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  • 1.
    Asplund, Therese
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Käyhkö, Janina
    University of Helsinki.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    University of Helsinki.
    Benefits and challenges of serious gaming – thecase of “The Maladaptation Game”2019Ingår i: Open Agriculture, ISSN 2391-9531, s. 107-117, artikel-id https://doi.org/10.1515/opag-2019-0010Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of digital tools and interactive technologies for farming systems has increased rapidly in recent years and is likely to continue to play a significant role in meeting future challenges. Particularly games and gaming are promising new and innovative communication strategies to inform and engage public and stakeholders with scientific research. This study offers an analysis of how a research based game on climate change maladaptation can support, but also hinder players’ sense-making processes. Through the analysis of eight gaming workshops, this study identifies challenges and support for the players’ sense-making. While it concludes that conceptual thinking of game content sometimes clashes with players’ everyday experiences and practice, possibly resulting in loss of credibility, this study also concludes that gaming may function as an eye-opener to new ways of thinking. Overall, this paper suggests that the communication of (social) science and agricultural practices through serious gaming has great potential but at the same time poses challenges due to different knowledge systems and interpretive frameworks among researchers and practitioners.

  • 2.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Kayhko, Janina
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR. Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Ctr Climate Sci and Policy Res, Dept Themat Studies Environm Change, Linkoping, Sweden; Univ Helsinki, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Making sense of maladaptation: Nordic agriculture stakeholders perspectives2019Ingår i: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 153, nr 1-2, s. 107-121Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for climate change adaptation has been widely recognised and examples of successful adaptation are increasingly reported in the literature, but little attention has so far been paid to the potential negative impacts of implemented adaptation measures. As the agricultural sector is implementing measures to adapt to or cope with climatic variability and change, the potential negative consequences of these measures need to be explored in order to avoid increased vulnerability or (unintended) environmental impacts. This paper employs serious gaming and focus group methodology to study how agricultural stakeholders in Sweden and Finland frame and negotiate the unintended negative impacts of adaptation measures. The results of our interactional frame analysis suggest that the participants negotiated the potential maladaptive outcomes depending on: (1) whether they agreed that this was indeed a potential consequence of an adaptation measure, (2) whether they considered this to be a negative outcome, and if so whether it was (3) a negative outcome which they could adapt to, (4) a negative outcome that would make it preferable not to adapt at all (5) negotiable in terms of a trade-off with alternative outcomes. While it may be obvious that adaptation options that increase vulnerability should be avoided, this study illustrates the complex, value based, individual, yet dialogical processes and contextual basis for identifying and assessing maladaptation.

  • 3.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Alves, Melisa
    Association for the Defense of the Environment and Development, ADAD, Cabo Verde.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Bohman, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Boykoff, Maxwell T.
    Center for Science and Technology Policy Research, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, USA.
    Feetham, Pamela M.
    School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing, Massey University, New Zealand.
    Huang, Yi
    School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Guangzhou University, China.
    Nascimento, Januario
    Association for the Defense of the Environment and Development, ADAD, Cabo Verde.
    Rich, Jessica
    Department of Communication and Media, Merrimack College, USA.
    Rocha, Charles Yvon
    Association for the Defense of the Environment and Development, ADAD, Cabo Verde.
    Vaccarino, Franco
    School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing, Massey University, New Zealand.
    Xian, Shi
    School of Geographical Sciences, Guangzhou University, China.
    Stories of Transformation: A Cross-Country Focus Group Study on Sustainable Development and Societal Change2019Ingår i: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, nr 8, artikel-id 2427Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Societal transformation is one of the most topical concepts in sustainability research and policy-making. Used in many ways, it indicates that nonlinear systematic changes are needed in order to fully address global environmental and human development challenges. This paper explores what sustainability transformations mean for lay focus group participants in Cabo Verde, China, Fiji, Sweden, and the USA. Key findings include: (a) Tightly linked to interpersonal relationships, sustainability was seen as going beyond the Sustainable Development Goals to include a sense of belonging; (b) transformations were framed as fundamental changes from today’s society, but most participants stated that transformation pathways need to splice new structures into the old; (c) new technologies are key engines of change. Yet, the most common drivers were awareness, education, and knowledge sharing; and (d) regardless of whether state-centric or decentralized governance was preferred, personal action was seen as essential. The focus groups displayed a shared understanding across the geographical settings; a common realization of profound sustainability predicaments facing societies across the world; and a desire for fundamental change towards a more sustainable way of life.

