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  • 1.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Fischer, Marcelo Rivano
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ringqvist, Asa
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Acceptance and Fear-Avoidance Mediate Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Pain Rehabilitation Programs at 12-Month Follow-Up: A Clinical Registry-Based Longitudinal Cohort Study from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP)2024Ingår i: Journal of Pain Research, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 17, s. 83-105Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Factors that influence outcomes of interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation programs (IPRP) are poorly known. It is unclear how outcomes are influenced by pain intensity, psychological distress, and coping strategies.Aim: This clinical registry-based longitudinal cohort study has three aims: 1) to determine the relative importance of pain intensity, psychological distress, acceptance, and fear-avoidance for changes in three outcomes of IPRP at 12-month follow-up; 2) to investigate whether the effects of pain intensity and psychological distress on the three outcomes are mediated via acceptance and fear-avoidance; and 3) to determine whether sex is a moderator.Methods: This study uses Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) from specialist units reporting data (2008-2016) to the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP). Adult chronic pain patients (N = 1991) answered the PROMs (background, pain, psychological distress, coping, participation, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL)). Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM) was used to explore the aims.Results: Changes in acceptance (13:0.424-0.553; all P<0.001) were the strongest predictor of the three outcomes (changes in life control, interference, and HRQoL) at 12-month follow-up. The next strongest predictor was baseline acceptance (13: 0.177-0.233; all P<0.001) and changes in fear-avoidance (13: -0.152- -0.186; all P<0.001). Baseline pain intensity and psychological distress showed weak positive associations. Their effects on the three outcomes were mediated via acceptance aspects. Sex was not a moderator.Discussion and Conclusion: Acceptance aspects (baseline and changes) were important predictors of IPRP outcomes. Changes in fear-avoidance were also important although to a lesser degree. Some of the effects of pain intensity and psychological distress on outcomes were mediated via acceptance at baseline. Future PLS-SEM analysis of real-world IPRP should include more potential mediators (eg, catastrophizing and more facets of psychological flexibility and fear-avoidance) and the components of IPRP.

  • 2.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Brain, Katherine
    Univ Newcastle, Australia; Hunter Integrated Pain Serv, Australia.
    Olsson, Max
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Eating habits and the desire to eat healthier among patients with chronic pain: a registry-based study2024Ingår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 4705Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare professionals often meet pain patients with a poor nutritional status such as obesity, unhealthy dietary behaviors, and a suboptimal dietary intake. A poor nutritional status may play a significant role in the occurrence, development, and prognosis of chronic pain. This study investigated eating habits in a specialized pain rehabilitation center using data (N = 2152) from the Swedish quality registry for pain rehabilitation during the period 2016-2021. Patients answered a lifestyle questionnaire regarding their eating habits and desire to modify their lifestyle. The mean (SD) patient age was 46.1 (14.6) years, with 24.8% classified as obese. Suboptimal eating habits included irregular mealtimes (27.2%), weekly consumption of fast-food (20.3%) and nearly daily consumption of confectionery (33.3%). Approximately 20% (n = 426) reported a desire to eat healthier. Frequent confectionery intake (Odds ratio [OR] 1.23, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.04-1.47) and fast-food consumption (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.24-2.02) increased the likelihood to desire healthier eating. Younger patients (18-29 years), those classified as obese, and those with more extended spatial pain were more likely to express a desire to eat healthier. Eating habits should be addressed in pain management and interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation teams are encouraged to provide nutritional care tailored to the patient's needs.

  • 3.
    Choi, Yujin
    et al.
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Hyeon Jin
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Jaeyu
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Rahmati, Masoud
    Lorestan Univ, Iran; Vali e Asr Univ Rafsanjan, Iran.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA USA.
    Sanchez, Guillermo F. Lopez
    Univ Murcia, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Lee, Jinseok
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Rhee, Sang Youl
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Sunyoung
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lim, Hyunjung
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    National prevalence and trends in food labeling awareness, comprehension, usage, and COVID-19 pandemic-related factors in South Korea, 2014-20222024Ingår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, nr 1, artikel-id 2617Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Although food labeling on food packages is crucial for promoting a healthy diet, limited research has been conducted on how the COVID-19 pandemic (hereinafter "the pandemic") has affected food labeling awareness. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the changes in trends in food labeling awareness, comprehension, and usage in South Korea during the pandemic. We utilized a nationwide, large-scale, and long-term dataset provided by the Korea Community Health Survey (KCHS) from 2014 to 2022 (total = 1,756,847 participants). This allowed the researchers to assess the long-term trends in the prevalence of food labeling awareness, comprehension, and usage. Furthermore, we investigated the factors associated with awareness specifically related to the pandemic. In total, 1,756,847 adults (54.19% women) participated in this study. The upward slope in overall food labeling awareness became less pronounced and even exhibited a downward slope during the pandemic (beta diff - 1.759; 95% CI - 1.874 to - 1.644). The upward slope in food labeling comprehension and usage became more pronounced during the pandemic (comprehension: beta diff 0.535; 95% CI 0.436-0.634; usage: beta diff 0.693; 95% CI 0.601-0.785). The vulnerability factors associated with lower food labeling awareness during the pandemic included older age, male, obesity, residing in rural areas, lower household income, lower educational level, smoking, and increased alcohol consumption. This study analyzed the 9-year trend in the prevalence of food labeling awareness, comprehension, and usage based on nationally representative data of adults in South Korea from 2014 to 2022. Our findings suggest that personalized nutrition strategies are needed to recognize vulnerable groups with risk factors and improve food labeling awareness among Korean adults during the pandemic.

  • 4.
    Lee, Jun Hyuk
    et al.
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea; Univ Southern Calif, CA USA.
    Lee, Myeongcheol
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Hojae
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Jaeyu
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Woo, Selin
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Sunyoung
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Res & Dev Unit, Spain.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Broad Inst & Harvard, MA USA.
    Sanchez, Guillermo F. Lopez
    Univ Murcia, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Rahmati, Masoud
    Univ Ioannina, Greece; Lorestan Univ, Iran.
    Fond, Guillaume
    Aix Marseille Univ, France; Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Boyer, Laurent
    Vali Easr Univ Rafsanjan, Iran; Aix Marseille Univ, France; Aix Marseille Univ, France; Aix Marseille Univ, France; Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea; Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    National trends in sleep sufficiency and sleep time among adolescents, including the late-COVID-19 pandemic, 2009-2022: A nationally representative serial study in South Korea2024Ingår i: Asian Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 1876-2018, E-ISSN 1876-2026, Vol. 93, artikel-id 103911Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 5.
    Choi, Hangnyoung
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Jae Han
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Yang, Hee Sang
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Jong Yeob
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England; NYU, NY USA; Univ Bari Aldo Moro, Italy.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Parc Sanitari St Joan Deu, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Pavia, Italy; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; Ludwig Maximilian Univ Munich, Germany.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ Hlth Syst, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Cheon, Keun-Ah
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Charite, Germany.
    Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for irritability in autism spectrum disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis with the GRADE assessment2024Ingår i: Molecular Autism, ISSN 2040-2392, Vol. 15, nr 1, artikel-id 7Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundNumerous interventions for irritability in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been investigated. We aimed to appraise the magnitude of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for irritability in ASD without any restrictions in terms of eligible interventions.MethodsWe systematically searched PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science until April 15, 2023. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with a parallel design that examined the efficacy of interventions for the treatment of irritability in patients of any age with ASD without any restrictions in terms of eligible interventions. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis by pooling effect sizes as Hedges' g. We classified assessed interventions as follows: pharmacological monotherapy, risperidone plus adjuvant therapy versus risperidone monotherapy, non-pharmacological intervention, and dietary intervention. We utilized the Cochrane tool to evaluate the risk of bias in each study and the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of evidence for each meta-analyzed intervention.ResultsOut of 5640 references, we identified 60 eligible articles with 45 different kinds of interventions, including 3531 participants, of which 80.9% were males (mean age [SD] = 8.79 [3.85]). For pharmacological monotherapy, risperidone (Hedges' g - 0.857, 95% CI - 1.263 to - 0.451, certainty of evidence: high) and aripiprazole (Hedges' g - 0.559, 95% CI - 0.767 to - 0.351, certainty of evidence: high) outperformed placebo. Among the non-pharmacological interventions, parent training (Hedges' g - 0.893, 95% CI - 1.184 to - 0.602, certainty of evidence: moderate) showed a significant result. None of the meta-analyzed interventions yielded significant effects among risperidone + adjuvant therapy and dietary supplementation. However, several novel molecules in augmentation to risperidone outperformed risperidone monotherapy, yet from one RCT each.LimitationsFirst, various tools have been utilized to measure the irritability in ASD, which may contribute to the heterogeneity of the outcomes. Second, meta-analyses for each intervention included only a small number of studies and participants.ConclusionsOnly risperidone, aripiprazole among pharmacological interventions, and parent training among non-pharmacological interventions can be recommended for irritability in ASD. As an augmentation to risperidone, several novel treatments show promising effects, but further RCTs are needed to replicate findings.Trial registration PROSPERO, CRD42021243965.ConclusionsOnly risperidone, aripiprazole among pharmacological interventions, and parent training among non-pharmacological interventions can be recommended for irritability in ASD. As an augmentation to risperidone, several novel treatments show promising effects, but further RCTs are needed to replicate findings.Trial registration PROSPERO, CRD42021243965.

  • 6.
    Fabiano, Nicholas
    et al.
    Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Gupta, Arnav
    Univ Calgary, Canada; Kent State Univ, OH 44242 USA.
    Wong, Stanley
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Tran, Jason
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Mohammad, Ibrahim Y. Z.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Bal, Shan
    McMaster Univ, Canada.
    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada.
    Firth, Joseph
    Univ Manchester, England; Greater Manchester Mental Hlth NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Stubbs, Brendon
    EXI, England; Kings Coll London, England.
    Vancampfort, Davy
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Schuch, Felipe B.
    Univ Fed Santa Maria, Brazil; Univ Autonoma Chile, Chile; Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Carr, Lucas J.
    Univ Iowa, IA USA.
    Shorr, Risa
    Ottawa Hosp, Canada.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England.
    Manchia, Mirko
    Univ Cagliari, Italy; Univ Hosp Agcy Cagliari, Italy; Dalhousie Univ, Canada.
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Hoye, Anne
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway; Univ Hosp North Norway, Norway.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Pavia, Italy; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    CIBERSAM, Spain; Catalan Inst Res & Adv Studies, Spain; Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Mental, Spain.
    Vieta, Eduard
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Nielsen, Rene Ernst
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Denmark; Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Holt, Richard I. G.
    Univ Southampton, England; Univ Hosp Southampton NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Correll, Christoph U.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany; Northwell Hlth, NY USA; Hofstra Northwell, NY USA.
    Du Rietz, Ebba
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Taipale, Heidi
    Univ Eastern Finland, Finland; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lehto, Kelli
    Univ Tartu, Estonia.
    Larrson, Henrik
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Nordentoft, Merete
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Skonieczna-Zydecka, Karolina
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Physical activity, suicidal ideation, suicide attempt and death among individuals with mental or other medical disorders: A systematic review of observational studies2024Ingår i: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, ISSN 0149-7634, E-ISSN 1873-7528, Vol. 158, artikel-id 105547Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing body of research has demonstrated the potential role for physical activity as an intervention across mental and other medical disorders. However, the association between physical activity and suicidal ideation, attempts, and deaths has not been systematically appraised in clinical samples. We conducted a PRISMA 2020compliant systematic review searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO for observational studies investigating the influence of physical activity on suicidal behavior up to December 6, 2023. Of 116 eligible full -text studies, seven (n = 141691) were included. Depression was the most frequently studied mental condition (43%, k = 3), followed by chronic pain as the most common other medical condition (29%, k = 2). Two case -control studies examined suicide attempts and found an association between physical activity and a reduced frequency of such attempts. However, in studies examining suicidal ideation (k = 3) or suicide deaths (k = 2), no consistent associations with physical activity were observed. Overall, our systematic review found that physical activity may be linked to a lower frequency of suicide attempts in non -prospective studies involving individuals with mental disorders.

  • 7.
    Stamou, Paraskevi
    et al.
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Tsartsalis, Dimitrios
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Papathanakos, Georgios
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Gouva, Mary
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Koulouras, Vasilios
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Agreement between Family Members and the Physicians View in the ICU Environment: Personal Experience as a Factor Influencing Attitudes towards Corresponding Hypothetical Situations2023Ingår i: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 11, nr 3, artikel-id 345Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is not known whether intensive care unit (ICU) patients family members realistically assess patients health status. Objectives: The aim was to investigate the agreement between family and intensivists assessment concerning changes in patient health, focusing on family members resilience and their perceptions of decision making. Methods: For each ICU patient, withdrawal criteria were assessed by intensivists while family members assessed the patients health development and completed the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and the Self-Compassion Scale. Six months after ICU discharge, follow-up contact was established, and family members gave their responses to two hypothetical scenarios. Results: 162 ICU patients and 189 family members were recruited. Intensivists decisions about whether a patient met the withdrawal criteria had 75,9% accuracy for prediction of survival. Families assessments were statistically independent of intensivists opinions, and resilience had a significant positive effect on the probability of agreement with intensivists. Six months after discharge, family members whose relatives were still alive were significantly more likely to consider that the family or patient themselves should be involved in decision-making. Conclusions: Resilience is related to an enhanced probability of agreement of the family with intensivists perceptions of patients health progression. Family attitudes in hypothetical scenarios were found to be significantly affected by the patients actual health progression.

