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  • 1.
    Nair, Vishnu K. K.
    et al.
    Univ Reading, England.
    Clark, Grace T.
    NYU, NY USA.
    Siyambalapitiya, Samantha
    Griffith Univ, Australia.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för sinnesorgan och kommunikation. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Language intervention in bilingual children with developmental language disorder: A systematic review2023Ingår i: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 58, nr 2, s. 576-600Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAlthough there is a growing body of literature on cognitive and language processing in bilingual children with developmental language disorder (DLD), there is a major gap in the evidence for language intervention. Critically, speech-language therapists are often required to make clinical decisions for language intervention on specific domains, such as phonology, vocabulary, morphosyntax and literacy. AimsTo examine evidence for language intervention and cross-language transfer effects in bilingual children with DLD. Specifically, the study aimed to review intervention evidence targeting non-linguistic cognitive skills and six areas of language: phonology, vocabulary, morphosyntax, pragmatics, narrative skills and literacy. Methods & ProceduresWe carried out searches in five electronic databases: CINAHL, Scopus, Psychinfo, Proquest and Sciencedirect. Data from selected papers were extracted and organized into the three following categories: study information, participant information and intervention information. Critical appraisal for selected papers was conducted using a quality assessment tool (QAT). Outcomes & ResultsWe included 14 papers in the review. The majority indicated evidence for vocabulary intervention. There was limited evidence for intervention targeting phonology or morphosyntax. Cross-language generalization effects were evident for vocabulary, but in some instances also reported for morphosyntax and literacy. Conclusions & ImplicationsThe present review indicates that there is a significant gap in the literature regarding language intervention for several key language areas such as morphosyntax, narrative skills and literacy. There are only limited data for the effects of cross-language generalization indicating that more research is needed in this area specifically for skills beyond vocabulary. What this paper addsWhat is already known on the subjectPrevious studies have examined the effects of bi- and monolingual intervention in bilingual children with DLD. Although the results indicated superior effects for bilingual compared with monolingual intervention, language intervention evidence in specific language domains (e.g., vocabulary, literacy) has not been investigated. What this paper adds to existing knowledgeThis study will add intervention evidence specific to language domains such as phonology, vocabulary, morphosyntax, pragmatics, narrative skills and literacy. Additionally, we have synthesized intervention evidence on non-linguistic cognition given that these skills are often impaired in bilingual children with DLD. The review has also demonstrated evidence for the effects of cross-language transfer beyond vocabulary skills, especially when the intervention was provided in the home language. What are the potential or actual clinical implications of this work?Although there was a lack of intervention evidence in language domains such as pragmatics, the results indicated some evidence for intervention targeting vocabulary. However, positive effects of cross-language generalization were not constrained to vocabulary but were also reported for intervention targeting mean length of utterance and literacy in the home language. This result indicates an interactive nature of the two languages, as well as provides further evidence for supporting home language(s) in intervention. Finally, intervention targeting non-linguistic cognition may yield additional cross-domain generalization to language skills specifically for bilingual children with DLD.

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  • 2.
    Clark, Grace T.
    et al.
    NYU, NY 10012 USA.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för biomedicinska och kliniska vetenskaper, Avdelningen för sinnesorgan och kommunikation. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Word Learning With Orthographic Support in Nonspeaking and Minimally Speaking School-Age Autistic Children2023Ingår i: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 66, nr 6, s. 2047-2063Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Previous research has demonstrated that typically developing children, verbal children with a diagnosis of autism, children with Down syndrome, children with developmental language disorder, and children with dyslexia can all benefit from orthographic support during word learning tasks. This study sought to determine if minimally speaking or nonspeaking children with a diagnosis of autism would also demonstrate an orthographic facilitation effect during a computer-based remote word learning task. Method: Twenty-two school-age children with a diagnosis of autism and little to no spoken language learned four novel words by contrasting the words with known objects. Two novel words were taught with orthographic support present, and two were taught without orthographic support. Participants were exposed to the words a total of 12 times and then given an immediate posttest to assess identification. Parent report measures of receptive vocabulary, expressive vocabulary, autism symptomatology, and reading skills were also collected. Results: During learning tasks, participants performed equally well whether orthographic support was given or not. For the posttest, however, participants performed significantly better for words that were taught with orthographic support. The presence of orthography improved accuracy and supported a greater number of participants to reach the passing criterion compared to the absence of orthography. Orthographic representations aided the word learning of those with lower expressive language significantly more than those with higher expressive language. Conclusions: Minimally speaking or nonspeaking children with a diagnosis of autism benefit from orthographic support when learning new words. Further investigation is warranted to determine if this effect holds during face-to-face interactions using augmentative and alternative communication systems.