  • 4.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Communicating Climate Science: A Matter of Credibility: Swedish Farmers' Perceptions of Climate-Change Information2018Ingår i: The International Journal of Climate Change, ISSN 1835-7156, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 23-28Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In the climate change communication literature, the concept of framing is increasingly used to discuss various understandings of climate change. This paper addresses the under-researched question of how specific audiences perceive the adequacy of various climate change frames, by exploring how Swedish farmers make sense of climate change information. Based on focus group discussions with farmers, the paper explores what communicators, or frame articulators, Swedish farmers perceive as central and how farmers judge the credibility of potential frame articulators in climate change communication. The paper discusses 1) the credibility of frame articulators as a matter of perceived independence and impartiality, 2) empirical credibility—whether farmers were able to verify the claims underlying climate change frames—as a matter of practical experience versus analytical reasoning, and 3) frame consistency, i.e. whether climate change frames correspond to audience beliefs and claims.

  • 5.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema Miljöförändring. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning, CSPR.
    Natural versus anthropogenic climate change: Swedish farmers joint construction of climate perceptions2016Ingår i: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 25, nr 5, s. 560-575Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    While previous research into understandings of climate change has usually examined general public perceptions, this study offers an audience-specific departure point. This article analyses how Swedish farmers perceive climate change and how they jointly shape their understandings. The agricultural sector is of special interest because it both contributes to and is directly affected by climate change. Through focus group discussions with Swedish farmers, this study finds that (1) farmers relate to and understand climate change through their own experiences, (2) climate change is understood either as a natural process subject to little or no human influence or as anthropogenic and (3) various communication tools contribute to the formation of natural and anthropogenic climate change frames. The article ends by discussing frame resonance and frame clash in public understanding of climate change and by comparing potential similarities and differences in how various segments of the public make sense of climate change.

  • 6.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Climate change frames and frame formation: An analysis of climate change communication in the Swedish agricultural sector2014Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här avhandlingen studerar uppfattningar om klimatförändringar och bidrar med sin målgruppsorienterade utgångspunkt till tidigare forskning kring hur klimatförändringar kan förstås och uppfattas. Avhandlingen studerar klimatkommunikation inom den svenska lantbrukssektorn genom analyser av 10 års klimatrapportering i tidningarna ATL samt Land Lantbruk, samt åtta fokusgruppsdiskussioner med svenska lantbrukare. Analysen visar att medan svensk lantbruksmedia ramade in klimatförändringar som en fråga om konflikter, vetenskaplig osäkerhet och ekonomisk börda, rörde lantbrukarnas diskussioner om klimatförändringar (i) dess orsaker; naturliga eller antropogena, (ii) olika faktorer som påverkar huruvida klimatinformation anses trovärdig. Därtill visar avhandlingen att lantbrukstidningar använde krigs- och spelmetaforer för att gestalta klimatförändringar medan lantbrukarna formade klimatinramningar genom analogier, distinktioner, nyckelord, metaforer och prototypiska exempel. Tillsammans med lantbrukarnas upplevda erfarenheter bildade dessa kommunikativa verktyg olika gestaltningar av klimatförändringar. Lantbrukarna visade på olika uppfattningar kring trovärdighet och klimatinformation. Vanligen efterfrågades ett informationslandskap karaktäriserat av en mångfald av perspektiv. Återkommande i materialet var också uppfattningen att kunskap om klimatförändringar borde vara praktiskt baserad snarare än teoretisk hållen för att öka i trovärdighet. Denna avhandling kring klimatkommunikation inom den svenska lantbrukssektorn pekar på komplexiteten i tolkningsprocesser och visar att associativt tänkande och erfarenhetsbaserad kunskap tillsammans utgör grunden för hur klimatförändringar och klimatinformation uppfattas.

