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  • 1.
    Jonson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelning för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Sandberg, Alexander
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Carlback, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Michno, Wojciech
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanrieder, Jorg
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; UCL, England.
    Starkenberg, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Kirurgi, Ortopedi och Onkologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Peter, K.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för hematopoes och utvecklingsbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Amyloid fibril polymorphism and cell-specific toxicity in vivo2019Ingår i: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 26, nr sup1, s. 136-137Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING Photonic amyloids2019Ingår i: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, Vol. 13, nr 7, s. 442-444Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging data reveal that amyloid fibrils possess intrinsic photonic activity, showing luminescence over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared.

  • 3.
    Mishra, Rajesh
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Jawaharlal Nehru Univ, India.
    Elgland, Mathias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Begum, Afshan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Fyrner, Timmy
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Impact of N-glycosylation site variants during human PrP aggregation and fibril nucleation2019Ingår i: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Proteins and Proteomics, ISSN 1570-9639, E-ISSN 1878-1454, Vol. 1867, nr 10, s. 909-921Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Misfolding and aggregation of the human prion protein (PrP) cause neurodegenerative transmissible spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Mature native PrP is composed of 209 residues and is folded into a C-terminal globular domain (residues 125-209) comprising a small two-stranded beta-sheet and three alpha-helices. The N-terminal domain (residues 23-124) is intrinsically disordered. Expression of truncated PrP (residues 90-231) is sufficient to cause prion disease and residues 90/100-231 is comprising the amyloid-like fibril core of misfolded infectious PrP. During PrP fibril formation under native conditions in vitro, the disordered N-terminal domain slows down fibril formation likely due to a mechanism of initial aggregation forming morphologically disordered aggregates. The morphological disordered aggregate is a transient phase. Nucleation of fibrils occurs from this initial aggregate. The aggregate phase is largely circumvented by seeding with preformed PrP fibrils. In vivo PrP is N-glycosylated at positions Asn181 and Asn197. Little is known about the importance of these positions and their glycans for PrP stability, aggregation and fibril formation. We have in this study taken a step towards that goal by mutating residues 181 and 197 for cysteines to study the positional impact on these processes. We have further by organic synthetic chemistry and chemical modification generated synthetic glycosylations in these positions. Our data shows that residue 181 when mutated to a cysteine is a key residue for self -chaperoning, rendering a trap in the initial aggregate preventing conformational changes towards amyloid fibril formation. Position 197 is less involved in the aggregate trapping and is more geared towards beta-sheet structure conversion within amyloid fibrils. As expected, synthetic glycosylated 197 is less affected towards fibril formation compared to glycosylated 181. Our data are rather compatible with the parallel in-register intermolecular beta-sheet model structure of the PrP90-231 fibril and sheds light on the misfolding transitions of PrP in vitro. We hypothesize that glycosylation of position 181 is a key site for prion strain differentiation in vivo.

  • 4.
    Zhang, Jun
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Konsmo, Audun
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Sandberg, Alexander
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Wu, Xiongyu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Obermuller, Ulrike
    Univ Tubingen, Germany; DZNE German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis, Germany.
    Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M.
    Univ Tubingen, Germany; DZNE German Ctr Neurodegenerat Dis, Germany.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Phenolic Bis-styrylbenzo[c]-1,2,5-thiadiazoles as Probes for Fluorescence Microscopy Mapping of A beta Plaque Heterogeneity2019Ingår i: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 62, nr 4, s. 2038-2048Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A fluorescent bis-styryl-benzothiadiazole (BTD) with carboxylic acid functional groups (X-34/Congo red analogue) showed lower binding affinity toward A beta 1-42 and A beta 1-40 fibrils than its neutral analogue. Hence, variable patterns of neutral OH-substituted bis-styryl-BTDs were generated. All bis-styryl-BTDs showed higher binding affinity to A beta 1-42 fibrils than to A beta 1-40 fibrils. The para-OH on the phenyl rings was beneficial for binding affinity while a meta-OH decreased the affinity. Differential staining of transgenic mouse A beta amyloid plaque cores compared to peripheral coronas using neutral compared to anionic bis-styryl ligands indicate differential recognition of amyloid polymorphs. Hyperspectral imaging of transgenic mouse A beta plaque stained with uncharged para-hydroxyl substituted bis-styryl-BTD implicated differences in binding site polarity of polymorphic amyloid plaque. Most properties of the corresponding bis-styryl-BTD were retained with a rigid alkyne linker rendering a probe insensitive to cis trans isomerization. These new BTDbased ligands are promising probes for spectral imaging of different A beta fibril polymorphs.

  • 5.
    Michno, Wojciech
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Wehrli, Patrick
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lashley, Tammaryn
    UCL, England.
    Brinkmalm, Gunnar
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Guerard, Laurent
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Syvanen, Stina
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Sehlin, Dag
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Kaya, Ibrahim
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brinet, Dimitri
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; UCL, England; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; UCL, England.
    Hanrieder, Jorg
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; UCL, England.
    Pyroglutamation of amyloid-x-42 (Ax-42) followed by A1-40 deposition underlies plaque polymorphism in progressing Alzheimers disease pathology2019Ingår i: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 294, nr 17, s. 6719-6732Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the formation of polymorphic deposits comprising diffuse and cored plaques. Because diffuse plaques are predominantly observed in cognitively unaffected, amyloid-positive (CU-AP) individuals, pathogenic conversion into cored plaques appears to be critical to AD pathogenesis. Herein, we identified the distinct Aβ species associated with amyloid polymorphism in brain tissue from individuals with sporadic AD (s-AD) and CU-AP. To this end, we interrogated Aβ polymorphism with amyloid conformation–sensitive dyes and a novel in situ MS paradigm for chemical characterization of hyperspectrally delineated plaque morphotypes. We found that maturation of diffuse into cored plaques correlated with increased Aβ1–40 deposition. Using spatial in situ delineation with imaging MS (IMS), we show that Aβ1–40 aggregates at the core structure of mature plaques, whereas Aβ1–42 localizes to diffuse amyloid aggregates. Moreover, we observed that diffuse plaques have increased pyroglutamated Aβx-42 levels in s-AD but not CU-AP, suggesting an AD pathology–related, hydrophobic functionalization of diffuse plaques facilitating Aβ1–40 deposition. Experiments in tgAPPSwe mice verified that, similar to what has been observed in human brain pathology, diffuse deposits display higher levels of Aβ1–42 and that Aβ plaque maturation over time is associated with increases in Aβ1–40. Finally, we found that Aβ1–40 deposition is characteristic for cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposition and maturation in both humans and mice. These results indicate that N-terminal Aβx-42 pyroglutamation and Aβ1–40 deposition are critical events in priming and maturation of pathogenic Aβ from diffuse into cored plaques, underlying neurotoxic plaque development in AD.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Sandberg, Alexander
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Carlback, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Michno, Wojciech
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanrieder, Jorg
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; UCL, England.
    Starkenberg, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Aggregated A beta 1-42 Is Selectively Toxic for Neurons, Whereas Glial Cells Produce Mature Fibrils with Low Toxicity in Drosophila2018Ingår i: Cell Chemical Biology, ISSN 2451-9456, E-ISSN 2451-9448, Vol. 25, nr 5, s. 595-610Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The basis for selective vulnerability of certain cell types for misfolded proteins (MPs) in neurodegenerative diseases is largely unknown. This knowledge is crucial for understanding disease progression in relation to MPs spreading in the CNS. We assessed this issue in Drosophila by cell-specific expression of human A beta 1-42 associated with Alzheimers disease. Expression of A beta 1-42 in various neurons resulted in concentration-dependent severe neurodegenerative phenotypes, and intraneuronal ringtangle-like aggregates with immature fibril properties when analyzed by aggregate-specific ligands. Unexpectedly, expression of A beta 1-42 from a pan-glial driver produced a mild phenotype despite massive brain load of A beta 1-42 aggregates, even higher than in the strongest neuronal driver. Glial cells formed more mature fibrous aggregates, morphologically distinct from aggregates found in neurons, and was mainly extracellular. Our findings implicate that A beta 1-42 cytotoxicity is both cell and aggregate morphotype dependent.

  • 7.
    Khodaparast, Ladan
    et al.
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Khodaparast, Laleh
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Gallardo, Rodrigo
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Louros, Nikolaos N.
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Michiels, Emiel
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Ramakrishnan, Reshmi
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Ramakers, Meine
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Claes, Filip
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Young, Lydia
    Univ Leeds, England; Univ Leeds, England.
    Shahrooei, Mohammad
    KULeuven, Belgium.
    Wilkinson, Hannah
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Desager, Matyas
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Tadesse, Wubishet Mengistu
    KULeuven, Belgium.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Aertsen, Abram
    KULeuven, Belgium.
    Carpentier, Sebastien
    KULeuven, Belgium.
    Van Eldere, Johan
    KULeuven, Belgium.
    Rousseau, Frederic
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Schymkowitz, Joost
    SWITCH Lab, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Aggregating sequences that occur in many proteins constitute weak spots of bacterial proteostasis2018Ingår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, artikel-id 866Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aggregation is a sequence-specific process, nucleated by short aggregation-prone regions (APRs) that can be exploited to induce aggregation of proteins containing the same APR. Here, we find that most APRs are unique within a proteome, but that a small minority of APRs occur in many proteins. When aggregation is nucleated in bacteria by such frequently occurring APRs, it leads to massive and lethal inclusion body formation containing a large number of proteins. Buildup of bacterial resistance against these peptides is slow. In addition, the approach is effective against drug-resistant clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii, reducing bacterial load in a murine bladder infection model. Our results indicate that redundant APRs are weak points of bacterial protein homeostasis and that targeting these may be an attractive antibacterial strategy.

