intention is that this trial will contribute to the evidence base regarding effective treatment for hot flushes. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Boström, A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thulin, K.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Reese, D.
    IFK Norrköping, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Rockborn, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Risk factors for acute and overuse sport injuries in Swedish children 11 to 15 years old: What about resistance training with weights?2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 317-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the 1-year self-reported incidence of overuse and traumatic sport injuries and risk factors for injuries in children participating in a summer sports camp representing seven different sports. 4363 children, 11 to 15 years old participating in a summer camp in seven different sports answered a questionnaire. Injury in this cross-sectional study was defined as a sport-related trauma or overload leading to pain and dysfunction preventing the person from participation in training or competition for at least 1 week. A number of risk factors for injury were investigated such as sex, age, number of hours spent on training in general, and on resistance training with weights. Nearly half [49%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 48–51%] of the participants had been injured as a result of participation in a sport during the preceding year, significantly more boys than girls (53%, 95% CI 50–55% vs 46%, 95% CI 43–48%; P < 0.001). Three factors contributed to increased incidence of sport injuries: age, sex, and resistance training with weights. Time spent on resistance training with weights was significantly associated with sport injuries in a logistic regression analysis. In children age 11 to 15 years, the risk of having a sport-related injury increased with age and occurred more often in boys than in girls. Weight training was the only modifiable risk factor that contributed to a significant increase in the incidence of sport injuries.

  • 23.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    The effect of flip-angle on body composition using calibrated water-fat MRI.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study tested how the flip angle affects body composition analysis by MRI, if adipose tissue is used as an internal intensity reference. Whole-body water-fat images with flip angle 5° and 10° were collected from 29 women in an ongoing study. The images were calibrated based on the adipose tissue signal and whole-body total adipose, lean and soft tissue volumes were measured. A mean difference of 0.29 L, or 0.90 % of the average volume, and a coefficient of variation of 0.40 % was observed for adipose tissue.

  • 24.
    West, Janne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Automatic combined whole-body muscle and fat volume quantification using water-fat separated MRI in postmenopausal women2015In: International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Annual Meeting: Proceedings, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative and exact measurements of fat and muscle in the body are important when addressing some of the greatest health-challenges today. In this study whole-body combined regional muscle and fat volume quantification was validated in a group of postmenopausal women, where the body composition is changing. Twelve subjects were scanned with a 4-echo 3D gradient-echo sequence. Water and fat image volumes were calculated using IDEAL, and image intensity correction was performed. Subsequently, automatic tissue segmentation was established using non-rigid morphon based registration. Whole-body regional fat and muscle segmentation could be performed with excellent test-retest reliability, in a single 7-minutes MR-scan.

  • 25.
    Lindh Falk, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Does gender matter?: Differences between students at an interprofessional training ward2015In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 616-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on graduates’ transitions from education into clinical work highlight inequalities concerning how women and men experience their professional learning and development. This study explores how female and male students from different programs within the health care education system, i.e. medicine, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy programmes, experience an IPTW as a part of their professional identity formation.

    Students from the medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy programmes collaborate in teams during two weeks at one of three IPTWs at the medical school, Linköping University. They together take the responsibility for diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of the patients, albeit with professional supervisors as support. During 2010 to 2011 454 (93%) of the 488 students who practiced at the IPTWs answered a questionnaire on their experiences of the IPTW. The students stated that the IPTW had positively influenced their professional development. The female and male medical students were significantly less positive than other female and male students, respectively, concerning the value of IPTW. The male students from all programmes were slightly, but significantly, less positive than all the female students. These findings show that students “do gender” as an integral part of the educational practice. It is important to scrutinize the IPTW as an educational practice, influencing students’ preparation for future work. Gender should be discussed during the IPTW rotation but also in general during the curriculum for all healthcare programmes.

     

  • 26.
    Lindh-Åstrand, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Järvstråt, Lotta
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hormone therapy might be underutilized in women with early menopause.2015In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 848-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY QUESTION Are Swedish women age 40–44 years with assumed early menopause ‘undertreated’ by hormone therapy (HT)?

    SUMMARY ANSWER Many women with probable early menopause discontinue their HT after a short period of time. Thus, they fail to complete the recommended replacement up to age 51–52 years, the average age of menopause.

    WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Spontaneous early menopause occurs in ∼5% of women age 40–45 years. Regardless of the cause, women who experience hormonal menopause due to bilateral oophorectomy before the median age of spontaneous menopause are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, neurological disease, osteoporosis, psychiatric illness and even death.

    STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The study is descriptive, and epidemiological and was based on the use of national registers of dispensed drug prescriptions (HT) linking registers from the National Board of Health and Welfare and Statistics Sweden from 1 July 2005 until 31 December 2011.

    PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS The study population consisted of 310 404 women, 40–44 years old on 31 December 2005 who were followed from 1 July 2005 until 31 December 2011.

    MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Only 0.9% of women 40–44 years old started HT during the study period. A majority of these women used HT <1 year.

    LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION We do not know the indications that led to the prescription of HT but assume that early onset of menopause was the main reason. Because of the study design—making a retrospective study of registers—we can only speculate on the reasons for most of the women in this group discontinuing HT. Another limitation of this study is that we have a rather short observation time. However, we have up to now only been able to collect and combine the data since July 2005.

    WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS As the occurrence of spontaneous early menopause in women age 40–45 is reported to be ∼5%, the fact that <1% of Swedish women age 40–44 are prescribed HT, and can be shown also to have had the medication dispensed at a pharmacy suggests an unexpectedly low treatment rate. Some women with early menopause may have used combined contraceptives as supplementation therapy, but in Sweden HT is the recommended treatment for early menopause so any such women are not following this recommendation. Women who experience early menopause are at increased risk for overall morbidity and mortality, and can expect to benefit from HT until they have reached at least the median age of spontaneous menopause. It is therefore important to individualize the information given these women and to convey new knowledge in this area to gynaecologists and physicians in general as well as the recommendation that women in this group continue HT at least until the average age for spontaneous menopause is reached.

  • 27.
    Lindh-Åstrand, Lotta
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. The NEPI foundation.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hot flushes, hormone therapy and alternative treatments: 30 years of experience from Sweden2015In: Climacteric, ISSN 1369-7137, E-ISSN 1473-0804, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 53-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The use of hormone therapy (HT) for hot flushes has changed dramatically over the past five decades. In this cross-sectional questionnaire study, the aim was to describe the use of HT and alternative treatments and to study the frequency of hot flushes. A further aim was to compare data from the present questionnaire with data from previous studies made in the same geographic area. Method A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 2000 women aged 47-56 years living in Ostergotland County, Sweden. The results were compared with findings from previous studies regarding use of HT, alternative treatment and hot flushes, and the number of HT prescriptions dispensed during the corresponding time using data derived from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Registry. Results The response rate was 66%. Six percent used HT, in line with prevalence data from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Registry. Alternative treatments were used by 10%. About 70% of postmenopausal women reported flushes and almost one-third of those with flushes stated that they would be positive to HT if therapy could be shown to be harmless, a view more often stated by women with severe complaints of hot flushes (67%). Conclusion The use of HT and alternative treatments is low and many women suffer from flushes that could be treated. Women considered their knowledge of the climacteric period and treatment options as insufficient. Individualized information should be given and women with significant climacteric complaints, without contraindications, should be given the opportunity to try HT.

  • 28.
    Kempe, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, County Hospital Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis during use of Combined Hormonal Contraception2015In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Incidence and disease course of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is influenced by sex steroids and several studies have shown less disease activity during high estrogen states. We have earlier shown variation in symptom experience related to estrogen/progestogen phase in women using combined hormonal contraceptives (CHC) in a small sample. The aim of this study was confirm these results in a larger sample.

    Design: Self-assessment of symptoms of MS in relation to CHC cycle or menstrual cycle. Sample: Twenty-three female MS patients using CHC. Control groups were female MS patients without hormonal contraception and healthy women with CHC and without hormonal contraception.

    Methods: All women filled out a symptom diary based on a validated instrument for cyclical symptoms.

    Main Outcome measures: Mean scores for high and low estrogen/progestogen phases were compared.

    Results: The women with MS using combined hormonal contraceptives scored all symptoms higher during the pill-free week than during the CHC-phase and the scores for vertigo, weakness, urinary symptoms and stiffness were significantly higher during the seven days without CHC (p < 0.05). No such relation was found in the group of women with MS not using any hormonal contraception. Women without MS did not report any symptoms at all.

    Conclusion: Women with MS report more pronounced symptoms during the lowestrogen/ progestogen phase of CHC use. Future studies should investigate, with a prospective, controlled design, which effects continuous-use regimens of CHC have in women with MS.

  • 29.
    Järvstråt, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh-Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Use of hormone therapy in Swedish women aged 80 years or older2015In: Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause, ISSN 1072-3714, E-ISSN 1530-0374, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 275-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats may persist for 10 to 20 years or even longer. Information about the extent to which older women use hormone therapy is limited. The aim of this study was to determine the use of hormone therapy in Swedish women aged 80 years or older.Methods: The study is based on national register data on dispensed drug prescriptions (ie, prescribed therapy that has been provided to individuals by pharmacies) for hormone therapy and local low-dose estrogens.Results: Of 310,923 Swedish women who were aged at least 80 years, 609 (0.2%) were new users of hormone therapy. A total of 2,361 women (0.8%) were current users of hormone therapy. The median duration of hormone therapy use in new users was 257 days (25th to 75th percentiles, 611-120 d). About one in six women aged 80 years or older had used local vaginal estrogen therapy for at least four 3-month periods. The drugs were mainly prescribed by gynecologists and general practitioners.Conclusions: Our results show that a number of women aged 80 years or older still use hormone therapy and that most women who started a new treatment period had only one or two dispensations despite the median duration of treatment being more than half a year. Because at least some of the women aged 80 years or older who used hormone therapy probably did so owing to persistent climacteric symptoms, vasomotor symptoms and hormone therapy are still relevant issues that need to be discussed when counseling women around and after age 80.