  • 3.
    Siyambalapitiya, Samantha
    et al.
    Griffith Univ, Australia; Griffith Univ, Australia.
    Paynter, Jessica
    Griffith Univ, Australia; Griffith Univ, Australia.
    Nair, Vishnu K. K.
    West Virginia Univ, WV 26506 USA.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    NYU, NY USA.
    Tucker, Madonna
    AEIOU Fdn, Australia.
    Trembath, David
    Griffith Univ, Australia.
    Longitudinal Social and Communication Outcomes in Children with Autism Raised in Bi/Multilingual Environments2022Ingår i: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 52, nr 1, s. 339-348Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally, there are more bilingual speakers than monolingual speakers; however, scant research evidence exists regarding social communication development and outcomes for bilingual children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A stronger evidence base will facilitate health professionals and educators providing accurate recommendations regarding language use. This study employed a longitudinal cohort design to compare social and communication skills, at baseline and over 12 months, for 60 monolingual and 60 bilingual children with ASD receiving community based early intervention. We found few differences at intake, and no difference in the magnitude of change over 12 months for this cohort. Findings support the notion that there is no basis on which to discourage home language use with bilingual children with ASD.

  • 4.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    et al.
    NYU, NY 10003 USA.
    Hallin, Anna Eva
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nair, Vishnu K. K.
    West Virginia Univ, WV 26506 USA.
    Hansson, Kristina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Morphosyntactic Challenges for Swedish-Speaking Children with Developmental Language Disorder in Comparison with L1 and L2 Peers2021Ingår i: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 42, nr 4, s. 720-739Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an overview of the research on morpho-syntactic challenges in Swedish-speaking children with developmental language disorder (DLD), compared with typically developing (TD) children learning Swedish as their first and second language (L1/L2). Children with DLD show vulnerabilities with verb finiteness, the possessive construction, and noun phrase gender agreement, as well as word-order in nonsubject initiated sentences. For L2-learners, word order and the noun phrase gender agreement present main challenges. We discuss to what extent these morpho-syntactic weaknesses can be explained by different theoretical accounts and identify future research needs. Surface similarities between groups may originate from different factors and more knowledge is needed to inform educational and clinical practice for both of these groups of children.

  • 5.
    Clark, Grace T
    et al.
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, NY. USA.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, NY. USA.
    Orthographic Support for Word Learning in Clinical Populations: A Systematic Review.2021Ingår i: Language, speech & hearing services in schools, ISSN 0161-1461, E-ISSN 1558-9129, Vol. 52, nr 3, s. 937-948Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose A systematic review was performed to determine the extent to which orthographic facilitation, a strategy to improve word learning, has been demonstrated in the literature for children and adolescents from clinical categories such as developmental language disorders (DLD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), Down syndrome, dyslexia, hearing impairment, intellectual disability, and cerebral palsy.

    Method Five databases were searched for all studies published through December 2019. Eligible studies included participants from a clinical population (DLD, ASD, dyslexia, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, hearing impairment, etc.) and compared word learning with and without orthography. Selected studies were extracted for pertinent information. In addition, assessment of the methodological rigor was performed for each study.

    Results The review yielded five studies that targeted word learning with orthographic facilitation for children from various clinical populations including DLD, verbal children with autism, Down syndrome, and dyslexia. All studied populations showed a benefit for word learning in picture naming posttests when words were trained in the presence of orthography.

    Conclusions For the studied populations, training words in the presence of orthography will improve word learning accuracy and retention. The review highlights the need for more research in this area across other clinical populations.

    Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.14632791.