  • 8.
    Fändrich, M.
    et al.
    Ulm Univ, Germany.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Bockmann, A.
    Univ Lyon, France.
    LeVine, H. III
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40536 USA; Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Amyloid fibril polymorphism: a challenge for molecular imaging and therapy2018Ingår i: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 283, nr 3, s. 218-237Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins (MPs), both unique and common, for different diseases is central for many chronic degenerative diseases. In certain patients, MP accumulation is systemic (e.g. TTR amyloid), and in others, this is localized to a specific cell type (e.g. Alzheimers disease). In neurodegenerative diseases, NDs, it is noticeable that the accumulation of MP progressively spreads throughout the nervous system. Our main hypothesis of this article is that MPs are not only markers but also active carriers of pathogenicity. Here, we discuss studies from comprehensive molecular approaches aimed at understanding MP conformational variations (polymorphism) and their bearing on spreading of MPs, MP toxicity, as well as MP targeting in imaging and therapy. Neurodegenerative disease (ND) represents a major and growing societal challenge, with millions of people worldwide suffering from Alzheimers or Parkinsons diseases alone. For all NDs, current treatment is palliative without addressing the primary cause and is not curative. Over recent years, particularly the shape-shifting properties of misfolded proteins and their spreading pathways have been intensively researched. The difficulty in addressing ND has prompted most major pharma companies to severely downsize their nervous system disorder research. Increased academic research is pivotal for filling this void and to translate basic research into tools for medical professionals. Recent discoveries of targeting drug design against MPs and improved model systems to study structure, pathology spreading and toxicity strongly encourage future studies along these lines to provide an opportunity for selective imaging, prognostic diagnosis and therapy.

  • 9.
    Schuetz, Anne K.
    et al.
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Hornemann, Simone
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Waelti, Marielle A.
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Greuter, Ladina
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Tiberi, Cinzia
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Cadalbert, Riccardo
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Gantner, Matthias
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Riek, Roland
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Boeckmann, Anja
    Univ Lyon 1, France.
    Aguzzi, Adriano
    Univ Zurich, Switzerland.
    Meier, Beat H.
    Swiss Fed Inst Technol, Switzerland.
    Binding of Polythiophenes to Amyloids: Structural Mapping of the Pharmacophore2018Ingår i: ACS Chemical Neuroscience, ISSN 1948-7193, E-ISSN 1948-7193, Vol. 9, nr 3, s. 475-481Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Luminescent conjugated polythiophenes bind to amyloid proteins with high affinity. Their fluorescence properties, which are modulated by the detailed conformation in the bound state, are highly sensitive to structural features of the amyloid. Polythiophenes therefore represent diagnostic markers for the detection and differentiation of pathological amyloid aggregates. 560 We clarify the binding site and mode of two different polythiophenes to fibrils of the prion domain of the HET-s protein by solid-state NMR and correlate these findings with their fluorescence properties. We demonstrate how amyloid dyes recognize distinct binding sites with specific topological features. Regularly spaced surface charge patterns and well-accessible grooves on the fibril surface define the pharmacophore of the amyloid, which in turn determines the binding mode and fluorescence wavelength of the polythiophene.

  • 10.
    Zhang, Jun
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Sandberg, Alexander
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Konsmo, Audun
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Wu, Xiongyu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    LeVine, Harry III
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40536 USA.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Detection and Imaging of A beta 1-42 and Tau Fibrils by Redesigned Fluorescent X-34 Analogues2018Ingår i: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 24, nr 28, s. 7210-7216Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We revisited the Congo red analogue 2,5-bis(4-hydroxy-3-carboxy-styryl)benzene (X-34) to develop this highly fluorescent amyloid dye for imaging Alzheimers disease (AD) pathology comprising A beta and Tau fibrils. A selection of ligands with distinct optical properties were synthesized by replacing the central benzene unit of X-34, with other heterocyclic moieties. Full photophysical characterization was performed, including recording absorbance and fluorescence spectra, Stokes shift, quantum yield and fluorescence lifetimes. All ligands displayed high affinity towards recombinant amyloid fibrils of A beta 1-42 (13-300nmK(d)) and Tau (16-200nmK(d)) as well as selectivity towards the corresponding disease-associated protein aggregates in AD tissue. We observed that these ligands efficiently displaced X-34, but not Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) from recombinant A beta 1-42 amyloid fibrils, arguing for retained targeting of the Congo red type binding site. We foresee that the X-34 scaffold offers the possibility to develop novel high-affinity ligands for A pathology found in human AD brain in a different mode compared with PiB, potentially recognizing different polymorphs of A fibrils.

  • 11.
    Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia
    et al.
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Bett, Cyrus
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Sevillano, Alejandro M.
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Kurt, Timothy D.
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Lawrence, Jessica
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Soldau, Katrin
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Sigurdson, Christina J.
    Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Univ Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Univ Calif Davis, CA USA.
    Generation of novel neuroinvasive prions following intravenous challenge2018Ingår i: Brain Pathology, ISSN 1015-6305, E-ISSN 1750-3639, Vol. 28, nr 6, s. 999-1011Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Prions typically spread into the central nervous system (CNS), likely via peripheral nerves. Yet prion conformers differ in their capacity to penetrate the CNS; certain fibrillar prions replicate persistently in lymphoid tissues with no CNS entry, leading to chronic silent carriers. Subclinical carriers of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob (vCJD) prions in the United Kingdom have been estimated at 1:2000, and vCJD prions have been transmitted through blood transfusion, however, the circulating prion conformers that neuroinvade remain unclear. Here we investigate how prion conformation impacts brain entry of transfused prions by challenging mice intravenously to subfibrillar and fibrillar strains. We show that most strains infiltrated the brain and caused terminal disease, however, the fibrillar prions showed reduced CNS entry in a strain-dependent manner. Strikingly, the highly fibrillar mCWD prion strain replicated in the spleen and emerged in the brain as a novel strain, indicating that a new neuroinvasive prion had been generated from a previously non-neuroinvasive strain. The new strain showed altered plaque morphology, brain regions targeted and biochemical properties and these properties were maintained upon intracerebral passage. Intracerebral passage of prion-infected spleen re-created the new strain. Splenic prions resembled the new strain biochemically and intracerebral passage of prion-infected spleen re-created the new strain, collectively suggesting splenic prion replication as a potential source. Taken together, these results indicate that intravenous exposure to prion-contaminated blood or blood products may generate novel neuroinvasive prion conformers and disease phenotypes, potentially arising from prion replication in non-neural tissues or from conformer selection.

  • 12.
    Zhang, Jun
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Wang, Jun
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Bioinformatik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Sandberg, Alexander
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Wu, Xiongyu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    LeVine, Harry III
    Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, KY 40536-0230, Lexington, USA..
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Durbeej, Bo
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Bioinformatik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491, Trondheim, Norway..
    Intramolecular Proton and Charge Transfer of Pyrene-based trans-Stilbene Salicylic Acids Applied to Detection of Aggregated Proteins.2018Ingår i: ChemPhysChem, ISSN 1439-4235, E-ISSN 1439-7641, Vol. 19, nr 22, s. 3001-3009Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Two analogues to the fluorescent amyloid probe 2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carboxy-styryl)benzene (X-34) were synthesized based on the trans-stilbene pyrene scaffold (Py1SA and Py2SA). The compounds show strikingly different emission spectra when bound to preformed Aβ1-42 fibrils. This remarkable emission difference is retained when bound to amyloid fibrils of four distinct proteins, suggesting a common binding configuration for each molecule. Density functional theory calculations show that Py1SA is twisted, while Py2SA is more planar. Still, an analysis of the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs) of the two compounds indicates that the degree of electronic coupling between the pyrene and salicylic acid (SA) moieties is larger in Py1SA than in Py2SA. Excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) coupled-charge transfer (ICT) was observed for the anionic form in polar solvents. We conclude that ICT properties of trans-stilbene derivatives can be utilized for amyloid probe design with large changes in emission spectra and decay times from analogous chemical structures depending on the detailed physical nature of the binding site.less thanbr /greater than (© 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim.)

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Department of Physics, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Luminescent-Conjugated Oligothiophene Probe Applications for Fluorescence Imaging of Pure Amyloid Fibrils and Protein Aggregates in Tissues2018Ingår i: Amyloid Proteins: Methods and Protocols / [ed] Einar M. Sigurdsson, Miguel Calero and María Gasset, Humana Press, 2018, Vol. 1779, s. 485-496Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Luminescent-conjugated oligo- and polythiophenes (LCOs and LCPs) are valuable tools for optical imaging of a plethora of protein aggregates associated with amyloidoses. Here, we outline updated protocols for the application of the anionic pentameric LCO, p-FTAA, for staining and hyperspectral imaging of protein aggregates in a variety of settings such as in vitro formed amyloid fibrils, ex vivo tissue sections, and whole brain Drosophila.

