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  • 1.
    Levin, Sara K.
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Regional Forensic Psychiatric Hospital, Vadstena, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Bülow, Per
    Regional Forensic Psychiatric Hospital, Vadstena, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Science and Social Work, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Adherence to planned risk management interventions in Swedish forensic care: What is said and done according to patient records2019Ingår i: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, ISSN 0160-2527, E-ISSN 1873-6386, Vol. 64, s. 71-82Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Both structured and unstructured clinical risk assessments within forensic care aim to prevent violence by informing risk management, but research about their preventive role is inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate risk management interventions that were planned and realized during forensic care by analysing patient records. Records from a forensic clinic in Sweden, covering 14 patients and 526 months, were reviewed. Eight main types of risk management interventions were evaluated by content analysis: monitoring, supervision, assessment, treatment, victim protection, acute coercion, security level and police interventions. Most planned risk management interventions were realized, both in structured and clinical risk assessments. However, most realized interventions were not planned, making them more open to subjective decisions. Analysing risk management interventions actually planned and realized in clinical settings can reveal the preventive role of structured risk assessments and how different interventions mediate violence risk.

  • 2.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comorbidity of Adult ADHD and Its Subtypes With Substance Use Disorder in a Large Population-Based Epidemiological Study.2019Ingår i: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 23, nr 12, s. 1416-1426Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to explore the role and possible substance preference in ADHD and subtypes in substance use disorder (SUD).

    METHOD: Using self-report data on ADHD Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) symptoms and SUD (alcohol, illicit drugs, and nicotine) in 18,167 Swedish twins, aged 20 to 45 years, we obtained odds ratios (OR) from mixed effect logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, education, and nonindependence of twin data.

    RESULTS: Increased ADHD symptoms were significantly associated with increased odds for all SUD. ORs ranged between 1.33 for regular nicotine (95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.12, 1.59]); 2.54 for multiple drug use (95% CI = [2.00, 3.23]), and 3.58 for alcohol dependence (95% CI = [2.86, 4.49]).

    CONCLUSION: ADHD symptoms and subtypes in the population are associated with increased risks for all SUD outcomes, with no difference between ADHD subtypes, no substance preference, and no sex differences for the comorbidity. Clinicians need to consider ADHD evaluation and treatment as part of management of SUD in adults.

  • 3.
    Berman, Anne H.
    et al.
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Kolaas, Karoline
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Gustavsberg Primary Care Clin, Sweden.
    Petersen, Elisabeth
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Hedman, Erik
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Gustavsberg Primary Care Clin, Sweden.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Sinadinovic, Kristina
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Spak, Fredrik
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thurang, Anna
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Clinician experiences of healthy lifestyle promotion and perceptions of digital interventions as complementary tools for lifestyle behavior change in primary care2018Ingår i: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 19, artikel-id 139Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence-based practice for healthy lifestyle promotion in primary health care is supported internationally by national policies and guidelines but implementation in routine primary health care has been slow. Referral to digital interventions could lead to a larger proportion of patients accessing structured interventions for healthy lifestyle promotion, but such referral might have unknown implications for clinicians with patients accessing such interventions. This qualitative study aimed to explore the perceptions of clinicians in primary care on healthy lifestyle promotion with or without digital screening and intervention. Methods: Focus group interviews were conducted at 10 primary care clinics in Sweden with clinicians from different health professions. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using content analysis, with inspiration from a phenomenological-hermeneutic method involving naive understanding, structural analysis and comprehensive understanding. Results: Two major themes captured clinicians perceptions on healthy lifestyle promotion: 1) the need for structured professional practice and 2) deficient professional practice as a hinder for implementation. Sub-themes in theme 1 were striving towards professionalism, which for participants meant working in a standardized fashion, with replicable routines regardless of clinic, as well as being able to monitor statistics on individual patient and group levels; and embracing the future with critical optimism, meaning expecting to develop professionally but also being concerned about the consequences of integrating digital tools into primary care, particularly regarding the importance of personal interaction between patient and provider. For theme 2, sub-themes were being in an unmanageable situation, meaning not being able to do what is perceived as best for the patient due to lack of time and resources; and following ones perception, meaning working from a gut feeling, which for our participants also meant deviating from clinical routines. Conclusions: In efforts to increase evidence-based practice and lighten the burden of clinicians in primary care, decision-and policy-makers planning the introduction of digital tools for healthy lifestyle promotion will need to explicitly define their role as complements to face-to-face encounters. Our overriding hope is that this study will contribute to maintaining meaningfulness in the patient-clinician encounter, when digital tools are added to facilitate patient behavior change of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors.

  • 4.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Effectiveness of a Text Messaging-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial2018Ingår i: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 6, nr 6, artikel-id e146Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Excessive drinking among university students is a global challenge, leading to significant health risks. However, heavy drinking among students is widely accepted and socially normalized. Mobile phone interventions have attempted to reach students who engage in excessive drinking. A growing number of studies suggest that text message-based interventions could potentially reach many students and, if effective, such an intervention might help reduce heavy drinking in the student community. Objective: The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of a behavior change theory-based 6-week text message intervention among university students. Methods: This study was a two-arm, randomized controlled trial with an intervention group receiving a 6-week text message intervention and a control group that was referred to treatment as usual at the local student health care center. Outcome measures were collected at baseline and at 3 months after the initial invitation to participate in the intervention. The primary outcome was total weekly alcohol consumption. Secondary outcomes were frequency of heavy episodic drinking, highest estimated blood alcohol concentration, and number of negative consequences attributable to excessive drinking. Results: A total of 896 students were randomized to either the intervention or control group. The primary outcome analysis included 92.0% of the participants in the intervention group and 90.1% of the control group. At follow-up, total weekly alcohol consumption decreased in both groups, but no significant between-group difference was seen. Data on the secondary outcomes included 49.1% of the participants in the intervention group and 41.3% of the control group. No significant between-group difference was seen for any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusions: The present study was under-powered, which could partly explain the lack of significance. However, the intervention, although theory-based, needs to be re-assessed and refined to better support the target group. Apart from establishing which content forms an effective intervention, the optimal length of an alcohol intervention targeting students also needs to be addressed in future studies.

  • 5.
    Palacio-Vieira, J.
    et al.
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Segura, L.
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Anderson, P.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, A.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Drummond, C.
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Wojnar, M.
    Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Kaner, E.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Keurhorst, M. N.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    van Steenkiste, B.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Kloda, K.
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Mierzecki, A.
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Parkinson, K.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Newbury-Birch, D.
    Teesside Univ, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, K.
    State Agcy Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Deluca, P.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Colom, J.
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Gual, A.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Spain; IDIBAPS, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Improving screening and brief intervention activities in primary health care: Secondary analysis of professional accuracy based on the AUDIT-C2018Ingår i: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 24, nr 2, s. 369-374Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and objectiveThe ODHIN trial found that training and support and financial reimbursement increased the proportion of patients that were screened and given advice for their heavy drinking in primary health care. However, the impact of these strategies on professional accuracy in delivering screening and brief advice is underresearched and is the focus of this paper. MethodFrom 120 primary health care units (24 in each jurisdiction: Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden), 746 providers participated in the baseline and the 12-week implementation periods. Accuracy was measured in 2 ways: correctness in completing and scoring the screening instrument, AUDIT-C; the proportion of screen-negative patients given advice, and the proportion of screen-positive patients not given advice. Odds ratios of accuracy were calculated for type of profession and for intervention group: training and support, financial reimbursement, and internet-based counselling. ResultsThirty-two of 36711 questionnaires were incorrectly completed, and 65 of 29641 screen-negative patients were falsely classified. At baseline, 27% of screen-negative patients were given advice, and 22.5% screen-positive patients were not given advice. These proportions halved during the 12-week implementation period, unaffected by training. Financial reimbursement reduced the proportion of screen-positive patients not given advice (OR=0.56; 95% CI, 0.31-0.99; Pamp;lt;.05). ConclusionAlthough the use of AUDIT-C as a screening tool was accurate, a considerable proportion of risky drinkers did not receive advice, which was reduced with financial incentives.

  • 6.
    Levin, Sara
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Rättspsykiatrisk regionklinik LPÖ. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Bülow, Per
    Department of Behavioural Science and Social Work, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University,Jönköping, Sweden.
    Staff Perceptions of Facilitators and Barriers to the Use of a Short- Term Risk Assessment Instrument in Forensic Psychiatry2018Ingår i: Journal of Forensic Psychology Research and Practice, ISSN 2473-2850, Vol. 18, nr 3, s. 199-228Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Prospective adverse events within forensic settings should be assessed using structured risk assessment instruments. Our aim was to identify the barriers and facilitators of a structured instrument for assessment of short-term risk within inpatient forensic psychiatric care. The instrument was piloted at a forensic psychiatric clinic. Three focus group interviews were conducted with staff. Content analysis revealed three main categories of barriers and facilitators for clinical use: implementation object, context, and users. Complexity of the instrument, insufficient continuous training and support, difficulties retrieving assessments on wards, and insecurity about translating assessments into actions were perceived barriers to clinical use. Routines for documentation improved communication and the inclusion of protective and short-term dynamic clinical factors were perceived as clinically relevant. Problem-solving ability, attitude, and motivation of staff were facilitating factors. Comprehensive risk assessment instruments require substantial support for staff to find them manageable. Systematic documentation is required to measure actual daily clinical use.