  • 30.
    Vikström, Josefin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics UHL.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Birth characteristics in a clinical sample of women seeking infertility treatment: a case-control study2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 004197-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To determine the distribution of low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) by main cause of infertility (female, combined, male, unexplained) in women seeking infertility treatment. Design A case-control study. Setting A Centre for Reproductive Medicine in Sweden. Participants All women (n=1293) born in Sweden in 1973 or later and who were part of heterosexual couples seeking infertility treatment at a Centre of Reproductive Medicine from 2005 to 2010 were asked to participate. Those who had not begun the diagnostic process and who declined participation in the study were excluded. In total, 1206 women (94.5%) participated in the study. Main outcome measures Main cause of infertility (female, combined, male, unexplained) collected from the patients medical charts. LBW (less than 2500 g), preterm birth (less than 37 weeks), SGA (less than-2SD of the mean weight for the gestational length) and LGA (greater than+2SD of the mean weight for the gestational length), collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Results The risk of being born with LBW was increased about 2.4 times (OR=2.40, CI 1.13 to 5.07, p=0.02) in women seeking treatment for infertility due to female causes rather than for male or unexplained causes. Women with a female infertility factor were 2.7 times more likely to be born SGA (OR=2.73, CI 1.02 to 7.34, p=0.047) compared with those in whom the cause of infertility was unexplained. Conclusions Women born with LBW or SGA seem to suffer an increased risk of infertility due to a female factor. Thus, infants born with birth characteristics that deviate from the norm may be at greater risk of difficulties in childbearing later on in life. Since this study is the first of its kind, more studies are needed to verify the associations found in this study and to determine their nature.

  • 31. Berin, Emilia
    et al.
    Sundell, micaela
    Karki, Chanda
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Contraceptive knowledge and attitudes among women seeking induced abortion in Kathmandu, Nepal2014In: International Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1179-1411, E-ISSN 1179-1411, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 335-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To map the knowledge about and attitudes toward birth control methods among women in Kathmandu, Nepal, and to compare the results between women seeking an induced abortion and a control group. Method: This was a cross-sectional cohort study with matched controls. Women aged 15-49 years seeking medical care at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Kathmandu Medical College were included and interviewed. A case was defined as a woman who sought an elective medical or surgical abortion. A control was defined as a woman who sought medical care at the outpatient department or had already been admitted to the ward for reasons other than elective abortion. A questionnaire developed for the study - dealing with different demographic characteristics as well as knowledge about and attitudes toward contraceptives - was filled out based on the interview. Results: A total of 153 women were included: 64 women seeking an abortion and 89 controls. Women seeking an abortion had been pregnant more times than the control group and were more likely to have been informed about contraceptives. Women with higher education were less likely to seek an abortion than women with lower education. There was no significant difference in knowledge about and attitudes toward contraceptives between cases and controls. The women considered highest possible effectiveness to be the most important feature when deciding on a birth control method. Conclusion: Women seeking abortion in Kathmandu had shorter education and a history of more pregnancies and deliveries than women in the control group. Education and counseling on sex and reproduction as well as on contraceptive methods probably need to be improved in Nepal to avoid unwanted pregnancies. Attitudes about contraceptives need to be further investigated to develop better and more effective methods to educate women about family planning in order to increase reproductive health. © 2014 Berin et al.

  • 32.
    Frisk, Jessica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    How long do the effects of acupuncture on hot flashes persist in cancer patients?2014In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1409-1415Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Acupuncture has been suggested as therapy for hot flashes in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer. In this systematic review, we sought to evaluate the long-term effects on vasomotor symptoms after the end of a defined treatment period of acupuncture in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer. Methods A literature search revealed 222 articles within the field. With defined exclusion criteria, we identified 17 studies. We also used the Jadad quality score and identified seven studies with a score of at least 3. Results Six of seven identified studies qualified for inclusion in an analysis that measured frequency of hot flashes weighted in relation to number of patients (n=172). The average reduction from baseline to end of acupuncture (ranging between 5 and 12 weeks of treatment) showed 43.2 % reduction of hot flashes. At the last follow-up (mean 5.8 months, range 39 months) after the end of therapy, the weighted reduction from baseline was sustained at 45.6 % in the 153 of 172 patients (89 %) who were followed up. Conclusions Data from six prospective analyzed studies indicate at least 3-month effects after the end of acupuncture treatment for flashes in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer. However, larger randomized trials with long-term follow-up will be needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  • 33.
    Gjessing, Kristian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Torgé, Cristina Joy
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Improvement of quality and safety in health care as a new interprofessional learning module – evaluation from students2014In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, no 7, p. 341-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interprofessional teamwork is in many ways a norm in modern health care, and needs to be taught during professional education.