  • 14.
    Michno, Wojciech
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kaya, Ibrahim
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Guerard, Laurent
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden; UCL, England.
    Hanrieder, Jorg
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; UCL, England; Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Multimodal Chemical Imaging of Amyloid Plaque Polymorphism Reveals A beta Aggregation Dependent Anionic Lipid Accumulations and Metabolism2018Ingår i: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 90, nr 13, s. 8130-8138Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid plaque formation constitutes one of the main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimers disease (AD) and is suggested to be a critical factor driving disease pathogenesis. Interestingly, in patients that display amyloid pathology but remain cognitively normal, A beta deposits are predominantly of diffuse morphology suggesting that cored plaque formation is primarily associated with cognitive deterioration and AD pathogenesis. Little is known about the molecular mechanism responsible for conversion of monomeric A beta into neurotoxic aggregates and the predominantly cored deposits observed in AD. The structural diversity among A beta plaques, including cored/compact- and diffuse, may be linked to their distinct A beta profile and other chemical species including neuronal lipids. We developed a novel, chemical imaging paradigm combining matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) and fluorescent amyloid staining. This multimodal imaging approach was used to probe the lipid chemistry associated with structural plaque heterogeneity in transgenic AD mice (tgAPP(Swe)) and was correlated to A beta profiles determined by subsequent laser microdissection and immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry. Multivariate image analysis revealed an inverse localization of ceramides and their matching metabolites to diffuse and cored structures within single plaques, respectively. Moreover, phosphatidylinositols implicated in AD pathogenesis, were found to localize to the diffuse A beta structures and correlate with A beta 1-42. Further, lysophospholipids implicated in neuroinflammation were increased in all A beta deposits. The results support previous clinical findings on the importance of lipid disturbances in AD pathophysiology and associated sphingolipid processing. These data highlight the potential of multimodal imaging as a powerful technology to probe neuropathological mechanisms.

  • 15.
    Rasmussen, Jay
    et al.
    University of Tubingen, Germany; German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Mahler, Jasmin
    University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Beschorner, Natalie
    University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Kaeser, Stephan A.
    University of Tubingen, Germany; German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease, Germany.
    Haesler, Lisa M.
    University of Tubingen, Germany; German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease, Germany.
    Baumann, Frank
    University of Tubingen, Germany; German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease, Germany.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Portelius, Erik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Blennow, Kaj
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lashley, Tammaryn
    UCL, England.
    Fox, Nick C.
    UCL, England.
    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego
    University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany; University of Antioquia, Colombia; University of Antioquia, Colombia.
    Glatzel, Markus
    University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany.
    Oblak, Adrian L.
    Indiana University of School Med, IN 46202 USA.
    Ghetti, Bernardino
    Indiana University of School Med, IN 46202 USA.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Staufenbiel, Matthias
    University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Walker, Lary C.
    Emory University, GA 30329 USA.
    Jucker, Mathias
    University of Tubingen, Germany; German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease, Germany.
    Amyloid polymorphisms constitute distinct clouds of conformational variants in different etiological subtypes of Alzheimers disease2017Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, nr 49, s. 13018-13023Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The molecular architecture of amyloids formed in vivo can be interrogated using luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), a unique class of amyloid dyes. When bound to amyloid, LCOs yield fluorescence emission spectra that reflect the 3D structure of the protein aggregates. Given that synthetic amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) has been shown to adopt distinct structural conformations with different biological activities, we asked whether A beta can assume structurally and functionally distinct conformations within the brain. To this end, we analyzed the LCO-stained cores of beta-amyloid plaques in postmortem tissue sections from frontal, temporal, and occipital neocortices in 40 cases of familial Alzheimers disease (AD) or sporadic (idiopathic) AD (sAD). The spectral attributes of LCO-bound plaques varied markedly in the brain, but the mean spectral properties of the amyloid cores were generally similar in all three cortical regions of individual patients. Remarkably, the LCO amyloid spectra differed significantly among some of the familial and sAD subtypes, and between typical patients with sAD and those with posterior cortical atrophy AD. Neither the amount of A beta nor its protease resistance correlated with LCO spectral properties. LCO spectral amyloid phenotypes could be partially conveyed to A beta plaques induced by experimental transmission in a mouse model. These findings indicate that polymorphic A beta-amyloid deposits within the brain cluster as clouds of conformational variants in different AD cases. Heterogeneity in the molecular architecture of pathogenic A beta among individuals and in etiologically distinct subtypes of AD justifies further studies to assess putative links between A beta conformation and clinical phenotype.

  • 16.
    Hahn, Katharina
    et al.
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Urban, Peter
    Institute Pathol and Dermatopathol, Germany.
    Ruediger Meliss, Rolf
    Institute Dermatopathol, Germany.
    Behrens, Hans-Michael
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Krueger, Sandra
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Roecken, Christoph
    Christian Albrechts University of Kiel, Germany.
    Establishing and validating the fluorescent amyloid ligand h-FTAA (heptamer formyl thiophene acetic acid) to identify transthyretin amyloid deposits in carpal tunnel syndrome2017Ingår i: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 24, nr 2, s. 78-86Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Transthyretin-derived (ATTR) amyloidosis is a frequent finding in carpal tunnel syndrome. We tested the following hypotheses: the novel fluorescent amyloid ligand heptameric formic thiophene acetic acid (h-FTAA) has a superior sensitivity for the detection of amyloid compared with Congo red-staining; Amyloid load correlates with patient gender and/or patient age. We retrieved 208 resection specimens obtained from 184 patients with ATTR amyloid in the carpal tunnel. Serial sections were stained with Congo red, h-FTAA and an antibody directed against transthyretin (TTR). Stained sections were digitalized and forwarded to computational analyses. The amount of amyloid was correlated with patient demographics. Amyloid stained intensely with h-FTAA and an anti-TTR-antibody. Congo red-staining combined with fluorescence microscopy was significantly less sensitive than h-FTAA-fluorescence and TTR-immunostaining: the highest percentage area was found in TTR-immunostained sections, followed by h-FTAA and Congo red. The Pearson correlation coefficient was .8 (Congo red vs. h-FTAA) and .9 (TTR vs. h-FTAA). Amyloid load correlated with patient gender, anatomical site and patient age. h-FTAA is a highly sensitive method to detect even small amounts of ATTR amyloid in the carpal tunnel. The staining protocol is easy and h-FTAA may be a much more sensitive procedure to detect amyloid at an earlier stage.

  • 17.
    Nyström, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Bäck, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Imaging Amyloid Tissues Stained with Luminescent Conjugated Oligothiophenes by Hyperspectral Confocal Microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging2017Ingår i: Journal of Visualized Experiments, ISSN 1940-087X, E-ISSN 1940-087X, nr 128, artikel-id e56279Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteins that deposit as amyloid in tissues throughout the body can be the cause or consequence of a large number of diseases. Among these we find neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers and Parkinsons disease afflicting primarily the central nervous system, and systemic amyloidosis where serum amyloid A, transthyretin and IgG light chains deposit as amyloid in liver, carpal tunnel, spleen, kidney, heart, and other peripheral tissues. Amyloid has been known and studied for more than a century, often using amyloid specific dyes such as Congo red and Thioflavin T (ThT) or Thioflavin (ThS). In this paper, we present heptamer-formyl thiophene acetic acid (hFTAA) as an example of recently developed complements to these dyes called luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs). hFTAA is easy to use and is compatible with co-staining in immunofluorescence or with other cellular markers. Extensive research has proven that hFTAA detects a wider range of disease associated protein aggregates than conventional amyloid dyes. In addition, hFTAA can also be applied for optical assignment of distinct aggregated morphotypes to allow studies of amyloid fibril polymorphism. While the imaging methodology applied is optional, we here demonstrate hyperspectral imaging (HIS), laser scanning confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). These examples show some of the imaging techniques where LCOs can be used as tools to gain more detailed knowledge of the formation and structural properties of amyloids. An important limitation to the technique is, as for all conventional optical microscopy techniques, the requirement for microscopic size of aggregates to allow detection. Furthermore, the aggregate should comprise a repetitive beta-sheet structure to allow for hFTAA binding. Excessive fixation and/or epitope exposure that modify the aggregate structure or conformation can render poor hFTAA binding and hence pose limitations to accurate imaging.

  • 18.
    Nyström, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Vahdat Shariat Panahi, Aida
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelning för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Westermark, Per
    d Department of Immunology , Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
    Westermark, Gunilla T.
    e Department of Medical Cell Biology , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Lundmark, Katarzyna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelning för neurobiologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Diagnostikcentrum, Klinisk patologi.
    Seed-dependent templating of murine AA amyloidosis2017Ingår i: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 24, nr sup1, s. 140-141Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Zhang, Jun
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Molekylär ytfysik och nanovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi.
    Sandberg, Alexander
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Wu, Xiongyu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Department of Physics, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    trans-Stilbenoids with Extended Fluorescence Lifetimes for the Characterization of Amyloid Fibrils2017Ingår i: ACS Omega, ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 2, nr 8, s. 4693-4704Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It was previously reported that two naphthyl-based trans-stilbene probes, (E)-4-(2-(naphthalen-1-yl)vinyl)benzene-1,2-diol (1) and (E)-4-(2-(naphthalen-2-yl)vinyl)benzene-1,2-diol (3), can bind to both native transthyretin (TTR) and misfolded protofibrillar TTR at physiological concentrations, displaying distinct emission maxima bound to the different conformational states (>100 nm difference). To further explore this amyloid probe scaffold to obtain extended fluorescence lifetimes, two new analogues with expanded aromatic ring systems (anthracene and pyrene), (E)-4-(2-(anthracen-2-yl)vinyl)benzene-1,2-diol (4) and (E)-4-(2-(pyren-2-yl)vinyl)benzene-1,2-diol (5), were synthesized employing the palladium-catalyzed Mizoroki–Heck reaction. (E)-4-Styrylbenzene-1,2-diol (2), 3, 4, and 5 were investigated with respect to their photophysical properties in methanol and when bound to insulin, lysozyme, and Aβ1-42 fibrils, including time-resolved fluorescence measurements. In conclusion, 4 and 5 can bind to both native and fibrillar TTR, becoming highly fluorescent. Compounds 2–5 bind specifically to insulin, lysozyme, and Aβ1-42 fibrils with an apparent fluorescence intensity increase and moderate binding affinities. The average fluorescence lifetimes of the probes bound to Aβ1-42 fibrils are 1.3 ns (2), 1.5 ns (3), 5.7 ns (4), and 29.8 ns (5). In summary, the variable aromatic moieties of the para-positioned trans-stilbenoid vinyl-benzene-1,2-diol with benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene showed that the extended conjugated systems retained the amyloid targeting properties of the probes. Furthermore, both the anthracene and pyrene moieties extensively enhanced the fluorescence intensity and prolonged lifetimes. These attractive probe properties should improve amyloid detection and characterization by fluorescence-based techniques.