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  • 8.
    Biazus, Tais Boeira
    et al.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Beraldi, Gabriel Henrique
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Tokeshi, Lucas
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Rotenberg, Luisa de Siqueira
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Charite, Germany.
    Lafer, Beny
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    All-cause and cause-specific mortality among people with bipolar disorder: a large-scale systematic review and meta-analysis2023Ingår i: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 28, nr 6, s. 2508-2524Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveBipolar disorder (BD) is associated with premature mortality. All-cause and specific mortality risks in this population remain unclear, and more studies are still needed to further understand this issue and guide individual and public strategies to prevent mortality in bipolar disorder Thus, a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing mortality risk in people with BD versus the general population was conducted. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality, whilst secondary outcomes were mortality due to suicide, natural, unnatural, and specific-causes mortality.ResultsFifty-seven studies were included (BD; n = 678,353). All-cause mortality was increased in people with BD (RR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.89-2.16, k = 39). Specific-cause mortality was highest for suicide (RR = 11.69, 95% CI: 9.22-14.81, k = 25). Risk of death due to unnatural causes (RR = 7.29, 95% CI: 6.41-8.28, k = 17) and natural causes (RR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.75-2.06, k = 17) were also increased. Among specific natural causes analyzed, infectious causes had the higher RR (RR = 4,38, 95%CI: 1.5-12.69, k = 3), but the analysis was limited by the inclusion of few studies. Mortality risk due to respiratory (RR = 3.18, 95% CI: 2.55-3.96, k = 6), cardiovascular (RR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.53-2.01, k = 27), and cerebrovascular (RR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.34-1.84, k = 13) causes were increased as well. No difference was identified in mortality by cancer (RR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.88-1.11, k = 16). Subgroup analyses and meta-regression did not affect the findings.ConclusionResults presented in this meta-analysis show that risk of premature death in BD is not only due to suicide and unnatural causes, but somatic comorbidities are also implicated. Not only the prevention of suicide, but also the promotion of physical health and the prevention of physical conditions in individuals with BD may mitigate the premature mortality in this population. Notwithstanding this is to our knowledge the largest synthesis of evidence on BD-related mortality, further well-designed studies are still warranted to inform this field.

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  • 9.
    Solmi, Marco
    et al.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany; Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England; NYU, NY USA; Univ Nottingham, England; Univ Bari Aldo Moro, Italy.
    Vita, Giovanni
    Univ Verona, Italy.
    De Prisco, Michele
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Spain; Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS, Spain; Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Kohler-Forsberg, Ole
    Aarhus Univ Hosp Psychiat, Denmark; Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Madsen, Nanna M.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp Psychiat, Denmark; Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Rohde, Christopher
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark; Aarhus Univ Hosp Psychiat, Denmark.
    Eudave, Luis
    Univ Navarra, Spain.
    Aymerich, Claudia
    Univ Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Pedruzo, Borja
    Basurto Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Rodriguez, Victoria
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Rosson, Stella
    Local Hlth Unit ULSS3 Serenissima, Italy.
    Sabe, Michel
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Switzerland.
    Hojlund, Mikkel
    Reg Southern Denmark, Denmark; Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark; Capital Reg Denmark, Denmark.
    Catalan, Ana
    Univ Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    de Luca, Beatrice
    Univ Verona, Italy.
    Fornaro, Michele
    Federico II Naples, Italy.
    Ostuzzi, Giovanni
    Univ Verona, Italy.
    Barbui, Corrado
    Univ Verona, Italy.
    Salazar-de-Pablo, Gonzalo
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Complutense, Spain.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Pavia, Italy; NHS South London & Maudsley Fdn Trust, England; Ludwig Maximilian Univ Munich, Germany.
    Correll, Christoph U.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany; Northwell Hlth, NY 10011 USA; Donald & Barbara Zucker Sch Med Hofstra Northwell, NY 11549 USA; Feinstein Inst Med Res, NY 11030 USA.
    An umbrella review of candidate predictors of response, remission, recovery, and relapse across mental disorders2023Ingår i: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 28, s. 3671-3687Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We aimed to identify diagnosis-specific/transdiagnostic/transoutcome multivariable candidate predictors (MCPs) of key outcomes in mental disorders. We conducted an umbrella review (protocol link), searching MEDLINE/Embase (19/07/2022), including systematic reviews of studies reporting on MCPs of response, remission, recovery, or relapse, in DSM/ICD-defined mental disorders. From published predictors, we filtered MCPs, validating MCP criteria. AMSTAR2/PROBAST measured quality/risk of bias of systematic reviews/individual studies. We included 117 systematic reviews, 403 studies, 299,888 individuals with mental disorders, testing 796 prediction models. Only 4.3%/1.2% of the systematic reviews/individual studies were at low risk of bias. The most frequently targeted outcome was remission (36.9%), the least frequent was recovery (2.5%). Studies mainly focused on depressive (39.4%), substance-use (17.9%), and schizophrenia-spectrum (11.9%) disorders. We identified numerous MCPs within disorders for response, remission and relapse, but none for recovery. Transdiagnostic MCPs of remission included lower disease-specific symptoms (disorders = 5), female sex/higher education (disorders = 3), and quality of life/functioning (disorders = 2). Transdiagnostic MCPs of relapse included higher disease-specific symptoms (disorders = 5), higher depressive symptoms (disorders = 3), and younger age/higher anxiety symptoms/global illness severity/ number of previous episodes/negative life events (disorders = 2). Finally, positive trans-outcome MCPs for depression included less negative life events/depressive symptoms (response, remission, less relapse), female sex (response, remission) and better functioning (response, less relapse); for schizophrenia, less positive symptoms/higher depressive symptoms (remission, less relapse); for substance use disorder, marital status/higher education (remission, less relapse). Male sex, younger age, more clinical symptoms and comorbid mental/physical symptoms/disorders were poor prognostic factors, while positive factors included social contacts and employment, absent negative life events, higher education, early access/intervention, lower disease-specific and comorbid mental and physical symptoms/conditions, across mental disorders. Current data limitations include high risk of bias of studies and extraction of single predictors from multivariable models. Identified MCPs can inform future development, validation or refinement of prediction models of key outcomes in mental disorders.

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  • 10.
    Solmi, Marco
    et al.
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Kings Coll London, England; Univ Southampton, England; NHS Trust, England; Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    De Toffol, Marco
    ASL Lecce, Italy.
    Kim, Jong Yeob
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Choi, Min Je
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Stubbs, Brendon
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Thompson, Trevor
    Univ Greenwich, England.
    Firth, Joseph
    Univ Manchester, England; Greater Manchester Mental Hlth NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Miola, Alessandro
    Univ Padua, Italy.
    Croatto, Giovanni
    AULSS 3 Serenissima, Italy.
    Baggio, Francesca
    AULSS 3 Serenissima, Italy.
    Michelon, Silvia
    AULSS 7 Pedemontana Veneto, Italy.
    Ballan, Luca
    AULSS 7 Pedemontana Veneto, Italy.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Monaco, Francesco
    Asl Salerno, Italy; European Biomed Res Inst Salerno, Italy.
    Simonato, Pierluigi
    Univ Hertfordshire, England; ULSS 6 Euganea, Italy.
    Scocco, Paolo
    ULSS 6 Euganea, Italy.
    Ricca, Valdo
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Castellini, Giovanni
    Univ Florence, Italy.
    Fornaro, Michele
    Univ Sch Med Federico II, Italy.
    Murru, Andrea
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Vieta, Eduard
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Pavia, Italy.
    Barbui, Corrado
    Univ Verona, Italy.
    Ioannidis, John P. A.
    Stanford Univ, CA USA; Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany; Stanford Univ, CA USA; Stanford Univ, CA USA; Stanford Univ, CA USA; Stanford Univ, CA USA.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Correll, Christoph U.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany; Zucker Hillside Hosp, NY USA; Donald & Barbara Zucker Sch Med Hofstra Northwell, NY USA.
    Cortese, Samuel
    Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England; Univ Nottingham, England; NYU, NY USA.
    Murray, Robin M.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Castle, David
    Univ Tasmania, Australia; Ctr Mental Hlth Serv Innovat, Australia.
    Il Shin, Jae
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Balancing risks and benefits of cannabis use: umbrella review of meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials and observational studies2023Ingår i: BMJ. British Medical Journal, ISSN 0959-8146, E-ISSN 0959-535X, Vol. 382, artikel-id e072348Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE To systematically assess credibility and certainty of associations between cannabis, cannabinoids, and cannabis based medicines and human health, from observational studies and randomised controlled trials (RCTs). DESIGN Umbrella review. DATA SOURCES PubMed, PsychInfo, Embase, up to 9 February 2022. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING STUDIES Systematic reviews with meta-analyses of observational studies and RCTs that have reported on the efficacy and safety of cannabis, cannabinoids, or cannabis based medicines were included. Credibility was graded according to convincing, highly suggestive, suggestive, weak, or not significant (observational evidence), and by GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations) (RCTs). Quality was assessed with AMSTAR 2 (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews 2). Sensitivity analyses were conducted. RESULTS 101 meta-analyses were included (observational=50, RCTs=51) (AMSTAR 2 high 33, moderate 31, low 32, or critically low 5). From RCTs supported by high to moderate certainty, cannabis based medicines increased adverse events related to the central nervous system (equivalent odds ratio 2.84 (95% confidence interval 2.16 to 3.73)), psychological effects (3.07 (1.79 to 5.26)), and vision (3.00 (1.79 5.03)) in people with mixed conditions (GRADE=high), improved nausea/vomit, pain, spasticity, but increased psychiatric, gastrointestinal adverse event, and somnolence among others (GRADE=moderate). Cannabidiol improved 50% reduction of seizures (0.59 (0.38 to 0.92)) and seizure events (0.59 (0.36 to 0.96)) (GRADE=high), but increased pneumonia, gastrointestinal adverse events, and somnolence (GRADE=moderate). For chronic pain, cannabis based medicines or cannabinoids reduced pain by 30% (0.59 (0.37 to 0.93), GRADE=high), across different conditions (n=7), but increased psychological distress. For epilepsy, cannabidiol increased risk of diarrhoea (2.25 (1.33 to 3.81)), had no effect on sleep disruption (GRADE=high), reduced seizures across different populations and measures (n=7), improved global impression (n=2), quality of life, and increased risk of somnolence (GRADE=moderate). In the general population, cannabis worsened positive psychotic symptoms (5.21 (3.36 to 8.01)) and total psychiatric symptoms (7.49 (5.31 to 10.42)) (GRADE=high), negative psychotic symptoms, and cognition (n=11) (GRADE=moderate). In healthy people, cannabinoids improved pain threshold (0.74 (0.59 to 0.91)), unpleasantness (0.60 (0.41 to 0.88)) (GRADE=high). For inflammatory bowel disease, cannabinoids improved quality of life (0.34 (0.22 to 0.53) (GRADE=high). For multiple sclerosis, cannabinoids improved spasticity, pain, but increased risk of dizziness, dry mouth, nausea, somnolence (GRADE=moderate). For cancer, cannabinoids improved sleep disruption, but had gastrointestinal adverse events (n=2) (GRADE=moderate). Cannabis based medicines, cannabis, and cannabinoids resulted in poor tolerability across various conditions (GRADE=moderate). Evidence was convincing from observational studies (main and sensitivity analyses); in pregnant women, small for gestational age (1.61 (1.41 to 1.83)), low birth weight (1.43 (1.27 to 1.62)); in drivers, car crash (1.27 (1.21 to 1.34)); and in the general population, psychosis (1.71 (1.47 to 2.00)). Harmful effects were noted for additional neonatal outcomes, outcomes related to car crash, outcomes in the general population including psychotic symptoms, suicide attempt, depression, and mania, and impaired cognition in healthy cannabis users (all suggestive to highly suggestive). CONCLUSIONS Convincing or converging evidence supports avoidance of cannabis during adolescence and early adulthood, in people prone to or with mental health disorders, in pregnancy and before and while driving. Cannabidiol is effective in people with epilepsy. Cannabis based medicines are effective in people with multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, inflammatory bowel disease, and in palliative medicine, but not without adverse events.

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  • 11.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Rivano Fischer, Marcelo
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Ringqvist, Asa
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Catastrophizing and acceptance are mediators between insomnia and pain intensity-an SQRP study of more than 6,400 patients with non-malignant chronic pain conditions2023Ingår i: FRONTIERS IN PAIN RESEARCH, ISSN 2673-561X, Vol. 4, artikel-id 1244606Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundSleep problems (insomnia) and chronic pain are associated. Chronic pain and insomnia/insufficient sleep quality share similar symptoms and features. Although they have a bidirectional relationship, more research is needed to understand how they interact via mediators and how moderators influence this relationship.AimsIn this large clinical registry-based cohort study (N = 6,497), we investigate important mediators between insomnia and pain intensity in a cross-sectional sample of chronic pain patients using advanced path analysis. In addition, we investigate whether some background variables were moderators of the identified important paths or not and the correlation patterns between insomnia and pain intensity in relation to the mediators.MethodsThis study includes a cohort of adult patients with chronic non-cancer pain from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP) with data on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) (2008-2016). The PROMs cover the background, pain aspects, psychological distress, pain-related cognitions, activity/participation, and health-related quality of life variables of the patients. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to explore the direct and indirect (via mediators) relationships between insomnia and pain intensity at baseline.ResultsIn this cohort study, insomnia was prevalent at 62.3%, and both direct and indirect mediating paths were present for the insomnia-pain intensity relationship. All of the mediating effects combined were weaker than the direct effect between insomnia and pain intensity. The mediating effects via catastrophizing and acceptance showed the strongest and equal mediating paths, and mediating effects via fear avoidance were the second strongest. Insomnia showed stronger direct significant correlations with psychological distress, catastrophizing, and acceptance compared with those of pain intensity. Sex, age, education level, spatial extent of pain, or body mass index did not moderate the mediating paths.Discussion and conclusionThis study confirms the existence of significant direct and mediating paths between reported insomnia and pain intensity. Future studies should focus on illuminating how sleep interventions influence pain intensity and other important key factors that contribute to the distress of chronic pain patients.