    Description: This study is an evaluation of a newly introduced and mandatory learning module where students from different health profession programs used Improvement of Quality and Safety as a way to develop interprofessional competence in a real-life setting. The intention of this learning module was to integrate interprofessional teamwork within the students' basic education, and to give students a basic knowledge about Improvement of Quality and Safety. This report focuses on evaluations from the participating students (n=222), mainly medical and nursing students.

    Materials and methods: To evaluate this new learning module, a questionnaire was developed and analyzed using a mixed methods design, integrating both qualitative and quantitative methods. The evaluation addressed learning concepts, learning objectives, and interprofessional and professional development.

    Results and conclusion: A majority of students responded positively to the learning module as a whole, but many were negative towards specific parts of the learning module and its implementation. Medical students and male students were less positive towards this learning module. Improvements and alterations were suggested. 

  • 34.
    Kempe, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, County Hospital Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Eklund, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallin, Agnes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Olsson, Thomas
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    T cell subset-associated transcription factors, cytokines and chemokines in relation to the menstrual cycle and use of combined hormonal contraceptives in women with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Study question: Do peripheral blood levels of cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors for different T helper (Th) cell subsets change in relation to high and low estrogen/progestogen states in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls with and without combined hormonal contraceptives (CHC)?

    Summary answer: Our findings indicate a general activation of peripheral blood T cells and B cells during high estrogen/progestogen phases with higher levels of transcription factors associated with both Th1 (TBX21) and Th2 (GATA3) subsets of T cells and the B cell-associated chemokine CXCL13.

    What is known already: There are some indications that sex steroids may positively affect MS clinically and immunologically.

    Study design, size, duration: A total of 60 women were included. Paired blood samples were drawn in high and low estrogen/progestogen phases during the same cycle in women using or not using CHC.

    Participants/materials, setting, methods: Participants were female MS patients and healthy controls with and without CHC. Concentrations of cytokines and chemokines were measured using multiplex bead technology and expression of transcription factors in blood cells was determined by qPCR. Owing to possible differences in cell composition, expression of Th-associated transcription factors were normalized to the T cell-specific transcription factor CD3E.

    Main results and the role of chance: Sixty women were included but 13 women dropped out, leaving 47 women to the statistical analyses. In healthy controls using CHC, both TBX21, and GATA3 expression was higher in the high estrogen/progestogen phase than in the low estrogen/progestogen phase. TBX21 expression in high estrogen/progestogen phase differed significantly between groups with the highest levels in healthy controls without CHC. In all MS patients as well as in healthy controls using CHC, the concentrations of CXCL13 was significantly higher in the high estrogen/progestogen phase compared to the low estrogen/progestogen phase.

    Limitations, reasons for caution: The low number of participants. A majority of the MS patients were using immunomodulatory drugs which may have interfered with the results. The study design makes it impossible to differ between estrogenic and progestogenic effects.

    Wider implications of the findings: Our findings show that high and low levels of estrogens and/or progestogens differently affect immune parameters related to Th cell subsets as well as B cells. The differences between high- and low estrogen/progestogen phases were most obvious in women using CHC indicating that CHC is more potent than 17β-Estradiol/progesterone in inducing immune changes in both MS patients and healthy women.

    Study funding/competing interest(s): This study was funded by the County Councils of Östergötland and Västernorrland, Sweden. No author have any conflicts of interest to declare.

  • 35.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Healthy aging and age-adjusted nutrition and physical fitness2013In: Baillière's Best Practice & Research: Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, ISSN 1521-6934, E-ISSN 1532-1932, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 741-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expected life span is gradually increasing worldwide. Healthy dietary and exercise habits contribute to healthy ageing. Certain types of diet can prevent or reduce obesity, and may reduce the risk of diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease). Exercise also reduces the risk of diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, some cancers and some mental disturbances). A less sedentary life style seems at least as important as regular exercise. Exercise can probably be tailored to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and extent of bone loss. To ensure adherence, it is important to increase slowly the frequency, duration and intensity of exercise, and to find activities that suit the individual. More research is needed to find ideal modes and doses of exercise, and to increase long-term adherence. Dietary and exercise modification seem to be strong promoters of healthy ageing.

  • 36.
    Vikström, Josefin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hot flushes still occur in a population of 85-year-old Swedish women2013In: Climacteric, ISSN 1369-7137, E-ISSN 1473-0804, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Hot flushes and night sweats often cause discomfort and may negatively affect sleep and quality of life. Studies have shown that menopausal symptoms, like hot flushes, may persist for up to 20 years after the menopausal transition, but there are no published studies regarding the occurrence of hot flushes among women older than 80 years. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of hot flushes in 85-year-old women.

