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  • 1.
    Bojovic, Neva
    et al.
    Kedge Business School, Bordeaux, France.
    Salignac, Fanny
    University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ponsignon, Frédéric
    Kedge Business School, Bordeaux, France.
    Framing Contests During Collaborative Experimentation in Ecosystem Emergence2023Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates how ecosystem actors collaborate in the early stages of ecosystem emergence to create and test the ecosystem value proposition. It analyses multi-actor data from a two-year-long experimentation process around the circularization of human waste in France. In doing so, the findings of this study open a black box of collaborative experimentation and uncover important struggles based on the different framings of value and power that become pertinent during the experimentation process. This study contributes to ecosystem literature, by shedding light on the importance of internal legitimacy between ecosystem actors in ecosystem emergence, and to the strategic experimentation literature by showing how multiple theories of value in collaborative experiments lead to negative, yet generative experimentation outcomes.

  • 2.
    Nansubuga, Brenda
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell ekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell ekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    From Access to Ownership: A Study of E-Scooter Service Customers2023Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 3.
    Nansubuga, Brenda
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell ekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    From Access to Ownership: A Study of E-Scooter Service Customers2023Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Parment, Anders
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University.
    Greenwashing: Teaching from Marketing & Sustainability2023Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This session is based on the book “Marketing & Sustainability: Why and how sustainability is changing current marketing practices” (Guyader et al. 2020, Studentlitteratur). The authors host a workshop about using the concept of greenwashing in the classroom, and they open for discussion with fellow teachers about teaching marketing with a sustainability approach. The session begins with a short introductory presentation of the book content, with a focus on the practice of greenwashing — before moving-on to a workshop/discussion of greenwashing cases in Sweden.

  • 5.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Olsson, Lars E.
    Department of Social and Psychological Studies, and Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Friman, Margareta
    Department of Social and Psychological Studies, and Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sharing economy platforms as mainstream: balancing pro-social and economic tensions2023Ingår i: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 34, nr 9-10, s. 1257-1276Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour, this study explains sharing economy platform usage intention. Our results based on PLS-SEM estimations with survey data (N = 655) from the carpooling context show that sharing orientation (i.e. sharing usage instead of owning/buying), grassroots engagement (i.e. non-profit organisation driven by volunteers), and platform authenticity (i.e. loyalty to the original carpooling practice) are strong determinants of people’s attitudes towards the carpooling platform, while trend orientation (e.g. the ‘sharing economy’ paradigm) is not significant. This implies that while digitalisation can optimise older practices (e.g. hitchhiking), online platforms facilitating contemporary sharing practices need to be embedded in the original sharing ethos and values to raise usage intention – even though the sharing economy has become mainstream.

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  • 6.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Flaig, Alexander
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sustainable Service Ecosystem Design: Tensions and Engagement Constraints2023Ingår i: 2023 AMA Winter Academic Conference: "Marketing During Times of Change" / [ed] Umashankar N. & Lisjak M., 2023, s. 1055-1057Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the promise and necessity of sustainable service ecosystems (SSE) to generate transformative value, many SSEs have failed to emerge or have struggled to survive. By investigating the design process of an SSE and the underlying factors that inhibit collaboration between its actors, this study answers calls to use the concept of actor engagement to further understand the dynamics of designing service ecosystems (Vink et al. 2021), as well as calls to further research sustainable services (Huang et al. 2021; Ostrom et al. 2021) and SSEs (Field et al. 2021). 

    The main contribution lays in the expansion of the actor engagement concept by identifying five engagement constraints (i.e., institutional, economic, legal, political, and technological) that influence the level of engagement. In line with the systemic view of actor engagement (Brodie et al. 2019), the identified engagement constraints complement current actor engagement conceptualizations by providing systemic factors that influence the engagement behavior of actors. 

    Secondly, we leverage service ecosystem design literature, and we identify two non-design related tensions in SSE design (coopetition, and personal commitment), and three design related tensions (related to the value proposition, business model, and governance of the SSE). Indeed, service ecosystem designers may encounter unexpected problems when sustainability becomes a central feature — our findings provide a first overview of tensions that occur in the design process of an SSE and that inhibit them from emerging and realizing sustainable/transformative outcomes.

    Thirdly, we find indications that the interplay between engagement and tensions can be perceived as a recursive process, as an actor’s engagement can result in tensions, which in turn can influence their level of engagement. Thus, we provide further insights into the interdependencies and dynamics in SSE design processes (Patrício et al. 2018; Sangiorgi et al. 2017; Vink et al. 2021) and a theoretical understanding for disengagement processes(Chandler and Lusch 2015; Lehtinen et al. 2019)

  • 7.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ponsignon, Frederic
    Kedge Business School, 33405 Talence, France.
    Salignac, Fanny
    TD School, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, 2007, Australia; Department of Strategy, Sustainable Development and Entrepreneurship, Kedge Business School, 33405 Talence, France.
    Bojovic, Neva
    Department of Strategy, Sustainable Development and Entrepreneurship, Kedge Business School, 33405 Talence, France.
    Beyond a mediocre customer experience in the circular economy: The satisfaction of contributing to the ecological transition2022Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 378, artikel-id 134495Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to understand and explain the differences in circular (versus traditional) economy consumption habits. It explores the customer experience's role in influencing satisfaction and reuse decisions. Data is collected through a mixed-methods case study. Specifically, the article looks at an innovative ecological sanitation system for urban households aiming at collecting human waste for valorization. Among the participating households, 46 persons provided data: 12 were interviewed about their motives for and experience of using dry sanitation and participating in the waste collection process, 42 answered a user profile survey focusing on demographics and basic individual values, and 36 submitted diary entries (123 in total) providing detailed descriptions and evolutions of their experiences. Based on this rich dataset, the findings highlight that the customer experience is largely inferior to that of using traditional sanitation systems because it is inconsistent, inconvenient and requires significant customer efforts (e.g., voluntary participation, creativity, and bricolage skills). Nonetheless, this mediocre experience is counterbalanced by the customer's personal values and beliefs, as well as the satisfaction of achieving a more responsible and sustainable activity.