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  • 12.
    Kim, Min Seo
    et al.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Jae Han
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Ryu, Seohyun
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Eunyoung
    Chung Ang Univ, South Korea.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Shin, Jae
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Comparative efficacy and optimal duration of first-line antibiotic regimens for acute otitis media in children and adolescents: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of 89 randomized clinical trials2023Ingår i: World Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 1708-8569, E-ISSN 1867-0687Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionAntibiotic use for acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the major sources of antimicrobial resistance. However, the effective minimal antibiotic duration for AOM remains unclear. Moreover, guidelines often recommend broad ranges (5-10 days) of antibiotic use, yet the clinical impact of such a wide window has not been assessed.MethodsWe systematically searched PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library from database inception to 6 October 2021. Network meta-analysis was conducted on randomized controlled trials that assessed antibiotic treatment for AOM in children (PROSPERO CRD42020196107).ResultsFor amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanate, 7-day regimens were noninferior to 10-day regimens in clinical responses [amoxicillin: risk ratio (RR) 0.919 (95% CI 0.820-1.031), amoxicillin-clavulanate: RR 1.108 (0.957-1.282)], except for <= 2 years. For the third-generation cephalosporins, 7-day and 10-day regimens had similar clinical responses compared to placebo [7-day: RR 1.420 (1.190-1.694), 10-day: RR 1.238 (1.125-1.362) compared to placebo]. However, 5-day regimens of amoxicillin-clavulanate and third-generation cephalosporins were inferior to 10-day regimens. Compared to amoxicillin, a shorter treatment duration was tolerable with amoxicillin-clavulanate.ConclusionsOur findings indicated that 10 days of antibiotic use may be unnecessarily long, while the treatment duration should be longer than 5 days. Otherwise, 5-day regimens would be sufficient for a modest treatment goal. Our findings revealed that the current wide range of recommended antibiotic durations may have influenced the clinical outcome of AOM, and a narrower antibiotic duration window should be re-established.

  • 13.
    Tatsis, Fotios
    et al.
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Gouva, Mary
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Koulouras, Vasilios
    Univ Hosp Ioannina, Greece.
    Economic Burden of ICU-Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2023Ingår i: Cureus, E-ISSN 2168-8184, Vol. 15, nr 7, artikel-id e41802Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the global economy is far-reaching and difficult to assess accurately. We aimed to systematically determine the magnitude of the costs and the economic burden of intensive care for hospitalized COVID-19 patients since the onset of the pandemic by means of a systematic review. We conducted a PRISMA 2020-compliant (protocol: PROSPERO literature. We included studies that presented costs based on a primary partial economic evaluation. Using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist and the population, intervention, control, and outcome criteria, we established the risk of bias in studies at the individual level. Daily cost per ICU admission and total cost per ICU patient of the original studies extracted. A random effect model was adopted for meta-analysis whenever possible. Of the 1,635 unique records identified, 14 studies related to ICU-hospitalized costs due to COVID-19 were eligible for inclusion. Included studies represented 93,721 hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Regarding total direct medical costs, the lowest cost per patient at ICU was observed in Turkey ($2,984.78 & PLUSMN; 2,395.93), while the highest was in Portugal ($51,358.52 & PLUSMN; 30,150.38). The Republic of Korea reported the highest length of stay of 29.4 days (& PLUSMN;17.80), and the lowest is observed in India for nine days (& PLUSMN;5.98). Our findings emphasize COVID-19s significance on healtheconomic outcomes. Limited research exists on the economic burden of COVID-19 in the ICU. Further studies on cost estimates can enhance data clarity, enabling informed analysis of healthcare costs and aiding efficient patient care organization by care providers and policymakers.

  • 14.
    Ghafouri, Nazdar
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Fischer, Marcelo Rivano
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ringqvist, Asa
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Effects of interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation programs on neuropathic and non-neuropathic chronic pain conditions - a registry-based cohort study from Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP)2023Ingår i: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 24, nr 1, artikel-id 357Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aimNeuropathic pain arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. Pharmacological treatments for neuropathic pain often fail despite following guidelines. Interdisciplinary Pain Rehabilitation Programs (IPRP) are an effective intervention for chronic pain conditions. Little research has investigated whether IPRP can benefit patients with chronic neuropathic pain compared to other chronic pain conditions.This study assesses the real-world effects of IPRP on patients with chronic neuropathic pain compared to non-neuropathic patients using Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) available in the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP).MethodsA neuropathic group of patients (n = 1,654) were identified in two steps. This group was compared to a non-neuropathic group (n = 14,355) composed of common diagnoses (low back pain, fibromyalgia, whiplash associated disorders, and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome) in relation to background variables, three overall outcome variables, and mandatory outcome variables (pain intensity, psychological distress symptoms, activity/participation aspects and health-related quality of life variables). Of these patients 43-44% participated in IPRP.ResultsAt assessment, the neuropathic group reported significantly (with small effect sizes (ES)) more physician visits the previous year, older age, shorter pain durations, and less spatial extent of the pain (moderate ES). Moreover, for the 22 mandatory outcome variables, we found only clinically insignificant differences according to ESs between the groups. For patients participating in IPRP, the neuropathic group displayed equal or in some cases slightly superior results compared to the non-neuropathic group.Discussion and conclusionAfter assessing the real-world effects of IPRP, this large study found that neuropathic pain patients can benefit from the IPRP intervention. Both registry studies and RCTs are needed to better understand which patients with neuropathic pain are most suitable for IPRP and to what extent special considerations need to be made for these patients within the framework of IPRP.

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  • 15.
    Jeong, Yeon Jae
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Seoyeon
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Tizaoui, Kalthoum
    Univ Tunis El Manar, Tunisia.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    CIBERSAM, Spain; Catalan Inst Res & Adv Studies, Spain; Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Mental, Spain.
    Jacob, Louis
    CIBERSAM, Spain; Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Kostev, Karel
    Philipps Univ Marburg, Germany.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Kings Coll London, England; Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Sodertorn Univ, Sweden.
    Oh, Hans
    Univ Southern Calif, CA 90007 USA.
    Il Shin, Jae
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Global burden of gout in 1990-2019: A systematic analysis of the Global Burden of Disease study 20192023Ingår i: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 53, nr 4, artikel-id e13937Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and AimsAlthough gout is one of the most common rheumatic diseases, world data are lacking because most studies have focused on industrialized countries. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the global burden of gout and its associations with the year of diagnosis, age, geographical region, sociodemographic status and various further risk factors. MethodsRetrospective data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) were used, initially collected between 1990 and 2019. Raw numbers and age-standardized rates (per 100,000 persons) of prevalence, incidence and years lived with disability (YLDs) of gout were extracted from GBD 2019 for 204 countries and territories and stratified by sex, age, year, sociodemographic index and geographic region. Correlations between gout and other chronic diseases were identified, and the burden attributable to high body mass index (BMI) and kidney dysfunction was described. ResultsThe total number of patients and gout age-standardized prevalence rate increased between 1990 and 2019. Gout was most prevalent in Australasia and high-income North America, and a higher sociodemographic index (SDI) was associated with higher age-standardized prevalence, incidence and YLDs. High BMI and kidney dysfunction were risk factors for gout, while gout was correlated with other kidney diseases. ConclusionsThe global prevalence of gout, as well as incidence, and YLDs increased worldwide from 1990 to 2019 and had a significant association with sex, age, geographic region, SDI and risk factors. Understanding the complex interplay of environmental, sociodemographic and geographic risk factors is essential in mitigating the ever-rising disease burden of gout.

  • 16.
    Choi, Sungchul
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Beom Kyung
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ Hlth Syst, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Han Gyeol
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Chang, Ho Hyeok
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Seoyeon
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    CIBERSAM, Spain; Pg Lluis Co 23, Spain.
    Jacob, Louis
    CIBERSAM, Spain; Univ Paris Cite, France.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Kings Coll London, England.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Seung Up
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ Hlth Syst, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Global burden of primary liver cancer and its asso- ciation with underlying aetiologies, sociodemo- graphic status, and sex differences from 1990-2019: A DALY-based analysis of the Global Burden of Disease 2019 study2023Ingår i: Clinical and Molecular Hepatology, ISSN 2287-2728, E-ISSN 2287-285X, Vol. 29, nr 2, s. 433-452Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Global distribution of dominant liver cancer aetiologies has significantly changed over the past decades. This study analyzed the updated temporal trends of liver cancer aetiologies and sociodemographic status in 204 countries and territories from 1990 to 2019.Methods: The Global Burden of Disease 2019 report was used for statistical analysis. In addition, we performed stratification analysis to five quintiles using sociodemographic index and 21 geographic regions.Results: The crude numbers of liver cancer disease-adjusted life years (DALYs) and deaths significantly increased during the study period (DALYs; 11,278,630 in 1990 and 12,528,422 in 2019, deaths; 365,215 in 1990 and 484,577 in 2019). However, the Age-standardized DALY and mortality rates decreased. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains the leading cause of liver cancer DALYs and mortality, followed by hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcohol consumption, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis/non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH/NAFLD). Although Age-standardized DALY and mortality rates of liver cancer due to HBV and HCV have decreased, the rates due to alcohol consumption and NASH/NAFLD have increased. In 2019, the population of the East Asia region had the highest Age-standardized DALY and mortality rates, followed by high-income Asia-Pacific and Central Asia populations. Although East Asia and high-income Asia-Pacific regions showed a decrease during the study period, Age-standardized DALY rates increased in Central Asia. High-income North American and Australasian populations also showed a significant increase in Age-standardized DALY.Conclusions: Liver cancer remains an ongoing global threat. The burden of liver cancer associated with alcohol consumption and NASH/NAFLD is markedly increasing and projected to continuously increase. (Clin Mol Hepatol 2023;29:433-452)

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  • 17.
    Hahn, Jong Woo
    et al.
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Yang, Hye Ran
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Moon, Jin Soo
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Chang, Ju Young
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Kwanjoo
    CHA Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Gi Ae
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Rahmati, Masoud
    Lorestan Univ, Iran; Vali Easr Univ Rafsanjan, Iran.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Parc Sanit St Joan Deu, Spain.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA USA.
    Sanchez, Guillermo F. Lopez
    Univ Murcia, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Shin, Ju-Young
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kwon, Rosie
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Soeun
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Hyeon Jin
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Hojae
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Ko, Jae Sung
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Global incidence and prevalence of autoimmune hepatitis, 1970-2022: a systematic review and meta-analysis2023Ingår i: eClinicalMedicine, E-ISSN 2589-5370, Vol. 65, artikel-id 102280Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) varies significantly in incidence and prevalence across countries and regions. We aimed to examine global, regional, and national trends in incidence and prevalence of AIH from 1970 to 2022.Methods We conducted a thorough search of the PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Google Scholar, and Cochrane databases from database inception to August 9, 2023, using the search term "autoimmune hepatitis" in combination with "incidence," "prevalence," or "trend." Only general population-based observational studies with larger samples sizes were considered for inclusion. Studies that recruited convenience samples, and those with fewer than 50 participants were excluded. Summary data were extracted from published reports. A random effects model was used and pooled estimates with 95% CI were used to calculate the incidence and prevalence of AIH. Heterogeneity was evaluated using the I-2 statistic. The study protocol was registered with PROSPERO, CRD42023430138. Findings A total of 37 eligible studies, encompassing more than 239 million participants and 55,839 patients with AIH from 18 countries across five continents, were included in the analysis. Global pooled incidence and prevalence of AIH were found to be 1.28 cases per 100,000 inhabitant-years (95% CI, 1.01-1.63, I-2 = 99<middle dot>51%; number of studies, 33; sample population, 220,673,674) and 15.65 cases per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI, 13.42-18.24, I-2 = 99<middle dot>75%; number of studies, 26; sample population, 217,178,684), respectively. The incidence of AIH was greater in countries with high Human Development Index (>0.92), in North America and Oceania (compared with Asia), among females, adults (compared with children), and high latitude (>45 degrees). Similar patterns in AIH prevalence were observed. Pooled AIH prevalence increased gradually from 1970 to 2019 (1970-1999; 9.95 [4.77-15.13], I-2 = 95<middle dot>58% versus 2015-2022; 27.91 [24.86-30.96], I-2 = 99<middle dot>32%; cases per 100,000 inhabitants). The overall incidence and prevalence of AIH, as well as some subgroup analyses of the studies, displayed asymmetry in the funnel plots, suggesting potential evidence of publication bias.Interpretation AIH incidence and prevalence have increased significantly and exhibit substantial variation across regions worldwide. Further research is required to assess the incidence and prevalence of AIH, specifically in South America and Africa.

  • 18.
    Han, Jonghoon
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Seoyeon
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Woo, Wongi
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Parc Sanitari St Joan De Deu, Spain; Ctr Invest Biomed Red Salud Mental, Spain; Catalan Inst Res & Adv Studies, Spain.
    Jacob, Louis
    Parc Sanitari St Joan De Deu, Spain; Univ Clin Marburg, Germany.
    Kostev, Karel
    Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Lee, Sungsoo
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Global, Regional, and National Burden of Mesothelioma 1990-2019 A Systematic Analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 20192023Ingår i: Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society online, ISSN 1546-3222, E-ISSN 1943-5665, Vol. 20, nr 7, s. 976-983Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: Mesothelioma has become a major health burden since World War II because of the use of asbestos. Although many countries have imposed bans on asbestos, there remain significant mortality and morbidity from mesothelioma because of its long latent period and aggressiveness. Also, the use of asbestos is increasing in low-income countries, potentiating risk of mesothelioma in the coming decades. Assessment of the global burden of mesothelioma is required to take proper measures against the disease. Objectives: To assess the burden of mesothelioma from 1990 to 2019 at the global, regional, and national levels and to investigate patterns according to sex, age, sociodemographic index, and risk factors. Methods: The numbers, rates, and age-standardized rates of incidence, death, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of mesothelioma in 204 countries and territories from 1990 to 2019 were estimated using vital registration and cancer registry data. The relationship between sociodemographic index and agestandardized DALY rate was determined, and DALYs attributable to occupational exposure to asbestos were calculated. Results: In 2019, there were 34,511 (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 31,199 to 37,771) incident cases of mesothelioma globally, with an age-standardized rate of 0.43 per 100,000 persons (95% UI, 0.38 to 0.47), which decreased between 1990 and 2019 by -12.6% (95% UI, -21.8% to -2.3%). Mesothelioma was responsible for 29,251 (95% UI, 26,668 to 31,006) deaths in 2019, with an age-standardized rate of 0.36 deaths per 100,000 persons (95% UI, 0.33 to 0.39), which decreased between 1990 and 2019 by -9.6% (95% UI, -17.8% to 21.1%). The age-standardized incidence rate increased in central Europe between 1990 and 2019 by 46.1% (95% UI, 16.6% to 72.4%). The Netherlands, Australia, and the United Kingdom had the highest agestandardized incidence rates. Incidence rates were higher in men than in women ages 45-49 to 90-94 years, peaking at 85-89 years. Occupational exposure to asbestos contributed to 85.2% (95% UI, 82.1% to 88.1%) of DALYs. Conclusions: The global burden of mesothelioma is decreasing in terms of age-standardized incidence and mortality rates. Mesothelioma remains a substantial public health challenge in many parts of the world.