    Methods All 85-year old women living in Linköping municipality in 2007 (n = 415) received a postal questionnaire. The majority, 74% (n = 307), answered the questionnaire and 47% (n = 194) agreed to visit the Department of Geriatric Medicine; during this visit questions regarding hot flushes and use of hormone therapy were asked.

    Results About 16% (n = 29) of the women experienced hot flushes during the day and/or during the night and 6.5% (n = 12) of the women were currently using hormone therapy. Almost 10% (n = 17) of all responding women were very to moderately distressed by their hot flushes.

    Conclusion Our results confirm and extend previous knowledge based on studies of younger postmenopausal women in showing that menopausal symptoms still occur in elderly women. We found that, while the prevalence of menopausal symptoms decreases with age, these symptoms are still experienced by some 85-year-old women.

  • 37.
    Lindh Falk, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hopwood, Nick
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia .
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    One site fits all? A student ward as a learning practice for interprofessional development2013In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 476-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interprofessional training wards (IPTWs), aiming to enhance interprofessional collaboration, have been implemented in medical education and evaluated over the last decade. The Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping University has, in collaboration with the local health provider, arranged such training wards since 1996, involving students from the medical, nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy programs. Working together across professional boundaries is seen as a necessity in the future to achieve sustainable and safe healthcare. Therefore, educators need to arrange learning contexts which enhance students interprofessional learning. This article shows aspects of how the arrangement of an IPTW can influence the students collaboration and learning. Data from open-ended questions from a questionnaire survey, during autumn term 2010 and spring term 2011 at an IPTW, was analyzed qualitatively using a theoretical framework of practice theory. The theoretical lens gave a picture of how architectures of the IPTW create a clash between the "expected" professional responsibilities and the "unexpected" responsibilities of caring work. Also revealed was how the proximity between students opens up contexts for negotiations and boundary work. The value of using a theoretical framework of professional learning in practice within the frames of healthcare education is discussed.

  • 38.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Frisk, Jessica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Acupuncture as Treatment of Hot Flashes and the Possible Role of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide2012In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2012, no 579321Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms behind hot flashes in menopausal women are not fully understood. The flashes in women are probably preceded by and actually initiated by a sudden downward shift in the set point for the core body temperature in the thermoregulatory center that is affected by sex steroids, beta-endorphins, and other central neurotransmitters. Treatments that influence these factors may be expected to reduce hot flashes. Since therapy with sex steroids for hot flashes has appeared to cause a number of side effects and risks and women with hot flashes and breast cancer as well as men with prostate cancer and hot flashes are prevented from sex steroid therapy there is a great need for alternative therapies. Acupuncture affecting the opioid system has been suggested as an alternative treatment option for hot flashes in menopausal women and castrated men. The heat loss during hot flashes may be mediated by the potent vasodilator and sweat gland activator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) the concentration of which increases in plasma during flashes in menopausal women and, according to one study, in castrated men with flushes. There is also evidence for connections between the opioid system and the release of CGRP. In this paper we discuss acupuncture as a treatment alternative for hot flashes and the role of CGRP in this context.

  • 39.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Johnsson, Anna
    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Onelöv, Erik
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Acupuncture Compared To Placebo Acupuncture in Radiotherapy-induced Nausea: a Randomized Controlled Study2012In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1353-1361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate if verum (real) acupuncture is effective against nausea and vomiting during radiotherapy.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We randomised blinded cancer patients to verum; penetrating “deqi” creating acupuncture (n=109) in the antiemetic acupuncture point PC6 (three cm above the wrist), or sham (n=106) with a non-penetrating sham needle at a non-acupuncture point six cm above the wrist 2-3 times/week. The patients daily during the radiotherapy period documented nausea and vomiting. Primary endpoint was number of patients with at least one episode of nausea during the whole radiotherapy period. RESULTS: Data was provided by 205 patients (95 %). In the verum acupuncture group, 70 % experienced nausea at least once during the radiotherapy period (p=0.12 compared to the sham group) (mean number of days of 10.1), 25 % vomited and 42 % used antiemetic drugs at least once. In the sham group 62 % experienced nausea (mean number of days 8.7), 28 % vomited and 37 % consumed antiemetic drugs. Ninety five percent in the verum and 96 % in the sham acupuncture group believed that the treatment had been effective against nausea. In both groups 67 % experienced positive effects on relaxation, mood, sleep or pain-reduction, and 89 % wished to receive the treatment again.

    CONCLUSION: Acupuncture creating deqi is not more effective than sham in radiotherapy-induced nausea, but in this study nearly all patients in both groups experienced that the treatment was effective for nausea.