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  • 8.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Olsson, Lars E.
    Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Serv Res Ctr, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Friman, Margareta
    Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Serv Res Ctr, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Platform authenticity, sharing orientation, and grassroots engagement in the sharing economy2022Ingår i: Proceedings of the 17th International research symposium on service excellence in management (QUIS17) / [ed] Bruce Tracey, Kristina Heinonen, Oscar Trull-Domínguez, Ángel Peiró-Signes, Valencia, Spain: Universitat Politècnica de València , 2022, s. 186-195Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explains sharing economy platform usage intention. The results of PLS-SEM estimations based on survey data (N=655) in the context of non-profit carpooling indicate that sharing orientation (i.e. sharing usage instead of owning/buying), grassroots engagement (i.e. non-profit organization driven by volunteers), and platform authenticity (i.e. loyalty to the original carpooling practice) are strong determinants of people’s attitudes towards the carpooling platform while trend orientation (e.g., the “sharing economy” paradigm) is not significant. While digitalization can optimize older practices (e.g., hitchhiking), online platforms facilitating contemporary practices (e.g., carpooling) need to be embedded in the original sharing ethos and values to raise usage intention.

  • 9.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ponsignon, Frédéric
    Kedge Business School, Bordeaux, France.
    Salignac, Fanny
    University of Technology Sidney.
    Bojovic, Neva
    Kedge Business School, Bordeaux, France.
    “Shit shouldn’t go to waste!” Ecological benefits counterbalancing mediocre customer experience in thecircular economy2022Ingår i: 12th AMA SERVSIG Conference: 'Reconnect, Rejuvenate, Reshape', University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK, 16-18 June 2022 / [ed] M. Alexander; J. Wilson; E. Tsougkou, 2022Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from linear to circular economy not only requires industrial and service innovations, but it also demands a change of consumption habits with daily life implications. The customer experience with circular solutions is different from the ‘take-make-dispose’ consumption processes of the linear economy: product-service systems based on rental, repair, or recirculation prolong the usage of goods compared with the throw-away culture for example. But there is an issue of customer acceptance of such behavioral changes. Very few studies investigated factors related to the customer experience in the circular economy. There needs more research on circular economy practices which environmentally concerned consumers adopt voluntarily despite the personal trade-offs and the amount of extra work these practices entail. This paper seeks to better understand the differentiating factors in traditional versus circular economy consumption habits, and the role customer experience plays in influencing key outcomes (e.g., satisfaction).

    This paper is based on a framework from the customer experience literature (i.e., TCQ nomenclature developed by De Keyser et al. 2020), and on a case of ecological sanitation in urban households for the collection of human waste for transformation and valorization. The circular economy market based on recovering energy from human waste (e.g., transforming the nutrients contained in urine and feces into agricultural fertilizers) is estimated to reach $6 billion by 2030. We conducted 12 interviewees with users about their participation motives, their experience of using eco-sanitation and participating in the waste collection process (i.e., positive/negative customer values — cf. Leroi-Werelds 2019), and we collected 42 survey responses (about demographic and basic individual values, e.g., Schwartz’ PVQ) and 123 diary entries of ‘critical incidents’ providing detailed descriptions of the customer experience.

    All in all, the ecological sanitation experience was perceived as mediocre, i.e., inferior to the standard sanitation system. Negative perceptions were primarily driven by unpleasant sensorial stimuli (e.g., visual, olfactive). Yet, the overall satisfaction was high. Participants derived benefits from factors unrelated to the qualities of the customer experience. While certain issues required an increased activity (i.e. “voluntary customer participation” — cf. Dong and Sivakumar 2017) and additional efforts (e.g., “bricolage” skills — cf. Witell et al. 2017), this mediocre customer experience was counterbalanced by the participants’ engagement in such pioneering citizen-driven project, their strong belief in the ecological benefits of the circular economy, and the satisfaction of contributing to sustainable consumption.

    Our framework based on the customer experience literature and our customer-centric approach contributes to the relevant issue of the adoption of “closed-loops” circular solutions. Previous research on valorizing waste has concentrated on the food sector and the biogas industry, therefore, our case study and contributions are novel and unique. 

  • 10.
    Bojovic, Neva
    et al.
    Kedge Business School, Bordeaux, France.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ponsignon, Frédéric
    Kedge Business School, Bordeaux, France.
    Salignac, Fanny
    Kedge Business School, Bordeaux, France.
    Framing contests in circular innovation ecosystems: The case of valorizing human waste2021Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystems are communities of hierarchically independent yet interdependent heterogeneous participants who collectively generate a value proposition. In an ‘innovation ecosystems’ multiple actors work together to create and capture value from collaborative innovation activities. Agreeing on a common goal, however, is fraught with tensions and conflicts as partners typically have diverging ideological and moral assumptions about what the purpose of the ecosystem should be. In the case of ‘sustainability focused innovation ecosystems’, such challenges are typically exacerbated as partners may weigh environmental, social, and economic value differently and therefore have conflicting views about what it means to gain sufficient value to remain active in the ecosystem.

    In this paper, we are interested in better understanding how participants come to play specific roles and the impact of this on the construction of a shared purpose and ecosystem emergence. More insights into this process may explain how actors in an innovation ecosystem can collaboratively develop a viable sustainable business model. To do so, we study the early development stage of a ‘circular innovation ecosystems’. The ecosystem in our study emerges around the valorization and circularization of human excreta in France and involves government, citizens and start-ups that have divergent interest but aim to align around a sustainable value proposition. To better understand the socio-cognitive aspects of the emergence of a shared purpose, we build on the framing literature as it provides insights about ecosystem actors’ interest in promoting a certain vision of an ecosystem’s value proposition. We, thus, seek to better understand how ecosystem participants frame the ecosystem’s initial value proposition, how these frames may change when participants interact, and how participants use framing to convince others in the ecosystem. Ultimately, we set out to explore framing contests – i.e. struggles over meaning-making amongst ecosystem participants. We advance research on ecosystem emergence by delving into the nature of these framing contests, and the role of ecosystem orchestrators in aligning contesting frames. Second, we also contribute to better understanding circular innovation ecosystems by outlining the characteristics that give rise to such framing contests, and the overall role of framing and re-framing in creating value from waste.