  • 20.
    Nordeman, Patrik
    et al.
    Preclinical PET Platform, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Leif B. G.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Bäck, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Estrada, Sergio
    Preclinical PET Platform, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hall, Håkan
    Preclinical PET Platform, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjölander, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Westermark, Gunilla T.
    Department of Medicinal Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westermark, Per
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, UppsalaSweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, K. Peter R.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Antoni, Gunnar
    Preclinical PET Platform, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    11C and 18FRadiolabeling of Tetra- and Pentathiophenes as PET-ligands for Amyloid Protein Aggregates2016Ingår i: ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, ISSN 1948-5875, E-ISSN 1948-5875, Vol. 7, nr 4, s. 368-373Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Three oligothiophenes were evaluated as PET tracers for the study of local and systemic amyloidosis ex vivo using tissue from patients with amyloid deposits and in vivo using healthy animals and PET-CT. The ex vivo binding studies revealed that all three labeled compounds bound specifically to human amyloid deposits. Specific binding was found in the heart, kidney, liver and spleen. To verify the specificity of the oligothiophenes towards amyloid deposits, tissue sections with amyloid pathology were stained using the fluorescence exhibited by the compounds and evaluated with multiphoton microscopy. Furthermore, in vivo rat and monkey PET-CT studies showed very low uptake in the brain, pancreas and heart of the healthy animals indicating low non-specific binding to healthy tissue. The biological evaluations indicated that this is a promising group of compounds for the visualization of systemic and localized amyloidosis.

  • 21.
    Gallardo, Rodrigo
    et al.
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Ramakers, Meine
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    De Smet, Frederik
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Claes, Filip
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Khodaparast, Ladan
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Khodaparast, Laleh
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Couceiro, Jose R.
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Langenberg, Tobias
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Siemons, Maxime
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Young, Laurence J.
    University of Cambridge, England; University of Leeds, England; University of Leeds, England.
    Laine, Romain F.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Young, Lydia
    University of Cambridge, England; University of Leeds, England; University of Leeds, England.
    Radaelli, Enrico
    VIB Centre Biol Disease, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Benilova, Iryna
    VIB Centre Biol Disease, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Kumar, Manoj
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Staes, An
    VIB, Belgium; University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Desager, Matyas
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Beerens, Manu
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Vandervoort, Petra
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Luttun, Aernout
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Gevaert, Kris
    VIB, Belgium; University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Bormans, Guy
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Dewerchin, Mieke
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; VIB, Belgium.
    Van Eldere, Johan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Carmeliet, Peter
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; VIB, Belgium.
    Vande Velde, Greetje
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Verfaillie, Catherine
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Kaminski, Clemens F.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    De Strooper, Bart
    VIB Centre Biol Disease, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Serpell, Louise
    University of Sussex, England.
    Schymkowitz, Joost
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Rousseau, Frederic
    VIB Switch Lab, Belgium; Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    De novo design of a biologically active amyloid2016Ingår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 354, nr 6313, s. 720-+Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Most human proteins possess amyloidogenic segments, but only about 30 are associated with amyloid-associated pathologies, and it remains unclear what determines amyloid toxicity. We designed vascin, a synthetic amyloid peptide, based on an amyloidogenic fragment of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a protein that is not associated to amyloidosis. Vascin recapitulates key biophysical and biochemical characteristics of natural amyloids, penetrates cells, and seeds the aggregation of VEGFR2 through direct interaction. We found that amyloid toxicity is observed only in cells that both express VEGFR2 and are dependent on VEGFR2 activity for survival. Thus, amyloid toxicity here appears to be both protein-specific and conditional-determined by VEGFR2 loss of function in a biological context in which target protein function is essential.

  • 22.
    Babu Moparthi, Satish
    et al.
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Carlsson, Uno
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Vincentelli, Renaud
    University of Aix Marseille, France.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Harald
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Wenger, Jerome
    Aix Marseille University, France.
    Differential conformational modulations of MreB folding upon interactions with GroEL/ES and TRiC chaperonin components2016Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, nr 28386Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we study and compare the mechanisms of action of the GroEL/GroES and the TRiC chaperonin systems on MreB client protein variants extracted from E. coli. MreB is a homologue to actin in prokaryotes. Single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and time-resolved fluorescence polarization anisotropy report the binding interaction of folding MreB with GroEL, GroES and TRiC. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on MreB variants quantified molecular distance changes occurring during conformational rearrangements within folding MreB bound to chaperonins. We observed that the MreB structure is rearranged by a binding-induced expansion mechanism in TRiC, GroEL and GroES. These results are quantitatively comparable to the structural rearrangements found during the interaction of beta-actin with GroEL and TRiC, indicating that the mechanism of chaperonins is conserved during evolution. The chaperonin-bound MreB is also significantly compacted after addition of AMP-PNP for both the GroEL/ES and TRiC systems. Most importantly, our results showed that GroES may act as an unfoldase by inducing a dramatic initial expansion of MreB (even more than for GroEL) implicating a role for MreB folding, allowing us to suggest a delivery mechanism for GroES to GroEL in prokaryotes.

  • 23.
    Sjölander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi.
    Roecken, Christoph
    University of Kiel, Germany.
    Westermark, Per
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Westermark, Gunilla T.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Establishing the fluorescent amyloid ligand h-FTAA for studying human tissues with systemic and localized amyloid2016Ingår i: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 23, nr 2, s. 98-108Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid and accurate detection of amyloid deposits in routine surgical pathology settings are of great importance. The use of fluorescence microscopy in combination with appropriate amyloid specific dyes is very promising in this regard. Here we report that a luminescent conjugated oligothiophene, h-FTAA, rapidly and with high sensitivity and selectivity detects amyloid deposits in verified clinical samples from systemic amyloidosis patients with AA, AL and ATTR types; as well as in tissues laden with localized amyloidosis of AANF, AIAPP and ASem1 type. The probe h-FTAA emitted yellow red fluorescence on binding to amyloid deposits, whereas no apparent staining was observed in surrounding tissue. The only functional structure stained with h-FTAA showing the amyloidotypic fluorescence spectrum was Paneth cell granules in intestine. Screening of 114 amyloid containing tissues derived from 107 verified (Congo red birefringence and/or immunohistochemistry) amyloidosis patients revealed complete correlation between h-FTAA and Congo red fluorescence (107/107, 100% sensitivity). The majority of Congo red negative control cases (27 of 32, 85% specificity) were negative with h-FTAA. Small Congo red negative aggregates in kidney, liver, pancreas and duodenum were found by h-FTAA fluorescence in five control patients aged 72-83 years suffering from diverse diseases. The clinical significance of these false-positive lesions is currently not known. Because h-FTAA fluorescence is one magnitude brighter than Congo red and as the staining is performed four magnitudes lower than the concentration of dye, we believe that these inclusions are beyond detection by Congo red. We conclude that h-FTAA is a fluorescent hypersensitive, rapid and powerful tool for identifying amyloid deposits in tissue sections. Use of h-FTAA can be exploited as a rapid complementary technique for accurate detection of amyloid in routine surgical pathology settings. Our results also implicate the potential of the technique for detection of prodromal amyloidosis as well as for discovery of new amyloid-like protein aggregates in humans.

  • 24.
    Psonka-Antonczyk, Katarzyna M.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Johansson, Leif
    Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Stokke, Björn T.
    Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nanoscale Structure and Spectroscopic Probing of A beta 1-40 Fibril Bundle Formation2016Ingår i: Frontiers in Chemistry, E-ISSN 2296-2646, Vol. 4, artikel-id 44Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid plaques composed of fibrillar Amyloid-beta (A beta) are hallmarks of Alzheimers disease. However, A beta fibrils are morphologically heterogeneous. Conformation sensitive luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) are versatile tools for monitoring such fibril polymorphism in vivo and in vitro. Biophysical methods applied on in vitro generated A beta fibrils, stained with LCOs with different binding and fluorescence properties, can be used to characterize the A beta fibrillation in depth, far beyond that possible for in vivo generated amyloid plaques. In this study, in vitro fibrillation of the A beta 1-40 peptide was monitored by time-lapse transmission electron microscopy, LCO fluorescence, and atomic force microscopy. Differences in the LCO binding in combination with nanoscale imaging revealed that spectral variation correlated with fibrils transforming from solitary filaments (empty set similar to 2.5 nm) into higher order bundled structures (empty set similar to 5 nm). These detailed in vitro experiments can be used to derive data that reflects the heterogeneity of in vivo generated A beta plaques observed by LCO fluorescence. Our work provides new structural basis for targeted drug design and molecular probe development for amyloid imaging.