  • 40.
    Frisk, Jessica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Källström, Ann-Christine
    Clinical Department of Surgery, Division of Oncology, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Wall, Najme
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Acupuncture improves health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in women with breast cancer and hot flushes2012In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 715-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Evaluate effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) and hormone therapy (HT) on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in breast cancer survivors with vasomotor symptoms.

    METHODS: Forty-five women, randomized to EA (n = 27) for 12 weeks or HT (n = 18) for 24 months, were followed for up to 2 years. Distress caused by, and numbers of, hot flushes, hours slept and times woken up/night, Psychological and General Well-being Index (PGWB) and Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) were registered before and during treatment and at 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months after start of treatment.

    RESULTS: After 12 weeks of EA (n = 19), WHQ improved from 0.32 (IQR 0.23-0.53) at baseline to 0.24 (IQR 0.12-0.39; p < 0.001) and PGWB from 78 (IQR 53-89) to 79 (IQR 68-93; p = 0.002). All sleep parameters improved and Hot Flush Score (HFS) decreased by 80%. At 12 months, WHQ, PGWB and all sleep parameters remained significantly improved (n = 14) and HFS decreased by 65%. After 12 weeks of HT (n = 18), WHQ improved from 0.29 (IQR 0.15-0.44) at baseline to 0.15 (IQR 0.05-0.22; p = 0.001), PGWB from 75 (IQR 59-88) to 90 (62-97; p = 0.102) and three of five sleep parameters improved.

    CONCLUSION: Both EA and HT increased HRQoL and sleep, probably through decreasing numbers of and distress by hot flushes. Although flushes decreased less in the EA group than in the HT group, HRQoL improved at least to the same extent maybe due to other effects of EA, not induced by HT, e.g. on anxiety, vitality and sleep, supported by subscale analyses. EA should be further evaluated as treatment for women with breast cancer and climacteric complaints, since HT no longer can be recommended for these women.

  • 41.
    Risto, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Elderly men with a history of distal radius fracture have significantly lower calcaneal bone density and free androgen index than age-matched controls2012In: The Aging Male, ISSN 1368-5538, E-ISSN 1473-0790, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 59-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Age related bone loss is widely accepted as related to decreased serum levels of circulating sex hormones. Epidemiological data also show distal radius fractures in men to be a sensitive marker of bone fragility. The aim of this study was to assess if men with a history of distal radius fracture have lower bone mass density (BMD), lower free androgen index (FAI), lower total testosterone (T) and lower bio-available testosterone (Bio-T) than healthy age-matched controls. Patients and methods: A case-control study is based on consecutive cases treated for low energy distal radius fracture at our department and age-matched controls. Thirty-nine men treated between 1997-2004 and 45 age-matched controls underwent calcaneal bone density measurements (t-score) and analyses of T, Bio-T and serum hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Results: The fracture group had lower BMD (p andlt; 0.01) and lower FAI (p = 0.01). Linear regression analysis showed a correlation between Bio-T and t-scores (p = 0.03). Using analysis of covariance, a significant difference with lower Bio-T in the fracture group was shown. Conclusion: Bio-T seems to correlate with BMD in elderly men and may serve as a marker for increased fracture risk in this patient group.

  • 42.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hot flushes in healthy aging men differ from those in men with prostate cancer and in menopausal women2012In: Gynecological Endocrinology, ISSN 0951-3590, E-ISSN 1473-0766, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 72-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) seems to be involved in hot flushes in women and in castrated men. Therefore, we studied whether the plasma concentrations of CGRP changed during flushes in a group of healthy aging men. Twelve men (49-71 years) with no history of current or former prostate cancer or hormonal treatment reporting greater than= 20 flushes/week were investigated. Blood samples were drawn during and between flushes for analysis of CGRP and also androgen concentrations, that is, testosterone and bioavailable testosterone were analysed. Skin temperature and skin conductance were monitored. Thirty-five flushes were reported by 10 men. The plasma concentrations of CGRP did not increase during flushes. No significant change in skin temperature or conductance was found. CGRP is probably not involved in the mechanisms of flushes in healthy aging men. Therefore, flushes in aging healthy men seem to be different from flushes in men and women deprived of sex steroids where CGRP increases during flushes.