  • 11.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Nansubuga, Brenda
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell ekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Skill, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema teknik och social förändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Institutional Logics at Play in a Mobility-as-a-Service Ecosystem2021Ingår i: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, nr 15, artikel-id 8285Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decade has brought the transport sector to the forefront of discussions on sustainability and digital innovations: practitioners, researchers, and regulators alike have witnessed the emergence of a wide diversity of shared mobility services. Based on a longitudinal case study of a regional Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) ecosystem in Sweden, constituted of a document analysis and 24 semi-structured interviews with 18 representatives from regional authorities, mobility service providers, and other stakeholders from the public and private sectors, this study examines the co-existing and competing institutional logics at play, identified as State logic, Market logic, Sustainability logic, Experimental logic, and Service logic. The analysis reveals that these institutional logics pertain to tensions in the collaboration within the ecosystem’s stakeholders in terms of: (1) finding a common vision and scope for MaaS, (2) establishing a sustainable business model, (3) triggering a behavioral change regarding car travel, (4) being able to find one’s role within the project and to consequently collaborate with other stakeholders, and (5) managing uncertainty through testing and experimenting innovative solutions, which ultimately yielded key learnings about MaaS and the shared mobility ecosystem and its stakeholders. These case study findings, based on an institutional logics framework, provide a novel perspective on emerging ecosystems, from which implications for MaaS developers and further research on shared mobility are drawn.

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  • 12.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Skill, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Statsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema teknik och social förändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Institutional Logics in the Creation of Mobility-as-a-Service2021Ingår i: Sammanställning av referat från Transportforum 2021 / [ed] Fredrik Hellman och Mattias Haraldsson, VTI, 2021, s. 161-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    1) Background

    Offering Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is about integrating different mobility services from a diversity of public and private actors, into one platform system embodied in a smartphone app to provide unique mobility solutions to each customer need. The objectives of MaaS are to provide more convenient sustainable mobility solutions than the use of private cars, and to reduce traffic congestion and CO2 emissions, liberate parking areas, and other major issues in city centers. In the “sharing economy paradigm”, commuters will not necessarily possess their own means of transportation. With the assumption that a high level of integration between mobility services is more appealing to customers and a tool for promoting sustainability, than the possession and usage of private cars, MaaS is anchored in this paradigm promoting access instead of ownership.

    MaaS can be traced back to a pilot project developed and implemented in Gothenburg, Sweden during 2013-2014, known as Go:Smart. Go:Smart aimed to develop, test (for a limited time period), and evaluate ways to offer smarter and more sustainable ways of traveling for city residents. At the end of the project, 93% of the pilot participants found MaaS app very useful and were willing to continue using it. Despite this, Go:Smart was discontinued. To succeed at the “transportation smörgåsbord concept” future projects would require a careful cooperation and collaboration between the key actors (i.e. the diverse providers of transportation services) involved in the project. In short, while the pilot app worked for 200 people, the actors behind the MaaS solution did not manage to maintain the collaboration and to establish a sustainable business model. Integration barriers, issues of public-private partnership, lack of scalability, developing trust for collaboration, are among the main challenges in implementing MaaS. The public-private partnership impedes the conversion from successful MaaS pilots to full public launch, so that more research should be conducted to better understand the obstacles of MaaS development within public-private collaborations.

    For the MaaS sector to grow as expected, we need to better understand how the mobility actors involved collaborate to launch a MaaS app that meets customers demand, attracts new customers, and maintains a sufficient user base on the long term. This paper aims to investigate the different logics performed by actors involved in creating a market for MaaS that fulfils and shapes customer demand for mobility. On the one hand, a certain mobility demand already exists among customers (e.g. commuters who use different transportation modes), which the MaaS offer can provide a solution through a combination of mobility services that removes inconvenient hassles (e.g. combining multiple subscriptions, timetables, and itineraries from different providers). On the other hand, the demand for mobility can be constructed to attract new customers (e.g. early adopters of new technologies, people with an access-over-ownership lifestyle) with a convenient, innovative, and seamless solution to organize commuting and daily travels such as they find MaaS superior to private car travels and remain actual users. To grasp the different logics underlying these aspects of fulfilling and shaping the demand on a new market, the MaaS actors’ collaboration is analyzed through the lens of institutional logics.

    The marketing literature has recognized that markets are emerging in an on-going process guided by actors so that the markets are shaped favorably to them. This market creation is influenced by other market-shaping processes from adjacent markets and certain market actors can even force the creation of a market. Furthermore, markets are not immediately populated by a wide variety of market actors, but through an incremental process of different activities, sometimes aimed at changing the rules of a market. Considering the introduction of MaaS in an existing ecosystem of actors with their own mobility services as a case of new market creation and shaping activities and mechanisms guided by the same actors opens up opportunities to investigate the processes aimed at claiming, demarcating or controlling a market. 

    (2) Method and material

    This paper is based a case study of LinMaaS, an ongoing project initiated by the municipality of Linköping to launch its own MaaS within the next two years. We investigate in what ways demand for MaaS with seamless, flexible, and multi-modal mobility precedes the introduction of the mobility solution and this demand is created and shaped by the actors behind LinMasS development. We gather empirical data from interviews with managers and decisions makers from different LinMaaS public and private stakeholders (e.g., the municipality, the public transportation company offering bus and train services, the carsharing company, the software company, the e-scooter company), and notes and meeting minutes across different Work Package groups (e.g., app design, pricing models, marketing communications). As members of the research team evaluating the pilot project of LinMaaS, we have been able to get in-depth insights.

    (3) Analysis and results

    Different institutional logics can coexist in everyday practice, but they can also get into conflict. Institutional logics are particularly relevant for studying initiatives where actors from private and public sectors collaborate to create new digital solutions while managing the tensions between different assumptions, norms, ambitions, regulations, and organizational practices, which investigating intersecting logics allow to highlight. The sharing economy discourse and practices are also permeated with tensions (i.e. similar to institutional logics) between the communal norms of pro-social sharing and the commercial norms of market-based transactions. The results of this case study of LinMaaS and how the demand for mobility is identified and shaped in a new market show how different logics coexist and conflict simultaneously in unresolved tensions between a great diversity of actors. Identifying these different logics and their implications is key to a better management of the collaboration to create a sustainable ecosystem for MaaS.  