  • 6.
    Moses, Nelson
    et al.
    Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus, USA.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    New York University, USA.
    Klein, Harriet B.
    New York University, USA.
    Language Sampling And Semantics In Dynamic assessment: Value, Biases, Solutions2020Ingår i: Journal of the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing, E-ISSN 1943-4316, nr 3, s. 98-100Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 7.
    Jing, Linye
    et al.
    NYU, NY 10003 USA.
    Vermeire, Katrien
    Long Isl Univ, NY USA.
    Mangino, Andrea
    Northwell Hlth, NY USA.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    NYU, NY 10003 USA.
    Rhyme Awareness in Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Cochlear Implants: An Exploratory Study2019Ingår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, artikel-id 2072Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Phonological awareness is a critical component of phonological processing that predicts childrens literacy outcomes. Phonological awareness skills enable children to think about the sound structure of words and facilitates decoding and the analysis of words during spelling. Past research has shown that childrens vocabulary knowledge and working memory capacity are associated with their phonological awareness skills. Linguistic characteristics of words, such as phonological neighborhood density and orthography congruency have also been found to influence childrens performance in phonological awareness tasks. Literacy is a difficult area for deaf and hard of hearing children, who have poor phonological awareness skills. Although cochlear implantation (CI) has been found to improve these childrens speech and language outcomes, limited research has investigated phonological awareness in children with Cl. Rhyme awareness is the first level of phonological awareness to develop in children with normal hearing (NH). The current study investigates whether rhyme awareness in children with NH (n = 15, median age = 5; 5, IQR = 11 ms) and a small group of children with CI (n = 6, median age = 6; 11.5, IQR = 3.75 ms) is associated with individual differences in vocabulary and working memory. Using a rhyme oddity task, well-controlled for perceptual similarity, we also explored whether childrens performance was associated with linguistic characteristics of the task items (e.g., rhyme neighborhood density, orthographic congruency). Results indicate that there is an association between vocabulary and working memory and performance in a rhyme awareness task in NH children. Only working memory was correlated with rhyme awareness performance in CI children. Linguistic characteristics of the task items, on the other hand, were not found to be associated with success. Implications of the results and future directions are discussed.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Hallin, Anna Eva
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    NYU, NY 10003 USA.
    Effects of frequency and morphosyntactic structure on error detection, correction, and repetition in Swedish-speaking children2018Ingår i: Applied Psycholinguistics, ISSN 0142-7164, E-ISSN 1469-1817, Vol. 39, nr 6, s. 1189-1220Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Grammatical error detection and correction are often used to test explicit language knowledge. This study investigated effects of token frequency and error type in error detection, correction, and repetition, and performance on the three tasks were compared and related to models of metalinguistic awareness and development. Thirty Swedish-speaking 10-year-olds with typical language development participated in the study, which focused on four morphosyntactic errors: the infinitive instead of past tense for regular and irregular verbs, and the omission of the obligatory indefinite article in common and neuter gender noun phrases. Target verbs and nouns were of high or low frequency. Results showed significant effects of verb frequency in all tasks, and effects of noun gender for error detection, but not for correction and repetition. Children detected significantly more past-tense errors than they accurately corrected, but the opposite result was seen for noun phrase errors. The patterns of results both within and across tasks imply that implicit language knowledge affects performance, and that lexical frequency, even of familiar words, needs to be controlled when designing tasks for measuring grammatical knowledge. The particular challenge of the Swedish neuter noun phrase in language development and language processing needs to be further investigated.

  • 9.
    Hallin, Anna Eva
    et al.
    NYU, NY 10003 USA; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    NYU, NY 10003 USA.
    Error Type and Lexical Frequency Effects: Error Detection in Swedish Children With Language Impairment2017Ingår i: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 60, nr 10, s. 2924-2934Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The first aim of this study was to investigate if Swedish-speaking school-age children with language impairment (LI) show specific morphosyntactic vulnerabilities in error detection. The second aim was to investigate the effects of lexical frequency on error detection, an overlooked aspect of previous error detection studies. Method: Error sensitivity for grammatical structures vulnerable in Swedish-speaking preschool children with LI (omission of the indefinite article in a noun phrase with a neuter/common noun, and use of the infinitive instead of past-tense regular and irregular verbs) was compared to a control error (singular noun instead of plural). Target structures involved a high-frequency (HF) or a low-frequency (LF) noun/verb. Grammatical and ungrammatical sentences were presented in headphones, and responses were collected through button presses. Results: Children with LI had similar sensitivity to the plural control error as peers with typical language development, but lower sensitivity to past-tense errors and noun phrase errors. All children showed lexical frequency effects for errors involving verbs (HF > LF), and noun gender effects for noun phrase errors (common > neuter). Conclusions: School-age children with LI may have subtle difficulties with morphosyntactic processing that mirror expressive difficulties in preschool children with LI. Lexical frequency may affect morphosyntactic processing, which has clinical implications for assessment of grammatical knowledge.