  • 43.
    Stening, Kent
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Voster, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Amandusson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Influence of estrogen levels on thermal perception, pain thresholds and pain tolerance: Studies on women undergoing in vitro fertilization2012In: Journal of Pain, ISSN 1526-5900, E-ISSN 1528-8447, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 459-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the relationship between estrogen and pain in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). Quantitative sensory tests (QST) were performed twice during the IVF-regimen: once during hormonal down-regulation and once during hormonal upregulation. A group of healthy men and a group of women using monophasic contraceptives were also examined, to control for session-to-session effects. Among the women undergoing IVF, serum 17β-estradiol levels differed strongly between treatments as expected, and increased from 65.7 (SD = 26) pmol/l during the downregulation phase, to 5188 (SD = 2524) pmol/l during the up-regulation phase. Significant outcomes in the QST were only seen for temperature perception thresholds (1.7°C vs. 2.2°C; P = 0.003) and cold pain threshold (11.5°C vs. 14.5°C; P = 0.04). A similar change in cold pain threshold was also seen in the two control groups, however, and statistical analysis suggested that this change was due to a session-to-session effect rather than being the result of hormonal modulation. Heat pain thresholds, heat tolerance, pressure pain thresholds, and the cold pressor test showed no significant differences between sessions. These data demonstrate that pain perception and pain thresholds in healthy women show little, if any, changes even with major variations in serum estradiol levels.

  • 44.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Symptoms of testosterone deficiency in early middle aged men2012In: The Aging Male, ISSN 1368-5538, E-ISSN 1473-0790, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 78-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms of testosterone deficiency and concentrations of testosterone (T) and bioavailable testosterone (BT) were studied in 35-and 45-year-old men. Methods: A questionnaire, was sent to all 35-and 45-year-old men in Linkoping, Sweden (n = 1998). The questionnaire has earlier been used for 55- to 75-year-old men and included demographic data, medical history, different symptoms possibly of T deficiency and the 10 questions from the "ADAM-questionnaire". Totally 200 men randomly selected among the men who answered the questionnaire were asked to give blood samples for analysis of T-and BT-concentrations. Results: A total of 38.7% of the questionnaires were returned and analysed, and 43.5% of the 200 randomly selected men gave blood samples. The older age group reported more symptoms that may be connected to low B and BT and had lower T-and BT-concentrations. Less strong erections and higher alcohol consumption were associated with lower concentrations of BT in 45-year-old men. Conclusions: The burden of symptoms possibly related to low T concentrations were higher in 45-year-old men, and BT and T were lower. However, due to the low answer frequency and number of blood samples analyzed no general conclusions can be drawn.

  • 45.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Biographical-Item: Nils-Holger Areskog IN MEMORIAM in JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE, vol 25, issue 2, pp 161-1622011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 46.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Palmefors, Lennart G
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Per S
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology.
    Joborn, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Change in testosterone concentrations over time is a better predictor than the actual concentrations for symptoms of late onset hypogonadism2011In: The Aging Male, ISSN 1368-5538, E-ISSN 1473-0790, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 249-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Symptoms of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) and concentrations of testosterone (T) and bioavailable testosterone (BT) were studied in relation to the data from the same men 5 years earlier. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. In 2008, 282 men, aged 60-82 years, answered a questionnaire regarding demographic data, medical history, different symptoms of LOH and the 10 questions from the Androgen Decline in Aging Males (ADAM)-questionnaire. Blood samples were analysed for concentrations of T and calculations were made for BT. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. A total of 87.2% of the questionnaires were returned and analysed, and 75.2% of the responders gave blood samples. The oldest third of the men were most affected by LOH symptoms (p andlt; 0.05). Both T and BT concentrations decreased during the 5 years (p andlt; 0.05) but only the symptom less strong erections changed significantly (p andlt; 0.05). Men reporting one of the four specific symptoms from the ADAM-questionnaire for the first time in 2008 had a higher loss of T and BT than men who had unchanged or fewer symptoms than that reported in 2003. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. The magnitude of the decrease in concentrations is a better predictor of LOH than are the actual concentrations of T and BT. A combination of symptoms predicts LOH better than any single symptom.

  • 47.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lekander, Mats
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Johnsson, Anna
    Lund University Hospital.
    Onelov, Erik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska Institute.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Getting the Grip on Nonspecific Treatment Effects: Emesis in Patients Randomized to Acupuncture or Sham Compared to Patients Receiving Standard Care2011In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is not known whether or not delivering acupuncture triggers mechanisms cited as placebo and if acupuncture or sham reduces radiotherapy-induced emesis more than standard care. Methodology/Principal Findings: Cancer patients receiving radiotherapy over abdominal/pelvic regions were randomized to verum (penetrating) acupuncture (n = 109; 99 provided data) in the alleged antiemetic acupuncture point PC6 or sham acupuncture (n = 106; 101 provided data) performed with a telescopic non-penetrating needle at a sham point 2-3 times/week during the whole radiotherapy period. The acupuncture cohort was compared to a reference cohort receiving standard care (n = 62; 62 provided data). The occurrence of emesis in each group was compared after a mean dose of 27 Gray. Nausea and vomiting were experienced during the preceding week by 37 and 8% in the verum acupuncture group, 38 and 7% in the sham acupuncture group and 63 and 15% in the standard care group, respectively. The lower occurrence of nausea in the acupuncture cohort (verum and sham) compared to patients receiving standard care (37% versus 63%, relative risk (RR) 0.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.5-0.8) was also true after adjustment for potential confounding factors for nausea (RR 0.8, CI 0.6 to 0.9). Nausea intensity was lower in the acupuncture cohort (78% no nausea, 13% a little, 8% moderate, 1% much) compared to the standard care cohort (52% no nausea, 32% a little, 15% moderate, 2% much) (p = 0.002). The acupuncture cohort expected antiemetic effects from their treatment (95%). Patients who expected nausea had increased risk for nausea compared to patients who expected low risk for nausea (RR 1.6; Cl 1.2-2.4). Conclusions/Significance: Patients treated with verum or sham acupuncture experienced less nausea and vomiting compared to patients receiving standard care, possibly through a general care effect or due to the high level of patient expectancy.