  • 13.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Friman, Margareta
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Social & Psychol Studies, Serv Res Ctr, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Olsson, Lars E.
    Karlstad Univ, Dept Social & Psychol Studies, Serv Res Ctr, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Shared Mobility: Evolving Practices for Sustainability2021Ingår i: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, nr 21, artikel-id 12148Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This introductory paper to the Special Issue “Shared Mobility” aims (1) to present and differentiate the diversity of practices and services that constitute the shared mobility sector; (2) to emphasize the contribution of each published article; and (3) to identify knowledge gaps of knowledge and provide further research avenues. With the contribution from 29 authors affiliated to social sciences and transportation research institutions in seven countries (Sweden, Germany, Netherlands, Greece, Belgium, Norway, and Australia), new understandings of the potential, drivers, barriers, and limitations of diverse shared mobility solutions for a more sustainable society are presented. The common message across the special issue is that the shared mobility sector is constantly evolving, while aiming to attain sustainability goals. Several papers have taken a psychological approach to explain the adoption of shared mobility practices (e.g., carsharing), yet these findings may be context-dependent, which future research should further investigate (e.g., differences between platform-based and self-service modes). We also call for researchers to pay attention to how traditional transit services can be combined with newer shared mobility services (e.g., micro-mobility), but also to informal public transport systems, as we identify these as important developing areas.

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  • 14.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Frankelius, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Karlstads Universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Identifying the resource integration processes of green service2020Ingår i: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 31, nr 4, s. 839-859Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of green service. In particular, the focus is on identifying homopathic and heteropathic resource integration processes that preserve or increase the resourceness of the natural ecosystem.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Through an extensive multiple case study involving ten service providers from diverse sectors based on a substantial number of interviews, detailed accounts of green service are provided.

    Findings

    Six resource integration processes were identified: reducing, recirculating, recycling, redistributing, reframing and renewing. While four of these processes are based on homopathic resource integration, both reframing and renewing are based on heteropathic resource integration. While homopathic processes historically constitute a green service by mitigating the impact of consumption on the environment, heteropathic resource integration increases the resourceness of the natural ecosystem through emergent processes and the (re)creation of natural resources.

    Research limitations/implications

    The present study breaks away from the paradigm that “green service” is about reducing the negative environmental impact of existing services, toward providing a green service that expands biological diversity and other natural resources.

    Originality/value

    Transformative service research on environmental sustainability is still in its infancy. The present study contributes through conceptualizing green service, redefining existing resource integration processes (reducing, recirculating, recycling) and identifying new resource integration processes (redistributing, reframing, renewing).

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Identifying the resource integration processes of green service
  • 15.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi.
    Parment, Anders
    Stockholms universitet.
    Marketing and sustainability: why and how sustainability is changing current marketing practices2020 (uppl. 1)Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This book aims to equip business students and marketing practitioners with a thorough understanding of sustainability issues. It uses contemporary cases and useful conceptualizations from recent research to provide a toolbox that help the reader understand how to deliver value to today’s consumers, while considering the well-being of future generations.

    Marketing & Sustainability raises important questions concerning the impact of (over)consumption, production, distribution, and communication, all key marketing activities, on socio-environmental challenges in the world — such as climate change and natural resource depletion.

    Servitization, dematerialization of consumption, the emergence of the circular economy paradigm, the platform-based sharing economy paradigm and the use of sharing schemes and platform-based exchanges of existing market goods are all dealt with in this book, which will make a lot of sense for students, marketers and other professionals who are aware of and striving for sustainable growth.

  • 16.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    The interrelated tensions of the collaborative consumption paradox2020Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 17.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Är det svårt att lyckas med hållbar mobilitet?: The shared mobility sector2020Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 18.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Piscicelli, Laura
    Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, 3584 CS, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Business model diversification in the sharing economy: The case of GoMore2019Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 215, s. 1059-1069Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper improves our understanding of the rise of the sharing economy by shedding light on the current trend in the mobility sector for new firms to operate different business models simultaneously. A shared mobility platform is used as a case study to examine the underexplored process of diversification into a business model portfolio, and test the theoretical proposition that successful business model configurations maximize the existing resources of a firm to establish hard-to-imitate capabilities and create sustainable competitive advantage. Data collection was conducted through interviews with key informants from the platform management team and a document analysis. The analysis shows the evolution, diversification, and expansion of the sharing economy startup from a non-profit ridesharing website to a for-profit matchmaking platform offering peer-to-peer (P2P) mobility solutions (ridesharing and short-term car rental) alongside business-to-consumer (B2C) access-based services (long-term leasing). The analysis suggests that each new service subsequently offered by the case firm aimed to increase the supply of peer providers in its existing P2P business models. The business model portfolio relies on six key resources (member community, platform technology, user data, customer support, local management teams, and partners) and three key capabilities (leverage of the community’s assets, technological improvement, and user engagement), which are shared and redeployed across business models and geographic locations to improve matchmaking quality, enable growth, and increase profits.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Business model diversification in the sharing economy: The case of GoMore
  • 19.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Piscicelli, Laura
    Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, 3584 CS, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Car-as-a-service platforms2019Ingår i: Perspectives on the sharing economy / [ed] Dominika Wruk, Achim Oberg, Indre Maurer, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2019, s. 126-133Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Many sharing economy firms operate two or more business models at once to enhance their competitive position and grow: a so-called business model portfolio. This phenomenon is particularly salient in the shared mobility sector where both automotive manufacturers and pure digital players are diversifying their services. From the industry incumbents’ side of the shared mobility sector, Volvo Cars has partnered with SunFleet carsharing, and with Uber to provide leasing services to drivers as well as collaborate on autonomous technology development. Daimler has acquired, invested in, or developed several mobility services such as Car2Go, Turo, Flinc, MyTaxi, and ChauffeurPrivé to offer ridesharing, free-floating carsharing, ride-hailing, and peer-to-peer (P2P) car rental services. Similarly, Ford acquired ChariotGetAround, and GoDrive as to be involved in ridesharing, P2P carsharing, and leasing services as well as providing vehicles to Zipcar. The Volkswagen Group also offers on-demand rentals of Audi and Porsche vehicles, and it has invested in Gett ridesharing services. General Motors has invested in or acquired SideCarLyftRelayRides, and Mavenas to have a foot in different services. From the disruptors side of shared mobility, long-distance ridesharing platform BlaBlaCar started to offer to its loyal members the possibility to lease cars at discounted rates in partnership with ALD Automotive, it launched the BlaBlaLines app to facilitate ridesharing on short-distance commutes, and it acquired urban carpooling startup Less. Business-to-consumer (B2C) carsharing platform MyWheels began to also offer cars made available by neighbors (i.e. P2P carsharing). Conversely, Turo now allows professional rental agencies to list their cars on its P2P platform to diversify its revenue streams and increase the number of cars available to its customers. 