  • 19.
    Oh, Jiyeon
    et al.
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Myeongcheol
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Hojae
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yang, Hwi
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Jaeyu
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Rahmati, Masoud
    Lorestan Univ, Iran; Vali E Asr Univ Rafsanjan, Iran.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Res & Dev Unit, Spain.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Fond, Guillaume
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Boyer, Laurent
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA USA.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Sanchez, Guillermo F. Lopez
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA USA.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Woo, Ho Geol
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea; Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Hand and Oral Hygiene Practices of South Korean Adolescents Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic2023Ingår i: JAMA Network Open, E-ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 6, nr 12, artikel-id e2349249Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance Only a few studies have examined the long-term trends of hand and oral hygiene, especially among adolescents.Objective To investigate the 15-year trends in frequency of handwashing and toothbrushing and examine the factors associated with hand and oral hygiene, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.Design, Setting, and Participants This cross-sectional study, performed from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2022, used general population-based data from 963 644 individuals in a national representative survey (Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey [KYRBS]).Exposure COVID-19 pandemic.Main Outcomes and Measures Trends in hand and oral hygiene practices were measured by how frequently adolescents washed their hands and whether they fulfilled the recommended guidelines for toothbrushing. An interrupted time series analysis using linear and logistic regression models was performed to assess any associations with the COVID-19 pandemic. Hand and oral hygiene behaviors before and during the pandemic in each sociodemographic subgroup were also compared.Results In the 963 644 adolescents (495 697 [51.4%] male; mean [range] age, 15.01 [12-18] years) who participated in the KYRBS from 2008 to 2022, a 73.3% (95% CI, 59.4%-97.4%; P < .001) immediate increase was seen in overall hand hygiene behavior at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the prepandemic period, with a sustained decrease thereafter (beta = -0.018; 95% CI, -0.022 to -0.015; P < .001). Meanwhile, no immediate increase was observed in terms of overall oral hygiene behavior (0.1%; 95% CI, -0.9% to 1.1%; P = .82); however, there was a sustained decrease during the pandemic (beta = -0.018; 95% CI, -0.020 to -0.016; P < .001). Older age, female sex, nonsmoking status, alcohol use, low household economic level, and poor school performance were significantly associated with poor hand hygiene during the pandemic.Conclusions and Relevance In this cross-sectional study of South Korean adolescents, an increase in the prevalence of hand hygiene was observed during the early pandemic; however, this prevalence decreased over time. Meanwhile, the decrease in the prevalence of oral hygiene was more pronounced during the pandemic. This study recommends stronger guidelines for adolescent health coaches, such as teachers or public health advisers, regarding hygiene behaviors, even after the COVID-19 pandemic ends.

  • 20.
    Lee, San
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Keum Hwa
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Kyung Mee
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Sung Jong
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Won Jae
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Jinhee
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kronbichler, Andreas
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Kings Coll London, England.
    Stubbs, Brendon
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Jacob, Louis
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Sodertorn Univ, Sweden.
    Thompson, Trevor
    Univ Greenwich, England.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Oh, Hans
    Univ Southern Calif, CA 90089 USA.
    Brunoni, Andre R.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany; Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil; Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil; Hosp Univ, Brazil.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth CAMH, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Kings Coll London, England; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; CIBERSAM, Spain.
    An, Suk Kyoon
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Namkoong, Kee
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Eun
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Pavia, Italy.
    Impact of data extraction errors in meta-analyses on the association between depression and peripheral inflammatory biomarkers: an umbrella review2023Ingår i: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 53, nr 5, s. 2017-2030, artikel-id PII S0033291721003767Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in inflammatory biomarkers are important in depression. However, previous meta-analyses disagree on these associations, and errors in data extraction may account for these discrepancies. Methods PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched from database inception to 14 January 2020. Meta-analyses of observational studies examining the association between depression and levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1 beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were eligible. Errors were classified as follows: incorrect sample sizes, incorrectly used standard deviation, incorrect participant inclusion, calculation error, or analysis with insufficient data. We determined their impact on the results after correction thereof. Results Errors were noted in 14 of the 15 meta-analyses included. Across 521 primary studies, 118 (22.6%) showed the following errors: incorrect sample sizes (20 studies, 16.9%), incorrect use of standard deviation (35 studies, 29.7%), incorrect participant inclusion (7 studies, 5.9%), calculation errors (33 studies, 28.0%), and analysis with insufficient data (23 studies, 19.5%). After correcting these errors, 11 (29.7%) out of 37 pooled effect sizes changed by a magnitude of more than 0.1, ranging from 0.11 to 1.15. The updated meta-analyses showed that elevated levels of TNF- alpha, IL-6, CRP, but not IL-1 beta, are associated with depression. Conclusions These findings show that data extraction errors in meta-analyses can impact findings. Efforts to reduce such errors are important in studies of the association between depression and peripheral inflammatory biomarkers, for which high heterogeneity and conflicting results have been continuously reported.

  • 21.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Barcelona, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Solmi, Marco
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Univ Southampton, England; Charite, Germany.
    Gosling, Corentin J.
    Univ Southampton, England; Paris Nanterre Univ, France; Univ Paris Cite, France.
    Oliver, Dominic
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Oxford, England.
    Lascialfari, Filippo
    Univ Pavia, Italy.
    Ahmed, Muhammad
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Estrade, Andres
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Arrondo, Gonzalo
    Univ Southampton, England; NYU Langone, NY USA.
    Gouva, Mary
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Fornaro, Michele
    Univ Navarra, Spain.
    Batiridou, Agapi
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Dimou, Konstantina
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Tsartsalis, Dimitrios
    Federico II Univ Naples, Italy.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Deakin Univ, Australia; Barwon Hlth, Australia; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Berk, Michael
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Stringhini, Silvia
    Severance Childrens Hosp, South Korea; Geneva Univ Hosp, Switzerland; Univ Lausanne, Switzerland; Univ Geneva, Switzerland.
    Correll, Christoph U.
    Charite, Germany; Zucker Hillside Hosp, NY USA.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Pavia, Italy.
    Impact of mental disorders on clinical outcomes of physical diseases: an umbrella review assessing population attributable fraction and generalized impact fraction2023Ingår i: World Psychiatry, ISSN 1723-8617, E-ISSN 2051-5545, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 86-104Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical evidence indicates a significant bidirectional association between mental disorders and physical diseases, but the prospective impact of men-tal disorders on clinical outcomes of physical diseases has not been comprehensively outlined. In this PRISMA- and COSMOS-E-compliant umbrella review, we searched PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, and Joanna Briggs Institute Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, up to March 15, 2022, to identify systematic reviews with meta-analysis that examined the prospective association between any mental disorder and clinical outcomes of physical diseases. Primary outcomes were disease-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were disease-specific incidence, functioning and/or disability, symptom severity, quality of life, recurrence or progression, major cardiac events, and treatment-related outcomes. Additional inclusion criteria were further applied to primary studies. Random effect models were employed, along with I-2 statistic, 95% prediction intervals, small-study effects test, excess significance bias test, and risk of bias (ROBIS) assessment. Associations were classified into five credibility classes of evidence (I to IV and non-significant) according to established criteria, complemented by sensitivity and subgroup analyses to examine the robustness of the main analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using a new package for conducting umbrella reviews (). Population attributable fraction (PAF) and generalized impact fraction (GIF) were then calculated for class I-III associations. Forty-seven systematic reviews with meta-analysis, encompassing 251 non-overlapping primary studies and reporting 74 associations, were included (68% were at low risk of bias at the ROBIS assessment). Altogether, 43 primary outcomes (disease-specific mortality: n=17; all-cause mortality: n=26) and 31 secondary outcomes were investigated. Although 72% of associations were statistically significant (p<0.05), only two showed convincing (class I) evidence: that between depressive disorders and all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure (hazard ratio, HR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.26-1.65), and that between schizophrenia and cardiovascular mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases (risk ratio, RR=1.54, 95% CI: 1.36-1.75). Six associations showed highly suggestive (class II) evidence: those between depressive disorders and all-cause mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (HR=2.84, 95% CI: 2.00-4.03) and with kidney failure (HR=1.41, 95% CI: 1.31-1.51); that between depressive disorders and major cardiac events in patients with myocardial infarction (odds ratio, OR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.36-1.70); that between depressive disorders and dementia in patients with diabetes mellitus (HR=2.11, 95% CI: 1.77-2.52); that between alcohol use disorder and decompensated liver cirrhosis in patients with hepatitis C (RR=3.15, 95% CI: 2.87-3.46); and that between schizophrenia and cancer mortality in patients with cancer (standardized mean ratio, SMR=1.74, 95% CI: 1.41-2.15). Sensitivity/subgroup analyses confirmed these results. The largest PAFs were 30.56% (95% CI: 27.67-33.49) for alcohol use disorder and decompensated liver cirrhosis in patients with hepatitis C, 26.81% (95% CI: 16.61-37.67) for depressive disorders and all-cause mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus, 13.68% (95% CI: 9.87-17. 58) for depressive disorders and major cardiac events in patients with myocardial infarction, 11.99% (95% CI: 8.29-15.84) for schizophrenia and cardiovascular mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases, and 11.59% (95% CI: 9.09-14.14) for depressive disorders and all-cause mortality in patients with kidney failure. The GIFs confirmed the preventive capacity of these associations. This umbrella review demonstrates that mental disorders increase the risk of a poor clinical outcome in several physical diseases. Prevention targeting mental disorders - particularly alcohol use disorders, depressive disorders, and schizophrenia - can reduce the incidence of adverse clinical outcomes in people with physical diseases. These findings can inform clinical practice and trans-speciality preventive approaches cutting across psychiatric and somatic medicine.

  • 22.
    Cortese, Samuele
    et al.
    Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England; NYU, NY 10012 USA; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Song, Minjin
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Farhat, Luis C.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Seoyeon
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Oh, Jae Won
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, San
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Cheon, Keun-Ah
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Gosling, Corentin J.
    Univ Southampton, England; Paris Nanterre Univ, France; Univ Paris, France.
    Polanczyk, Guilherme V.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rohde, Luis A.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; Natl Inst Dev Psychiat, Brazil.
    Faraone, Stephen V.
    SUNY Upstate Med Univ, NY USA.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    ISCIII, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Southampton, England; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Charite, Germany.
    Incidence, prevalence, and global burden of ADHD from 1990 to 2019 across 204 countries: data, with critical re-analysis, from the Global Burden of Disease study2023Ingår i: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 28, s. 4823-4830Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Data on incidence, prevalence and burden of ADHD are crucial for clinicians, patients, and stakeholders. We present the incidence, prevalence, and burden of ADHD globally and across countries from 1990 to 2019 from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. We also: (1) calculated the ADHD prevalence based on data actually collected as opposed to the prevalence estimated by the GBD with data imputation for countries without prevalence data; (2) discussed the GBD estimated ADHD burden in the light of recent meta-analytic evidence on ADHD-related mortality. In 2019, GBD estimated global age-standardized incidence and prevalence of ADHD across the lifespan at 0.061% (95%UI = 0.040-0.087) and 1.13% (95%UI = 0.831-1.494), respectively. ADHD accounted for 0.8% of the global mental disorder DALYs, with mortality set at zero by the GBD. From 1990 to 2019 there was a decrease of -8.75% in the global age-standardized prevalence and of -4.77% in the global age-standardized incidence. The largest increase in incidence, prevalence, and burden from 1990 to 2019 was observed in the USA; the largest decrease occurred in Finland. Incidence, prevalence, and DALYs remained approximately 2.5 times higher in males than females from 1990 to 2019. Incidence peaked at age 5-9 years, and prevalence and DALYs at age 10-14 years. Our re-analysis of data prior to 2013 showed a prevalence in children/adolescents two-fold higher (5.41%, 95% CI: 4.67-6.15%) compared to the corresponding GBD estimated prevalence (2.68%, 1.83-3.72%), with no significant differences between low- and middle- and high-income countries. We also found meta-analytic evidence of significantly increased ADHD-related mortality due to unnatural causes. While it provides the most detailed evidence on temporal trends, as well as on geographic and sex variations in incidence, prevalence, and burden of ADHD, the GBD may have underestimated the ADHD prevalence and burden. Given the influence of the GBD on research and policies, methodological issues should be addressed in its future editions.

  • 23.
    Solmi, Marco
    et al.
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Univ Southampton, England; Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany.
    Seitidis, Georgios
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Mavridis, Dimitris
    Univ Ioannina, Greece; Paris Descartes Univ, France.
    Correll, Christoph U. U.
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Germany; Zucker Hillside Hosp, NY USA; Donald & Barbara Zucker Sch Med Hofstra Northwell, NY USA; Feinstein Inst Med Res, NY USA.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Guimond, Synthia
    Univ Quebec Outaouais, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Tuominen, Lauri
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Dargel, Aroldo
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Carvalho, Andre F. F.
    Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Fornaro, Michele
    Federico II Univ Naples, Italy.
    Maes, Michael
    Univ Elect Sci & Technol China, Peoples R China; Chulalongkorn Univ, Thailand; King Chulalongkorn Mem Hosp, Thailand; Med Univ Plovdiv, Bulgaria; Med Univ Plovdiv, Bulgaria.
    Monaco, Francesco
    ASL Salerno, Italy; European Biomed Res Inst Salerno EBRIS, Italy.
    Song, Minjin
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Univ Southampton, England; NYU, NY USA; Solent NHS Trust, England.
    Incidence, prevalence, and global burden of schizophrenia-data, with critical appraisal, from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 20192023Ingår i: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Schizophrenia substantially contributes to the burden of mental disorders. Schizophrenias burden and epidemiological estimates in some countries have been published, but updated estimates of prevalence, incidence, and schizophrenia-related disability at the global level are lacking. Here, we present the data from and critically discuss the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study data, focusing on temporal changes in schizophrenias prevalence, incidence, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) globally. From 1990 to 2019, schizophrenia raw prevalence (14.2 to 23.6 million), incidence (941,000 to 1.3 million), and DALYs (9.1 to 15.1 million) increased by over 65%, 37%, and 65% respectively, while age-standardized estimates remained stable globally. In countries with high socio-demographic index (SDI), both prevalence and DALYs increased, while in those with low SDI, the age-standardized incidence decreased and DALYs remained stable. The male/female ratio of burden of schizophrenia has remained stable in the overall population over the past 30 years (i.e., M/F = 1.1), yet decreasing from younger to older age groups (raw prevalence in females higher than males after age 65, with males having earlier age of onset, and females longer life expectancy). Results of this work suggest that schizophrenias raw prevalence, incidence, and burden have been increasing since 1990. Age-adjusted estimates did not reduce. Schizophrenia detection in low SDI countries is suboptimal, and its prevention/treatment in high SDI countries should be improved, considering its increasing prevalence. Schizophrenia sex ratio inverts throughout the lifespan, suggesting different age of onset and survival by sex. However, prevalence and burden estimates for schizophrenia are probably underestimated. GBD does not account for mortality from schizophrenia (and other mental disorders, apart from anorexia nervosa).