  • 25.
    Campos Melo, Raúl Ivan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Wu, Xiongyu
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Elgland, Mathias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Novel Trans-Stilbene-based Fluorophores as Probes for Spectral Discrimination of Native and Protofibrillar Transthyretin2016Ingår i: ACS Chemical Neuroscience, ISSN 1948-7193, E-ISSN 1948-7193, Vol. 7, nr 7, s. 924-940Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulation of misfolded transthyretin (TTR) as amyloid fibrils causes various human disorders. Native transthyretin is a neurotrophic protein and is a putative extracellular molecular chaperone. Several fluorophores have been shown in vitro to bind selectively to native TTR. Other compounds, such as thioflavin T, bind TTR amyloid fibrils. The probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) binds to both native and fibrillar TTR, becoming highly fluorescent, but with indistinguishable emission spectra for native and fibrillar TTR. Herein we report our efforts to develop a fluorescent small molecule capable of binding both native and misfolded protofibrillar TTR, providing distinguishable emission spectra. We used microwave synthesis for efficient production of a small library of trans-stilbenes and fluorescence spectral screening of their binding properties. We synthesized and tested 22 trans-stilbenes displaying a variety of functional groups. We successfully developed two naphthyl-based trans-stilbenes probes that detect both TTR states at physiological concentrations. The compounds bound with nanomolar to micromolar affinities and displayed distinct emission maxima upon binding native or misfolded protofibrillar TTR (>100 nm difference). The probes were mainly responsive to environment polarity providing evidence for the divergent hydrophobic structure of the binding sites of these protein conformational states. Furthermore, we were able to successfully use one of these probes to quantify the relative amounts of native and protofibrillar TTR in a dynamic equilibrium. In conclusion, we identified two trans-stilbene-based fluorescent probes, (E)-4-(2-(naphthalen-1-yl)vinyl)benzene-1,2-diol (11) and (E)-4-(2-(naphthalen-2-yl)vinyl)benzene-1,2-diol (14), that bind native and protofibrillar TTR, providing a wide difference in emission maxima allowing conformational discrimination by fluorescence spectroscopy. We expect these novel molecules to serve as important chemical biology research tools in studies of TTR folding and misfolding.

  • 26.
    Bednarska, Natalia G.
    et al.
    KULeuven, Belgium; VIB, Belgium.
    van Eldere, Johan
    KULeuven, Belgium.
    Gallardo, Rodrigo
    VIB, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Ganesan, Ashok
    VIB, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Ramakers, Meine
    VIB, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Vogel, Isabel
    KULeuven, Belgium.
    Baatsen, Pieter
    VIB11, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Staes, An
    VIB, Belgium; University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Goethals, Marc
    VIB, Belgium; University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Gevaert, Kris
    VIB, Belgium; University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Schymkowitz, Joost
    VIB, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Rousseau, Frederic
    VIB, Belgium; KULeuven, Belgium.
    Protein aggregation as an antibiotic design strategy2016Ingår i: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 99, nr 5, s. 849-865Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking advantage of the xenobiotic nature of bacterial infections, we tested whether the cytotoxicity of protein aggregation can be targeted to bacterial pathogens without affecting their mammalian hosts. In particular, we examined if peptides encoding aggregation-prone sequence segments of bacterial proteins can display antimicrobial activity by initiating toxic protein aggregation in bacteria, but not in mammalian cells. Unbiased in vitro screening of aggregating peptide sequences from bacterial genomes lead to the identification of several peptides that are strongly bactericidal against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Upon parenteral administration in vivo, the peptides cured mice from bacterial sepsis without apparent toxic side effects as judged from histological and hematological evaluation. We found that the peptides enter and accumulate in the bacterial cytosol where they cause aggregation of bacterial polypeptides. Although the precise chain of events that leads to cell death remains to be elucidated, the ability to tap into aggregation-prone sequences of bacterial proteomes to elicit antimicrobial activity represents a rich and unexplored chemical space to be mined in search of novel therapeutic strategies to fight infectious diseases.

  • 27.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Fysik och elektroteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Armgarth, Astrid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Fysik och elektroteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Fysik och elektroteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Spatiotemporal Control of Amyloid-Like A Plaque Formation Using a Multichannel Organic Electronic Device2016Ingår i: Macromolecular materials and engineering (Print), ISSN 1438-7492, E-ISSN 1439-2054, Vol. 301, nr 4, s. 359-363Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We herein report on an iontronic device to drive and control A1-40 and A1-42 fibril formation. This system allows kinetic control of A aggregation by regulation of H+ flows. The formed aggregates show both nanometer-sized fibril structure and microscopic growth, thus mimicking senile plaques, at the H+-outlet. Mechanistically we observed initial accumulation of A1-40 likely driven by electrophoretic migration which preceded nucleation of amyloid structures in the accumulated peptide cluster.

  • 28.
    Groenning, Minna
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Campos Melo, Raul Ivan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hirschberg, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Vestergaard, Bente
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Considerably Unfolded Transthyretin Monomers Preceed and Exchange with Dynamically Structured Amyloid Protofibrils2015Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, nr 11443Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite numerous studies, a detailed description of the transthyretin (TTR) self-assembly mechanism and fibril structure in TTR amyloidoses remains unresolved. Here, using a combination of primarily small -angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS) analysis, we describe an unexpectedly dynamic TTR protofibril structure which exchanges protomers with highly unfolded monomers in solution. The protofibrils only grow to an approximate final size of 2,900 kDa and a length of 70 nm and a comparative HXMS analysis of native and aggregated samples revealed a much higher average solvent exposure of TTR upon fibrillation. With SAXS, we reveal the continuous presence of a considerably unfolded TTR monomer throughout the fibrillation process, and show that a considerable fraction of the fibrillating protein remains in solution even at a late maturation state. Together, these data reveal that the fibrillar state interchanges with the solution state. Accordingly, we suggest that TTR fibrillation proceeds via addition of considerably unfolded monomers, and the continuous presence of amyloidogenic structures near the protofibril surface offers a plausible explanation for secondary nucleation. We argue that the presence of such dynamic structural equilibria must impact future therapeutic development strategies.

  • 29.
    Nyström, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Generic amyloidogenicity of mammalian prion proteins from species susceptible and resistant to prions2015Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, nr 10101Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Prion diseases are lethal, infectious diseases associated with prion protein (PrP) misfolding. A large number of mammals are susceptible to both sporadic and acquired prion diseases. Although PrP is highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed in all mammals, not all species exhibit prion disease. By employing full length recombinant PrP from five known prion susceptible species (human, cattle, cat, mouse and hamster) and two species considered to be prion resistant (pig and dog) the amyloidogenicity of these PrPs has been delineated. All the mammalian PrPs, even from resistant species, were swiftly converted from the native state to amyloid-like structure when subjected to a native condition conversion assay. The PrPs displayed amyloidotypic tinctorial and ultrastructural hallmarks. Self-seeded conversion of the PrPs displayed significantly decreased lag phases demonstrating that nucleation dependent polymerization is a dominating mechanism in the fibrillation process. Fibrils from A beta 1-40, A beta 1-42, Lysozyme, Insulin and Transthyretin did not accelerate conversion of HuPrP whereas fibrils from HuPrP90-231 and HuPrP121-231 as well as full length PrPs of all PrPs efficiently seeded conversion showing specificity of the assay requiring the C-terminal PrP sequence. Our findings have implications for PrP misfolding and could have ramifications in the context of prion resistant species and silent carriers.

  • 30.
    Sekijima, Yoshiki
    et al.
    Shinshu University,Matsumoto, Japan.
    Campos, Raul Ivan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Yoshinaga, Tsuneaki
    Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Japan.
    Nagamatsu, Kiyoshiro
    Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Japan.
    Yazaki, Masahide
    Shinshu University,Matsumoto, Japan.
    Kametani, Fuyuki
    Tokyo Metropolitan Org Medical Research, Japan.
    Ikeda, Shu-ichi
    Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Japan.
    Pathological, biochemical, and biophysical characteristics of the transthyretin variant Y114H (p.Y134H) explain its very mild clinical phenotype2015Ingår i: Journal of the peripheral nervous system, ISSN 1085-9489, E-ISSN 1529-8027, Vol. 20, nr 4, s. 372-379Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a homotetrameric protein that must misfold in order to form amyloid fibrils. Misfolding includes rate limiting tetramer dissociation, followed by fast tertiary structural changes of the monomer that enable aggregation. Hereditary ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder with systemic deposition of amyloid fibrils induced by TTR gene mutation. We identified a rare Y114H (p.Y134H) TTR variant in a Japanese patient presenting with late-onset, very mild clinical course. The patient had an extremely low serum variant TTR concentration (18% of total TTR), whereas the composition of variant TTR was 55% in amyloid fibrils in tenosynovial tissues obtained at carpal tunnel release surgery. The amyloid fibril deposits in the ATTR Y114H patient had an altered structure compared with that in wild-type ATTR patients, as determined by luminescent conjugated poly/oligo-thiophene fluorescence spectroscopy. Biophysical studies using recombinant protein showed that Y114H TTR was markedly destabilized both thermodynamically and kinetically and was highly amyloidogenic in vitro. These data suggest that extremely low serum variant Y114H TTR concentration, probably due to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of unstable variant TTR protein, protected this patient from severe amyloidosis, as self-assembly of the amyloidogenic intermediate is a concentration-dependent process.