    There have been some attempts at mapping sharing economy business models in the mobility sector. Despite the increasing number of platforms that operate several business models simultaneously, little research has examined how sharing economyplatforms successfully diversify into business model portfolios. The purpose of this research is to explore business model diversification in the shared mobility sector. 

  • 20.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sustainability & Marketing2019Ingår i: : Föreningen Företagsekonomi i Sverige, Gävle, Sweden, 2019Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    This session is based on the upcoming book “Marketing & Sustainability” (Studentlitteratur 2020) which aims to equip business students with the relevant mindset to pursue advanced marketing education or start their career as marketer with an understanding of sustainability issues — with contemporary cases and useful conceptualisations and classifications.

    The presentation will cover (1) classic consumer behavior concepts (e.g., consumer segmentations, the consumption process) and how to influence consumer behavior in light of infamous attitude-behavior “green gap” (e.g., nudging); (2) firms’ operations and responses to the sustainability imperative (e.g., new product/service development, the life-cycle approach, ISO standards, open innovation); (3) sustainable marketing communications (e.g., branding, certifications and labelling, communication channels) and the pitfalls of “cheating the consumers” (e.g., greenwashing issues, transparency, GDPR implications); and (4) the diverse sustainable business models and marketing channels (e.g., Product-Service Systems, circular economy paradigm, peer-to-peer platforms). 

  • 21.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    The Heart and Wallet Paradox of Collaborative Consumption2019Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kollaborativ konsumtion bygger på P2P-utbyte (peer-to-peer) av varor och tjänster genom online-plattformar. Detta fenomen drivs på av teknologi som gör det enklare och billigare att dela användningen av befintliga men underutnyttjade privata resurser. Det är inbäddat i paradigmskiftet i samhället mot tillgångsbaserad konsumtion, i motsats till privat ägande. Företag får en ny roll som underlättare av kollaborativ konsumtion där privatpersoner istället intar rollerna som både leverantörer och konsumenter.

    Kollaborativ konsumtion är förankrat i två motsatta logiker: delning och varuutbyte. Detta resulterar i Heart & Wallet-paradoxen med spänningar emellan en pro-social orientering som bygger på gemensamma normer, och en vinstdrivande orientering baserad på marknadsnormer. Medan det funnits en debatt kring den så kallade ”delningsekonomin” och dess samhälleliga och legala implikationer, så har den akademiska debatten ännu ej hunnit ta fart kring dess påverkan på affärsverksamhet och konsumentbeteende.

    Avhandlingen syftar till att förbättra förståelsen av kollaborativ konsumtion genom att bidra till konceptualiseringen av detta fenomen där delningslogik och marknadslogik samexisterar. Avhandlingen är baserad på två artiklar som undersöker kollaborativ konsumtion från ett företagsperspektiv och två artiklar där begreppet studeras ur de deltagande individernas perspektiv. Kontexten ”shared mobility” (d.v.s. privat biluthyrning, samåkning) undersöks i tre organisationer med hjälp av intervjuer med anställda på onlineplattformar och deltagare i kollaborativ konsumtion, deltagarobservationer, en nätnografi, en tvärsnittsundersökning av plattformsanvändare och dokumentanalyser.

    Avhandlingen placerar kollaborativ konsumtion i paradigmet kring studier av tillgång till tjänster, där den temporära omfördelningen i tid och monetariseringen av privata resurser underlättas via online-plattformar, samtidigt som den gemensamma tillhörigheten och det ”delningsetos” som finns inbäddat i P2P-utbyten uppmuntras. Genom att undersöka spänningarna i Heart & Wallet-paradoxen i kollaborativ konsumtion, belyser jag motsättningarna mellan delningslogiken från gräsrotsrörelsen och marknadslogiken i plattformsaffärsmodellerna. Vidare diskuterar jag den centrala rollen av ”communal identification”-upplevelsen av autencitet vid delning av resurser för kollaborativ konsumtion. Avhandlingen bidrar till tjänsteforskningen kring tillgång till tjänster genom en ökad förståelse av P2P-utbyten och en konceptualisering av kollaborativ konsumtion.  

    Delarbeten
    1. Identifying the resource integration processes of green service
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Identifying the resource integration processes of green service
    2020 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 31, nr 4, s. 839-859Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of green service. In particular, the focus is on identifying homopathic and heteropathic resource integration processes that preserve or increase the resourceness of the natural ecosystem.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Through an extensive multiple case study involving ten service providers from diverse sectors based on a substantial number of interviews, detailed accounts of green service are provided.

    Findings

    Six resource integration processes were identified: reducing, recirculating, recycling, redistributing, reframing and renewing. While four of these processes are based on homopathic resource integration, both reframing and renewing are based on heteropathic resource integration. While homopathic processes historically constitute a green service by mitigating the impact of consumption on the environment, heteropathic resource integration increases the resourceness of the natural ecosystem through emergent processes and the (re)creation of natural resources.

    Research limitations/implications

    The present study breaks away from the paradigm that “green service” is about reducing the negative environmental impact of existing services, toward providing a green service that expands biological diversity and other natural resources.

    Originality/value

    Transformative service research on environmental sustainability is still in its infancy. The present study contributes through conceptualizing green service, redefining existing resource integration processes (reducing, recirculating, recycling) and identifying new resource integration processes (redistributing, reframing, renewing).