    Delarbeten
    1. Framings and coverage of climate change in Swedish specialized farming magazines
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Framings and coverage of climate change in Swedish specialized farming magazines
    2013 (Engelska)Ingår i: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 117, nr 1-2, s. 197-209Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is a fundamental challenge for which agriculture is sensitive and   vulnerable. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has identified relevant information as key to enabling appropriate climate adaptation and mitigation action. Information specifically directed to farmers can be found, for example, in specialized farming magazines.

    While recent studies examine how national news media frame climate change, less —if any —studies have addressed climate framings and coverage in specialized media. Media framings are storylines that provide meaning by communicating how and why an issue should be seen as a problem, how it should be handled, and who is responsible for it. This paper analyses the framings and coverage of climate change in two Swedish specialized farming magazines from 2000 to 2009. It examines the extent of the climate change coverage, the content of the media items, and the dominant framings underlying their climate change coverage. The study identifies: increased coverage of climate change starting in 2007; frequent coverage of agriculture 's contribution to climate change, climate change impacts on agriculture, and consequences of climate politics for agriculture; and four prominent frames: conflict, scientific certainty, economic burden, and action. The paper concludes that climate change communicators addressing farmers and agricultural extension officers should pay attention to how these frames may be interpreted by different target audiences. Research is needed on how specialized media reports on climate-related issues and how science-based climate information is understood  by different groups of farmers and which other factors influence farmers’ engagement in climate mitigation and adaptation.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2013
    Nyckelord
    climate change, media representation, media frames, farming magazines, communication; specialized media
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medievetenskap Tvärvetenskapliga studier inom samhällsvetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80851 (URN)10.1007/s10584-012-0535-0 (DOI)000316128700014 ()
    Projekt
    Ett konkurrenskraftigt jordbruk-kommunikation kring klimatförändringar och nya möjligheter (SLF)Baltic Challenges and Chances for local and regional development generated by Climate Change (BalticClimate)
    Tillgänglig från: 2012-08-31 Skapad: 2012-08-31 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-09-01
    2. Metaphors in climate discourse: an analysis of Swedish farm magazines
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Metaphors in climate discourse: an analysis of Swedish farm magazines
    2011 (Engelska)Ingår i: JCOM - Journal of Science Communication, ISSN 1824-2049, E-ISSN 1824-2049, Vol. 10, nr 4Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines communicative aspects of climate change, identifying and analysing metaphors used in specialized media reports on climate change, and discussing the aspects of climate change these metaphors emphasize and neglect. Through a critical discourse analysis of the two largest Swedish farm magazines over the 2000–2009 period, this study finds that greenhouse, war, and game metaphors were the most frequently used metaphors in the material. The analysis indicates that greenhouse metaphors are used to ascribe certain natural science characteristics to climate change, game metaphors to address positive impacts of climate change, and war metaphors to highlight negative impacts of climate change. The paper concludes by discussing the contrasting and complementary metaphorical representations farm magazines use to conventionalize climate change.