  • 31.
    Hammarström, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Porcine prion protein amyloid2015Ingår i: Prion, ISSN 1933-6896, E-ISSN 1933-690X, Vol. 9, nr 4, s. 266-277Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  • 32.
    Sjölander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Bijzet, Johan
    Department of Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hazenberg, Bouke P.
    Department of Rheumatology & Clinical Immunology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Sensitive and rapid assessment of amyloid by oligothiophene fluorescence in subcutaneous fat tissue2015Ingår i: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 19-25Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic amyloidosis (SA) is often diagnosed late. Combining clinical and biochemical biomarkers is necessary for raising suspicion of disease. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) of subcutaneous fat enables SA detection by Congo red staining. The luminescent conjugated probe heptameric formic thiophene acetic acid (h-FTAA) is a sensitive alternative to Congo red-staining of tissue samples. Our objective was to compare h-FTAA fluorescence with the Congo red stain for amyloid detection in FNA-obtained fat tissue. Herein, we studied samples from 57 patients with established SA (19 with AA, 20 with AL, and 18 with ATTR) and 17 age-matched controls (34–75 years). Positivity for h-FTAA was graded according to a Congo red-based grading scale ranging from 0 to 4+. Amyloid grading by both methods correlated strongly (r = 0.87). Here h-FTAA was positive in 53 of 54 Congo red-positive cases (sensitivity 98%) and h-FTAA was negative in 7 of 17 Congo red-negative controls (specificity 41%), but was also positive for 3 Congo red-negative SA cases. We conclude that h-FTAA fluorescence is more sensitive than Congo red staining in this small exploratory study of fat tissue samples, implicating potential sensitivity for prodromal amyloidosis, but is less specific for clinical amyloidosis defined by Congo red positivity. Given its simplicity h-FTAA staining may therefore be the most appropriate method for rapid screening of fat tissue samples but should presently treat grade 1+ as only suggestive, whereas 2+ or higher as positive for amyloidosis. Parallel assessment of h-FTAA and Congo red staining appears highly promising for clinical applications.

  • 33.
    Herrmann, Uli S.
    et al.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Schuetz, Anne K.
    ETH, Switzerland.
    Shirani, Hamid
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Huang, Danzhi
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Saban, Dino
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Nuvolone, Mario
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Li, Bei
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Ballmer, Boris
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Åslund, Andreas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Mason, Jeffrey
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Rushing, Elisabeth
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Budka, Herbert
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Boeckmann, Anja
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Caflisch, Amedeo
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Meier, Beat H.
    ETH, Switzerland.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Hornemann, Simone
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Aguzzi, Adriano
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Structure-based drug design identifies polythiophenes as antiprion compounds2015Ingår i: Science Translational Medicine, ISSN 1946-6234, E-ISSN 1946-6242, Vol. 7, nr 299, s. 299ra123-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Prions cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies for which no treatment exists. Prions consist of PrPSc, a misfolded and aggregated form of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). We explore the antiprion properties of luminescent conjugated polythiophenes (LCPs) that bind and stabilize ordered protein aggregates. By administering a library of structurally diverse LCPs to the brains of prion-infected mice via osmotic minipumps, we found that antiprion activity required a minimum of five thiophene rings bearing regularly spaced carboxyl side groups. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance analyses and molecular dynamics simulations revealed that anionic side chains interacted with complementary, regularly spaced cationic amyloid residues of model prions. These findings allowed us to extract structural rules governing the interaction between LCPs and protein aggregates, which we then used to design a new set of LCPs with optimized binding. The new set of LCPs showed robust prophylactic and therapeutic potency in prion-infected mice, with the lead compound extending survival by greater than80% and showing activity against both mouse and hamster prions as well as efficacy upon intraperitoneal administration into mice. These results demonstrate the feasibility of targeted chemical design of compounds that may be useful for treating diseases of aberrant protein aggregation such as prion disease.

  • 34.
    Jonsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Pokrzywa, Malgorzata
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin.
    Starkenberg, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Systematic A beta Analysis in Drosophila Reveals High Toxicity for the 1-42, 3-42 and 11-42 Peptides, and Emphasizes N- and C-Terminal Residues2015Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, nr 7, artikel-id e0133272Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain amyloid plaques are a hallmark of Alzheimers disease (AD), and primarily consist of aggregated A beta peptides. While A beta 1-40 and A beta 1-42 are the most abundant, a number of other A beta peptides have also been identified. Studies have indicated differential toxicity for these various A beta peptides, but in vivo toxicity has not been systematically tested. To address this issue, we generated improved transgenic Drosophila UAS strains expressing 11 pertinent A beta peptides. UAS transgenic flies were generated by identical chromosomal insertion, hence removing any transgenic position effects, and crossed to a novel and robust Gal4 driver line. Using this improved Gal4/UAS set-up, survival and activity assays revealed that A beta 1-42 severely shortens lifespan and reduces activity. N-terminal truncated peptides were quite toxic, with 3-42 similar to 1-42, while 11-42 showed a pronounced but less severe phenotype. N-terminal mutations in 3-42 (E3A) or 11-42 (E11A) resulted in reduced toxicity for 11-42, and reduced aggregation for both variants. Strikingly, C-terminal truncation of A beta (1-41, -40, -39, -38, -37) were non-toxic. In contrast, C-terminal extension to 1-43 resulted in reduced lifespan and activity, but not to the same extent as 1-42. Mutating residue 42 in 1-42 (A42D, A42R and A42W) greatly reduced A beta accumulation and toxicity. Histological and biochemical analysis revealed strong correlation between in vivo toxicity and brain A beta aggregate load, as well as amount of insoluble A beta. This systematic Drosophila in vivo and in vitro analysis reveals crucial N- and C-terminal specificity for A beta neurotoxicity and aggregation, and underscores the importance of residues 1-10 and E11, as well as a pivotal role of A42.

  • 35.
    Fritschi, Sarah K.
    et al.
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease DZNE, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Cintron, Amarallys
    Emory University, GA 30329 USA.
    Ye, Lan
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease DZNE, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Mahler, Jasmin
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease DZNE, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Buehler, Anika
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease DZNE, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Baumann, Frank
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease DZNE, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Neumann, Manuela
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease DZNE, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Walker, Lary C.
    Emory University, GA 30329 USA; Emory University, GA 30322 USA.
    Jucker, Mathias
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease DZNE, Germany; University of Tubingen, Germany .
    A beta seeds resist inactivation by formaldehyde2014Ingår i: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 128, nr 4, s. 477-484Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerebral beta-amyloidosis can be exogenously induced by the intracerebral injection of brain extracts containing aggregated beta-amyloid (A beta) into young, pre-depositing A beta precursor protein- (APP) transgenic mice. Previous work has shown that the induction involves a prion-like seeding mechanism in which the seeding agent is aggregated A beta itself. Here we report that the beta-amyloid-inducing activity of Alzheimers disease (AD) brain tissue or aged APP-transgenic mouse brain tissue is preserved, albeit with reduced efficacy, after formaldehyde fixation. Moreover, spectral analysis with amyloid conformation-sensitive luminescent conjugated oligothiophene dyes reveals that the strain-like properties of aggregated A beta are maintained in fixed tissues. The resistance of A beta seeds to inactivation and structural modification by formaldehyde underscores their remarkable durability, which in turn may contribute to their persistence and spread within the body. The present findings can be exploited to establish the relationship between the molecular structure of A beta aggregates and the variable clinical features and disease progression of AD even in archived, formalin-fixed autopsy material.

  • 36.
    Usmani, Shariq M.
    et al.
    Ulm University Medical Center, Germany .
    Zirafi, Onofrio
    Ulm University Medical Center, Germany .
    Mueller, Janis A.
    Ulm University Medical Center, Germany .
    Sandi-Monroy, Nathallie L.
    Ulm University Medical Center; Kinderwunsch-Zentrum Ulm, Germany.
    Yadav, Jay K.
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Meier, Christoph
    Ulm University, Germany .
    Weil, Tanja
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Roan, Nadia R.
    University of California at San Francisco, USA .
    Greene, Warner C.
    University of California at San Francisco, USA.
    Walther, Paul
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Wetzel, Ronald
    University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA .
    Pilcher, Christopher D.
    University of California, San Francisco, USA .
    Gagsteiger, Friedrich
    Kinderwunsch-Zentrum Ulm, Germany.
    Fändrich, Marcus
    Ulm University, Germany.
    Kirchhoff, Frank
    Ulm University Medical Center, Germany.
    Münch, Jan
    Ulm University Medical Center, Germany.
    Direct visualization of HIV-enhancing endogenous amyloid fibrils in human semen2014Ingår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 5, s. 3508-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturally occurring fragments of the abundant semen proteins prostatic acid phosphatase ( PAP) and semenogelins form amyloid fibrils in vitro. These fibrils boost HIV infection and may play a key role in the spread of the AIDS pandemic. However, the presence of amyloid fibrils in semen remained to be demonstrated. Here, we use state of the art confocal and electron microscopy techniques for direct imaging of amyloid fibrils in human ejaculates. We detect amyloid aggregates in all semen samples and find that they partially consist of PAP fragments, interact with HIV particles and increase viral infectivity. Our results establish semen as a body fluid that naturally contains amyloid fibrils that are exploited by HIV to promote its sexual transmission.