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2020
    Nyckelord
    Sustainability, Resource integration, Green service, Transformative Service Research
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Företagsekonomi
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154974 (URN)10.1108/JOSM-12-2017-0350 (DOI)000596299700011 ()2-s2.0-85062676177 (Scopus ID)
    Tillgänglig från: 2019-03-07 Skapad: 2019-03-07 Senast uppdaterad: 2022-03-04Bibliografiskt granskad
    2. Business model diversification in the sharing economy: The case of GoMore
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Business model diversification in the sharing economy: The case of GoMore
    2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 215, s. 1059-1069Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper improves our understanding of the rise of the sharing economy by shedding light on the current trend in the mobility sector for new firms to operate different business models simultaneously. A shared mobility platform is used as a case study to examine the underexplored process of diversification into a business model portfolio, and test the theoretical proposition that successful business model configurations maximize the existing resources of a firm to establish hard-to-imitate capabilities and create sustainable competitive advantage. Data collection was conducted through interviews with key informants from the platform management team and a document analysis. The analysis shows the evolution, diversification, and expansion of the sharing economy startup from a non-profit ridesharing website to a for-profit matchmaking platform offering peer-to-peer (P2P) mobility solutions (ridesharing and short-term car rental) alongside business-to-consumer (B2C) access-based services (long-term leasing). The analysis suggests that each new service subsequently offered by the case firm aimed to increase the supply of peer providers in its existing P2P business models. The business model portfolio relies on six key resources (member community, platform technology, user data, customer support, local management teams, and partners) and three key capabilities (leverage of the community’s assets, technological improvement, and user engagement), which are shared and redeployed across business models and geographic locations to improve matchmaking quality, enable growth, and increase profits.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Elsevier, 2019
    Nyckelord
    Sharing economy, Business model diversification, Business model portfolio, Shared mobility platform
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Företagsekonomi Data- och informationsvetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154006 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.01.114 (DOI)000459358300090 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2019-01-22 Skapad: 2019-01-22 Senast uppdaterad: 2021-12-28Bibliografiskt granskad
    3. No One Rides for Free!: Three Styles of Collaborative Consumption
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>No One Rides for Free!: Three Styles of Collaborative Consumption
    2018 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 32, nr 6, s. 692-714Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper focuses on collaborative consumption; that is, the peer-to-peer (P2P)exchange of goods and services facilitated by online platforms. Anchored in the access paradigm,collaborative consumption (e.g., accommodation rental, ridesharing services) differs fromcommercial services offered by firms (e.g., B2C carsharing). The aim of this study is to examine thenuanced styles of collaborative consumption in relation to market-mediated access practices andsocially mediated sharing practices.Design/methodology/approach – Following the general research trend on mobility services, thecontext of long-distance ridesharing is chosen. Data collection was conducted using participantobservation as peer service provider, 11 ethnographic interviews of consumers, and a netnographicstudy of digital artefacts.Findings – Using practice theory, 10 ridesharing activities were identified. These activities and thenuances in the procedures, understandings, and engagements in the ridesharing practice led to thedistinction of three styles of collaborative consumption: (1) Communal collaborative consumption,which is when participants seek pro-social relationships in belonging to a community; (2)Consumerist collaborative consumption, performed by participants who seek status andconvenience in the access lifestyle; and (3) Opportunistic collaborative consumption, whenparticipants seek to achieve monetary gain or personal benefits from abusive activities.Originality/value – By taking a phenomenological approach on collaborative consumption, thisstudy adds to the understanding of the sharing economy as embedded in both autilitarian/commercial economic system, and a non-market/communal social system. The threestyles of collaborative consumption propose a framework for future studies differentiating P2Pexchanges from other practices (i.e., B2C access-based services, sharing).

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
    Nyckelord
    Access-based consumption; Collaborative consumption; Practice theory; Sharing economy; Ridesharing
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Systemvetenskap, informationssystem och informatik med samhällsvetenskaplig inriktning Mänsklig interaktion med IKT
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149072 (URN)10.1108/JSM-11-2016-0402 (DOI)000449156700004 ()
    Tillgänglig från: 2018-06-26 Skapad: 2018-06-26 Senast uppdaterad: 2021-12-28
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    The Heart and Wallet Paradox of Collaborative Consumption
    Ladda ner (png)
    presentationsbild
  • 22.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Benoit, Sabine
    Surrey Business School, University of Surrey, UK.
    The key role of communal belonging for collaborative consumption platforms2019Ingår i: / [ed] Roland Rust, Bart Larivière, Jochen Wirtz, Hugo Guyader , 2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 23.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Kienzler, Mario
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Industriell ekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    "True Sharing" or "Sharing Economy" Fad?2019Ingår i: / [ed] Bo Edvardsson, Anders Gustafsson, Mary Jo Bitner, Rohit Verma, 2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the semantics, the “sharing economy” is not about true sharing (e.g., Belk 2014) but really about firms offering the benefits of owning goods without the burdens of ownership—the rental/access paradigm in service research (Lovelock and Gumesson 2004). In this new sharing paradigm conceptualized as collaborative consumption (Benoit et al. 2017), services firms take on the role of enablers by developing online platforms facilitating the peer-to-peer (P2P) exchanges of private resources—also called consumer-to-consumer (C2C) exchanges—forming a triadic relationship between peer providers and consumers.

    While true sharing practices are not market-mediated, collaborative consumption practices in the “sharing economy” are market-mediated by platforms. In other words, consumers compensate peer providers monetarily for using their goods temporarily. That is, collaborative consumption practices are situated between true sharing practices and traditional market exchanges. 

    However, there has been a lack of empirical research impeding the understanding of collaborative consumption. Most published articles on the phenomenon are conceptual or based on illustrations and anecdotes (e.g., Belk 2014; Benoit et al. 2017). In particular, scholarly research has yet to explore what participation motives for collaborative consumption are most related to people’s inclination towards the true sharing ethos, their trend orientation in the fad in the “sharing economy”, or a professional orientation (vs. amateurism).

    The present study explores the different relationships between the three most important drivers of individual participation in collaborative consumption (i.e., cost-savings, social motives, and environmental concerns) and the participants’ orientation towards true sharing, the “sharing economy”, and professionalization. The results (see Table 1) are based on three OLS regression models, based on a survey of 381 active platform users, in the context of ridesharing. Cost-savings (β= .39, p< .001) and social motives (β= .34, p< .001), but not environmental concerns (ß= .08, p= n.s.) are significantly related to a truesharing orientation. Moreover, social motives (β= .27, p< .001) but neither cost-savings (β= .06, p= n.s.) nor environmental concerns (β= .09, p= n.s.) are significantly related to the “sharing economy” trend orientation. Finally, cost-savings (β= .11, p< .05), social motives (β= .22, p< .001), and environmental concerns (β= .18, p< .001) are significantly related to a professional orientation.