  • 7.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Keurhorst, Myrna
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Laurant, Miranda
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Gual, Antoni
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Attitudes and Learning through Practice Are Key to Delivering Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Health Care: Analyses from the ODHIN Five Country Cluster Randomized Factorial Trial2017Ingår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, nr 2, artikel-id 121Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we test path models that study the interrelations between primary health care provider attitudes towards working with drinkers, their screening and brief advice activity, and their receipt of training and support and financial reimbursement. Study participants were 756 primary health care providers from 120 primary health care units (PHCUs) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, The Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Our interventions were training and support and financial reimbursement to providers. Our design was a randomized factorial trial with baseline measurement period, 12-week implementation period, and 9-month follow-up measurement period. Our outcome measures were: attitudes of individual providers in working with drinkers as measured by the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire; and the proportion of consulting adult patients (age 18+ years) who screened positive and were given advice to reduce their alcohol consumption (intervention activity). We found that more positive attitudes were associated with higher intervention activity, and higher intervention activity was then associated with more positive attitudes. Training and support was associated with both positive changes in attitudes and higher intervention activity. Financial reimbursement was associated with more positive attitudes through its impact on higher intervention activity. We conclude that improving primary health care providers screening and brief advice activity for heavy drinking requires a combination of training and support and on-the-job experience of actually delivering screening and brief advice activity.

  • 8.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Coulton, Simon
    University of Kent, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Delivery of Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Care: Outcomes of the ODHIN 5-Country Cluster Randomized Trial2017Ingår i: Annals of family medicine (online), ISSN 1544-1709, E-ISSN 1544-1717, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 335-340Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE We aimed to test whether 3 strategies-training and support, financial reimbursement, and an option to direct screen-positive patients to an Internet-based method of giving brief advice-have a longer-term effect on primary care clinicians delivery of screening and advice to heavy drinkers operationalized with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) tool. METHODS We undertook a cluster randomized factorial trial with a 12-week implementation period in 120 primary health care units throughout Catalonia, England, Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Units were randomized to 8 groups: care as usual (control); training and support alone; financial reimbursement alone; electronic brief advice alone; paired combinations of these conditions; and all 3 combined. The primary outcome was the proportion of consulting adult patients (aged 18 years and older) receiving intervention-screening and, if screen-positive, advice-at 9 months. RESULTS Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the log of the proportion of patients given intervention at the 9-month follow-up was 1.39 (95% CI, 1.03-1.88) in units that received training and support as compared with units that did not. Neither financial reimbursement nor directing screen-positive patients to electronic brief advice led to a higher proportion of patients receiving intervention. CONCLUSIONS Training and support of primary health care units has a lasting, albeit small, impact on the proportion of adult patients given an alcohol intervention at 9 months.

  • 9.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Yao, S.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kuja-Halkola, R.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bulik, C. M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC USA; University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Thornton, L. M.
    University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Centrum för social och affektiv neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Larsson, H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden.
    Genetic and environmental aspects in the association between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms and binge-eating behavior in adults: a twin study2017Ingår i: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 47, nr 16, s. 2866-2878Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Prior research demonstrated that attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with binge-eating behavior, binge-eating disorder (BED), and bulimia nervosa (BN). The aim of this study was to investigate these associations in an adult twin population, and to determine the extent to which ADHD symptoms and binge-eating behavior share genetic and environmental factors. Methods We used self-reports of current ADHD symptoms and lifetime binge-eating behavior and associated characteristics from a sample of over 18 000 adult twins aged 20-46 years, from the population-based Swedish Twin Registry. Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to examine the association between ADHD and lifetime binge-eating behavior, BED, and BN. Structural equation modeling was used in 13 773 female twins to determine the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the association between ADHD symptoms and binge-eating behavior in female adult twins. Results ADHD symptoms were significantly associated with lifetime binge-eating behavior, BED, and BN. The heritability estimate for current ADHD symptoms was 0.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.44], and for lifetime binge-eating behavior 0.65 (95% CI 0.54-0.74). The genetic correlation was estimated as 0.35 (95% CI 0.25-0.46) and the covariance between ADHD and binge-eating behavior was primarily explained by genetic factors (91%). Non-shared environmental factors explained the remaining part of the covariance. Conclusions The association between adult ADHD symptoms and binge-eating behavior in females is largely explained by shared genetic risk factors.

  • 10.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Pelgrum-Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    King’s College London, London, UK.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Teesside Univ, England.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle Univ, England; State Agcy Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency for Prevention of Alcohol-Related Problems, Warsaw, Poland.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Gual, Antoni
    Neurosciences Institute, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
    Impact of practice, provider and patient characteristics on delivering screening and brief advice for heavy drinking in primary healthcare: Secondary analyses of data from the ODHIN five-country cluster randomized factorial trial2017Ingår i: European Journal of General Practice, ISSN 1381-4788, E-ISSN 1751-1402, Vol. 23, nr 1, s. 241-245Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of primary healthcare-based screening and advice that is effective in reducing heavy drinking can be enhanced with training. Objectives: Undertaking secondary analysis of the five-country ODHIN study, we test: the extent to which practice, provider and patient characteristics affect the likelihood of patients being screened and advised; the extent to which such characteristics moderate the impact of training in increasing screening and advice; and the extent to which training mitigates any differences due to such characteristics found at baseline. Methods: A cluster randomized factorial trial involving 120 practices, 746 providers and 46 546 screened patients from Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Practices were randomized to receive training or not to receive training. The primary outcome measures were the proportion of adult patients screened, and the proportion of screen-positive patients advised. Results: Nurses tended to screen more patients than doctors (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.9, 4.9). Screenpositive patients were more likely to be advised by doctors than by nurses (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.1), and more liable to be advised the higher their risk status (OR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.7). Training increased screening and advice giving, with its impact largely unrelated to practice, provider or patient characteristics. Training diminished the differences between doctors and nurses and between patients with low or high-risk status. Conclusions: Training primary healthcare providers diminishes the negative impacts that some practice, provider and patient characteristics have on the likelihood of patients being screened and advised.

  • 11.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Short message service (SMS)-based intervention targeting alcohol consumption among university students: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial2017Ingår i: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 18, artikel-id 156Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite significant health risks, heavy drinking of alcohol among university students is a widespread problem; excessive drinking is part of the social norm. A growing number of studies indicate that short message service (SMS)-based interventions are cost-effective, accessible, require limited effort by users, and can enable continuous, real-time, brief support in real-world settings. Although there is emerging evidence for the effect of SMS-based interventions in reducing alcohol consumption, more research is needed. This study aims to test the effectiveness of a newly developed SMS-based intervention targeting excessive alcohol consumption among university and college students in Sweden. Methods: The study is a two-arm randomized controlled trial with an intervention (SMS programme) and a control (treatment as usual) group. Outcome measures will be investigated at baseline and at 3-month follow up. The primary outcome is total weekly alcohol consumption. Secondary outcomes are frequency of heavy episodic drinking, highest estimated blood alcohol concentration and number of negative consequences due to excessive drinking. Discussion: This study contributes knowledge on the effect of automatized SMS support to reduce excessive drinking among students compared with existing support such as Student Health Centres.

  • 12.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för mikrobiologi och molekylär medicin.
    Kuja-Halkola, R.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Viding, E.
    Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit, University College, London UK.
    McCrory, E.
    Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit, University College, London UK.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Larsson, H.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Childhood maltreatment and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in adults: a large twin study2016Ingår i: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 46, nr 12, s. 2637-2646Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Childhood maltreatment (CM) has been associated with increased risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. It is, however, unclear whether this association is causal or due to familial confounding.

    Method

    Data from 18 168 adult twins, aged 20–46 years, were drawn from the population-based Swedish twin registry. Retrospective self-ratings of CM (emotional and physical neglect, physical and sexual abuse and witnessing family violence), and self-ratings for DSM-IV ADHD symptoms in adulthood were analysed. Possible familial confounding was investigated using a within twin-pair design based on monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins.

    esults

    CM was significantly associated with increased levels of ADHD symptom scores in adults [regression coefficient: 0.40 standard deviations, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37–0.43]. Within twin-pair analyses showed attenuated but significant estimates within DZ (0.29, 95% CI 0.21–0.36) and MZ (0.18, 95% CI 0.10–0.25) twin pairs. Similar results emerged for hyperactive/impulsive and inattentive ADHD symptom scores separately in association with CM. We conducted sensitivity analyses for early maltreatment, before age 7, and for abuse and neglect separately, and found similarly reduced estimates in DZ and MZ pairs. Re-traumatization after age 7 did not significantly influence results.

    Conclusions

    CM was significantly associated with increased ADHD symptoms in adults. Associations were partly due to familial confounding, but also consistent with a causal interpretation. Our findings support cognitive neuroscience studies investigating neural pathways through which exposure to CM may influence ADHD. Clinicians treating adults with ADHD should be aware of the association with maltreatment.

