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  • 1.
    Overkamp, Tim
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    How Service Ideas Are Implemented: Ways of Framing and Addressing Service Transformation2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As a field in practice and academia, service design is moving out of its formative phase. In service design research, the realisation of service transformation from idea to service practice and the ways that design(ers) can contribute to this process are topics that are not well understood yet. The work presented in this thesis contributes to improving this understanding.

    A programmatic design research approach was used to explore service transformation. This resulted in the formulation of two ways of framing and addressing the topic: type 1 service transformation, which frames the realisation of service transformation in terms of assembling a service delivery system, and type 2 service transformation, which views the realisation of service transformation as enabling value co-creating relationships between service actors.

    Type 1 service transformation builds on the assimilation perspective on service innovation where service transformation is realised by implementing service concepts. Service Design contributes to this by facilitating the development of desirable service experiences. Trained designers can apply implementation strategies and support the handover of service design projects to contribute to the realisation of type 1 service transformation by. Design for manufacture and assembly (DFMA) is a generative construct for addressing type 1 service transformation. DFMA is central to the program implementation during design, which was used to explore type 1 service transformation.

    Type 2 service transformation builds on the synthesis perspective on service innovation, which adopts a service-dominant logic. Service transformation is the shaping of value co-creating relationships between service actors and is realised by enabling service actors to enact roles that make the envisioned value co-creating relationships possible. Designing contributes by helping service developers to improve their understanding of value co-creating relationships and the way that realising service transformation is expected to affect those relations. Trained designers contribute by supporting this inquiry. The concept of roles, including Role Theory vocabulary, is a generative construct for addressing type 2 service transformation and is central to the program enabling enactment, which is suggested for the study of type 2 service transformation.

    The main contribution of this thesis is the articulation of these two perspectives on service transformation. The articulation of these two framings helps service developers and researchers in their efforts to study and work on the realisation of service transformation.

  • 2.
    Overkamp, Timothy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rodrigues, Vanessa
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Resource integration as a perspective on value in interaction design2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service-dominant logic (SDL) is a theoretical framework that has impacted the development of service design. Resource integration, a core concept in SDL, provides a distinctive perspective that changes the perception of value in situations of interaction. In this paper, we explore the implications of applying the resource integration view on interaction in the context of an illustrative design project. We argue that considering the resources of each actor in a design situation elevates the discussion towards a more strategic level of service and value creation. Through the example, we draw implications of utilising this perspective in specifying, positioning and shaping interactions in the system to provide value for different actors.

  • 3.
    Overkamp, Timothy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Towards a structured way to represent future service roles2018In: Proceedings of the the 5th Participatory Innovation Conference (PIN-C), 2018, p. 345-348Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service designs suggest changes in service systems, that – when implemented – change roles of actors in such systems. To fulfil their new role, actors in a service need to know what is expected of them and be both willing and able to perform this new role. Combining data from an ongoing service development project with existing knowledge of external representations used in service design and Role Theory, we propose a framework showing the extent to which different aspects of envisioned roles are included in different types of service representations. This provides a structured way to describe and evaluate roles, adjust them if needed and prepare service actors for their own and others’ new roles.

  • 4.
    Overkamp, Timothy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Čaić, Martina
    Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mahr, Dominik
    Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Odekerken-Schröder, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Understanding generalisability from network-conscious service design projects2018In: Service Design Proof of Concept: Proceedings of the ServDes.2018 conference / [ed] Anna Meroni, Anna María Ospina Medina and Beatrice Villari, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018, p. 368-385, article id 030Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of technology on value co-creation practices of service actors has been studied from a service encounter perspective, during or after technology introduction. We contribute to this existing research by introducing a multi-actorperspective to study such changes priorto technology deployment. We provide two illustrative cases that show how this can be done. In addition, we study the generalisability of findings from such research projects, through an exploratory qualitative comparison of the projects. We make a second contribution by providing five contextual aspects for other researchers to use when assessing 1) generalisability of our findings and 2) to what contexts their research results can be transferred. Finally, we make a third contribution by positing that literature on roles and role change supports service researchers and designers to make sense of the ways in which service actors perceive that technology deployment will influence value co-creation in service systems. 

  • 5.
    Overkamp, Tim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Evolutions of service actor roles towards future service2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Realising new ways of value co-creation involves changes in the roles of actors in a service system. Role Theory and its concepts have been used in service research to articulate dynamics in service actor roles in existing value co-creation situations, but they are not applied to evaluate roles in future situations of service. Several methods exist in (service) design that can be used to describe existing roles in service systems and to suggest possible futures based on these descriptions, but describing roles in these futures in a structured way is not a part of these methods.

    Structured ways to describe service actor roles in envisioned services are thus lacking, which makes it difficult to assess the feasibility of the evolution from contemporary service actor roles towards realising services. In this paper, we suggest how Role Theory and theatre-inspired methods in design can complement one-another to fill this gap. We use interview data from the evaluation of an envisioned service scenario to show how Role Theory can be used as an analytical perspective to describe roles in this envisioned service. Finally, we suggest possible directions for future research.