    This study contributes to service research by focusing on the P2P or C2C consumer context that is specific to the collaborative consumption phenomenon and mostly empirically unexplored, and showing how it differs from access-based services with B2C interactions. Contrary to what would be expected (i.e. social motives would only be related with true sharing, and cost-savings more likely to be linked with the “sharing economy” trend), the study shows that social motives play a strong role for both orientations, as well as professionalization. That is, to benefit from the fad of the “sharing economy”, firms should balance their communication on cost-savings with an emphasis on the social aspects of collaborative consumption without falling into the pitfalls of “sharewashing”.

  • 24.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Exploring the practice of collaborative consumption2018Ingår i: SERVSIG Proceedings 2018: Opportunities for Services in a Challenging World, 14-16 June 2018, IÉSEG School of Management, Paris, / [ed] Demoulin N., Cabooter E., Chumpitaz R., Mustak M., Paparoidamis N. & Le Suün C., SERVSIG , 2018, s. 60-63Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on peer-to-peer (P2P) exchanges facilitated by online sharing platforms, among actors who cocreate value in a quasi-commercial context. The recent advent of P2P exchange of services through online platforms enables the monetisation of underutilised assets for peer-providers, and more cost-efficient, convenient, and eco-friendly alternatives to traditional modes of consumption for peer-consumers. One example is the digitalisation of the old practice of hitchhiking. Thanks to technological developments over the last 15 years,“hitchhikers 2.0” can find a ride online by using ridesharing platforms such as BlaBlaCar orZimride.

    The contemporary sharing economy phenomena include various forms of access-based service provision, as well as pseudo-sharing and collaborative consumption practices which allow temporary access to products, for a fee or for free, without transfer of ownership (Bardhi and Eckhardt 2012; Belk 2014; Benoit et al. 2017). Some individuals engage in true sharing practices within closed social circles (e.g. friends and family), while others engage in P2P exchanges with a commercial or even entrepreneurial mindset. For instance, a potential use of collaborative consumption practices is to gain access to new products, brands or places otherwise financially inaccessible (Herbert and Collin-Lachaud 2017). Thus, there seems to be differences in magnitude in collaborative consumption, and not one unique way to participate. In light of practice theory, it is the consumers’ and the organizations’ practices that influencehow P2P and B2C markets are shaped (Kjellberg and Harrison 2007).

    This study explores the quasi-commercial context of P2P exchanges in order to understand what platform users do when performing a collaborative consumption practice, and to what extent the differences in procedures, understandings, and engagements with the practice by its actors lead to different styles of collaborative consumption.

    This paper’s main contribution lies in nuancing the conceptualisation of collaborativeconsumption as an alternative mode of consumption. Such nuances in how platform users exchange P2P services build on and contrast previous studies on the access economy, propose a more relevant framework for future studies to depict what aspect of the phenomenon is in focus, and aid characterise collaborative consumption as a form of socio-economic exchange, distinct from B2C access-based services and true sharing. That is, it contributes to the framing of the access economy as not true sharing, but not pure commercial exchanges either.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    No One Rides for Free!: Three Styles of Collaborative Consumption2018Ingår i: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 32, nr 6, s. 692-714Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper focuses on collaborative consumption; that is, the peer-to-peer (P2P)exchange of goods and services facilitated by online platforms. Anchored in the access paradigm,collaborative consumption (e.g., accommodation rental, ridesharing services) differs fromcommercial services offered by firms (e.g., B2C carsharing). The aim of this study is to examine thenuanced styles of collaborative consumption in relation to market-mediated access practices andsocially mediated sharing practices.Design/methodology/approach – Following the general research trend on mobility services, thecontext of long-distance ridesharing is chosen. Data collection was conducted using participantobservation as peer service provider, 11 ethnographic interviews of consumers, and a netnographicstudy of digital artefacts.Findings – Using practice theory, 10 ridesharing activities were identified. These activities and thenuances in the procedures, understandings, and engagements in the ridesharing practice led to thedistinction of three styles of collaborative consumption: (1) Communal collaborative consumption,which is when participants seek pro-social relationships in belonging to a community; (2)Consumerist collaborative consumption, performed by participants who seek status andconvenience in the access lifestyle; and (3) Opportunistic collaborative consumption, whenparticipants seek to achieve monetary gain or personal benefits from abusive activities.Originality/value – By taking a phenomenological approach on collaborative consumption, thisstudy adds to the understanding of the sharing economy as embedded in both autilitarian/commercial economic system, and a non-market/communal social system. The threestyles of collaborative consumption propose a framework for future studies differentiating P2Pexchanges from other practices (i.e., B2C access-based services, sharing).

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Mikael, Ottosson
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi.
    Frankelius, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi.
    Witell, Lars
    Karlstad University.
    A Typology for Green Service: Resource Integration and Actors Involvement.2017Ingår i: Proceedings of the QUIS15 International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, 12-15 June 2017, University of Porto, Portugal., 2017, s. 47-56Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a typology for green service. It is based on two dimensions: a resource integration dimension to differentiate between different efforts aiming to reduce, reuse, redistribute, recycle or renew resources (for instance natural or operant resources); and a dimension representing whether other ecosystem actors are actively or passively involvement in the green service. The ten types of green service provide an analytical tool for service marketing managers and scholars discussing how to improve or develop green service.

  • 27.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi.
    Satisfaction and Loyalty for P2P Service Exchanges through Online Sharing Platforms (abstract).2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to validate factors driving satisfaction and loyalty in P2P service exchanges: feelings of belonging to a community, cost saving incentive, environmental motivation, non-ownership benefits, perceived exchange authenticity, P2P trust, trust in the platform, and supply/demand ratio.

    Whereas previous studies exploring the determinants of satisfaction of P2P exchanges largely used the theory of reasoned action or planned behavior (Bucher et al. 2016; Hamari et al. 2015; Plouffe 2008; Teubner et al. 2016; Tussyadiah 2016), this study follows marketing researchers who built on the access paradigm with the concept of “non-ownership services” (Moeller & Wittkowski 2010), and “access based” -consumption or -services (Bardhi & Eckhardt 2012; Schaefers et al. 2016). 

    The context of this study is ridesharing (carpooling in the U.S.), organized by online platform providers matching P2P service exchange participants: drivers offer transportation and passengers economically contributes to the trip. Whereas the aforementioned studies predominantly rely on vignette studies and survey data from M-Turk, this study, like Schaefers et al. (2015), is based on an original dataset collected from a large sample of active participants in long distance ridesharing, combing survey responses and actual behavioral measures originating from a platform’s exchange history (i.e. distance shared). The satisfaction and loyalty model was estimated using Smart PLS.