  • 13.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England.
    Mccambridge, James
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. University of York, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Effectiveness of Short Message Service Text-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention Among University Students A Randomized Clinical Trial2016Ingår i: JAMA Internal Medicine, ISSN 2168-6106, E-ISSN 2168-6114, Vol. 176, nr 3, s. 321-328Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Smoking is globally the most important preventable cause of ill health and death. Mobile telephone interventions and, in particular, short message service (SMS) text messaging, have the potential to overcome access barriers to traditional health services, not least among young people. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of a text-based smoking cessation intervention among young people. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A single-blind, 2-arm, randomized clinical trial (Nicotine Exit [NEXit]) was conducted from October 23, 2014, to April 17, 2015; data analysis was performed from April 23, 2014, to May 22, 2015. Participants included daily or weekly smokers willing to set a quit date within 1 month of enrollment. The study used email to invite all college and university students throughout Sweden to participate. INTERVENTIONS The NEXit core program is initiated with a 1- to 4-week motivational phase during which participants can choose to set a stop date. The intervention group then received 157 text messages based on components of effective smoking cessation interventions for 12 weeks. The control group received 1 text every 2 weeks thanking them for participating in the study, with delayed access to the intervention. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcomes were self-reported prolonged abstinence (not having smoked >5 cigarettes over the past 8 weeks) and 4-week point prevalence of complete smoking cessation shortly after the completion of the intervention (approximately 4 months after the quit date). RESULTS A total of 1590 participants, mainly between 21 and 30 years of age, were randomized into the study; 827 (573 [69.3%] women) were allocated to the intervention group and 763 (522 [68.4%] women) were included in the control group. Primary outcome data were available for 783 (94.7%) of the intervention group and 719 (94.2%) of the control group. At baseline, participants were smoking a median (range) of 63 (1-238) and 70 (2-280) cigarettes per week, respectively. Eight-week prolonged abstinence was reported by 203 participants (25.9%) in the intervention group and 105 (14.6%) in the control group; 4-week point prevalence of complete cessation was reported by 161 (20.6%) and 102 (14.2%) participants, respectively, a mean (SD) of 3.9 (0.37) months after the quit date. The adjusted odds ratios (95% CIs) for these findings were 2.05 (1.57-2.67) and 1.56 (1.19-2.05), respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE With the limitation of assessing only the short-term effect of the intervention, the effects observed in this trial are comparable with those for traditional smoking cessation interventions. The simple NEXit intervention has the potential to improve the uptake of effective smoking cessation interventions.

  • 14.
    Keurhorst, M.
    et al.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Anderson, P.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Heinen, M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Brzozka, Krzysztof
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Slodownik, Luiza
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Laurant, M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Wensing, M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; University of Heidelberg Hospital, Germany.
    Impact of primary healthcare providers initial role security and therapeutic commitment on implementing brief interventions in managing risky alcohol consumption: a cluster randomised factorial trial2016Ingår i: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 11, nr 96Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Brief interventions in primary healthcare are cost-effective in reducing drinking problems but poorly implemented in routine practice. Although evidence about implementing brief interventions is growing, knowledge is limited with regard to impact of initial role security and therapeutic commitment on brief intervention implementation. Methods: In a cluster randomised factorial trial, 120 primary healthcare units (PHCUs) were randomised to eight groups: care as usual, training and support, financial reimbursement, and the opportunity to refer patients to an internet-based brief intervention (e-BI); paired combinations of these three strategies, and all three strategies combined. To explore the impact of initial role security and therapeutic commitment on implementing brief interventions, we performed multilevel linear regression analyses adapted to the factorial design. Results: Data from 746 providers from 120 PHCUs were included in the analyses. Baseline role security and therapeutic commitment were found not to influence implementation of brief interventions. Furthermore, there were no significant interactions between these characteristics and allocated implementation groups. Conclusions: The extent to which providers changed their brief intervention delivery following experience of different implementation strategies was not determined by their initial attitudes towards alcohol problems. In future research, more attention is needed to unravel the causal relation between practitioners attitudes, their actual behaviour and care improvement strategies to enhance implementation science.

  • 15.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Lopez-Pelayo, Hugo
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Gual, Antoni
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Implementing referral to an electronic alcohol brief advice website in primary healthcare: results from the ODHIN implementation trial2016Ingår i: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, nr 6, artikel-id e010271Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The objective of the present study was to explore whether the possibility of offering facilitated access to an alcohol electronic brief intervention (eBI) instead of delivering brief face-to-face advice increased the proportion of consulting adults who were screened and given brief advice. Design The study was a 12-week implementation study. Sixty primary healthcare units (PHCUs) in 5 jurisdictions (Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden) were asked to screen adults who attended the PHCU for risky drinking. Setting A total of 120 primary healthcare centres from 5 jurisdictions in Europe. Participants 746 individual providers (general practitioners, nurses or other professionals) participated in the study. Primary outcome Change in the proportion of patients screened and referred to eBI comparing a baseline 4-week preimplementation period with a 12-week implementation period. Results The possibility of referring patients to the eBI was not found to be associated with any increase in the proportion of patients screened. However, it was associated with an increase in the proportion of screen-positive patients receiving brief advice from 70% to 80% for the screen-positive sample as a whole (pamp;lt;0.05), mainly driven by a significant increase in brief intervention rates in England from 87% to 96% (pamp;lt;0.01). The study indicated that staff displayed a low level of engagement in this new technology. Staff continued to offer face-to-face advice to a larger proportion of patients (54%) than referral to eBI (38%). In addition, low engagement was seen among the referred patients; on average, 18% of the patients logged on to the website with a mean log-on rate across the different countries between 0.58% and 36.95%. Conclusions Referral to eBI takes nearly as much time as brief oral advice and might require more introduction and training before staff are comfortable with referring to eBI.

  • 16.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Newcastle University, England.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Heinen, Maud
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Coulton, Simon
    University of Kent, England.
    Gual, Toni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Improving the delivery of brief interventions for heavy drinking in primary health care: outcome results of the Optimizing Delivery of Health Care Intervention (ODHIN) five-country cluster randomized factorial trial2016Ingår i: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 111, nr 11, s. 1935-1945Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo test if training and support, financial reimbursement and option of referring screen-positive patients to an internet-based method of giving advice (eBI) can increase primary health-care providers delivery of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)-C-based screening and advice to heavy drinkers. DesignCluster randomized factorial trial with 12-week implementation and measurement period. SettingPrimary health-care units (PHCU) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. ParticipantsA total of 120 PHCU, 24 in each of Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. InterventionsPHCUs were randomized to one of eight groups: care as usual, training and support (TS), financial reimbursement (FR) and eBI; paired combinations of TS, FR and eBI, and all of FR, TS and eBI. MeasurementsThe primary outcome measure was the proportion of eligible adult (age 18+ years) patients screened during a 12-week implementation period. Secondary outcome measures were proportion of screen-positive patients advised; and proportion of consulting adult patients given an intervention (screening and advice to screen-positives) during the same 12-week implementation period. FindingsDuring a 4-week baseline measurement period, the proportion of consulting adult patients who were screened for their alcohol consumption was 0.059 per PHCU (95% CI 0.034 to 0.084). Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the logged proportion screened during the 12-week implementation period was 1.48 (95% CI=1.13-1.95) in PHCU that received TS versus PHCU that did not receive TS; for FR, the ratio was 2.00 (95% CI=1.56-2.56). The option of referral to eBI did not lead to a higher proportion of patients screened. The ratio for TS plus FR was 2.34 (95% CI=1.77-3.10), and the ratio for TS plus FR plus eBI was1.68 (95% CI=1.11-2.53). ConclusionsProviding primary health-care units with training, support and financial reimbursement for delivering Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-C-based screening and advice to heavy drinkers increases screening for alcohol consumption. Providing primary health-care units with the option of referring screen-positive patients to an internet-based method of giving advice does not appear to increase screening for alcohol consumption.

  • 17.
    Levin, Sara
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Rättspsykiatrisk regionklinik LPÖ.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Bulow, Per
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Structured Risk Assessment Instruments: A Systematic Review of Implementation Determinants2016Ingår i: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 602-628Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Research-based structured risk assessment instruments (SRAIs) can improve violence risk assessment and clinical judgements in mental health and correctional services. Practical challenges of implementing SRAIs have led to calls for more research to understand the determinants influencing this process. Studies describing determinants for SRAI implementation in psychiatric, correctional, or community in-patient settings were systematically reviewed. Findings were analysed according to the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. A total of 11 studies were included. Four types of main implementation determinants were found: characteristics of the SRAI; users of the SRAI; inner setting; and process. Findings underscore the importance of applying a multifactorial approach to the implementation of SRAIs to address many different barriers and facilitators. More stringent research is needed to obtain more solid evidence of factors that impede or enable SRAI implementation, especially regarding patient perspectives and outer setting determinants. Constructing shared concepts of determinants across research fields could further aid information transferences.

  • 18.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Text Message-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Findings From a Formative Development Study2016Ingår i: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 4, nr 4, artikel-id e119Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Drinking of alcohol among university students is a global phenomenon; heavy episodic drinking is accepted despite several potential negative consequences. There is emerging evidence that short message service (SMS) text messaging interventions are effective to promote behavior change among students. However, it is still unclear how effectiveness can be optimized through intervention design or how user interest and adherence can be maximized. Objective: The objective of this study was to develop an SMS text message-based intervention targeting alcohol drinking among university students using formative research. Methods: A formative research design was used including an iterative revision process based on input from end users and experts. Data were collected via seven focus groups with students and a panel evaluation involving students (n= 15) and experts (n= 5). Student participants were recruited from five universities in Sweden. A semistructured interview guide was used in the focus groups and included questions on alcohol culture, message content, and intervention format. The panel evaluation asked participants to rate to what degree preliminary messages were understandable, usable, and had a good tone on a scale from 1 (very low degree) to 4 (very high degree). Participants could also write their own comments for each message. Qualitative data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The SMS text messages and the intervention format were revised continuously in parallel with data collection. A behavior change technique (BCT) analysis was conducted on the final version of the program. Results: Overall, students were positive toward the SMS text message intervention. Messages that were neutral, motivated, clear, and tangible engaged students. Students expressed that they preferred short, concise messages and confirmed that a 6-week intervention was an appropriate duration. However, there was limited consensus regarding SMS text message frequency, personalization of messages, and timing. Overall, messages scored high on understanding (mean 3.86, SD 0.43), usability (mean 3.70, SD 0.61), and tone (mean 3.78, SD 0.53). Participants added comments to 67 of 70 messages, including suggestions for change in wording, order of messages, and feedback on why a message was unclear or needed major revision. Comments also included positive feedback that confirmed the value of the messages. Twenty-three BCTs aimed at addressing self-regulatory skills, for example, were identified in the final program. Conclusions: The formative research design was valuable and resulted in significant changes to the intervention. All the original SMS text messages were changed and new messages were added. Overall, the findings showed that students were positive toward receiving support through SMS text message and that neutral, motivated, clear, and tangible messages promoted engagement. However, limited consensus was found on the timing, frequency, and tailoring of messages.