    Nyckelord
    climate change, media, metaphors, farm magazine, climate change communication
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71870 (URN)
    Projekt
    Grant from the Swedish Farmers’ Foundation for Agricultural Research as part of the research program “Competitively strengthened agriculture: communication about climate change and new possibilities”.
    Tillgänglig från: 2011-11-08 Skapad: 2011-11-08 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-09-01
    3. “Do you believe in climate change?” Swedish farmers’ joint construction of climate perceptions
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>“Do you believe in climate change?” Swedish farmers’ joint construction of climate perceptions
    2014 (Engelska)Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change has shifted from being regarded as an exclusively physical phenomenon to being a social phenomenon as well, entailing many interpretations and multidimensional frames. This shift calls for an understanding of how various audiences and segments of the public understand climate change. This paper analyses how Swedish farmers perceive climate change and how they jointly shape and construct their understandings. The agricultural sector is of special interest because it both contributes to and is directly affected by climate change impact. Through focus group discussions with Swedish farmers, this study finds that: 1) farmers relate to and understand climate change through their own experience, and 2) climate change is understood either as a natural process subject to little or no human influence or as anthropogenic. The article ends by discussing frame resonance and frame clash in public understandings of climate change, and by comparing potential similarities and differences in how various segments of the public make sense of climate change.

    Nyckelord
    Agriculture, climate change communication, climate perceptions, focus groups, frame analysis
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medievetenskap Tvärvetenskapliga studier inom samhällsvetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105995 (URN)
    Tillgänglig från: 2014-04-16 Skapad: 2014-04-16 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-09-01Bibliografiskt granskad
    4. Communicating Climate Science: A Matter of Credibility: Swedish Farmers' Perceptions of Climate-Change Information
    Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Communicating Climate Science: A Matter of Credibility: Swedish Farmers' Perceptions of Climate-Change Information
    2018 (Engelska)Ingår i: The International Journal of Climate Change, ISSN 1835-7156, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 23-28Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the climate change communication literature, the concept of framing is increasingly used to discuss various understandings of climate change. This paper addresses the under-researched question of how specific audiences perceive the adequacy of various climate change frames, by exploring how Swedish farmers make sense of climate change information. Based on focus group discussions with farmers, the paper explores what communicators, or frame articulators, Swedish farmers perceive as central and how farmers judge the credibility of potential frame articulators in climate change communication. The paper discusses 1) the credibility of frame articulators as a matter of perceived independence and impartiality, 2) empirical credibility—whether farmers were able to verify the claims underlying climate change frames—as a matter of practical experience versus analytical reasoning, and 3) frame consistency, i.e. whether climate change frames correspond to audience beliefs and claims.

    Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
    Common Ground Publishing, 2018
    Nyckelord
    Climate Change Communication; Frame Analysis; Frame Credibility; Agriculture; Focus Groups
    Nationell ämneskategori
    Medievetenskap Tvärvetenskapliga studier inom samhällsvetenskap
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105996 (URN)10.18848/1835-7156/CGP/v10i01/23-38 (DOI)
    Tillgänglig från: 2014-04-16 Skapad: 2014-04-16 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-09-01Bibliografiskt granskad
  • 7.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    “Do you believe in climate change?” Swedish farmers’ joint construction of climate perceptions2014Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change has shifted from being regarded as an exclusively physical phenomenon to being a social phenomenon as well, entailing many interpretations and multidimensional frames. This shift calls for an understanding of how various audiences and segments of the public understand climate change. This paper analyses how Swedish farmers perceive climate change and how they jointly shape and construct their understandings. The agricultural sector is of special interest because it both contributes to and is directly affected by climate change impact. Through focus group discussions with Swedish farmers, this study finds that: 1) farmers relate to and understand climate change through their own experience, and 2) climate change is understood either as a natural process subject to little or no human influence or as anthropogenic. The article ends by discussing frame resonance and frame clash in public understandings of climate change, and by comparing potential similarities and differences in how various segments of the public make sense of climate change.

  • 8.
    Asplund, Therese
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Framings and coverage of climate change in Swedish specialized farming magazines2013Ingår i: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 117, nr 1-2, s. 197-209Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is a fundamental challenge for which agriculture is sensitive and   vulnerable. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has identified relevant information as key to enabling appropriate climate adaptation and mitigation action. Information specifically directed to farmers can be found, for example, in specialized farming magazines.