    Satisfaction with P2P services do not solely depends on utilitarian aspects (e.g. cost, convenience) but also emotional aspects (e.g. social interactions, fun) of the exchanges. A different set of satisfaction determinants is observed depending on the ridesharing participants’ initial motivations and attitudes. Participants sharing with a pro-social and communal style are more likely to use the platform again when satisfied with P2P service exchanges. However, participants sharing with an opportunistic style are less likely to remain loyal to the platform.

  • 28.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sharing platform business model: creating and matching resource-gaps.2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to provide an in-depth understanding of the growth of sharing platforms. As the mobility sector witnesses most activities, a case study of shared mobility platform is identified. The case represents a successful “Car-As-A-Service” platform that has consequently created peer-to-peer (P2P) markets for ridesharing and car rental services, and established a critical mass of users by increasing the supply side of the P2P markets through leasing services. The leased car remains in the closed loop of the platform to provide additional shared mobility services to its users. 

  • 29.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    You can't buy what you can't see: Retailer practices to increase the green premium2017Ingår i: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 34, s. 319-325Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Retailers are the gatekeepers between consumers and eco-friendly products. As such, they can influence green shopping behavior. The results of an eye-tracking experiment show that retailers can attract consumers’ visual attention and increase the green premium through various practices such as providing relevant information, orienting consumers inside the store, and offering an eco-friendly product assortment. Managerial implications are to use green-colored price tags to signal eco-friendly products, while avoiding greenwashing practices that can distract consumers from finding the eco-friendly products they look for.

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    fulltext
  • 30.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    P2P Service Exchange in a Quasi-Commercial Context: The Mutual Benefits of Ridesharing2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 31.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Aichagui, Victor
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Transformative Business Models: A case from Collaborative Consumption2015Ingår i: Proceedings of QUIS 14: Accelerate the Impact of Service Research June 18-21, 2015., Shanghai China., 2015 / [ed] Xiande Zhao, Jie J. Zhang, Hyun Jeong (Spring) Han, 2015, s. 1-1Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The study’s purpose is to describe the growth process of Collaborative Consumption (CC) platforms and to identify the challenges of establishing an innovative matchmaking business model. This paper takes a lens of the customer approach to understand how to develop value propositions to satisfy users of CC platforms and their value co-creation process.

    In a CC network system, users exchange, redistribute or share existing products. In 2013, revenues from CC increased by 25% (Geron, 2013), with rentals as the greatest share of business models, e.g. car sharing. Therein, consumers seek access rather than ownership (Bardhi & Eckhardt, 2012). Rental services, a way for consumers to co-create value by sharing existing products that are only temporarily needed, embed the sharing paradigm (Lovelock & Gummesson, 2004), as well as the service logic. In this sharing paradigm, service organizations create online marketplaces enabling peer-to-peer exchange of product-service systems (PSS), i.e. sharing the value proposition with other consumers, instead of owning a product. The organic growth of structured sharing platforms to exchange services is the epitome of CC business models.

    CC dilutes the link between ownership and value in use; today’s defacto standard in consumption-based economies. This “sharing economy” is being revolutionized by ICT development and follows the societal urge to reduce the environmental impact of consumption (Belk, 2010). It disrupts traditional product industries by challenging established business models; not only because consumers follow the economic rationale of saving costs, but also because of its positive socio-environmental impacts (Botsman & Rogers, 2010).

    To provide and maintain a high quality service, CC platforms must reach a critical mass. This means having a well-balanced PSS with enough satisfied users to support the service delivery. Adoption rate is a fundamental problem, as limited initial service delivery capabilities prevent CC to become mainstream.

    Our case study of a car sharing platform expanding its service in Scandinavia shows that car sharing can be identified as three sustainable service offerings: car pooling, renting, and leasing. These services are based on business models that transform throughout maturity. Creating the initial demand or sustaining the supply of PSS, require CC platforms to develop transformative business models.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Transformative Business Models: A case from Collaborative Consumption
  • 32.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Aichagui, Victor
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Closing the green gap: understanding why green consumers choose brown products2014Ingår i: NRWC 2014 The 4th Nordic Retail and Whole Sale Conference, November 5th to 6th of November, 2014, Nordic Retail and Wholesale Association , 2014, s. 1-4Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of in-store marketing and packaging elements on green shopping behavior, aiming to further understand the attitude-behavior Green Gap. The results of first, a choice experiment with 127 respondents and second an eye-tracking experiment with 67 respondents show implications for the retail industry.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Closing the green gap: understanding why green consumers choose brown products
  • 33.
    Frankelius, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Aichagui, Victor
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Företagsekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Green Service Innovation: The role of resource integration and service provision2014Ingår i: Proceedings of the 2014 AMA SERVSIG International Service Research Conference: Services Marketing in the New Economic and Social Landscape / [ed] Tsiotsou R.H. & Hajidimitriou Y., 2014, Vol. "Building Sustainability in Services", artikel-id 208Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The importance of green services is increasing. The purpose of the research project is to develop a better understanding of the concept “green services” and its relationship to “service innovation”. The research questions are: What factors can define the green services concept? What are the distinctive characteristics of different types of green services?

    Methodology: A multiple case study approach is used. The cases represent companies having introduced green service innovations. Based on interviews with the innovators and customers different categories of green services are indentified and described. The empirical findings are then analyzed in the light of a literature review.

    Findings: By combining empirical observations and theory the authors develop a framework for green service innovations. This framework describes how innovation can be attained through emphasizing changes in resource integration (reuse waste, reduce impact on nature and improve nature) and service provision (direct service or indirect service). In this frame six categories of green services are defined: redistribution of resources, changing customer behavior, improving conditions for nature, upcycling, replacement of technology and products to improve nature.

    Originality/value: The majority of existing research on green service has had focus on the service companies and the change of technology in providing services. The authors here rather emphasize the customer roles, and stresses that these roles need to change to fulfill green service innovation. Moreover, the perspective here is that green services have the ability to not only mitigate negative impact on the environment but also increase the quality of nature. The term “greenovation” is proposed to emphase this.

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    Green Service Innovation: The role of resource integration and service provision
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