  • 24.
    Kang, Jiseung
    et al.
    Gwangju Inst Sci & Technol, South Korea.
    Park, Jaeyu
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Hojae
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Myeongcheol
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Sunyoung
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Parc Sanitari St Joan de Deu, Spain.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA USA.
    Rahmati, Masoud
    Lorestan Univ, Iran; Vali E Asr Univ Rafsanjan, Iran.
    Fond, Guillaume
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Boyer, Laurent
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Sanchez, Guillermo F. Lopez
    Univ Murcia, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England; NYU, NY USA.
    Kim, Tae
    Gwangju Inst Sci & Technol, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    National trends in depression and suicide attempts and COVID-19 pandemic-related factors, 1998-2021: A nationwide study in South Korea2023Ingår i: Asian Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 1876-2018, E-ISSN 1876-2026, Vol. 88, artikel-id 103727Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the significant psychiatric effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, theres limited data on the prevalence and risk factors of depression and suicide attempts among South Korean adults. Methods: A nationwide cross-sectional study using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data from 1998 to 2021 was conducted. Changes in prevalence and risk factors for depression and suicide attempts were assessed using weighted odds ratios or weighted beta coefficients.Results: During the observation period (1998-2021), the prevalence of depression increased in the overall population; however, no significant surge was found regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, from 2.78% (95% CI, 2.41-3.15) in 1998-2005-4.96% (4.32-5.61) in 2020 and 5.06% (4.43-5.69) in 2021. However, immediately after the onset of the pandemic, younger ages, male sex, urban residence, higher education, and high economic status became significant vulnerable factors compared to pre-pandemic periods. The prevalence of suicide attempts remained stable, and there was no notable surge specifically related to the COVID-19 pandemic, from 0.23% (95% CI, 0.18-0.28) in 1998-2005-0.45% (0.25-0.66) in 2020 and 0.42% (0.24-0.60) in 2021. Furthermore, no distinct vulnerable factors associated with suicide attempts have been identified. Conclusion: Through this nationwide serial cross-sectional survey study, we emphasized the need for under-standing the differential impacts of global crises, such as COVID-19, across varied population subgroups, thereby highlighting the importance of specific and targeted mental health support strategies.

  • 25.
    Choi, Jungwoo
    et al.
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Minji
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Rhee, Sang Youl
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yang, Hwi
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Hyeon Jin
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kwon, Rosie
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Parc Sanitari St Joan de Deu, Spain; Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA USA.
    Fond, Guillaume
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Boyer, Laurent
    Aix Marseille Univ, France.
    Sanchez Lopez, Guillermo F.
    Univ Murcia, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England; NYU, NY USA; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Hayeon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Jinseok
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Rahmati, Masoud
    Lorestan Univ, Iran.
    Cho, Wonyoung
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    National trends in prevalence of sadness, counseling for sadness, and sleep time among Koreans amid pandemic, 2009-2021: A nationwide representative study of over 2.8 million individuals2023Ingår i: Asian Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 1876-2018, E-ISSN 1876-2026, Vol. 87, artikel-id 103695Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 26.
    Park, Jaeyu
    et al.
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Myeongcheol
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Hojae
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Hyeon Jin
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kwon, Rosie
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yang, Hwi
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Sunyoung
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Rahmati, Masoud
    Lorestan Univ, Iran; Vali E Asr Univ Rafsanjan, Iran.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Parc Sanitari St Joan Deu, Spain.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA USA.
    Jacob, Louis
    Vali E Asr Univ Rafsanjan, Iran; Parc Sanitari St Joan Deu, Spain; Lariboisiere Fernand Widal Hosp, France; Univ Paris Cite, France.
    Lopez Sanchez, Guillermo Felipe
    Univ Murcia, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Rhee, Sang Youl
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yoo, Myung Chul
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    National trends in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis prevalence in South Korea, 1998-20212023Ingår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, nr 1, artikel-id 19528Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on the trends in the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) are limited, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to analyze the temporal trend of RA and OA in South Korean adults from 1998 to 2021, including the COVID-19 pandemic period. The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data on adults aged >= 19 years were analyzed to investigate the prevalence of RA and OA from 1998 to 2021. The prevalence trends were compared by the years, and beta(diff) (beta difference) was calculated. Odds ratios (ORs) were computed for each disease to examine changes in disease prevalence before and during the pandemic in order to determine the impact of the pandemic on disease prevalence. Among 163,221 Korean adults, the prevalence of RA and OA showed a steady decrease from 2005 (RA: from 1.91% in 2005-2007 to 1.55% in 2016-2019 and OA: from 9.75% in 2005-2007 to 8.27% in 2016-2019), but there was a slight increased after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic (RA: from 1.23% in 2020 to 1.36% in 2021 and OA: from 8.04% in 2020 to 8.27% in 2021). Vulnerable groups, including participants aged >= 60 years (versus 19-60 years, ratio of ORs: 1.222; 95% CI 1.011-1.477), urban residents (ratio of ORs: 1.289; 95% CI 1.007-1.650), and participants with higher education level (ratio of ORs: 1.360; 95% CI 1.119-1.653) showed higher ORs of OA, whereas no particularly vulnerable population was observed for RA. Our findings provide an insight into the long-term trends of RA and OA among adult population and highlight a novel perspective on the impact of COVID-19 on disease prevalence.

  • 27.
    Apostolidi, Dimitra Maria
    et al.
    Univ West Attica, Greece.
    Pantelaki, Nikoletta
    Univ West Attica, Greece.
    Sarantaki, Antigoni
    Univ West Attica, Greece.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Metallinou, Dimitra
    Univ West Attica, Greece.
    Neonatal Palliative Care as an Integral Component of the Greek National Healthcare System: Time to Act2023Ingår i: Cureus, E-ISSN 2168-8184, Vol. 15, nr 9, artikel-id e45498Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Neonatal palliative care aims to provide multidisciplinary support to families and neonates suffering from life-threatening or life-limiting diseases. Many countries worldwide have recognized the importance of enhancing the quality of life in critically ill neonates and thus have created and systematically implemented palliative care protocols in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Europe has a very low neonatal mortality rate, which has been steadily decreasing over the last 30 years. Greece in particular, a country located in Southeast Europe, reported a neonatal mortality rate of 2.29/1,000 live births in 2020. Nevertheless, neonatal palliative care facilities are scarce on a national level. In this paper, several reasons are presented to support the integration of neonatal palliative care in the Greek national healthcare system with the vision to ensure that all neonates and their families will receive in the near future the care, support, and dignity they deserve when facing life-threatening or life-limiting illnesses.

  • 28.
    Park, Seung Hyun
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Hong, Sung Hwi
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Kwanghyun
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Jung, Sun Jae
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Abdeen, Ziad
    Al Quds Univ, Palestine.
    Abou Ghayda, Ramy
    Univ Hosp Case Western Reserve Univ, OH USA.
    Ahmed, Mohamed Lemine Cheikh Brahim
    Univ Nouakchott Al Aasriya, Mauritania; Mauritanian Assoc Sci Res Dev AMDRS, Mauritania.
    Al Serouri, Abdulwahed
    Yemen Field Epidemiol Training Program, Yemen.
    Al-Herz, Waleed
    Kuwait Univ, Kuwait.
    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.
    Burjeel Med City, U Arab Emirates.
    Ali, Sheeza
    Maldives Natl Univ, Maldives.
    Ali, Kosar
    Univ Sulaimani, Iraq.
    Baatarkhuu, Oidov
    Mongolian Natl Univ Med Sci, Mongolia.
    Nielsen, Henning Bay
    Zealand Univ Hosp Roskilde, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bernini-Carri, Enrico
    Council Europe CEMEC, France.
    Bondarenko, Anastasiia
    Int European Univ, Ukraine.
    Cassell, Ayun
    John F Kennedy Med Ctr, NJ USA.
    Cham, Akway
    Univ Juba, South Sudan.
    Chua, Melvin L. K.
    Natl Canc Ctr Singapore, Singapore; Duke NUS Med Sch, Singapore; Natl Canc Ctr Singapore, Singapore.
    Dadabhai, Sufia
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, MD USA.
    Darre, Tchin
    Univ Lome, Togo.
    Davtyan, Hayk
    TB Res & Prevent Ctr, Armenia.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    East, Barbora
    Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Edwards, Robert Jeffrey
    Med Res Fdn Trinidad & Tobago, Trinidad Tobago.
    Ferioli, Martina
    IRCCS Azienda Osped Univ Bologna, Italy.
    Georgiev, Tsvetoslav
    Med Univ Varna, Bulgaria.
    Ghandour, Lilian A.
    Amer Univ Beirut, Lebanon.
    Harapan, Harapan
    Univ Syiah Kuala, Indonesia.
    Hsueh, Po-Ren
    China Med Univ, Taiwan; China Med Univ, Taiwan.
    Mallah, Saad I.
    Royal Coll Surg Ireland Bahrain, Bahrain.
    Ikram, Aamer
    Natl Inst Hlth, Pakistan.
    Inoue, Shigeru
    Tokyo Med Univ, Japan.
    Jacob, Louis
    ISCIII, Spain; Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Jankovic, Slobodan M.
    Univ Kragujevac, Serbia.
    Jayarajah, Umesh
    Univ Colombo, Sri Lanka.
    Jesenak, Milos
    Comenius Univ, Slovakia.
    Kakodkar, Pramath
    Natl Univ Ireland, Ireland.
    Kapata, Nathan
    Zambia Natl Publ Hlth Inst, Zambia.
    Kebede, Yohannes
    Jimma Univ, Ethiopia.
    Khader, Yousef
    Jordan Univ Sci & Technol, Jordan.
    Kifle, Meron
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Koh, David
    Natl Univ Singapore, Singapore.
    Males, Visnja Kokic
    Univ Split, Croatia.
    Kotfis, Katarzyna
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    ISCIII, Spain.
    Kretchy, James-Paul
    Cent Univ, Ghana.
    Lakoh, Sulaiman
    Univ Sierra Leone, Sierra Leone.
    Lee, Jinhee
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Jun Young
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Mendonca, Maria da Luz Lima
    Natl Publ Hlth Inst Cape Verde, Cape Verde.
    Ling, Lowell
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Llibre-Guerra, Jorge
    Natl Inst Neurol, Zimbabwe.
    Machida, Masaki
    Tokyo Med Univ, Japan.
    Makurumidze, Richard
    Univ Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe.
    Memish, Ziad A.
    Minist Hlth, Saudi Arabia; Alfaisal Univ, Saudi Arabia.
    Mendoza, Ivan
    Cent Univ Venezuela, Venezuela.
    Moiseev, Sergey
    Sechenov First Moscow State Med Univ, Russia.
    Nadasdy, Thomas
    St Parascheva Infect Dis Hosp, Romania.
    Nahshon, Chen
    Carmel Hosp, Israel.
    Namendys-Silva, Silvio A.
    Inst Nacl Cancerol, Mexico.
    Yongsi, Blaise Nguendo
    Univ Yaounde II, Cameroon.
    Nicolasora, Amalea Dulcene
    Res Inst Trop Med, Philippines.
    Nugmanova, Zhamilya
    Asfendiyarov Kazakh Natl Med Univ, Kazakhstan.
    Oh, Hans
    Univ Southern Calif, CA 90007 USA.
    Oksanen, Atte
    Tampere Univ, Finland.
    Owopetu, Oluwatomi
    Univ Coll Hosp, Nigeria.
    Ozguler, Zeynep Ozge
    Minist Hlth Turkey, Turkey.
    Parperis, Konstantinos
    Univ Cyprus, Cyprus.
    Perez, Gonzalo Emanuel
    Clin Olivos, Argentina.
    Pongpirul, Krit
    Chulalongkorn Univ, Thailand.
    Rademaker, Marius
    Clin Trials New Zealand, New Zealand.
    Radojevic, Nemanja
    Clin Ctr Montenegro, Montenegro.
    Roca, Anna
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Gambia.
    Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J.
    Fdn Univ Autonoma Amer, Colombia; Univ Cient Sur, Peru; Lebanese Amer Univ, Lebanon.
    Roshi, Enver
    Univ Med Tirana, Albania.
    Saeed, Khwaja Mir Islam
    Afghanistan Natl Publ Hlth Inst ANPHI, Afghanistan.
    Sah, Ranjit
    Tribhuvan Univ Teaching Hosp, Nepal.
    Sakakushev, Boris
    RIMU Res Inst Med Univ Plovdiv, Bulgaria; Chair Propedeut Surg Dis, Bulgaria; Univ Hosp St George, Bulgaria.
    Sallam, Dina E.
    Ain Shams Univ, Egypt.
    Sathian, Brijesh
    Rumailah Hosp, Qatar.
    Schober, Patrick
    Amsterdam UMC Locat Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ali, P. Shaik Syed
    Maldives Natl Univ, Maldives.
    Simonovic, Zoran
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Slovenia.
    Singhal, Tanu
    Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hosp & Res Inst, India.
    Skhvitaridze, Natia
    Natl Ctr Dis Control & Publ Hlth, Georgia.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Dept Mental Hlth, Canada; Charite, Germany.
    Subbaram, Kannan
    Maldives Natl Univ, Maldives.
    Tizaoui, Kalthoum
    Univ Tunis El Manar, Tunisia.
    Tlhakanelo, John Thato
    Univ Botswana, Botswana.
    Torales, Julio
    Natl Univ Asuncion, Paraguay.
    Torres-Roman, Junior Smith
    Univ Cient Sur, Peru.
    Tsartsalis, Dimitrios
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Tsolmon, Jadamba
    MNUMS, Mongolia.
    Vieira, Duarte Nuno
    Univ Coimbra, Portugal.
    Rosa, Sandro G. Viveiros
    Inst Nacl Propriedade Ind, Brazil.
    Wanghi, Guy
    Univ Kinshasa, DEM REP CONGO.
    Wollina, Uwe
    Acad Teaching Hosp, Germany.
    Xu, Ren-He
    Univ Macau, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Lin
    Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Zia, Kashif
    Univ Glasgow, Scotland.
    Zildzic, Muharem
    Acad Med Sci Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bosnia & Herceg.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Nonpharmaceutical interventions reduce the incidence and mortality of COVID-19: A study based on the survey from the International COVID-19 Research Network (ICRN)2023Ingår i: Journal of Medical Virology, ISSN 0146-6615, E-ISSN 1096-9071, Vol. 95, nr 2Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The recently emerged novel coronavirus, "severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2)," caused a highly contagious disease called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It has severely damaged the worlds most developed countries and has turned into a major threat for low- and middle-income countries. Since its emergence in late 2019, medical interventions have been substantial, and most countries relied on public health measures collectively known as nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs). We aimed to centralize the accumulative knowledge of NPIs against COVID-19 for each country under one worldwide consortium. International COVID-19 Research Network collaborators developed a cross-sectional online survey to assess the implications of NPIs and sanitary supply on the incidence and mortality of COVID-19. The survey was conducted between January 1 and February 1, 2021, and participants from 92 countries/territories completed it. The association between NPIs, sanitation supplies, and incidence and mortality were examined by multivariate regression, with the log-transformed value of population as an offset value. The majority of countries/territories applied several preventive strategies, including social distancing (100.0%), quarantine (100.0%), isolation (98.9%), and school closure (97.8%). Individual-level preventive measures such as personal hygiene (100.0%) and wearing facial masks (94.6% at hospitals; 93.5% at mass transportation; 91.3% in mass gathering facilities) were also frequently applied. Quarantine at a designated place was negatively associated with incidence and mortality compared to home quarantine. Isolation at a designated place was also associated with reduced mortality compared to home isolation. Recommendations to use sanitizer for personal hygiene reduced incidence compared to the recommendation to use soap. Deprivation of masks was associated with increased incidence. Higher incidence and mortality were found in countries/territories with higher economic levels. Mask deprivation was pervasive regardless of economic level. NPIs against COVID-19 such as using sanitizer, quarantine, and isolation can decrease the incidence and mortality of COVID-19.