  • 19.
    Reinholdz, Hanna
    et al.
    Unit of Social Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Spak, Fredrik
    Unit of Social Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    The Impact of an Implementation Project on Primary Care Staff Perceptions of Delivering Brief Alcohol Advice.2016Ingår i: Journal Of Addiction, ISSN 2090-7834, Vol. 2016, artikel-id 4731571Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To explore how the perceptions and experiences of working with risky drinkers change over time among primary health care staff during a systematic implementation project. Methods. Qualitative focus group interviews took place before and after the implementation of the project. Results. The staff displayed a positive change during the implementation period with regard to awareness, knowledge, and confidence that led to a change in routine practice. Throughout the project, staff were committed to engaging with risky drinkers and appeared to have been learning-by-doing. Conclusions. The results indicated a positive attitude to alcohol prevention work but staff lack knowledge and confidence in the area. The more practical experience during the study is, the more confidence seems to have been gained. This adds new knowledge to the science of implementation studies concerning alcohol prevention measures, which have otherwise shown disappointing results, emphasizing the importance of learning in practice.

  • 20.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Mccambridge, James
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. University of York, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    User satisfaction with the structure and content of the NEXit intervention, a text messaging-based smoking cessation programme2016Ingår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, artikel-id 1179Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Smoking is still the leading cause of preventable ill health and death. There is a limited amount of evidence for effective smoking cessation interventions among young people. To address this, a text messaging-based smoking cessation programme, the NEXit intervention, was developed. Short-term effectiveness, measured immediately after the 12-week intervention revealed that 26% of smokers in the intervention group had prolonged abstinence compared with 15% in the control group. The present study was performed to explore the users experiences of the structure and content of the intervention in order to further develop the intervention. Methods: Students participating in the main NEXit randomized controlled trial were invited to grade their experiences of the structure and content of the intervention after having completed follow-up. The participants received an e-mail with an electronic link to a short questionnaire. Descriptive analysis of the distribution of the responses to the questionnaire was performed. Free-text comments to 14 questions were analysed. Results: The response rate for the user feedback questionnaire was 35% (n = 289/827) and 428 free-text comments were collected. The first motivational phase of the intervention was appreciated by 55% (158/289) of the participants. Most participants wanted to quit smoking immediately and only 124/289 (43%) agreed to have to decide a quit-date in the future. Most participants 199/289 (69%) found the content of the messages in the core programme to be very good or good, and the variability between content types was appreciated by 78% (224/289). Only 34% (97/289) of the participants thought that all or nearly all messages were valuable, and some mentioned that it was not really the content that mattered, but that the messages served as a reminder about the decision to quit smoking. Conclusions: The programme was largely perceived satisfactory in most aspects concerning structure and content by young people and most participants stated that they would recommend it to a friend who wants to quit smoking. The motivational phase might be worth shortening and the number of messages around the quit date itself reduced. Shorter messages seemed to be more acceptable.

  • 21.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken.
    Kuja-Halkola, Ralf
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Genetic and environmental contributions to the association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and alcohol dependence in adulthood: A large population-based twin study.2015Ingår i: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, ISSN 1552-4841, E-ISSN 1552-485X, Vol. 168, nr 6, s. 414-422Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research indicates that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently co-occurs with alcohol dependence; however, the extent to which shared genetic risk factors underpin this association remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the relative importance of genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental factors for the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence in adults. Almost 18,000 adult twins aged 20-45 years, from more than 12,000 twin pairs (5,420 complete pairs), from the population-representative Swedish Twin Registry, were included. Self-ratings were used to assess symptoms of ADHD and alcohol dependence. Twin analysis was used to determine the role of additive genetic (A), shared (C), and nonshared environmental (E) factors. As a result, we found a significant association between ADHD and alcohol dependence (odds ratio 3.58; 95% confidence interval, 2.85-4.49). Twin analysis suggested that shared genetic risk factors explained 64% of the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence. Nonshared environmental factors accounted for the remaining 36%, whereas the contribution of shared environmental factors was minimal. We found no support for statistically significant sex differences in the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence. In conclusion the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence in adulthood was largely explained by shared genetic risk factors. This is an important step toward understanding the underlying nature of the risk of alcohol dependence in patients with ADHD and suggests that individuals with ADHD and their family members are important targets for alcohol prevention and treatment.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Implementing healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: a quasi-experimental cross-sectional study evaluating a team initiative2015Ingår i: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 15, nr 31Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Non-communicable diseases are a leading cause of death and can largely be prevented by healthy lifestyles. Health care organizations are encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. This study evaluates the impact of a team initiative on healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care.

    Methods: A quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design compared three intervention centres that had implemented lifestyle teams with three control centres that used a traditional model of care. Outcomes were defined using the RE-AIM framework: reach, the proportion of patients receiving lifestyle promotion; effectiveness, self-reported attitudes and competency among staff; adoption, proportion of staff reporting regular practice of lifestyle promotion; implementation, fidelity to the original lifestyle team protocol. Data collection methods included a patient questionnaire (n = 888), a staff questionnaire (n = 120) and structured interviews with all practice managers and, where applicable, team managers (n = 8). The chi square test and problem-driven content analysis was used to analyse the questionnaire and interview data, respectively.

    Results:Reach: patients at control centres (48%, n = 211) received lifestyle promotion significantly more often compared with patients at intervention centres (41%, n = 169). Effectiveness: intervention staff was significantly more positive towards the effectiveness of lifestyle promotion, shared competency and how lifestyle promotion was prioritized at their centre. Adoption: 47% of staff at intervention centres and 58% at control centres reported that they asked patients about their lifestyle on a daily basis. Implementation: all intervention centres had implemented multi-professional teams and team managers and held regular meetings but struggled to implement in-house referral structures for lifestyle promotion, which was used consistently among staff.

    Conclusions:Intervention centres did not show higher rates than control centres on reach of patients or adoption among staff at this stage. All intervention centres struggled to implement working referral structures for lifestyle promotion. Intervention centres were more positive on effectiveness outcomes, attitudes and competency among staff, however. Thus, lifestyle teams may facilitate lifestyle promotion practice in terms of increased responsiveness among staff, illustrated by positive attitudes and perceptions of shared competency. More research is needed on lifestyle promotion referral structures in primary care regarding their configuration and implementation.

  • 23.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of York, England.
    Online Alcohol Assessment and Feedback for Hazardous and Harmful Drinkers: Findings From the AMADEUS-2 Randomized Controlled Trial of Routine Practice in Swedish Universities2015Ingår i: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 17, nr 7, s. e170-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research on the effectiveness of online alcohol interventions for college students has shown mixed results. Small benefits have been found in some studies and because online interventions are inexpensive and possible to implement on a large scale, there is a need for further study. Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of national provision of a brief online alcohol intervention for students in Sweden. Methods: Risky drinkers at 9 colleges and universities in Sweden were invited by mail and identified using a single screening question. These students (N=1605) gave consent and were randomized into a 2-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial consisting of immediate or delayed access to a fully automated online assessment and intervention with personalized feedback. Results: After 2 months, there was no strong evidence of effectiveness with no statistically significant differences in the planned analyses, although there were some indication of possible benefit in sensitivity analyses suggesting an intervention effect of a 10% reduction (95% CI -30% to 10%) in total weekly alcohol consumption. Also, differences in effect sizes between universities were seen with participants from a major university (n=365) reducing their weekly alcohol consumption by 14% (95% CI -23% to -4%). However, lower recruitment than planned and differential attrition in the intervention and control group (49% vs 68%) complicated interpretation of the outcome data. Conclusions: Any effects of current national provision are likely to be small and further research and development work is

  • 24.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland; University of Michigan, MI 48109 USA.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Newcastle University, England.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Brzozka, Krzysztof
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Palacio, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Slodownik, Luiza
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Professionals Attitudes Do Not Influence Screening and Brief Interventions Rates for Hazardous and Harmful Drinkers: Results from ODHIN Study2015Ingår i: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 50, nr 4, s. 430-437Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the relation between existing levels of alcohol screening and brief intervention rates in five European jurisdictions and role security and therapeutic commitment by the participating primary healthcare professionals. Health care professionals consisting of, 409 GPs, 282 nurses and 55 other staff including psychologists, social workers and nurse aids from 120 primary health care centres participated in a cross-sectional 4-week survey. The participants registered all screening and brief intervention activities as part of their normal routine. The participants also completed the Shortened Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (SAAPPQ), which measure role security and therapeutic commitment. The only significant but small relationship was found between role security and screening rate in a multilevel logistic regression analysis adjusted for occupation of the provider, number of eligible patients and the random effects of jurisdictions and primary health care units (PHCU). No significant relationship was found between role security and brief intervention rate nor between therapeutic commitment and screening rate/brief intervention rate. The proportion of patients screened varied across jurisdictions between 2 and 10%. The findings show that the studied factors (role security and therapeutic commitment) are not of great importance for alcohol screening and BI rates. Given the fact that screening and brief intervention implementation rate has not changed much in the last decade in spite of increased policy emphasis, training initiatives and more research being published, this raises a question about what else is needed to enhance implementation.