  • 37.
    Sjölander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Röcken, Christoph
    Institute of Pathology, Christian-Albrechts-Univeristy, Kiel, Germany.
    Westermark, Per
    Department of Immunology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westermark, Gunilla T.
    Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Evaluation of the fluorescent amyloid ligand h-FTAA in human tissues with systemic and localized amyloid2014Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid and accurate detection of amyloid deposits in routine surgical pathology settings are of great importance. The use of fluorescence microscopy in combination with appropriate amyloid specific dyes is very promising in this regard. Most systemic amyloidosis are progressive and lethal. Disease specific therapy depends on the identification of the offending proteins. Here we report that a luminescent conjugated oligothiophene, h-FTAA, rapidly and with high sensitivity and selectivity detects amyloid deposits in verified clinical samples from systemic amyloidosis patients with AA, AL, and ATTR types; as well as in tissues laden with localized amyloidosis of AANF, AIAPP and ASem1 type. The probe h-FTAA emitted yellow red fluorescence on binding to amyloid deposits, whereas no apparent staining was observed in surrounding tissue. Screening of 114 amyloid containing tissues derived from §07 verified (Congo red birefringence and immunohistochemistry) amyloidosis patients revealed complete correlation between h-FTAA and Congo red fluorescence. We conclude that h-FTAA is a fluorescent hypersensitive, rapid and powerful tool for identifying amyloid deposits in tissue sections. H-FTAA staining can be utilized as a rapid complementary technique for accurate detection of amyloid in routine surgical pathology settings. It was also revealed that within 5 of 15 age matched Congo red negative control samples h-FTAA detects microdeposits of amyloid-like protein aggregates in liver and kidney. The results emphasize the potential of the dye for detection of prodromal amyloidosis as well as for discovery of novel amyloid-like protein aggregates in humans.

  • 38.
    Nyström, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Is the prevalent human prion protein 129M/V mutation a living fossil from a Paleolithic panzootic superprion pandemic?2014Ingår i: Prion, ISSN 1933-6896, E-ISSN 1933-690X, Vol. 8, nr 1Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Prion diseases are consistently associated with prion protein (PrPC) misfolding rendering a cascade of auto-catalytic self-perpetuation of misfolded PrP in an afflicted individual. The molecular process is intriguingly similar to all known amyloid diseases both local and systemic. The prion disease is also infectious by the transfer of misfolded PrP from one individual to the next. Transmissibility is surprisingly efficient in prion diseases and given the rapid disease progression following initial symptoms the prionoses stand out from other amyloidoses, which all may be transmissible under certain circumstances. The nature of the infectious prion as well as the genotype of the host is important for transmissibility. For hitherto unexplained reasons the majority of Europeans carry a missense mutation on one or both alleles of the PrP gene (PRNP), and hence express a variant of PrP with a substitution for valine (V) instead of methionine (M) in position 129. In fact the 129M/V variant is very common in all populations except for the Japanese. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a disease rarely striking people below the age of 60, where homozygosity especially 129MM is a very strong risk factor. Paradoxically, the 129M/V polymorphism suggestive of heterozygote advantage is one of the most clear cut disease associated traits of the human population, yet prion disease is extraordinarily rare. The genetic basis for how this trait spread with such prevalence within human populations is still target to investigations and deserves attention. This short essay represents a somewhat provocative hypothetical notion of a possible ancient significance of this polymorphism.

  • 39.
    Magnusson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Simon, Rozalyn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Sjölander, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Sigurdson, Christina J.
    Department of Pathology, Unversity of California, San Diego, USA.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Nilsson, Peter R
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Multimodal fluorescene microscopy of prion strain specific PrP deposits stained by thiophene-bassed amyloid ligands2014Ingår i: Prion, ISSN 1933-6896, E-ISSN 1933-690X, Vol. 8, nr 4, s. 319-329Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrP) forms aggregates which vary in structural conformation yet share identical primary sequence. These variations in PrP conformation are believed to manifest in prion strains exhibiting distinctly different periods of disease incubation as well as regionally specific aggregate deposition within the brain. The anionic luminescent conjugated polythiophene (LCP), polythiophene acetic acid (PTAA) has previously been used to distinguish PrP deposits associated with distinct mouse adapted strains via distinct fluorescence emission profiles from the dye. Here we employed PTAA and 3 structurally related chemically defined luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) to stain brain tissue sections from mice inoculated with 2 distinct prion strains. Our results showed that in addition to emission spectra, excitation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can fruitfully be assessed for optical distinction of PrP deposits associated with distinct prion strains. Our findings support the theory that alterations in LCP/LCO fluorescence are due to distinct conformational restriction of the thiophene backbone upon interaction with PrP aggregates associated with distinct prion strains. We foresee that LCP and LCO staining in combination with multimodal fluorescence microscopy might aid in detecting structural differences among discrete protein aggregates and in linking protein conformational features with disease phenotypes for a variety of neurodegenerative proteinopathies.

  • 40.
    LeVine III, Harry
    et al.
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Reporters of amyloid structural polymorphism2014Ingår i: Bio-nanoimaging: protein misfolding & aggregation / [ed] Vladimir N. Uversky, Yuri L. Lyubchenko, London: Academic Press, 2014, s. 69-79Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Misfolding of proteins induced by environmental conditions or by the presence of destabilizing mutations often triggers squestration (aggresome formation) or cellular removal (unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy) intracellular responses. Extracellular aggregates are phagocytosed or endocytosed by macrophages in the periphery and microglia and astrocytes in the brain and central nervous system. In some cases a highly stable altemative assembly structure, an amyloid fibril, is formed that is highly resistant to degadation and thus accumulates.

  • 41.
    Babu Moparthi, Satish
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Institut Fresnel, CNRS UMR 7249, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France.
    Sjölander, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Villebeck, Laila
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Molekylär Bioteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Harald
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Carlsson, Uno
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Transient conformational remodeling of folding proteins by GroES - Individually and in concert with GroEL2014Ingår i: Journal of chemical biology, ISSN 1864-6158, E-ISSN 1864-6166, Vol. 7, nr 1, s. 1-15Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The commonly accepted dogma of the bacterial GroE chaperonin system entails protein folding mediated by cycles of several ATP-dependent sequential steps where GroEL interacts with the folding client protein. In contrast, we herein report GroES-mediated dynamic remodeling (expansion and compression) of two different protein substrates during folding: the endogenous substrate MreB and carbonic anhydrase (HCAII), a well-characterized protein folding model. GroES was also found to influence GroEL binding induced unfolding and compression of the client protein underlining the synergistic activity of both chaperonins, even in the absence of ATP. This previously unidentified activity by GroES should have important implications for understanding the chaperonin mechanism and cellular stress response. Our findings necessitate a revision of the GroEL/ES mechanism.

  • 42.
    Bagheri, Maryam
    et al.
    Ilam University of Medical Science, Iran .
    Rezakhani, Arjang
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Nyström, Sofie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Turkina, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Roghani, Mehrdad
    Shahed University, Iran .
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Mohseni, Simin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för cellbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Amyloid Beta1-40-Induced Astrogliosis and the Effect of Genistein Treatment in Rat: A Three-Dimensional Confocal Morphometric and Proteomic Study2013Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, nr 10Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Astrocytes are highly involved in regulation and homeostasis of the extracellular environment in the healthy brain. In pathological conditions, these cells play a major role in the inflammatory response seen in CNS tissues, which is called reactive astrogliosis and includes hypertrophy and proliferation of astrocytes. Here, we performed 3D confocal microscopy to evaluate the morphological response of reactive astrocytes positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in rats, to the presence of Aβ1–40 in the rat brain before and after treatment with genistein. In 50 astrocytes per animal, we measured the volume and surface area for the nucleus, cell body, the entire cell, the tissue covered by single astrocytes and quantified the number and length of branches, the density of the astrocytes and the intensity of GFAP immunoreactivity. Injecting Aβ1–40 into the brain of rats caused astrogliosis indicated by increased values for all measured parameters. Mass spectrometric analysis of hippocampal tissue in Aβ1–40-injected brain showed decreased amounts of tubulins, enolases and myelin basic protein, and increased amounts of dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2. In Aβ1–40-injected rats pretreated with genistein, GFAP intensity was decreased to the sham-operated group level, and Aβ1–40-induced astrogliosis was significantly ameliorated.

  • 43.
    Arja, Katriann
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Organisk Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan. Linköping, .
    Sjölander, Daniel
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Proteinkemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköping, .
    Åslund, Alma
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Organisk Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköping, .
    Prokop, Stefan
    Charite, Germany .
    Heppner, Frank L.
    Charite, Germany .
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Organisk Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköping, .
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway .
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Proteinkemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköping, .
    Åslund, Andreas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Organisk Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköping, .
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Organisk Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten. Linköping, .
    Enhanced Fluorescent Assignment of Protein Aggregates by an Oligothiophene-Porphyrin-Based Amyloid Ligand2013Ingår i: Macromolecular rapid communications, ISSN 1022-1336, E-ISSN 1521-3927, Vol. 34, nr 9, s. 723-730Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Fluorescent probes identifying protein aggregates are of great interest, as deposition of aggregated proteins is associated with many devastating diseases. Here, we report that a fluorescent amyloid ligand composed of two distinct molecular moieties, an amyloidophilic pentameric oligothiophene and a porphyrin, can be utilized for spectral and lifetime imaging assessment of recombinant A 1-42 amyloid fibrils and A deposits in brain tissue sections from a transgenic mouse model with Alzheimers disease pathology. The enhanced spectral range and distinct lifetime diversity of this novel oligothiopheneporphyrin-based ligand allow a more precise assessment of heterogeneous amyloid morphology compared with the corresponding oligothiophene dye.