    While recent studies examine how national news media frame climate change, less —if any —studies have addressed climate framings and coverage in specialized media. Media framings are storylines that provide meaning by communicating how and why an issue should be seen as a problem, how it should be handled, and who is responsible for it. This paper analyses the framings and coverage of climate change in two Swedish specialized farming magazines from 2000 to 2009. It examines the extent of the climate change coverage, the content of the media items, and the dominant framings underlying their climate change coverage. The study identifies: increased coverage of climate change starting in 2007; frequent coverage of agriculture 's contribution to climate change, climate change impacts on agriculture, and consequences of climate politics for agriculture; and four prominent frames: conflict, scientific certainty, economic burden, and action. The paper concludes that climate change communicators addressing farmers and agricultural extension officers should pay attention to how these frames may be interpreted by different target audiences. Research is needed on how specialized media reports on climate-related issues and how science-based climate information is understood  by different groups of farmers and which other factors influence farmers’ engagement in climate mitigation and adaptation.

  • 9.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Mapping energy crop cultivation and identifying motivational factors among Swedish farmers2013Ingår i: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 50, s. 25-34Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a meta-study, the paper describes the existing options, areal extents, and Swedish farmers' conditions for energy crop production promoted by the governments to mitigate and adapt to climate change. The drivers of and barriers to cultivating various energy crops are described in terms of a variety of motivational factors. The approach used peer-reviewed and gray literature using three Internet sources. Questions addressed include the energy crops available to Swedish farmers and how well established they are in terms of areal extent. What drivers of and barriers to growing energy crops do farmers perceive? How do various motivational factors for these drivers and barriers correspond to the adoption of certain energy crops? The results indicate that 13 energy-related crops are available, of which straw (a residue), oil crops, and wheat are the most extensively produced in terms of cultivated area. Results confirm earlier research findings that converting from annual to perennial crops and from traditional crops or production systems to new ones are important barriers. Economic motivations for changing production systems are strong, but factors such as values (e.g., esthetic), knowledge (e.g., habits and knowledge of production methods), and legal conditions (e.g., cultivation licenses) are crucial for the change to energy crops. Finally, there are knowledge gaps in the literature as to why farmers decide to keep or change a production system. Since the Swedish government and the EU intend to encourage farmers to expand their energy crop production, this knowledge of such motivational factors should be enhanced.

  • 10.
    Jonsson, Anna C.
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Physical Resource Theory, Department of Energy and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle.
    Barriers to and drivers of the adpotion of energy crops by Swedish farmers: An empirical approach2011Ingår i: World Renewable Energy Congress 2011: Policy Issues / [ed] Bahram Moshfegh, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011, s. 2509-2516, artikel-id 030Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the Swedish government and the EU intend to encourage farmers to expand energy crop production, knowledge of the factors motivating adoption decisions is vital to policy success. Earlier studies have demonstrated that important barriers to farmer adoption of energy crops include converting from annual to perennial crops and from traditional crops or production systems to new ones. Economic motivations for changing production systems are strong, but factors such as values (e.g., aesthetics), knowledge (e.g., habits and knowledge of production methods), and legal conditions (e.g., cultivation licenses) are crucial for the change to energy crops. This paper helps fill gaps in the literature regarding why farmers decide to keep or change a production system. Based on a series of focus group interviews with Swedish farmers, the paper explores how farmers frame crop change decisions and what factors they consider most important. The main drivers of and barriers to growing energy crops, according to interviewees, are grouped and discussed in relation to four broad groups of motivational factors identified in the literature, i.e., values, legal conditions, knowledge, and economic factors. The paper ends by discussing whether some barriers could be overcome by policy changes at the national and European levels.