  • 25.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute of Public Health.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of York.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    SMS-based smoking cessation intervention among university students: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (NEXit trial)2015Ingår i: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 16, artikel-id 140Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most smoking efforts targeting young people have so far been focused on prevention of initiation, whereas smoking cessation interventions have largely been targeted towards adult populations. Thus, there is limited evidence for effective smoking cessation interventions in young people, even though many young people want to quit smoking. Mobile communication technology has the potential to reach large numbers of young people and recent text-based smoking cessation interventions using phones have shown promising results. Methods/design: The study aims to evaluate a newly developed text-based smoking cessation intervention for students in colleges and universities in Sweden. The design is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) with a delayed/waiting list intervention control condition. The trial will be performed simultaneously in all colleges and universities served by 25 student health care centres in Sweden. Outcomes will be evaluated after 4 months, with 2 cessation primary outcomes and 4 secondary outcomes. After outcome evaluation the control group will be given access to the intervention. Discussion: The study will examine the effectiveness of a stand-alone SMS text-based intervention. The intervention starts with a motivational phase in which the participants are given an opportunity to set a quit date within 4 weeks of randomisation. This first phase and the subsequent core intervention phase of 12 weeks are totally automated in order to easily integrate the intervention into the daily routines of student and other health care settings. As well as providing data for the effectiveness of the intervention, the study will also provide data for methodological analyses addressing a number issues commonly challenging in Internet-based RCTs. For example, an extensive follow-up strategy will be used in order to evaluate the use of repeated attempts in the analysis, and in particular to explore the validity of a possible missing not at random assumption that the odds ratio between the primary outcome and response is the same at every attempt.

  • 26.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Towards implementing coordinated healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: a mixed method study2015Ingår i: International Journal of Integrated Care, ISSN 1568-4156, E-ISSN 1568-4156, Vol. 15, artikel-id e030Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Primary care is increasingly being encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. However, implementation has been suboptimal. Coordinated care could facilitate lifestyle promotion practice but more empirical knowledge is needed about the implementation process of coordinated care initiatives. This study aimed to evaluate the implementation of a coordinated healthy lifestyle promotion initiative in a primary care setting.

    Methods: A mixed method, convergent, parallel design was used. Three primary care centres took part in a two-year research project. Data collection methods included individual interviews, document data and questionnaires. The General Theory of Implementation was used as a framework in the analysis to integrate the data sources.

    Results: Multi-disciplinary teams were implemented in the centres although the role of the teams as a resource for coordinated lifestyle promotion was not fully embedded at the centres. Embedding of the teams was challenged by differences among the staff, patients and team members on resources, commitment, social norms and roles.

    Conclusions: The study highlights the importance of identifying and engaging key stakeholders early in an implementation process. The findings showed how the development phase influenced the implementation and embedding processes, which add aspects to the General Theory of Implementation.

  • 27.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Feasibility and user perception of a fully automated push-based multiple-session alcohol intervention for university students: randomized controlled trial.2014Ingår i: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 2, nr 2, s. e30-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, many electronic health behavior interventions have been developed in order to reach individuals with unhealthy behaviors, such as risky drinking. This is especially relevant for university students, many of whom are risky drinkers.

    OBJECTIVE: This study explored the acceptability and feasibility in a nontreatment-seeking group of university students (including both risk and nonrisk drinkers), of a fully automated, push-based, multiple-session, alcohol intervention, comparing two modes of delivery by randomizing participants to receive the intervention either by SMS text messaging (short message service, SMS) or by email.

    METHODS: A total of 5499 students at Luleå University in northern Sweden were invited to participate in a single-session alcohol assessment and feedback intervention; 28.04% (1542/5499) students completed this part of the study. In total, 29.44% (454/1542) of those participating in the single-session intervention accepted to participate further in the extended multiple-session intervention lasting for 4 weeks. The students were randomized to receive the intervention messages via SMS or email. A follow-up questionnaire was sent immediately after the intervention and 52.9% (240/454) responded.

    RESULTS: No difference was seen regarding satisfaction with the length and frequency of the intervention, regardless of the mode of delivery. Approximately 15% in both the SMS (19/136) and email groups (15/104) would have preferred the other mode of delivery. On the other hand, more students in the SMS group (46/229, 20.1%) stopped participating in the intervention during the 4-week period compared with the email group (10/193, 5.2%). Most students in both groups expressed satisfaction with the content of the messages and would recommend the intervention to a fellow student in need of reducing drinking. A striking difference was seen regarding when a message was read; 88.2% (120/136) of the SMS group read the messages within 1 hour in contrast to 45.2% (47/104) in the email group. In addition, 83.1% (113/136) in the SMS group stated that they read all or almost all the messages, compared with only 63.5% (66/104) in the email group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Based on the feedback from the students, an extended, multiple-session, push-based intervention seems to be a feasible option for students interested in additional support after a single-session alcohol intervention. SMS as a mode of delivery seems to have some advantages over email regarding when a message is read and the proportion of messages read. However, more students in the SMS group stopped the intervention than in the email group. Based on these promising findings, further studies comparing the effectiveness of single-session interventions with extended multiple-session interventions delivered separately or in combination are warranted.

  • 28.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Implementation of healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: Patients as coproducers2014Ingår i: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 97, nr 2, s. 283-290Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To explore and theorize how patients perceive, interpret, and reactin healthy lifestyle promotion situations in primary care and to investigate patients role in implementation of lifestyle promotion illustrated by typologies. Methods: Grounded theory was used to assess qualitative interview data from 22 patients with varied experience of healthy lifestyle promotion. Data were analyzed by constant comparative analysis. Results: A substantive theory of being healthy emerged from the data. The theory highlights the processes that are important for implementation before, during, and after lifestyle promotion. Three interconnected categories emerged from the data: conditions for being healthy, managing being healthy, and interactions about being healthy; these formed the core category: being healthy. A typology proposed four patient trajectories on being healthy: resigned, receivers, coworkers, and leaders. Conclusion: Patients coproduced the implementation of lifestyle promotion through the degree of transparency, which was a result of patients expectations and situation appraisals. Practice implications: Different approaches are needed during lifestyle promotion depending on a variety of patient-related factors. The typology could guide practitioners in their lifestyle promotion practice.

  • 29.
    Wallace, Paul
    et al.
    University College, London, UK.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Internet applications for screening and brief interventions for alcohol in primary care settings - implementation and sustainability.2014Ingår i: Frontiers in psychiatry, ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 5, artikel-id 151Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Screening and brief interventions head the list of effective evidence-based interventions for the prevention and treatment of alcohol use disorders in healthcare settings. However, healthcare professionals have been reluctant to engage with this kind of activity both because of the sensitive nature of the subject and because delivery is potentially time-consuming. Digital technologies for behavioral change are becoming increasingly widespread and their low delivery costs make them highly attractive. Internet and mobile technologies have been shown to be effective for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and smoking cessation in healthcare settings, and have the potential to add substantial value to the delivery of brief intervention for alcohol. Online alcohol questionnaires have been shown to elicit reliable responses on alcohol consumption and compared with conventional prevention techniques, digital alcohol interventions delivered in various settings have been found to be as effective in preventing alcohol-related harms. The last decade has seen the emergence of a range of approaches to the implementation in health care settings of referral to Internet-based applications for screening and brief interventions (eSBI) for alcohol. Research in this area is in its infancy, but there is a small body of evidence providing early indications about implementation and sustainability, and a number of studies are currently underway. This paper examines some of the evidence emerging from these and other studies and assesses the implications for the future of eSBI delivery in primary care settings.

  • 30.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Kypri, Kypros
    University of Newcastle, Australia .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Porter, John
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Letter: Deception in Research Is Morally Problematic ... and so too Is Not Using It Morally: Reply to Open Peer Commentaries on "The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials"2014Ingår i: American Journal of Bioethics, ISSN 1526-5161, E-ISSN 1536-0075, Vol. 14, nr 1, s. W9-W12Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 31.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Long-term impact of a real-world coordinated lifestyle promotion initiative in primary care: a quasi-experimental cross-sectional study2014Ingår i: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 15, nr 201Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Integration of lifestyle promotion in routine primary care has been suboptimal. Coordinated care models (e.g. screening, brief advice and referral to in-house specialized staff) could facilitate lifestyle promotion practice; they have been shown to increase the quality of services and reduce costs in other areas of care. This study evaluates the long-term impact of a coordinated lifestyle promotion intervention with a multidisciplinary team approach in a primary care setting. Methods: A quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design was used to compare three intervention centres using a coordinated care model and three control centres using a traditional model of lifestyle promotion care. Outcomes were inspired by using the RE-AIM framework: reach, the proportion of patients receiving lifestyle promotion; effectiveness, self-reported attitudes and competency among staff; adoption, proportion of staff reporting daily practice of lifestyle promotion and referral; and implementation, of the coordinated care model. The impact was investigated after 3 and 5 years. Data collection involved a patient questionnaire (intervention, n = 433-497; control, n = 455-497), a staff questionnaire (intervention, n = 77-76; control, n = 43-56) and structured interviews with managers (n = 8). The X-2 test or Fisher exact test with adjustment for clustering by centre was used for the analysis. Problem-driven content analysis was used to analyse the interview data. Results: The findings were consistent over time. Intervention centres did not show higher rates for reach of patients or adoption among staff at the 3- or 5-year follow-up. Some conceptual differences between intervention and control staff remained over time in that the intervention staff were more positive on two of eight effectiveness outcomes (one attitude and one competency item) compared with control staff. The Lifestyle team protocol, which included structural opportunities for coordinated care, was implemented at all intervention centres. Lifestyle teams were perceived to have an important role at the centres in driving the lifestyle promotion work forward and being a forum for knowledge exchange. However, resources to refer patients to specialized staff were used inconsistently. Conclusions: The Lifestyle teams may have offered opportunities for lifestyle promotion practice and contributed to enabling conditions at centre level but had limited impact on lifestyle promotion practices.