  • 44.
    Nyström, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Psonka-Antonczyk, Katarzyna M.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway .
    Ellingsen, Pal Gunnar
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway .
    Johansson, Leif
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Reitan, Nina
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway .
    Handrick, Susann
    University of Medical Berlin, Germany .
    Prokop, Stefan
    University of Medical Berlin, Germany .
    Heppner, Frank L.
    University of Medical Berlin, Germany .
    Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M.
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease, Germany .
    Jucker, Mathias
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease, Germany .
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Torger Stokke, Bjorn
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway .
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Nilsson, Peter K R.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Evidence for Age-Dependent in Vivo Conformational Rearrangement within A beta Amyloid Deposits2013Ingår i: ACS Chemical Biology, ISSN 1554-8929, E-ISSN 1554-8937, Vol. 8, nr 6, s. 1128-1133Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Deposition of aggregated A beta peptide in the brain is one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimers disease. Using a combination of two structurally different, but related, hypersensitive fluorescent amyloid markers, LCOs, reporting on separate ultrastructural elements, we show that conformational rearrangement occurs within A beta plaques of transgenic mouse models as the animals age. This important mechanistic insight should aid the design and evaluation of experiments currently using plaque load as readout.

  • 45.
    Sole-Domenech, Santiago
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Sjovall, Peter
    SP Technical Research Institute Sweden, Sweden .
    Vukojevic, Vladana
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Fernando, Ruani
    Hop St Eloi, France .
    Codita, Alina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Salve, Sachin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Bogdanovic, Nenad
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    H Mohammed, Abdul
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Biokemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    M LaFerla, Frank
    University of Calif Irvine, CA USA .
    Jacob, Stefan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Berggren, Per-Olof
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Gimenez-Llort, Lydia
    University of Autonoma Barcelona, Spain .
    Schalling, Martin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Terenius, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Johansson, Bjorn
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Localization of cholesterol, amyloid and glia in Alzheimers disease transgenic mouse brain tissue using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and immunofluorescence imaging2013Ingår i: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 125, nr 1, s. 145-157Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial distributions of lipids, amyloid-beta deposits, markers of neurons and glial cells were imaged, at submicrometer lateral resolution, in brain structures of a mouse model of Alzheimers disease using a new methodology that combines time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and confocal fluorescence microscopy. The technology, which enabled us to simultaneously image the lipid and glial cell distributions in Tg2576 mouse brain structures, revealed micrometer-sized cholesterol accumulations in hippocampal regions undergoing amyloid-beta deposition. Such cholesterol granules were either associated with individual amyloid deposits or spread over entire regions undergoing amyloidogenesis. Subsequent immunohistochemical analysis of the same brain regions showed increased microglial and astrocytic immunoreactivity associated with the amyloid deposits, as expected from previous studies, but did not reveal any particular astrocytic or microglial feature correlated with cholesterol granulation. However, dystrophic neurites as well as presynaptic vesicles presented a distribution similar to that of cholesterol granules in regions undergoing amyloid-beta accumulation, thus indicating that these neuronal endpoints may retain cholesterol in areas with lesions. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for an altered cholesterol distribution near amyloid deposits that would have been missed by several other lipid analysis methods, and opens for the possibility to study in detail the putative liaison between lipid environment and protein structure and function in Alzheimers disease.

  • 46.
    Sjölander, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Mason, Jeffrey
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Westermark, G. T.
    Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westermark, P.
    Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes: A novel dye for amyloid diagnostics2013Ingår i: XIIIth International Symposium on Amyloidosis: From Misfolded Proteins to Well-Designed Treatment: The Proceedings of the XIIIth International Symposium on Amyloidosis,May 6-10, 2012, Groningen, The Netherlands / [ed] Bouke P.C. Hazenberg and Johan Bijzet, GUARD (Groningen Unit for Amyloidosis Research & Development) , 2013, s. 179-182Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The alkaline Congo red staining method has, for almost half a century, been the gold standard of amyloid diagnosis. Unfortunately, the method is both laborious and requires great skill to achieve proper diagnosis. In this study we are presenting an alternative method that is compatible with immunofluorescence typing. We used a novel dye, h-FTAA, designed and synthesized by us. The dye belongs to the novel class of conformation sensitive dyes known as Luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs). We examined 37 different cases of systemic amyloidoses from various tissues. It was found that h-FTAA binds to amyloid with higher sensitivity and greater selectivity than Congo red, as was determined by both fluorescence- and light polarization microscopy. Due to the methods ease of use and performance compared to Congo red, it is concluded that h-FTAA is a better first choice for screening of systemic amyloidoses.

  • 47.
    Heilbronner, Goetz
    et al.
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Eisele, Yvonne S.
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Langer, Franziska
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Kaeser, Stephan A.
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Novotny, Renata
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Nagarathinam, Amudha
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Åslund, Andreas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Jucker, Mathias
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Seeded strain-like transmission of beta-amyloid morphotypes in APP transgenic mice2013Ingår i: EMBO Reports, ISSN 1469-221X, E-ISSN 1469-3178, Vol. 14, nr 11, s. 1017-1022Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The polymorphic beta-amyloid lesions present in individuals with Alzheimers disease are collectively known as cerebral beta-amyloidosis. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse models similarly develop beta-amyloid depositions that differ in morphology, binding of amyloid conformation-sensitive dyes, and A beta 40/A beta 42 peptide ratio. To determine the nature of such beta-amyloid morphotypes, beta-amyloid-containing brain extracts from either aged APP23 brains or aged APPPS1 brains were intracerebrally injected into the hippocampus of young APP23 or APPPS1 transgenic mice. APPPS1 brain extract injected into young APP23 mice induced beta-amyloid deposition with the morphological, conformational, and A beta 40/A beta 42 ratio characteristics of beta-amyloid deposits in aged APPPS1 mice, whereas APP23 brain extract injected into young APP23 mice induced b-amyloid deposits with the characteristics of beta-amyloid deposits in aged APP23 mice. Injecting the two extracts into the APPPS1 host revealed a similar difference between the induced beta-amyloid deposits, although less prominent, and the induced deposits were similar to the beta-amyloid deposits found in aged APPPS1 hosts. These results indicate that the molecular composition and conformation of aggregated A beta in APP transgenic mice can be maintained by seeded conversion.

  • 48.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarstrom, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    A pentameric luminescent-conjugated oligothiophene for optical imaging of in vitro-formed amyloid fibrils and protein aggregates in tissue sections.2012Ingår i: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), ISSN 1940-6029, Vol. 849, s. 425-434Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Luminescent-conjugated oligo- and polythiophenes (LCOs and LCPs) are valuable tools for optical imaging of a plethora of protein aggregates associated with amyloidoses. Here, we describe the utilization of an anionic pentameric LCO, p-FTAA, for staining of protein aggregates in a variety of platforms, including in vitro-formed amyloid fibrils and tissue sections.

  • 49.
    Zako, Tamotsu
    et al.
    Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, Wako, Saitama, Japan.
    Sakono, Masafumi
    Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, Wako, Saitama, Japan.
    Kobayashi, Takahiro
    Sörgjerd, Karin
    Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, Wako, Saitama, Japan.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Organisk Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Proteinkemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Maeda, Mizuo
    Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, Wako, Saitama, Japan.
    Cell Interaction Study of Amyloid by Using Luminescent Conjugated Polythiophene: Implication that Amyloid Cytotoxicity Is Correlated withProlonged Cellular Binding2012Ingår i: ChemBioChem (Print), ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 13, nr 3, s. 358-363Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Needles and noodles: Studying amyloid toxicity is important for understanding protein misfolding diseases. Using a luminescent conjugated polythiophene, we found that cell binding of nontoxic filamentous amyloids of insulin and β2-microglobulin was less efficient than that of toxic fibrillar amyloids; this suggests a correlation between amyloid toxicity and cell binding.

  • 50.
    Ceasar (Berg), Ina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Proteinkemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Proteinkemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Organisk Kemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Utvecklingsbiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för fysik, kemi och biologi, Proteinkemi. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Curcumin Promotes A-beta Fibrillation and Reduces Neurotoxicity in Transgenic Drosophila2012Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, nr 2Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathology of Alzheimers disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of extracellular deposits of misfolded and aggregated amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide and intraneuronal accumulation of tangles comprised of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein. For several years, the natural compound curcumin has been proposed to be a candidate for enhanced clearance of toxic A beta amyloid. In this study we have studied the potency of feeding curcumin as a drug candidate to alleviate A beta toxicity in transgenic Drosophila. The longevity as well as the locomotor activity of five different AD model genotypes, measured relative to a control line, showed up to 75% improved lifespan and activity for curcumin fed flies. In contrast to the majority of studies of curcumin effects on amyloid we did not observe any decrease in the amount of A beta deposition following curcumin treatment. Conformation-dependent spectra from p-FTAA, a luminescent conjugated oligothiophene bound to A beta deposits in different Drosophila genotypes over time, indicated accelerated pre-fibrillar to fibril conversion of A beta(1-42) in curcumin treated flies. This finding was supported by in vitro fibrillation assays of recombinant A beta(1-42). Our study shows that curcumin promotes amyloid fibril conversion by reducing the pre-fibrillar/oligomeric species of A beta, resulting in a reduced neurotoxicity in Drosophila.

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