  • 6.
    Overkamp, Tim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Implementation during design: Developing understanding about service realisation before implementation2017In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6965, Vol. 20, no sup 1, p. 4409-4421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design has been mentioned as potential support in the shift from a valuein-exchange to a value-in-use perspective that is part of servitization. However, thesediscussions pay little attention to the role of design(ers) for implementing 1) thechange in perspective of the organisation and 2) specific (product) service systems,which are both required for successful servitization.We argue that implementation as a concept needs to be part of service designprocesses in order to timely articulate how to implement new services, and whatresources need to be shaped in service system(s) involved for successful value cocreation.We analyse a workshop in a technology-dominant service developmentproject and show that using a service (process) perspective and concrete cases couldbe a way to integrate conversations about implementation in the design phase of PSSand service development. For technology-dominant services specifically, this canuncover factors for successful integration of technology and service.

  • 7.
    Overkamp, Tim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ruijs, Freya
    JAM Visual Thinking, the Netherlands.
    Involving stakeholders towards service implementation: Co-designing change of practices using a visual language2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, no sup 1, p. 531-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service implementation is complex and multifaceted. In this paper, wefocus on change of practices for actors in an organisation as one of these facets.Successful value co-creation requires different service actors to work together.Therefore, successful realisation of change of practices requires these actors to havea shared mental model of (consequences of) such change, both for themselves andfor the collaboration with other actors.We argue that collaborative development and use of a visual language can functionas boundary object that can facilitate conversations and development of sharedunderstanding regarding service implementation as change of practices, ifconnotative meaning of the words in the language is defined by those who use it.We use data from a workshop in the context of implementing a change of practicesto show how this can work and reflect on what role designers can have in thetransition towards service implementation.

  • 8.
    Overkamp, Tim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Roles of in-house designers towards service implementation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we study roles that in-house service designs take towards service implementation. We frame implementation from a service-dominant logic and service systems perspective as shaping service system resources (people, language, organisation technology) for resource exchange and integration (i.e. value co-creation). We analyse interviews with nine in-house service designers and show how in-house designers work with shaping the four service system resource types. We discuss implications for in-house designers and (their) managers. We reflect on using service-dominant logic and service systems as a lens for analysing in-house designers’ efforts related to service implementation. We make suggestions for future research.

  • 9.
    Overkamp, Tim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Multi-Touchpoint Design of Services for Troubleshooting and Repairing Trucks and Buses2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For professional transport companies, the time that a vehicle is not used for work – the downtime of a vehicle – is costly. In this paper, we introduce a research project that aims to speed up troubleshooting for trucks and buses through a combination of process improvements and development of software support. The result is a service that consists of multi-touchpoint encounters. During the project, we want to investigate how multi-touchpoint encounters can be represented, introduce the concept of implementation during the design of multi-touchpoint services and explore the consequences of the presence of multiple (non-)human actors that follow from multi-touchpoint encounters. We discuss preliminary results regarding these aspects. Thereby, we contribute with knowledge about how multi-touchpoint service encounters can be explored and how their implementation can be discussed as part of the process of designing them.

  • 10.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Overkamp, Tim
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Research in the first four service design and innovation (ServDes) conferences2016In: Service design geographies: Proceedings of the ServDes.2016 Conference / [ed] Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen, Francesco Grani, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016, p. 167-179Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we take a closer look at the papers published during the first four Service design and innovation (ServDes) conferences and sources that the authors of those papers have referenced. The analysis uses the academic search engine Scopus and the references found in the conferences’ Proceedings. In total 206 authors have contributed to the 105 research papers presented at ServDes, and 53% of all ServDes papers have been referenced at a later ServDes. ServDes authors are informed by research published mainly after 1999 (79,2%), primarily within the fields of Business, Computer Science and Engineering. We also look at what authors publish their research at ServDes and the percentage of self-referencing (27%) as well as within-conference referencing (2,4% of references) to examine the progression within the field through the research published at ServDes.

  • 11.
    Nordvall, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SICS East Swedish ICT.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SICS East Swedish ICT.
    Boström, Emil
    SICS East Swedish ICT.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Overkamp, Timothy
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vibed: A prototyping tool for haptic game interfaces2016In: iConference 2016 Proceedings, iSchools , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Haptics in the form of vibrations in game interfaces have the potential to strengthen visual and audio components, and also improve accessibility for certain populations like people with deafblindness. However, building vibrotactile game interfaces is difficult and time consuming. Our research problem was how to make a prototyping tool that facilitated prototyping of vibrotactile game interfaces for phones and gamepads. The results include a description of the prototyping tool we built, which is called VibEd. It allows designers to draw vibrotactile patterns, referred to as vibes, that can easily be tested on phones and gamepads, and exported to code that can be used in game development. It is concluded, based on user tests, that a haptic game interface prototyping tool such as VibEd, can facilitate haptic game interface design and development, and by that contribute to game accessibility for persons with deafblindness. 