  • 48.
    Stening, Kent
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Henriksson, Karl-Gösta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh-Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Amandusson, Åsa
    Uppsala University.
    Blomqvist, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hormonal replacement therapy does not affect self-estimated pain or experimental pain responses in post-menopausal women suffering from fibromyalgia: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial2011In: RHEUMATOLOGY, ISSN 1462-0324, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 544-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods. Twenty-nine post-menopausal women were randomized to either 8 weeks of treatment with transdermal 17 beta-oestradiol (50 mu g/day) or placebo according to a double-blind protocol. A self-estimation of pain, a set of quantitative sensory tests measuring thresholds to temperature, thermal pain, cold pain and pressure pain, and a cold pressor test were performed on three occasions: before treatment, after 8 weeks of treatment and 20 weeks after cessation of treatment. Results. Hormonal replacement treatment significantly increased serum oestradiol levels as expected (P andlt; 0.01). However, no differences in self-estimated pain were seen between treatment and placebo groups, nor were there any differences between the two groups regarding the results of the quantitative sensory tests or the cold pressor test at any of the examined time points. Conclusion. Eight weeks of transdermal oestradiol treatment does not influence perceived pain, pain thresholds or pain tolerance as compared with placebo treatment in post-menopausal women suffering from FM.

  • 49.
    Enblom, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tomasson, Annica
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Steineck, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Pilot testing of methods for evaluation of acupuncture for emesis during radiotherapy: a randomised single subject experimental design2011In: ACUPUNCTURE IN MEDICINE, ISSN 0964-5284, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 94-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Many acupuncture studies are of weak methodological quality, possibly due to lack of pilot testing. This pilot study tested design features, including test of feasibility, compliance to treatment and data collection, level of blinding success and the patients potential perceived effects of the treatment, in preparation for an efficacy study. Method A modified single subject experimental design was conducted. 10 cancer patients were randomised to verum penetrating acupuncture or non-penetrating sham needles for 30 min 2-3 times/week during radiotherapy over abdomen/pelvis. They answered test-retested emesis questions (r=0.527-1.0) covering nausea, vomiting, use of antiemetics, wellbeing and activities of daily living. Results Overall, the patients completed 98% of the 345 emesis-questionnaire days and 101 of the 115 offered treatments. All patients believed they received verum acupuncture. 10 patients experienced antiemetic effects, seven relaxation, five pain-reduction and five experienced sleep improvement. Two types of nausea questions showed absolute concordance (r=1.0) (n of observations=456). Nausea was experienced by one of five verum acupuncture treated patients (duration median 0% of the radiotherapy-days) and four of five sham acupuncture treated patients (duration median 24% of the radiotherapy-days). Patients experiencing nausea rated decreased wellbeing and performance of daily activities compared to patients free from nausea. Conclusions All patients were blinded, complied with verum/sham treatments and data-collection, and believed they had effects of the received treatment. The methods for verum/sham treatment and data collection may thus be used in an adequately powered randomised controlled study of the effect of acupuncture for radiotherapy-induced emesis.

  • 50.
    Pelling, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Preparation for becoming members of health care teams: findings from a 5-year evaluation of a student interprofessional training ward2011In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 328-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Setting. An orthopaedic interprofessional training ward manned by students at a University Hospital. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective. To assess to what extent students from different undergraduate programmes evaluated the effects of a 2-week rotation at the ward on their professional roles and the value of teamwork within health care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod. A questionnaire was filled in by 841 students by the end of a 2-week rotation at the ward over 5 years. Questions concerned students estimate of how the rotation had strengthened their insight into their own future professional role, into other students professional roles and into the value of teamwork within health care. Differences between the different student categories and possible associations between the different estimates were statistically analysed. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. Students from all programmes reported that the rotation at the student ward had dramatically strengthened their insight about their own future professional role as well as the roles of the other professions and the value of teamwork within health care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion. Health care is a complicated system based on cooperation and professionalism. We suggest that interprofessional training of students from all professions within health care should be a part of their education as a worthwhile preparation for their future professional work and to ensure high-quality health care.

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