  • 29.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Fischer, Marcelo Rivano
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ringqvist, Asa
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Pain intensity and psychological distress show different associations with interference and lack of life control: A clinical registry-based cohort study of >40,000 chronic pain patients from SQRP2023Ingår i: FRONTIERS IN PAIN RESEARCH, ISSN 2673-561X, Vol. 4, artikel-id 1093002Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundBoth chronic pain and depressive and/or anxiety symptoms are associated with negative impacts on daily living, including interference and lack of life control. However, little is known about how pain and psychological distress affect these impacts.AimThe first aim was to assess how pain intensity, psychological distress, and social support interact with interference and lack of life control. A second aim was to investigate whether the strength of these relationships is moderated by the presence or absence of depression and/or anxiety.Subjects and methodsPatient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs), which are available in the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP), were retrieved for patients with chronic pain (N = 40,184). A theoretical model with the constructs/latent variables pain intensity, psychological distress, interference, lack of life control, and social support was proposed and analyzed using Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM). Indicators for these constructs were identified from the PROMs of the SQRP. Two models of the total cohort, which differed with respect to the causal relationship between pain intensity and psychological distress, were investigated. The moderating effects of anxiety and/or depression were also analyzed.ResultsRelatively low correlation and explanatory power (R-2 = 0.16) were found for the pain intensity-psychological distress relationship. Pain intensity had a stronger effect on interference than on lack of life control. The reverse was found for psychological distress - i.e., psychological distress seemed to have a higher negative influence on function than on interference. The underlying assumption of the causal relationship between pain intensity and psychological distress determined how strong pain intensity and psychological distress influenced interference and lack of life control. Social support showed very similar absolute significant correlations with interference and lack of life control. Interference and lack of life control showed relatively weak associations. The psychological distress level was a moderating factor for several of the paths investigated.Discussion and conclusionA clinical treatment consequence of the low correlation between pain intensity and psychological distress may be that clinically treating one may not reduce the effect of the other. The relative importance of pain intensity and psychological distress on interference and lack of life control depends on the underlying assumption concerning the pain intensity-psychological distress relationship. Interference and lack of life control showed relatively weak associations, underscoring the need to clinically assess them separately. Social support influenced both impact constructs investigated. The cohort display heterogeneity and thus presence of definite signs of anxiety and/or depression or not was a moderating factor for several of the associations (paths) investigated. The results are important both for the assessments and the design of treatments for patients with chronic pain.

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  • 30.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Stratinaki, Maria
    Venizeleio Gen Hosp, Greece.
    Korela, Dafni
    Venizeleio Gen Hosp, Greece.
    Tzeis, Stylianos
    Mitera Hosp Hygeia Grp, Greece.
    Almroth, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Liuba, Ioan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Hassel Jönsson, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Charalambous, Georgios
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Tsartsalis, Dimitrios
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Predictors of recurrence after catheter ablation and electrical cardioversion of atrial fibrillation: an umbrella review of meta-analyses2023Ingår i: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 40-48Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The recurrence rates after catheter ablation (CA) and direct current (DC) cardioversion remain high, although they have been established treatments of rhythm control of atrial fibrillation (AF). This umbrella review systematically appraises published meta-analyses of both observational and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for the association of risk and protective factors for arrhythmia recurrence after CA and DC cardioversion of AF. Methods and results Three bibliographic databases were searched up to June 2021. Evidence of association was rated as convincing, highly suggestive, suggestive, weak, or not significant with respect to observational studies and as high, moderate, low, or very low with respect to RCTs, according to established criteria. Thirty-one meta-analyses were included. Of the 28 associations between CA and the risk of arrhythmia recurrence, none presented convincing evidence, and only the time from diagnosis to ablation over 1 year provided highly suggestive evidence. The association between hypertension and metabolic profile provided suggestive evidence. The associations of Class IC and III antiarrhythmic drugs use with the recurrence after DC cardioversion were supported by an intermediate level of evidence. Conclusion Although AF is a major health issue, few risk- and protective factors for AF recurrence have been identified. None of these factors examined were supported by convincing evidence, whereas established factors such as female gender and left atrial volume showed only weak association. An early CA strategy combined with treatment of metabolic syndrome and hypertension prior to CA may reduce the risk of arrhythmia recurrence. The use of antiarrhythmics can increase the success rate of DC cardioversion. Systematic review registration PROSPERO registry number: CRD42021270613.

  • 31.
    Tsiloni, Evangelia
    et al.
    Univ Patras, Greece.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Gouva, Mary
    Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.
    Univ Patras, Greece.
    Mentis, Manolis
    Univ Patras, Greece.
    Psychosocial effects of intergenerational learning on primary school children and older Adults: A systematic review2023Ingår i: Gerontology & Geriatrics Education, ISSN 0270-1960, E-ISSN 1545-3847Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been increasing emphasis on the importance of intergenerational learning and interaction. People of different ages engage in meaningful and mutually beneficial activities, aimed at developing knowledge, skills, and values. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the psychosocial effects of intergenerational learning in school-age children and older adults. A systematic review of both quantitative and qualitative data was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Scopus, and ERIC electronic databases were searched up to 26 July 2022 using the following Population (P) -Exposure (E) - Outcome (O) elements: school-age children and older adults (P), intergenerational learning (E), and psychosocial effects (O). Reference lists of included datasets and relevant review articles were also extensively searched. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used to assess the quality of eligible studies. A narrative synthesis was used as a framework for data analysis. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. Regarding the psychosocial outcomes of participation in intergenerational activities for children and older adults, the majority of studies highlighted improvements in attitudes, well-being, happiness, and other social and psychological aspects, although methodological flaws are discussed.

  • 32.
    Park, Jihye
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Jeong, Gwang Hun
    Gyeongsang Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Song, Minjin
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Jacob, Louis
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Kostev, Karel
    Univ Hosp Marburg, Germany.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Kings Coll London, England; Inst Invest Biomed August Pi I Sunyer IDIBAPS, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Cheon, Jae Hee
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    The global, regional, and national burden of inflammatory bowel diseases, 1990-2019: A systematic analysis for the global burden of disease study 20192023Ingår i: Digestive and Liver Disease, ISSN 1590-8658, E-ISSN 1878-3562, Vol. 55, nr 10, s. 1352-1359Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In recent years, the global epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has changed rapidly.Aims: We described the updated global IBD epidemiology results based on the 2019 Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD).Methods: We estimated the prevalence rate, death rate, years of life lost (YLLs), years lived with disability (YLDs), and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) from GBD 2019 in 195 countries and territories between 1990 and 2019.Results: The crude prevalence of IBD increased by 47% in 2019 globally. Accordingly, the age-standardized prevalence rate showed 19% decrease. The age-standardized death rates, YLDs, YLLs, and DALYs of IBD in 2019 decreased compared to those in 1990. The annual percentage change in age-standardized prevalence rate decreased most in United States and increased in East Asia and high-income Asia Pacific from 1990 to 2019. Continents with high socioeconomic index (SDI) had higher age-standardized prevalence rates compared to continents with low SDI. The 2019 age-standardized prevalence rate of high latitudes was higher than that of low latitudes in Asia, Europe, and North America.Conclusion: The observed trends and geographic variations in IBD documented in the 2019 GBD study will aid policymakers in policy, research, and investment development.

  • 33.
    Kim, Hakyoung
    et al.
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kwon, Rosie
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Hojae
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Rahmati, Masoud
    Lorestan Univ, Iran; Vali E Asr Univ Rafsanjan, Iran.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Parc Sanit St Joan de Deu, Spain.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA 02142 USA.
    Sanchez, Guillermo F. Lopez
    Univ Murcia, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Yeo, Seung Geun
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Cho, Wonyoung
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Viral load dynamics and shedding kinetics of mpox infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis2023Ingår i: Journal of Travel Medicine, ISSN 1195-1982, E-ISSN 1708-8305, Vol. 30, nr 5, artikel-id taad111Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Viral load dynamics and shedding kinetics are critical factors for studying infectious diseases. However, evidence on the viral dynamics of mpox remains limited and inconclusive. Thus, we aimed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the viral load and viability of the re-emerged mpox virus since 2022.Methods For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Google Scholar for published articles that are related to mpox viral dynamics up to April 2023.Results From 19 studies, 880 samples and 1477 specimens were collected. The pooled median Ct values appeared in the following order: skin lesion [Ct value 21.7 (IQR 17.8-25.5)], anorectal [22.3 (16.9-27.6)], saliva [25.9 (22.5-31.1)], oral [29.0 (24.5-32.8)], semen [29.6 (25.9-33.4)], urine [30.5 (24.6-36.4)], pharyngeal [31.9 (26.5-37.3)], urethra [33.0 (28.0-35.0)] and blood [33.2 (30.4-36.1)]. People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a lower Ct value in the skin [skin HIV+, 19.2 (18.3-20.0) vs skin HIV-, 25.4 (21.2-29.0)]. From the Ct values and test day since symptom onset, we identified temporal trends of viral load for each specimen type. Changes in the trend were observed at 4 days in saliva, 5 days in blood, 6 days in skin, 7 days in anorectal, urine, semen and pharyngeal and 8 days in the urethra. We determined optimal Ct cutoff values for anorectal (34.0), saliva (27.7) and urethra (33.0) specimens, where a Ct value above each cutoff suggests minimal viral viability. Using these cutoff values, we derived the duration of viable viral isolation in each specific specimen type (anorectal 19 days, saliva 14 days and urethra 14 days).Conclusion Skin lesion, anorectal and saliva samples contained the highest viral load. The peak viral load manifests within 4-8 days after symptom onset, and viable virus detection was presumed to cease within 14-19 days from symptom onset in anorectal, saliva and urethral samples.