  • 32.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK, England.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    White, Ian R.
    Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Alcohol assessment and feedback by e-mail for university student hazardous and harmful drinkers: study protocol for the AMADEUS-2 randomised controlled trial2013Ingår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, nr 949Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol is responsible for a large and growing proportion of the global burden of disease, as well as being the cause of social problems. Brief interventions are one component of comprehensive policy measures necessary to reduce these harms. Brief interventions increasingly take advantage of the Internet to reach large numbers of high risk groups such as students. The research literature on the efficacy and effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly. Although many studies show benefits in the form of reduced consumption, other intervention studies show no effects, for reasons that are unclear. Sweden became the first country in the world to implement a national system in which all university students are offered a brief online intervention via an e-mail. Methods/Design: This randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this national system comprising a brief online intervention among university students who are hazardous and harmful drinkers. This study employs a conventional RCT design in which screening to determine eligibility precedes random allocation to immediate or delayed access to online intervention. The online intervention evaluated comprises three main components; assessment, normative feedback and advice on reducing drinking. Screening is confined to a single question in order to minimise assessment reactivity and to prevent contamination. Outcomes will be evaluated after 2 months, with total weekly alcohol consumption being the primary outcome measure. Invitations to participate are provided by e-mail to approximately 55,000 students in 9 Swedish universities. Discussion: This RCT evaluates routine service provision in Swedish universities via a delay in offer of intervention to the control group. It evaluates effects in the key population for whom this intervention has been designed. Study findings will inform the further development of the national service provision.

  • 33.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Databas och informationsteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    White, Ian R.
    Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Alcohol assessment and feedback by email for university students: main findings from a randomised controlled trial2013Ingår i: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 203, nr 5, s. 334-340Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBrief interventions can be efficacious in changing alcohol consumption and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk populations such as students. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAims less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTo evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, controlling for the possible effects of the research process. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA three-arm parallel groups design was used to explore the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The three groups were: alcohol assessment and feedback (group 1); alcohol assessment only without feedback (group 2); and no contact, and thus neither assessment nor feedback (group 3). Outcomes were evaluated after 3 months via an invitation to participate in a brief cross-sectional lifestyle survey. The study was undertaken in two universities randomising the email addresses of all 14 910 students (the AMADEUS-1 study, trial registration: ISRCTN28328154). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanOverall, 52% (n=7809) of students completed follow-up, with small differences in attrition between the three groups. For each of the two primary outcomes, there was one statistically significant difference between groups, with group 1 having 3.7% fewer risky drinkers at follow-up than group 3 (P=0.006) and group 2 scoring 0.16 points lower than group 3 on the three alcohol consumption questions from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C) (P = 0.039). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis study provides some evidence of population-level benefit attained through intervening with individual students.

  • 34.
    Reinholdz, Hanna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Fornazar, Robin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Comparison of Systematic Versus Targeted Screening for Detection of Risky Drinking in Primary Care2013Ingår i: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 48, nr 2, s. 172-179Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To compare two identification methods for risky drinking in primary health care centres (PHCs). Methods: Sixteen PHCs from three Swedish counties were randomized into strands: consultation-based early identification (CEI) or systematic screening early identification (SS). Measurements took place at baseline and during two intervention periods. Patients filled in questionnaires including gender, age, if they had the issue of alcohol brought up during the consultation and the AUDIT-C (a three item screening tool). The intervention periods were preceded by training sessions for clinicians. The AUDIT-C was used for categorization of risky drinking with cut-offs for risky drinking set at andgt;= 5 for men and andgt;= 4 for women. In the SS strand, clinicians were supposed to give AUDIT-C to all patients for the identification of risky drinking. In the CEI strands, they were encouraged to use early clinical signs to identify risky drinking. Results: The proportions of patients having the issue of alcohol brought up are higher during the intervention periods than baseline. A higher proportion of all patients and of risk drinkers in SS, than in CEI, had the issue of alcohol brought up. A higher mean score of AUDIT-C was found among patients having the issue of alcohol brought up in CEI than in SS, and this was also true after adjusting for age and gender. Conclusions: More patients are asked about alcohol in the SS strand and thus have the possibility of receiving brief interventions. CEI identifies risk drinkers with higher AUDIT-C scores which might indicate more severe problems. No comparison of the effectiveness of a brief intervention following these alternative identification procedures is reported here.

  • 35.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    et al.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, United Kingdom.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Segura, Lidia
    Government of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Colom, Joan
    Government of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Fac Med, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Fac Med, England.
    Gual, Toni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Laurant, Miranda G H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Implementing training and support, financial reimbursement, and referral to an internet-based brief advice program to improve the early identification of hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in primary care (ODHIN): study protocol for a cluster randomized factorial trial2013Ingår i: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The European level of alcohol consumption, and the subsequent burden of disease, is high compared to the rest of the world. While screening and brief interventions in primary healthcare are cost-effective, in most countries they have hardly been implemented in routine primary healthcare. In this study, we aim to examine the effectiveness and efficiency of three implementation interventions that have been chosen to address key barriers for improvement: training and support to address lack of knowledge and motivation in healthcare providers; financial reimbursement to compensate the time investment; and internet-based counselling to reduce workload for primary care providers.

    Methods/design

    In a cluster randomized factorial trial, data from Catalan, English, Netherlands, Polish, and Swedish primary healthcare units will be collected on screening and brief advice rates for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption. The three implementation strategies will be provided separately and in combination in a total of seven intervention groups and compared with a treatment as usual control group. Screening and brief intervention activities will be measured at baseline, during 12 weeks and after six months. Process measures include health professionals’ role security and therapeutic commitment of the participating providers (SAAPPQ questionnaire). A total of 120 primary healthcare units will be included, equally distributed over the five countries. Both intention to treat and per protocol analyses are planned to determine intervention effectiveness, using random coefficient regression modelling.

    Discussion

    Effective interventions to implement screening and brief interventions for hazardous alcohol use are urgently required. This international multi-centre trial will provide evidence to guide decision makers.

  • 36.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Kypri, Kypros
    University of Newcastle, Australia .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Porter, John
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    The Use of Deception in Public Health Behavioral Intervention Trials: A Case Study of Three Online Alcohol Trials2013Ingår i: American Journal of Bioethics, ISSN 1526-5161, E-ISSN 1536-0075, Vol. 13, nr 11, s. 39-47Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Some public health behavioral intervention research studies involve deception. A methodological imperative to minimize bias can be in conflict with the ethical principle of informed consent. As a case study, we examine the specific forms of deception used in three online randomized controlled trials evaluating brief alcohol interventions. We elaborate our own decision making about the use of deception in these trials, and present our ongoing findings and uncertainties. We discuss the value of the approach of pragmatism for examining these kinds of ethical issues that can arise in research on public health interventions.

  • 37.
    Trinks, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys.
    What makes emergency department patients reduce their alcohol consumption? - A computer-based intervention study in Sweden2013Ingår i: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 3-9Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study investigates the effectiveness of a computerized emergency department intervention for alcohol consumption and identifies explanation factors associated with reduced alcohol consumption from risk to non-risk drinking. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Patients aged 18-69 years registered at the ED triage answered alcohol-related questions on a touch-screen computer. Follow-up data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire that was mailed to the patients 6 months after their ED visit. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: There were four independent explanations for reduced alcohol consumption: being motivated to reduce alcohol consumption at baseline, influenced by just visiting the emergency department, considering the alcohol-related feedback information and impact from a health care provider. 339 patients could be followed up and of these were 97 categorized as risk drinkers at baseline and 45 became non-risk drinker 6 month later. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Being motivated to reduce alcohol consumption at baseline, influenced by just visiting the emergency department, considering the alcohol-related feedback information and impact from a health care provider were predictors for change from risk to non-risk drinking 6 months later.

  • 38.
    Trinks, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Cherpitel, Cheryl J.
    Alcohol Research Group, Emeryville, CA, USA.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för hälso- och sjukvårdsanalys.
    Acute Alcohol Consumption and Motivation to Reduce Drinking Among Injured Patients in a Swedish Emergency Department2012Ingår i: Journal on Addictions Nursing, ISSN 1088-4602, E-ISSN 1548-7148, Vol. 23, nr 3, s. 152-158Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Injuries constitute a major public health problem. Millions of people are injured each year, and acute drinking is a well-known risk factor for injuries. Research suggests that acknowledgment of alcohol as a factor in an injury enhances willingness to change drinking behavior, possibly because the patient becomes aware of the negative consequences of their drinking. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of acute alcohol consumption (drinking before the event) among injury patients and to examine the importance of factors potentially associated with motivation to reduce alcohol consumption among these patients. All patients aged 18-69 years were requested to answer alcohol-related questions on a touchscreen computer. Fifteen percent of injured patients were categorized as acute drinkers, and of these, 64% reported that their injury was connected to alcohol. There were significant differences for all sociodemographic and drinking characteristics between acute drinkers and nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers were categorized as risky drinkers to a much higher extent than nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers had a considerably higher average weekly alcohol consumption and engaged far more frequently in heavy episodic drinking than nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers were motivated to reduce their alcohol intake to a greater extent than nonacute drinkers; 51% were in the action, preparation, and contemplation stages, compared with 19% of the nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers had considerably more detrimental alcohol consumption than nonacute drinkers, and the acute drinkers were more motivated to reduce their drinking than the nonacute drinkers.