  • 12.
    Overkamp, Tim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Views on implementation and how they could be used in service design2016In: Service design geographies: Proceedings of the ServDes.2016 Conference / [ed] Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen and Francesco Grani, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016, Vol. 125, p. 205-214Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although service designers have proven their abilities in the fuzzy front end of service development, their skills regarding implementation have been criticised and many service designs are not implemented successfully. So far, there has been little discussion concerning service implementation in service design research and there is potential for further development of this aspect of the design of services. This paper intends to contribute to this development by presenting different views on implementation from fields that are related to service design, such as product and interaction design. These fields mostly see implementation as the delivery of generic resources and process models, whereas service implementation (also) involves development and change of the (service) organisation as well as adaptation in use of resources and service processes models. Still, if discussions on implementation in these related fields are translated to a service context, they can provide inspiration for (future research on) service implementation.

  • 13.
    Overkamp, Tim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jamming to Direct Technology Development: An Analysis of Two Technology Jams2015In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference of the European Academy of Design: The Value of Design Research / [ed] Valentine, L., Borja de Mozota, B., Nelson, J., Merter, S. and Atkinson, P, Sheffield: Sheffield Hallam University, UK , 2015, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When technology is taken as the starting point for the development of new products and services, there is a risk for so-called technology-push innovations. Instead, the technology-driven perspective could be complemented with a design driven perspective (Verganti, 2009), in order to help create a better balance in desirability, feasibility and viability (Brown 2009). However, design driven innovation processes usually are time-intensive. With the development of Technology Jams we aim to speed up the design driven process, while preserving its other characteristics.. These Technology Jams are inspired on musical jams and design jams, where people from different backgrounds explore ideas together in a hands-on way. However, technology Jams take a specific technology and a target context as a starting point for ideation of new products and services. Rapid prototypes are used to give shape to these ideas in order to explore and improve them. In this paper we introduce the concept of Technology Jams. Furthermore, we describe two Technology Jams that we have organised. We discuss how their respective theme, setup and provided working material affected the process and outcome of the Technology Jams. We conclude by pointing out directions for possible future development and additional research in order to iteratively improve the concept of Technology Jams.

  • 14.
    Overkamp, Timothy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Marionette prototyping for evaluating conceptual ubicomp applications in their context2015In: PIN-C 2015. Reframing Design. Proceedings of the 4th participatory innovation conference: reframing design / [ed] Rianne Valkenburg, Coen Dekkers and Janneke Sluijs, The Hague University of Applied Science /Syddansk Univeristet , 2015, p. 462-469Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many methods for the evaluation of ubiquitous computing (ubicomp) applications. These evaluations usually require an autonomous system, or use scenarios or storyboards instead.

    We suggest Marionette Prototyping as a technique for ubicomp applications that can be used early in the design process. It allows participants to use a conceptual ubicomp application in a real-world context, followed by an evaluation that covers the participants understanding, experience and attitude with regard to the application. Marionette Prototyping is inspired by puppetry, especially the styles where the manipulator is in plain view. It combines principles from cardboard prototyping and Wizard-of-Oz and uses off-the-shelf tools and technology.

    We have used Marionette Prototyping in the evaluation of a ubicomp application. This evaluation has shown that Marionette Prototyping provides input on the understanding, experience and attitude of the user with regard to the ubicomp application in question. From this first step, we can continue to develop this method as a technique for early, in context evaluation of ubicomp applications. In this, Marionette Prototyping can overcome some of the issues with current evaluation methods for ubicomp applications 

  • 15.
    Overkamp, Tim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Technology Jams to bring new meaning to Human- Computer Interactions2014In: NORDICHI 2014 Workshop Innovation in HCI: What Can We Learn from Design Thinking / [ed] Alma Leora Culén and Asbjørn Følstad, Oslo: Universitetet i Oslo , 2014, p. 31-34Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we introduce Technology Jams as a platform for exploring how novel technologies, when introduced in a specific context, can open up possibilities for radical innovations that change the relationships between people and products or services.

    The concept of Technology Jams is based on elements from design thinking and so-called Jams. The platform that Technology Jams create, aims to support cooperation as well as exchange of knowledge and ideas between people from different backgrounds. Through rapid prototyping and user involvement in evaluation, these ideas can be tested and explored. This way, Technology Jams provide a more hands-on approach for sparking radical innovation of products and/or services within the field of Human-Computer Interaction.

    We provide a detailed description of the setup of Technology Jams and present the content and outcomes of a pilot Technology Jam. Based on these results, complemented with other questions and challenges, we sketch possible ways for further development of the concept of Technology Jams.

1 - 15 of 15
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