  • 34.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Li, Han
    Univ Florida, FL USA.
    Tsitsas, George
    Harokopio Univ, Greece.
    Lee, Keum Hwa
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Choi, Jiwoo
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Jiwon
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Choi, Young Jo
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Tsamakis, Konstantinos
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Estrade, Andres
    Univ Catolica, Uruguay; Kings Coll London, England.
    Agorastos, Agorastos
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Vancampfort, Davy
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Tsiptsios, Dimitrios
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Greece.
    Thompson, Trevor
    Univ Greenwich, England.
    Mosina, Anna
    Integrated Psychiat Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Vakadaris, Georgios
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Pavia, Italy.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Correll, Christoph U.
    Northwell Hlth, NY USA; Donald & Barbara Zucker Sch Med Hofstra Northwell, NY USA; Charite, Germany.
    Han, Young Joo
    Inje Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Seoyeon
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Il Shin, Jae
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada.
    A large-scale meta-analytic atlas of mental health problems prevalence during the COVID-19 early pandemic2022Ingår i: Journal of Medical Virology, ISSN 0146-6615, E-ISSN 1096-9071, Vol. 94, nr 5, s. 1935-1949Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions can impact mental health. To quantify the mental health burden of COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis, searching World Health Organization COVID-19/PsycInfo/PubMed databases (09/29/2020), including observational studies reporting on mental health outcomes in any population affected by COVID-19. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of anxiety, depression, stress, sleep problems, posttraumatic symptoms. Sensitivity analyses were conducted on severe mental health problems, in high-quality studies, and in representative samples. Subgroup analyses were conducted stratified by age, sex, country income level, and COVID-19 infection status. One-hundred-seventy-three studies from February to July 2020 were included (n = 502,261, median sample = 948, age = 34.4 years, females = 63%). Ninety-one percent were cross-sectional studies, and 18.5%/57.2% were of high/moderate quality. The highest prevalence emerged for posttraumatic symptoms in COVID-19 infected people (94%), followed by behavioral problems in those with prior mental disorders (77%), fear in healthcare workers (71%), anxiety in caregivers/family members of people with COVID-19 (42%), general health/social contact/passive coping style in the general population (38%), depression in those with prior somatic disorders (37%), and fear in other-than-healthcare workers (29%). Females and people with COVID-19 infection had higher rates of almost all outcomes; college students/young adults of anxiety, depression, sleep problems, suicidal ideation; adults of fear and posttraumatic symptoms. Anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic symptoms were more prevalent in low-/middle-income countries, sleep problems in high-income countries. The COVID-19 pandemic adversely impacts mental health in a unique manner across population subgroups. Our results inform tailored preventive strategies and interventions to mitigate current, future, and transgenerational adverse mental health of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • 35.
    Kim, Jong Yeob
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Choi, Min Je
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Ha, Sungji
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Hwang, Jimin
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, MD USA.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Inst dInvest Biomed August Pi Sunyer IDIBAPS, Spain; Kings Coll London, England; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Jacob, Louis
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Univ Versailles St Quentin Yvelines, France.
    de Pablo, Gonzalo Salazar
    Kings Coll London, England; South London Maudsley NHS Trust, England; Kings Coll London, England.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sejong Univ Coll Software Convergence, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Thompson, Trevor
    Univ Greenwich, England; Univ Nottingham, England.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England; New York Univ Child Study Ctr, NY USA.
    Lollo, Gianluca
    Osped Regionale Bellinzona Valli Ente Osped, Switzerland.
    Liang, Chih-Sung
    Natl Def Med Ctr, Taiwan; Natl Def Med Ctr, Taiwan.
    Chu, Che-Sheng
    Kaohsiung Vet Gen Hosp, Taiwan; Kaohsiung Vet Gen Hosp, Taiwan; Society Psychophysiol, Taiwan; Kaohsiung Med Univ, Taiwan.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Pavia, Italy; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Cheon, Keun-Ah
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Solmi, Marco
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Southampton, England; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Association between autism spectrum disorder and inflammatory bowel disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis2022Ingår i: Autism Research, ISSN 1939-3792, E-ISSN 1939-3806, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 340-352Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are frequently diagnosed with co-occurring medical conditions including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To investigate the association, we conducted a systematic review registered in PROSPERO (ID:CRD42021236263) with a random-effects meta-analysis. We searched PubMed, Embase, and PsycInfo (last search on January 25, 2021), and manually searched relevant publications. We included observational studies measuring the association between ASD and IBD. The primary outcome was the association (odds ratio, OR) between ASD and later development of IBD. Sensitivity analyses were conducted by quality, confounding adjustment, and study design. We performed meta-regression analyses and assessed heterogeneity, publication bias, and quality of studies with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Overall, we included six studies consisting of eight datasets, including over 11 million participants. We found that ASD was significantly associated with subsequent incident IBD (any IBD, OR = 1.66, 95% confidence interval[CI] = 1.25-2.21, p < 0.001; ulcerative colitis, OR = 1.91, 95%CI = 1.41-2.6, p < 0.001; Crohns disease, OR = 1.47, 95%CI = 1.15-1.88, p = 0.002). ASD and IBD were also associated regardless of temporal sequence of diagnosis (any IBD, OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.28-1.93, p < 0.001; ulcerative colitis, OR = 1.7, 95%CI = 1.36-2.12, p < 0.001; Crohns disease, OR = 1.37, 95%CI = 1.12-1.69, p = 0.003). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the findings of the main analysis. Meta-regression did not identify any significant moderators. Publication bias was not detected. Quality was high in four datasets and medium in four. In conclusion, our findings highlight the need to screen for IBD in individuals with ASD, and future research should identify who, among those with ASD, has the highest risk of IBD, and elucidate the shared biological mechanisms between ASD and IBD.

  • 36.
    Tsiptsios, Dimitrios
    et al.
    South Tyneside & Sunderland NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Leontidou, Eleni
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Greece.
    Fountoulakis, Petros N.
    Askepeion Hosp, Greece.
    Ouranidis, Andreas
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Matziridis, Anestis
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Greece.
    Manolis, Apostolos
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Greece.
    Triantafyllis, Andreas S.
    Askepeion Hosp, Greece.
    Tsamakis, Konstantinos
    Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, England.
    Serdari, Aspasia
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Greece.
    Terzoudi, Aikaterini
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Greece.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Steiropoulos, Paschalis
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Greece.
    Tripsianis, Gregory
    Democritus Univ Thrace, Greece.
    Association between sleep insufficiency and dyslipidemia: a cross-sectional study among Greek adults in the primary care setting2022Ingår i: Sleep Science, ISSN 1984-0659, E-ISSN 1984-0063, Vol. 15, s. 49-58Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the potential association between sleep insufficiency and dyslipidemia (DL) in the primary care setting using self-reported questionnaires. Material and Methods: 957 adults aged between 19 and 86 years old from the rural area of Thrace, Greece were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Multistage stratified cluster sampling was used and the subjects were classified into three groups according to sleep duration [short ( 6h), normal (6-8h), and long ( 8h) sleep duration]. DL was defined by a positive response to the question "Have you ever been told by a doctor or health professional that your blood cholesterol or triglyceride levels were high?", or if they were currently taking antilipidemic agents. Sleep quality, utilizing Epworth sleepiness scale, Athens insomnia scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index and Berlin questionnaire, was also examined. Results: DL prevalence was significantly associated with short sleep duration (aOR=2.18, p<0.001) and insomnia (aOR=1.43, p=0.050), while its relation with poor sleep quality (aOR=1.31, p=0.094) and risk for obstructive sleep apnea (aOR=1.32, p=0.097) were of marginal statistical significance. Concerning insomnia subtypes, DL was significantly associated with difficulties maintaining sleep (aOR=2.99, p<0.001) and early morning awakenings (aOR=1.38, p=0.050), but not difficulties initiating sleep (aOR=1.18, p=0.328). Conclusion: This study reveals an association between sleep pathology and DL. Thus, early pharmacological and cognitive or behavioral interventions that improve sleep are deemed necessary in order to decrease DL burden.

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  • 37.
    Arrondo, Gonzalo
    et al.
    Univ Navarra, Spain; Univ Southampton, England.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Southampton, England; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Kings Coll London, England.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum. Univ Ioannina, Greece.
    Eudave, Luis
    Univ Navarra, Spain.
    Ruiz-Goikoetxea, Maite
    Serv Navarro Salud Osasunbidea, Spain.
    Ciaurriz-Larraz, Amaia M.
    Univ Navarra, Spain.
    Magallon, Sara
    Univ Navarra, Spain.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Deakin Univ, Australia.
    Cipriani, Andrea
    Univ Oxford, England; Warneford Hosp, England.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; Univ Pavia, Italy.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Correll, Christoph U.
    Northwell Hlth, NY USA; Donald & Barbara Zucker Sch Med Hofstra Northwell, NY USA; Charite, Germany.
    Cortese, Samuele
    Univ Southampton, England; Univ Southampton, England; Solent NHS Trust, England; Univ Nottingham, England; NYU, NY USA.
    Associations between mental and physical conditions in children and adolescents: An umbrella review2022Ingår i: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, ISSN 0149-7634, E-ISSN 1873-7528, Vol. 137, artikel-id 104662Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We mapped the evidence on the type and strength of associations between a broad range of mental and physical conditions in children and adolescents, by carrying out an umbrella review, i.e., a quantitative synthesis of previous systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We also assessed to which extent the links between mental and physical conditions vary across disorders or, by contrast, are transdiagnostic. Based on a pre-established protocol, we retained 45 systematic reviews/meta-analyses, encompassing around 12.5 million of participants. In analyses limited to the most rigorous estimates, we found evidence for the following associations: ADHD-asthma, ADHDobesity, and depression-asthma. A transdiagnostic association was confirmed between asthma and anxiety/ASD/depression/bipolar disorder, between obesity and ADHD/ASD/depression, and between dermatitis and ASD/ADHD. We conclude that obesity and allergic conditions are likely to be associated with mental disorders in children and adolescents. Our results can help clinicians explore potential links between mental and physical conditions in children/adolescent and provide a road map for future studies aimed at shading light on the underlying factors.

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  • 38.
    Jung, Se Yong
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Korea Univ, South Korea; Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Li, Han
    Univ Florida, FL USA.
    Lee, Keum Hwa
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain; Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Kronbichler, Andreas
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Tizaoui, Kalthoum
    Tunis El Manar Univ, Tunisia.
    Cargnin, Sarah
    Univ Piemonte Orientale, Italy.
    Terrazzino, Salvatore
    Univ Piemonte Orientale, Italy.
    Hong, Sung Hwi
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Abou Ghayda, Ramy
    Univ Hosp, OH USA; Case Western Reserve Univ, OH 44106 USA.
    Kim, Nam Kyun
    Emory Univ, GA 30322 USA; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Chung, Seo Kyoung
    Ewha Womans Univ, South Korea.
    Jacob, Louis
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Salem, Joe-Elie
    Sorbonne Univ, France.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sejong Univ, South Korea.
    Kostev, Karel
    Univ Clin Marburg, Germany.
    Kim, Ah Young
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Jung, Jo Won
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Choi, Jae Young
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Shin, Jin Soo
    Korea Res Inst Chem Technol, Germany.
    Park, Soon-Jung
    T&R Biofab Co Ltd, Germany.
    Choi, Seong Woo
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Ban, Kiwon
    City Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Moon, Sung-Hwan
    T&R Biofab Co Ltd, Germany.
    Go, Yun Young
    City Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Cardiovascular events and safety outcomes associated with remdesivir using a World Health Organization international pharmacovigilance database2022Ingår i: Clinical and Translational Science, ISSN 1752-8054, E-ISSN 1752-8062, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 501-513Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    On October 2020, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved remdesivir as the first drug for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), increasing remdesivir prescriptions worldwide. However, potential cardiovascular (CV) toxicities associated with remdesivir remain unknown. We aimed to characterize the CV adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with remdesivir using VigiBase, an individual case safety report database of the World Health Organization (WHO). Disproportionality analyses of CV-ADRs associated with remdesivir were performed using reported odds ratios and information components. We conducted in vitro experiments using cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cell cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) to confirm cardiotoxicity of remdesivir. To distinguish drug-induced CV-ADRs from COVID-19 effects, we restricted analyses to patients with COVID-19 and found that, after adjusting for multiple confounders, cardiac arrest (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-3.29), bradycardia (aOR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.24-3.53), and hypotension (aOR: 1.67, 95% CI: 1.03-2.73) were associated with remdesivir. In vitro data demonstrated that remdesivir reduced the cell viability of hPSC-CMs in time- and dose-dependent manners. Physicians should be aware of potential CV consequences following remdesivir use and implement adequate CV monitoring to maintain a tolerable safety margin.

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  • 39.
    Lee, Christine J.
    et al.
    New York Inst Technol, NY 11568 USA.
    Woo, Wongi
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Ah Young
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sejong Univ, South Korea; Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Pg Lluis Co 23, Spain.
    Kim, Min Seo
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Tizaoui, Kalthoum
    Tunis El Manar Univ, Tunisia.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Radua, Joaquim
    CIBERSAM, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Kings Coll London, England.
    Lee, Sungsoo
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Il Shin, Jae
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Clinical manifestations of COVID-19 breakthrough infections: A systematic review and meta-analysis2022Ingår i: Journal of Medical Virology, ISSN 0146-6615, E-ISSN 1096-9071, Vol. 94, nr 9, s. 4234-4245Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To provide a comparative meta-analysis and systematic review of the risk and clinical outcomes of coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) infection between fully vaccinated and unvaccinated groups. Eighteen studies of COVID-19 infections in fully vaccinated ("breakthrough infections") and unvaccinated individuals were reviewed from Medline/PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science databases. The meta-analysis examined the summary effects and between-study heterogeneity regarding differences in the risk of infection, hospitalization, treatments, and mortality between vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. he overall risk of infection was lower for the fully vaccinated compared to that of the unvaccinated (relative risk [RR] 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.19-0.21), especially for variants other than Delta (Delta: RR 0.29, 95% CI: 0.13-0.65; other variants: RR 0.06, 95% CI: 0.04-0.08). The risk of asymptomatic infection was not statistically significantly different between fully vaccinated and unvaccinated (RR 0.56, 95% CI: 0.27-1.19). There were neither statistically significant differences in risk of hospitalization (RR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.38-2.93), invasive mechanical ventilation (RR 1.65, 95% CI: 0.90-3.06), or mortality (RR 1.19, 95% CI: 0.79-1.78). Conversely, the risk of supplemental oxygen during hospitalization was significantly higher for the unvaccinated (RR 1.40, 95% CI: 1.08-1.82). Unvaccinated people were more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection than fully vaccinated for all variants. Once infected, there were no statistically significant differences in the risk of hospitalization, invasive mechanical ventilation, or mortality. Still, unvaccinated showed an increased need for oxygen supplementation. Further prospective analysis, including patients risk factors, COVID-19 variants, and the utilized treatment strategies, would be warranted.