  • 39.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    London School Hyg and Tropical Medicine, England .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Interaktiva och kognitiva system. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi.
    Alcohol email assessment and feedback study dismantling effectiveness for university students (AMADEUS-1): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2012Ingår i: TRIALS, ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 13, nr 49Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol causes huge problems for population health and for society, which require interventions with individuals as well as populations to prevent and reduce harms. Brief interventions can be effective and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk groups such as students. The research literature on the effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly and is confronted by methodological challenges common to other areas of e-health including attrition and assessment reactivity and in the design of control conditions. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods/design: The study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, employing a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity, and other possible effects of the research process. Outcomes will be evaluated after 3 months both among student populations as a whole including for a randomized no contact control group and among those who are risky drinkers randomized to brief assessment and feedback (routine practice) or to brief assessment only. A three-arm parallel groups trial will also allow exploration of the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The trial will be undertaken simultaneously in 2 universities randomizing approximately 15,300 students who will all be blinded to trial participation. All participants will be offered routine practice intervention at the end of the study. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDiscussion: This trial informs the development of routine service delivery in Swedish universities and more broadly contributes a new approach to the study of the effectiveness of online interventions in student populations, with relevance to behaviors other than alcohol consumption. The use of blinding and deception in this study raise ethical issues that warrant further attention.

  • 40.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Vårdcentraler.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Forsknings- och utvecklingsenheten för Närsjukvården i Östergötland.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Allmänmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Forsknings- och utvecklingsenheten för Närsjukvården i Östergötland.
    Applying the RE-AIM framework to evaluate two implementation strategies used to introduce a tool for lifestyle intervention in Swedish primary health care2012Ingår i: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 27, nr 2, s. 167-176Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two implementation strategies for the introduction of a lifestyle intervention tool in primary health care (PHC), applying the RE-AIM framework to assess outcome. A computer-based tool for lifestyle intervention was introduced in PHC. A theory-based, explicit, implementation strategy was used at three centers, and an implicit strategy with a minimum of implementation efforts at three others. After 9 months a questionnaire was sent to staff members (n= 159) and data from a test database and county council registers were collected. The RE-AIM framework was applied to evaluate outcome in terms of reach, effectiveness, adoption and implementation. The response rate for the questionnaire was 73%. Significant differences in outcome were found between the strategies regarding reach, effectiveness and adoption, in favor of the explicit implementation strategy. Regarding the dimension implementation, no differences were found according to the implementation strategy. A theory-based implementation strategy including a testing period before using a new tool in daily practice seemed to be more successful than a strategy in which the tool was introduced and immediately used for patients.                 

  • 41.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    McCambridge, Jim
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för datavetenskap, Interaktiva och kognitiva system. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska högskolan.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Arbetslivsinriktad rehabilitering. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi.
    Effectiveness of a proactive mail-based alcohol Internet intervention for university students: dismantling the assessment and feedback components in a randomized controlled trial2012Ingår i: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 14, nr 5Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: University students in Sweden routinely receive proactive mail-based alcohol Internet interventions sent from student health services. This intervention provides personalized normative feedback on alcohol consumption with suggestions on how to decrease drinking. Earlier feasibility trials by our group and others have examined effectiveness in simple parallel-groups designs.Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of electronic screening and brief intervention, using a randomized controlled trial design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity (and other possible effects of the research process) due to the similarity between the intervention and assessment content. The design of the study allowed for exploration of the magnitude of the assessment effects per se.Methods: This trial used a dismantling design and randomly assigned 5227 students to 3 groups: (1) routine practice assessment and feedback, (2) assessment-only without feedback, and (3) neither assessment nor feedback. At baseline all participants were blinded to study participation, with no contact being made with group 3. We approached students 2 months later to participate in a cross-sectional alcohol survey. All interventions were fully automated and did not have any human involvement. All data used in the analysis were based on self-assessment using questionnaires. The participants were unaware that they were participating in a trial and thus were also blinded to which group they were randomly assigned.Results: Overall, 44.69% (n = 2336) of those targeted for study completed follow-up. Attrition was similar in groups 1 (697/1742, 40.01%) and 2 (737/1742, 42.31% retained) and lower in group 3 (902/1743, 51.75% retained). Intention-to-treat analyses among all participants regardless of their baseline drinking status revealed no differences between groups in all alcohol parameters at the 2-month follow-up. Per-protocol analyses of groups 1 and 2 among those who accepted the email intervention (36.2% of the students who were offered the intervention in group 1 and 37.3% of the students in group2 ) and who were risky drinkers at baseline (60.7% follow-up rate in group 1 and 63.5% in group 2) suggested possible small beneficial effects on weekly consumption attributable to feedback.Conclusions: This approach to outcome evaluation is highly conservative, and small benefits may follow the actual uptake of feedback intervention in students who are risky drinkers, the precise target group.Trial Registration: International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 24735383; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN24735383 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Awq7gjXG)

  • 42.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of London London School Hyg and Trop Med, England .
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Arbetslivsinriktad rehabilitering. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    When is it appropriate to address patients alcohol consumption in health care-national survey of views of the general population in Sweden2012Ingår i: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 37, nr 11, s. 1211-1216Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the Swedish populations beliefs and attitudes on when it is appropriate to address patients alcohol in health care services and to identify the characteristics of those who are most supportive of this alcohol-preventive work. A cross-sectional study of 5981 nationally representative individuals (18-64 years) was done using confidential mail questionnaires. Alcohol consumption was assessed with AUDIT-C and respondents were classified into four levels of drinking status. Sociodemographic data were also collected. Thirty-four percent completely agreed that health care providers should routinely ask patients about their alcohol habits and 33% completely agreed that providers should ask but only if patients have consulted them with alcohol-related symptoms. There was limited support for a statement that alcohol conversations should be premised on the patient bringing up the issue and even less support for the notion that alcohol habits are peoples own business and not something that health care providers should address. Thirty-four percent believed that people did not answer honestly when asked about their alcohol habits in health care. There appears to be considerable support in the general population for alcohol prevention in Swedish health care services that involves questions being asked routinely about alcohol. This should be helpful in ongoing efforts to improve the implementation of alcohol screening and brief interventions in Sweden. Further studies on the views of hazardous and excessive drinkers appear particularly important.

  • 43.
    Nilsen, Per
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    McCambridge, Jim
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Arbetslivsinriktad rehabilitering. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Brief interventions in routine health care: a population-based study of conversations about alcohol in Sweden.2011Ingår i: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 106, nr 10, s. 1748-1756Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To investigate how brief alcohol interventions are delivered in routine practice in the Swedish health-care system. Design, setting and participants  A cross-sectional sample of 6000 individuals representative of the adult population aged 18-64 years registered in the Swedish total population register was drawn randomly. Data were collected in 2010 by means of a mail questionnaire. The response rate was 54%.

    Measurements The questionnaire consisted of 27 questions, of which 15 variables were extracted for use in this study. Whether alcohol had been discussed and the duration, contents, experiences and effects of any conversations about alcohol, as reported by patients themselves, were assessed.

    Findings Sixty-six per cent of the respondents had visited health-care services in the past 12 months and 20% of these had had one or more conversations about alcohol during these visits (13% of the population aged 18-64 years). The duration of the conversations was generally brief, with 94% taking less than 5 minutes, and were not experienced as problematic. The duration, contents, experiences and effects of these conversations generally varied between abstainers, moderate, hazardous and excessive drinkers. Twelve per cent of those having a conversation about alcohol reported that it led to reduced alcohol consumption. Reduced alcohol consumption was more likely when conversations lasted for 1-10 minutes rather than less than 1 minute and included advice on how to reduce consumption.

    Conclusions Population survey data in Sweden suggest that when health-care professionals give brief advice to reduce alcohol consumption, greater effects are observed when the advice is longer and includes advice on how to achieve it.

  • 44.
    Reinholdz, Hanna K
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg.
    Different Methods of Early Identification of Risky Drinking: A Review of Clinical Signs2011Ingår i: ALCOHOL AND ALCOHOLISM, ISSN 0735-0414, Vol. 46, nr 3, s. 283-291Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To review the literature on detection of risky drinking to compare early identification based on everyday clinical encounters with systematic screening. We also reviewed specific clinical signs that have been suggested to be used as indicators of risky drinking. Methods: A literature review was performed in PubMed and CINAHL of articles up to November 2010. Results: Systematic screening and semi-systematic methods in various forms detected more risky drinkers than non-systematic identification during clinical encounter, but there was a lack of studies comparing the various means of identifying risky drinking. It may be too early to completely rule out the possibility of using non-systematic methods as an effective strategy to identify risky drinking. The earliest signs of risky drinking suggested in the literature are psychological distress and social problems. Conclusion: From a public health perspective, there is a lack of evidence that non-systematic or semi-systematic methods can substitute systematic screening in terms of numbers of risky drinkers detected. If early signs are going to be used to identify risky drinkers, or those to be screened for risky drinking, more focus should be on psychological and social signs because they appear earlier than somatic signs.