  • 10.
    Van Den Heuvel, Ellen
    et al.
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    NYU, NY USA.
    Solot, Cynthia
    Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Manders, Eric
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Swillen, Ann
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Belgium; Univ Hosp Leuven, Belgium.
    Zink, Inge
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Belgium; Univ Hosp Leuven, Belgium.
    Referential communication abilities in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome2017Ingår i: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, ISSN 1754-9507, E-ISSN 1754-9515, Vol. 19, nr 5, s. 490-502Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study describes the performance on a perspective- and role-taking task in 27 children, ages 6-13years, with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). A cross-cultural design comparing Dutch- and English-speaking children with 22q11.2DS explored the possibility of cultural differences. Method: Chronologically age-matched and younger typically developing (TD) children matched for receptive vocabulary served as control groups to identify challenges in referential communication. Results: The utterances of children with 22q11.2DS were characterised as short and simple in lexical and grammatical terms. However, from a language use perspective, their utterances were verbose, ambiguous and irrelevant given the pictured scenes. They tended to elaborate on visual details and conveyed off-topic, extraneous information when participating in a barrier-game procedure. Both types of aberrant utterances forced a listener to consistently infer the intended message. Moreover, children with 22q11.2DS demonstrated difficulty selecting correct speech acts in accordance with contextual cues during a role-taking task. Conclusion: Both English- and Dutch-speaking children with 22q11.2DS showed impoverished information transfer and an increased number of elaborations, suggesting a cross-cultural syndrome-specific feature.

  • 11.
    Hallin, Anna Eva
    et al.
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, 665 Broadway, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10012, USA.
    Garcia, Gabrielle D.
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, 70 Arts Circle Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, USA;Department of Psychology, New York University Abu Dhabi, P.O. Box 129188, Saadiyat Island, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, 665 Broadway, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10012, USA.
    The Use of Causal Language and Filled Pauses in Children with and without Autism2016Ingår i: Child Development Research, ISSN 2090-3987, E-ISSN 2090-3995, Vol. 2016, s. 1-11, artikel-id 8535868Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the relationship between pragmatic ability and two aspects of structural language in conversational language samples from 24 school-age children with and without high-functioning autism (HFA): causal statements and speech disruptions. In contrast to a majority of previous studies, grammatical complexity and mean length of utterance were factored into the analyses, since these are potential confounding variables. The results showed that children with HFA used fewer spontaneous causal statements and fewer filled pauses in conversation compared to children with typical development (TD). There was also a significant and positive relationship between filled pauses and pragmatic ability after controlling for structural language ability. The results may help us understand the conversational patterns of children with HFA better.

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  • 12.
    Reuterskiöld, Christina
    et al.
    New York University, Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York, USA.
    Hansson, Kristina
    Lund University, Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Narrative skills in Swedish children with language impairment.2011Ingår i: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 44, nr 6, s. 733-44Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the development of narrative skills in Swedish children with language impairment between age 5 and age 10. Seventeen children with LI and two control groups of age peers with typical development participated in a picture elicited story telling task. Analyses included measures of story content, cohesion and grammar. Our subjects showed development in different areas from age 5 to 10, but they did not perform at the level of the controls at age 10 on number of different verbs used and percent grammatically correct C-units. We conclude that preschool children with LI develop in their narrative skills over time, but not to the level of their age-peers at age 10.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES: The reader will be able to describe areas of vulnerability in Swedish-speaking children with language impairment in general, and related to narration in particular. Furthermore, the reader will be able to describe similarities in narrative skills between Swedish-speaking and English-speaking children with language impairment.

  • 13.
    Reuterskiöld Wagner, Christina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Kommunikation. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Logopedics and Phoniatrics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nettelbladt, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Kommunikation. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Logopedics and Phoniatrics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Kommunikation. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Logopedics and Phoniatrics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilholm, Claes
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Kommunikation. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Conversation versus narration in pre-school children with language impairment2000Ingår i: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 35, nr 1, s. 83-93Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study focuses on two elicitation methods for language sampling in children with language impairment: conversion and narration. It has been noted in other studies on different clinical groups that language elicited in different speaking contexts varies in aspects such as MLU, fluency and syntactic complexity. The purpose of this study was to compare genre effects on different aspects of language production in a group of pre-school children with language impairment. The results show that there are differences in language production during conversation compared with narration. Intelligibility and fluency were found to be higher in conversation than in narration, whereas MLU in words was higher in narration. The narrative task elicited more phrasal expansions and grammatical morphemes per utterance than the conversation. However, the children used more complex verb forms in conversation than in narration. The results are discussed in relation to recent research.

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