  • 11.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Genmodifierad mat står lågt i kurs hos svenska konsumenter2011Ingår i: Genteknik som tar skruv / [ed] Förare, Jonas, Stockholm: Forskningsrådet Formas , 2011, 1, s. 285-297Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 12.
    Svensson, Teresia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Johansson, Madelaine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Interdisciplinary Environmental Science in problem-based learning:  introducing complexity to students2011Ingår i: Celebrating the Past and Embracing the Future:  Evolution and Innovation in Problem-based Learning: Past & Embracing the Future Conference - 30th - 31st March 2011, 2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 13.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Metaphors in climate discourse: an analysis of Swedish farm magazines2011Ingår i: JCOM - Journal of Science Communication, ISSN 1824-2049, E-ISSN 1824-2049, Vol. 10, nr 4Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines communicative aspects of climate change, identifying and analysing metaphors used in specialized media reports on climate change, and discussing the aspects of climate change these metaphors emphasize and neglect. Through a critical discourse analysis of the two largest Swedish farm magazines over the 2000–2009 period, this study finds that greenhouse, war, and game metaphors were the most frequently used metaphors in the material. The analysis indicates that greenhouse metaphors are used to ascribe certain natural science characteristics to climate change, game metaphors to address positive impacts of climate change, and war metaphors to highlight negative impacts of climate change. The paper concludes by discussing the contrasting and complementary metaphorical representations farm magazines use to conventionalize climate change.

  • 14.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Climate change in Swedish farm magazines2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The profitability of agricultural production depends on weather conditions and decisions on the basis of expected weather conditions. As climate change is changing the conditions for farmers, information about climate change to individual farmers is important for the productivity in the agricultural sector. An analysis of the two largest Swedish agricultural magazines over the period 2000-2008 has been conducted with the aim to examine to what extent Swedish farm magazines report on climate change and to identify drivers for farm magazine coverage of climate change. The study identifies 1) an increased reporting on climate change in 2007 and 2) editorials and bottom-up engagement are aspects that have influenced the frequency and content of farm magazine coverage. The paper ends with a discussion of how the results of this study may relate to a wider climate science and policy context.

  • 15.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning.
    Social representations of climate change: Analyses of focus groups discussions with Swedish farmers2010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In everyday life scientific knowledge often poses a challenge to understanding. It is argued that scientific knowledge is often hard for non-scientists to understand and in the need of translation to be relevant. The circulation of knowledge from experts into the wider public and different decision-makers in various contexts thus involves the transformation of abstract and conceptual ideas into more accessible and concrete knowledge. Communicative tools, e.g. analogies, distinctions and metaphors, are often used to conventionalize complex phenomena, hence rendering them more concrete and easy to grasp.

    In order to analyze how abstract scientific knowledge is transformed into more accessible and concrete knowledge, I have selected the case of climate change. Climate change is an issue often described as invisible, with long term effects and with many embedded uncertainties. Furthermore, information is often identified as a crucial component of the ability of a system (natural or human) to adapt to climate change. In contrast to earlier studies, which are more focused on the content of perceptions of climate change, the aim of this paper is to analyze how climate perceptions are formed and withheld, and what underlying value premises they rest upon.

    In this paper, I present results from Swedish focus group discussions with farmers. Although climate change affects all sectors, the agricultural sector is among the most vulnerable and sensitive ones as changes in temperature and precipitation patterns will have a direct influence on the quantity and quality of agricultural production and the daily life of farmers. The aim is to analyse how participants talk about a complex issue like climate change. I will address questions such as: What communicative strategies do focus groups participants use in their conversations? What implicit value premises are embedded in these strategies?

  • 16.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Asplund, Therese
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Focus gropus: In: Moses, V. et al, Do European Consumers buy GM Foods? Final report from the CONSUMERCHOICE project2008Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 17.
    Asplund, Therese
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Centrum för klimatpolitisk forskning. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för tema, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sweden.: In Moses, V. et al, Do European consumers buy GM foods? Final report from the CONSUMERCHOICE Project.2008Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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