  • 40.
    Kim, Min Seo
    et al.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Seong, Dawon
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Li, Han
    Univ Florida, FL USA.
    Chung, Seo Kyoung
    Ewha Womans Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Youngjoo
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Minho
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sejong Univ, South Korea; Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Kyung Hee Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Jae Han
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Keum Hwa
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain; Inst Salud Carlos III, Spain.
    Jacob, Louis
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Kronbichler, Andreas
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Tizaoui, Kalthoum
    Tunis El Manar Univ, Tunisia.
    Cargnin, Sarah
    Univ Piemonte Orientale, Italy.
    Terrazzino, Salvatore
    Univ Piemonte Orientale, Italy.
    Hong, Sung Hwi
    Yonsei Univ Hlth Syst, South Korea.
    Abou Ghayda, Ramy
    Case Western Reserve Univ, OH USA.
    Radua, Joaquim
    CIBERSAM, Spain; Kings Coll London, England; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Oh, Hans
    Univ Southern Calif, CA USA.
    Kostev, Karel
    Univ Clin Marburg, Germany.
    Ogino, Shuji
    Dana Farber Harvard Canc Ctr, MA USA; Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA; Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA 02142 USA.
    Lee, I-Min
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA USA; Brigham & Womens Hosp, MA 02115 USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA.
    Giovannucci, Edward
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA USA; Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA USA.
    Barnett, Yvonne
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Butler, Laurie
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    McDermott, Daragh
    Nottingham Trent Univ, England.
    Ilie, Petre-Cristian
    Queen Elizabeth Hosp Fdn Trust, England.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea; Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Comparative effectiveness of N95, surgical or medical, and non-medical facemasks in protection against respiratory virus infection: A systematic review and network meta-analysis2022Ingår i: Reviews in Medical Virology, ISSN 1052-9276, E-ISSN 1099-1654, Vol. 32, nr 5, artikel-id e2336Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this systematic review and network meta-analysis is to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of N95, surgical/medical and non-medical facemasks as personal protective equipment against respiratory virus infection. The study incorporated 35 published and unpublished randomized controlled trials and observational studies investigating specific mask effectiveness against influenza virus, SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. We searched PubMed, Google Scholar and medRxiv databases for studies published up to 5 February 2021 (PROSPERO registration: CRD42020214729). The primary outcome of interest was the rate of respiratory viral infection. The quality of evidence was estimated using the GRADE approach. High compliance to mask-wearing conferred a significantly better protection (odds ratio [OR], 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-0.82) than low compliance. N95 or equivalent masks were the most effective in providing protection against coronavirus infections (OR, 0.30; CI, 0.20-0.44) consistently across subgroup analyses of causative viruses and clinical settings. Evidence supporting the use of medical or surgical masks against influenza or coronavirus infections (SARS, MERS and COVID-19) was weak. Our study confirmed that the use of facemasks provides protection against respiratory viral infections in general; however, the effectiveness may vary according to the type of facemask used. Our findings encourage the use of N95 respirators or their equivalents (e.g., P2) for best personal protection in healthcare settings until more evidence on surgical and medical masks is accrued. This study highlights a substantial lack of evidence on the comparative effectiveness of mask types in community settings.

  • 41.
    Kim, Min Seo
    et al.
    Korea Univ, South Korea; Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Jung, Se Yong
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Ahn, Jong Gyun
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Park, Se Jin
    Eulji Univ, South Korea.
    Shoenfeld, Yehuda
    St Petersburg State Univ, Russia; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Kronbichler, Andreas
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain; CIBERSAM, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Tizaoui, Kalthoum
    Univ Tunis El Manar, Tunisia.
    Hong, Sung Hwi
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Jacob, Louis
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; Univ Versailles St Quentin Yvelines, France.
    Salem, Joe-Elie
    Sorbonne Univ, France; Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, France.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sejong Univ, South Korea.
    Ogino, Shuji
    Dana Farber Harvard Canc Ctr, MA USA; Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, MA USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA 02115 USA; Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, MA 02142 USA.
    Kim, Hanna
    Ewha Womans Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Jerome H.
    Int Vaccine Inst, South Korea.
    Excler, Jean-Louis
    Int Vaccine Inst, South Korea.
    Marks, Florian
    Int Vaccine Inst, South Korea; Univ Cambridge, England; Univ Antananarivo, Madagascar.
    Clemens, John D.
    Int Vaccine Inst, South Korea; Int Ctr Diarrheal Dis Res, Bangladesh; UCLA Fielding Sch Publ Hlth, CA USA.
    Eisenhut, Michael
    Luton & Dunstable Univ Hosp, England.
    Barnett, Yvonne
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Butler, Laurie
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Ilie, Cristian Petre
    Queen Elizabeth Hosp Fdn Trust, England.
    Shin, Eui-Cheol
    Korea Adv Inst Sci & Technol, South Korea; Korea Adv Inst Sci & Technol, South Korea.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Comparative safety of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines to influenza vaccines: A pharmacovigilance analysis using WHO international database2022Ingår i: Journal of Medical Virology, ISSN 0146-6615, E-ISSN 1096-9071, Vol. 94, nr 3, s. 1085-1095Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Two messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines developed by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna are being rolled out. Despite the high volume of emerging evidence regarding adverse events (AEs) associated with the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines, previous studies have thus far been largely based on the comparison between vaccinated and unvaccinated control, possibly highlighting the AE risks with COVID-19 mRNA vaccination. Comparing the safety profile of mRNA vaccinated individuals with otherwise vaccinated individuals would enable a more relevant assessment for the safety of mRNA vaccination. We designed a comparative safety study between 18 755 and 27 895 individuals who reported to VigiBase for adverse events following immunization (AEFI) with mRNA COVID-19 and influenza vaccines, respectively, from January 1, 2020, to January 17, 2021. We employed disproportionality analysis to rapidly detect relevant safety signals and compared comparative risks of a diverse span of AEFIs for the vaccines. The safety profile of novel mRNA vaccines was divergent from that of influenza vaccines. The overall pattern suggested that systematic reactions like chill, myalgia, fatigue were more noticeable with the mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, while injection site reactogenicity events were more prevalent with the influenza vaccine. Compared to the influenza vaccine, mRNA COVID-19 vaccines demonstrated a significantly higher risk for a few manageable cardiovascular complications, such as hypertensive crisis (adjusted reporting odds ratio [ROR], 12.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.47-65.54), and supraventricular tachycardia (adjusted ROR, 7.94; 95% CI, 2.62-24.00), but lower risk of neurological complications such as syncope, neuralgia, loss of consciousness, Guillain-Barre syndrome, gait disturbance, visual impairment, and dyskinesia. This study has not identified significant safety concerns regarding mRNA vaccination in real-world settings. The overall safety profile patterned a lower risk of serious AEFI following mRNA vaccines compared to influenza vaccines.

  • 42.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Metelli, Silvia
    Univ Paris Cite, France.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Antoniadis, Antonios P.
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Rizas, Konstantinos D.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Liuba, Ioan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Almroth, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Jönsson, Anders Hassel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Schwieler, Jonas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Tsartsalis, Dimitrios
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Sideris, Skevos
    Natl & Kapodistrian Univ Athens, Greece.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Fragakis, Nikolaos
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Chaimani, Anna
    Univ Paris Cite, France.
    Comparing efficacy and safety in catheter ablation strategies for atrial fibrillation: a network meta-analysis2022Ingår i: BMC Medicine, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 20, nr 1, artikel-id 193Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is no consensus on the most efficient catheter ablation (CA) strategy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of different CA strategies for AF ablation through network meta-analysis (NMA). Methods: A systematic search of PubMed, Web of Science, and CENTRAL was performed up to October 5th, 2020. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing different CA approaches were included. Efficacy was defined as arrhythmia recurrence after CA and safety as any reported complication related to the procedure during a minimum follow-up time of 6 months. Results: In total, 67 RCTs (n = 9871) comparing 19 different CA strategies were included. The risk of recurrence was significantly decreased compared to pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) alone for PVI with renal denervation (RR: 0.60, CI: 0.38-0.94), PVI with ganglia-plexi ablation (RR: 0.62, CI: 0.41-0.94), PVI with additional ablation lines (RR: 0.8, CI: 0.68-0.95) and PVI in combination with bi-atrial modification (RR: 0.32, CI: 0.11-0.88). Strategies including PVI appeared superior to non-PVI strategies such as electrogram-based approaches. No significant differences in safety were observed. Conclusions: This NMA showed that PVI in combination with additional CA strategies, such as autonomic modulation and additional lines, seem to increase the efficacy of PVI alone. These strategies can be considered in treating patients with AF, since, additionally, no differences in safety were observed. This study provides decision-makers with comprehensive and comparative evidence about the efficacy and safety of different CA strategies.

  • 43.
    Charitakis, Emmanouil
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Metelli, Silvia
    Univ Paris, France.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Antoniadis, Antonios P.
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Liuba, Ioan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för diagnostik och specialistmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Almroth, Henrik
    Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Jönsson, Anders Hassel
    Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Kardiologiska kliniken US.
    Schwieler, Jonas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Sideris, Skevos
    Hippokrateion Hosp, Greece.
    Tsartsalis, Dimitrios
    Region Östergötland, Hjärtcentrum, Fysiologiska kliniken US.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Fragakis, Nikolaos
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Chaimani, Anna
    Univ Paris, France.
    Comparing Efficacy and Safety in Catheter Ablation Strategies for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials2022Ingår i: Diagnostics, ISSN 2075-4418, Vol. 12, nr 2, artikel-id 433Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Although catheter ablation (CA) is an established treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), there is no consensus regarding the most efficient CA strategy. The objective of this network meta-analysis (NMA) was to compare the efficacy and safety of different CA strategies for PAF. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Web of Science, and CENTRAL until the final search date, 5 October 2020. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing different CA strategies and methods for pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) were included. Efficacy was defined as lack of arrhythmia recurrence after CA and safety as any reported complication related to the procedure during a minimum follow-up time of six months. In total, 43 RCTs comparing 11 different CA strategies involving 6701 patients were included. The risk of recurrence was significantly decreased in comparison with PVI with radiofrequency only for the following treatments: PVI with adjuvant ablation (RR: 0.79, CI: 0.65-0.97) and PVI with sympathetic modulation (RR: 0.64, CI: 0.46-0.88). However, PVI with radiofrequency was superior to non-PVI strategies (RR: 1.65, CI: 1.2-2.26). No statistically significant difference was found in safety between different CA strategies. Concerning different PVI strategies, no difference was observed either in efficacy or in safety between tested strategies. This NMA suggests that different PVI strategies are generally similar in terms of efficacy, while PVI with additional ablation or sympathetic modulation may be more effective than PVI alone. This study provides decision-makers with insights into the efficacy and safety of different CA strategies.

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  • 44.
    Yoon, Sojung
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Sung Eun
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Ko, Younhee
    HankEngland Univ Foreign Studies, South Korea.
    Jeong, Gwang Hun
    Gyeongsang Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Keum Hwa
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Jinhee
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Solmi, Marco
    Univ Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hosp, Canada; Ottawa Hosp Res Inst OHRI, Canada; Univ Ottawa, Canada.
    Jacob, Louis
    Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France; Univ Barcelona, Spain.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Natl Ctr Neurol & Psychiat, Japan; Sodertorn Univ, Sweden.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth CAMH, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Kronbichler, Andreas
    Univ Cambridge, England.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Hong, Sung Hwi
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Thompson, Trevor
    Univ Greenwich, England.
    Oh, Hans
    Univ Southern Calif, CA 90015 USA.
    de Pablo, Gonzalo Salazar
    Kings Coll London, England; Kings Coll London, England; Univ Complutense, Spain.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Kings Coll London, England; CIBERSAM, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Shin, Jae Il
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Fusar-Poli, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England; Univ Pavia, Italy; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Differential expression of MicroRNAs in Alzheimers disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis2022Ingår i: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 27, nr 5, s. 2405-2413Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimers disease (AD) results in progressive cognitive decline owing to the accumulation of amyloid plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have attracted attention as a putative diagnostic and therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases. However, existing meta-analyses on AD and its association with miRNAs have produced inconsistent results. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the magnitude and consistency of differences in miRNA levels between AD patients, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients and healthy controls (HC). Articles investigating miRNA levels in blood, brain tissue, or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD and MCI patients versus HC were systematically searched in PubMed/Medline from inception to February 16(th), 2021. Fixed- and random-effects meta-analyses were complemented with the I-2 statistic to measure the heterogeneity, assessment of publication bias, sensitivity subgroup analyses (AD severity, brain region, post-mortem versus ante-mortem specimen for CSF and type of analysis used to quantify miRNA) and functional enrichment pathway analysis. Of the 1512 miRNAs included in 61 articles, 425 meta-analyses were performed on 334 miRNAs. Fifty-six miRNAs were significantly upregulated (n = 40) or downregulated (n = 16) in AD versus HC and all five miRNAs were significantly upregulated in MCI versus HC. Functional enrichment analysis confirmed that pathways related to apoptosis, immune response and inflammation were statistically enriched with upregulated pathways in participants with AD relative to HC. This study confirms that miRNAs expression is altered in AD and MCI compared to HC. These findings open new diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives for this disorder.

  • 45.
    Kim, Jae Han
    et al.
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Jong Yeob
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seul
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, San
    Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Stubbs, Brendon
    Kings Coll London, England; South London & Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England; Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Koyanagi, Ai
    Univ Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Spain.
    Dragioti, Elena
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, medicin och vård, Avdelningen för prevention, rehabilitering och nära vård. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Smärt och rehabiliteringscentrum.
    Jacob, Louis
    CIBERSAM, Spain; Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Carvalho, Andre F.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth CAMH, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Radua, Joaquim
    Kings Coll London, England; Inst Invest Biomed August Pi & Sunyer IDIBAPS, Spain; Mental Hlth Res Networking Ctr CIBERSAM, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Thompson, Trevor
    Univ Greenwich, England.
    Smith, Lee
    Anglia Ruskin Univ, England.
    Oh, Hans
    Univ Southern Calif, CA 90015 USA.
    Yang, Lin
    Alberta Hlth Serv, Canada; Univ Calgary, Canada; Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Fornaro, Michele
    Univ Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Stickley, Andrew
    Natl Ctr Neurol & Psychiat, Japan; Sodertorn Univ, Sweden.
    de Pablo, Gonzalo Salazar
    Kings Coll London, England; Kings Coll London, England; Univ Complutense, Spain.
    Tizaoui, Kalthoum
    Tunis El Manar Univ, Tunisia.
    Yon, Dong Keon
    Seoul Natl Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Seung Won
    Sejong Univ, South Korea.
    Hwang, Jimin
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, MD USA.
    Shin, Jae Il