  • 45.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Forsknings- och utvecklingsenheten för Närsjukvården i Östergötland.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Ståhlbrandt, Henriettae
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Johansson, Anne Lie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centrum för hälso- och vårdutveckling, Folkhälsocentrum.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Electronic screening and brief intervention for risky drinking in Swedish university students - A randomized controlled trial2011Ingår i: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 36, nr 6, s. 654-659Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The limited number of electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) projects taking place in young adult student populations has left knowledge gaps about the specific methods needed to motivate reduced drinking. The aim of the present study was to compare differences in alcohol consumption over time after a series of e-SBIs was conducted with two groups of young adult students who were considered risky drinkers. The intervention group (IC) (n = 80) received extensive normative feedback; the control group (CG) (n = 78) received very brief feedback consisting of only three statements. Method: An e-SBI project was conducted in naturalistic settings among young adult students at a Swedish university. This study used a randomized controlled trial design, with respondents having an equal chance of being assigned to either the IC or the CG. The study assessed changes comparing the IC with the CG on four alcohol-related measurements: proportion with risky alcohol consumption, average weekly alcohol consumption, frequency of heavy episodic drinking (HED) and peak blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Follow-up was performed at 3 and 6 months after baseline. Results: The study documented a significant decrease in the average weekly consumption for the IC over time but not for the CG, although the differences between the groups were non-significant. The study also found that there were significant decreases in HED over time within both groups: the differences were about equal in both groups at the 6-month follow-up. The proportion of risky drinkers decreased by about a third in both the CG and IC at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Conclusions: As the differences between the groups at 6 months for all alcohol-related outcome variables were not significant, the shorter, generic brief intervention appears to be as effective as the longer one including normative feedback. However, further studies in similar naturalistic settings are warranted with delayed assessment groups as controls in order to increase our understanding of reactivity assessment in email-based interventions among students.

  • 46.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Arbetslivsinriktad rehabilitering. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Utvärdering och hälsoekonomi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hazardous Drinking Concepts, Limits and Methods: Low Levels of Awareness, Knowledge and Use in the Swedish Population.2011Ingår i: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 46, nr 5, s. 638-645Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the awareness and knowledge of hazardous drinking limits among the general population in Sweden and the extent to which people estimate their alcohol consumption in standard drinks to assess their level of drinking.

    Methods: A population-based study involving 6000 individuals selected from the total Swedish population was performed. Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire. The mail survey response rate was 54.3% (n = 3200) of the net sample of 5891 persons.

    Results: With regard to drinking patterns, 10% of the respondents were abstainers, 59% were sensible drinkers and 31% were classified as hazardous drinkers. Most of the abstainers (80%), sensible drinkers (64%) and hazardous drinkers (56%) stated that they had never heard about the standard drink method. Familiarity with the hazardous drinking concept also differed between the three categories although ∼61% of sensible and hazardous drinkers expressed awareness of the concept (46% of the abstainers). Knowledge about the limits for sensible drinking was very poor. Between 94 and 97% in the three categories did not know the limit. There was a statistically significant association between having visited health care within the last 12 months and being aware of the standard drink method and the hazardous drinking concept, but not with knowing the hazardous drinking limits. Similarly, there was a significant association between having had at least one alcohol conversation in health care within the last 12 months and being aware of the standard drink method and the hazardous drinking concept, but not with knowing the hazardous drinking limits.

    Conclusion: The results can be seen as a major challenge for the health-care system and public health authorities because they imply that a large proportion of the Swedish population does not know when alcohol consumption becomes a threat to their health. The current strategy to disseminate knowledge about sensible drinking limits to the population through the health-care system seems to have failed and new means of informing the population are warranted.

  • 47.
    Leijon, Matti
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Arvidsson, Daniel
    Lund University/Region Skåne, Malmö.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    University West, Trollhättan.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Johansson, Anne Lie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Improvement of Physical Activity by a Kiosk-based Electronic Screening and Brief Intervention in Routine Primary Health Care: Patient-Initiated Versus Staff-Referred2011Ingår i: Journal of medical Internet research, ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 13, nr 4, s. e99-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Interactive behavior change technology (eg, computer programs, Internet websites, and mobile phones) may facilitate the implementation of lifestyle behavior interventions in routine primary health care. Effective, fully automated solutions not involving primary health care staff may offer low-cost support for behavior change.

    OBJECTIVES: We explored the effectiveness of an electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) deployed through a stand-alone information kiosk for promoting physical activity among sedentary patients in routine primary health care. We further tested whether its effectiveness differed between patients performing the e-SBI on their own initiative and those referred to it by primary health care staff.

    METHODS: The e-SBI screens for the physical activity level, motivation to change, attitudes toward performing the test, and physical characteristics and provides tailored feedback supporting behavior change. A total of 7863 patients performed the e-SBI from 2007 through 2009 in routine primary health care in Östergötland County, Sweden. Of these, 2509 were considered not sufficiently physically active, and 311 of these 2509 patients agreed to participate in an optional 3-month follow-up. These 311 patients were included in the analysis and were further divided into two groups based on whether the e-SBI was performed on the patient´s own initiative (informed by posters in the waiting room) or if the patient was referred to it by staff. A physical activity score representing the number of days being physically active was compared between baseline e-SBI and the 3-month follow-up. Based on physical activity recommendations, a score of 5 was considered the cutoff for being sufficiently physically active.

    RESULTS: In all, 137 of 311 patients (44%) were sufficiently physically active at the 3-month follow-up. The proportion becoming sufficiently physically active was 16/55 (29%), 40/101 (40%), and 81/155 (52%) for patients with a physical activity score at baseline of 0, 1 to 2, and 3 to 4, respectively. The patient-initiated group and staff-referred group had similar mean physical activity scores at baseline (2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-2.3, versus 2.3, 95% CI 2.1-2.5) and at follow-up, (4.1, 95% CI 3.4-4.7, vs 4.2, 95% CI 3.7-4.8).

    CONCLUSIONS: Among the sedentary patients in primary health care who participated in the follow-up, the e-SBI appeared effective at promoting short-term improvement of physical activity for about half of them. The results were similar when the e-SBI was patient-initiated or staff-referred. The e-SBI may be a low-cost complement to lifestyle behavior interventions in routine primary health care and could work as a stand-alone technique not requiring the involvment of primary health care staff.

  • 48.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    Karlstad University.
    Johansson, Anne Lie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Leijon, Matti
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Referral to an electronic screening and brief alcohol intervention in primary health care in Sweden: impact of staff referral to the computer2011Ingår i: International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications, ISSN 1687-6415, E-ISSN 1687-6423, Vol. 2011, s. 1-11, artikel-id 918763Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate whether primary health care staff's referral of patients to perform an electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) for alcohol use had a greater impact on change in alcohol consumption after 3 month, compared to patients who performed the test on their own initiative. Staff-referred responders reported reduced weekly alcohol consumption with an average decrease of 8.4 grams. In contrast, self-referred responders reported an average increase in weekly alcohol consumption of 2.4 grams. Staff-referred responders reported a 49% reduction of average number of heavy episodic drinking (HED) occasions per month. The corresponding reduction for self-referred responders was 62%. The differences between staff- and self-referred patient groups in the number who moved from risky drinking to nonrisky drinking at the followup were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that standalone computers with touchscreens that provide e-SBIs for risky drinking have the same effect on drinking behaviour in both staff-referred patients and self-referred patients.

  • 49.
    Trinks, Anna
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    What makes emergency department patients reduce their alcoholconsumption?: A computer-based intervention study in Sweden2011Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study investigates the effectiveness of a computerized emergency department intervention for alcohol consumption and identifies explanation factors associated with reduced alcohol consumption from risk to non-risk drinking.

    Methods: Patients aged 18–69 years registered at the ED triage answered alcohol-related questions on a touch-screen computer. Follow-up data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire that was mailed to the patients 6 months after their ED visit.

    Results: There were four independent explanations for reduced alcohol consumption: being motivated to reduce alcohol consumption at baseline, influenced by just visiting the emergency department, considering the alcohol-related feedback information and impact from a health care provider. 339 patients could be followed up and of these were 97 categorized as risk drinkers at baseline and 45 became non-risk drinker 6 month later.

    Conclusions: Being motivated to reduce alcohol consumption at baseline, influenced by just visiting the emergency department, considering the alcohol-related feedback information and impact from a health care provider were predictors for change from risk to non-risk drinking 6 months later.

  • 50.
    Leijon, Matti E.
    et al.
    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University .
    Faskunger, Johan
    Swedish National Institute of Public Health.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i centrala Östergötland, Akutkliniken. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Medicinska specialistkliniken .
    Festin, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Socialmedicin och folkhälsovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Who is not adhering to physical activity referrals, and why?2011Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 29, nr 4, s. 234-240Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To analyse patients self-reported reasons for not adhering to physical activity referrals (PARs). Design and setting. Data on 1358 patients who did not adhere to PARs were collected at 38 primary health care (PHC) centres in Sweden. Intervention. PHC providers issued formal physical activity prescriptions for home-based activities or referrals for facility-based activities. Subjects. Ordinary PHC patients whom regular staff believed would benefit from increased physical activity. Main outcome measure: Reasons for non-adherence to PARs: "sickness", "pain", "low motivation", "no time", "economic factors", and "other". Results. Sickness and pain were the most common motives for non-adherence among older patients. The youngest patients blamed economic factors and lack of time more frequently than those in the oldest age group. Economic factors was a more common reason for non-adherence among those referred for facility-based activities compared with those prescribed home-based activities. Low motivation was a more frequent cause of non-adherence among those prescribed home-based activities compared with those referred for facility-based activities. Furthermore, lack of time was a more common reason for non-adherence among patients issued with PARs due to high blood pressure than other patients, while low motivation was a more common reason among patients issued with PARs because of a BMI of greater than 25. Conclusion. The reasons for non-adherence differ between patients prescribed home-based activities and referred for facility-based activities, as well as between patients with different specific characteristics. The information obtained may be valuable not only for the professionals working in PHC, but also for those who work to develop PARs for use in different contexts.

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