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  • 1.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Glasgow, Philip
    Sport Northern Ireland Sports Institute, North Ireland; University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Schneiders, Anthony
    Central Queensland University, Australia.
    Witvrouw, Erik
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Clarsen, Benjamin
    Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway; Olymp Elite Sports Program Olympiatoppen, Norway.
    Cools, Ann
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Gojanovic, Boris
    Hop La Tour, Switzerland; Lausanne University of and Hospital, Switzerland.
    Griffin, Steffan
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Khan, Karim M.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Moksnes, Havard
    Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway; Olymp Elite Sports Program Olympiatoppen, Norway.
    Mutch, Stephen A.
    SPACE Clin, Scotland; Murrayfield Stadium, Scotland.
    Phillips, Nicola
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Reurink, Gustaaf
    Sports Phys Grp, Netherlands.
    Sadler, Robin
    Manchester City Football Club, England.
    Gravare Silbernagel, Karin
    University of Delaware, DE USA.
    Thorborg, Kristian
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wangensteen, Arnlaug
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway.
    Wilk, Kevin E.
    Champ Sports Med, AL USA.
    Bizzini, Mario
    Schulthess Clin, Switzerland.
    2016 Consensus statement on return to sport from the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy, Bern2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 14, 853-864 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deciding when to return to sport after injury is complex and multifactorial-an exercise in risk management. Return to sport decisions are made every day by clinicians, athletes and coaches, ideally in a collaborative way. The purpose of this consensus statement was to present and synthesise current evidence to make recommendations for return to sport decision-making, clinical practice and future research directions related to returning athletes to sport. A half day meeting was held in Bern, Switzerland, after the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy. 17 expert clinicians participated. 4 main sections were initially agreed upon, then participants elected to join 1 of the 4 groups-each group focused on 1 section of the consensus statement. Participants in each group discussed and summarised the key issues for their section before the 17-member group met again for discussion to reach consensus on the content of the 4 sections. Return to sport is not a decision taken in isolation at the end of the recovery and rehabilitation process. Instead, return to sport should be viewed as a continuum, paralleled with recovery and rehabilitation. Biopsychosocial models may help the clinician make sense of individual factors that may influence the athletes return to sport, and the Strategic Assessment of Risk and Risk Tolerance framework may help decision-makers synthesise information to make an optimal return to sport decision. Research evidence to support return to sport decisions in clinical practice is scarce. Future research should focus on a standardised approach to defining, measuring and reporting return to sport outcomes, and identifying valuable prognostic factors for returning to sport.

  • 2.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    24th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors – Biosensors 20142014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welcome to Biosensors 2014 and welcome to Melbourne, ranked as the world's most liveable city!

    This is the 24th anniversary edition of the World Congress on Biosensors and we continue to evolve, adapt and grow into new roles to serve the analytical needs of a rapidly changing society. Advances in telecommunications, expert systems and distributed diagnostics are prompting us to question the conventional ways we deliver healthcare, while robust industrial sensors are facilitating new paradigms in R&D and production. Personalisation of everything from medicine to environmental control, is giving new impetus to consumer choice and ownership of information, and will inevitably generate new payment structures and business models. Moreover, a deeper understanding of the bio/electronic interface leads us towards new horizons in areas such as bionics, power generation and computing.  Wearable, mobile and integrated sensors are becoming common place, but most current products have taken the easy path of incorporating physical sensors for parameters such as temperature, pressure, orientation or position. There is still a glaring absence of suitably robust and convenient commercial biosensors for body chemistries and ecosystems, and therein lies the real opportunities for progress.  We are a still-emerging technology that is fuelling scientific discovery and underpinning new products to enhance the length and quality of life.

    Always in a new country and always with fresh plenary speakers, we aim to reflect the latest and the best in Biosensors. This three-day event, organised by Elsevier in association with Biosensors & Bioelectronics, consists of two daily plenary presentations from leading figures in the field, followed by four parallel sessions, comprising a rigorously refereed selection of submitted papers. This year, we received 1,156 submissions of which 124 with be presented as regular Oral papers, with an additional 20 singled out as Invited talks and a further 12 selected for extended Keynote talks. The Keynote speakers have also been invited to submit full papers for consideration for the Biosensors and Bioelectronics Prize for the most original contribution to the Congress and the winners will be announced at the conference banquet on Thursday night. There will also be poster awards and you will find voting slips for each of the three days in your delegate bags. The winners of these awards and a prize draw, sponsored by Linköping University and Acreo Swedish ICT, will be announced at the closing ceremony on Friday. In order to enhance the valued medium of poster presentation, this year we have introduced a new Poster in my Pocket Ap.  Poster presenters have been able to upload a PDF of their poster prior to the conference to help increase the exposure of their work. This compliments the other new Ap introduced this year to place the full programme at your fingertips. Selected oral presentations will also have the opportunity to upload their talks online for future viewing.

    The academic programme, as usual, is enhanced by a fine collection of commercial exhibits and in addition to browsing their stands; you will be able to hear short elevator pitches during the breaks. We must thank our main commercial sponsor, Ercon for their generous and continued support of our congress. Thanks also to New Tools for Health for sponsoring the pre-congress Networking Event.  Now a regular feature for Biosensors, we have a pre-congress school, this year on Optical Biosensors, which is brought to you by Profs Fran Ligler and Tanya Monro. Last, but not least I must thank our marvellous Local Organising Committee chaired by Prof Justin Gooding, our hard working main Organising Committee, all the speakers and delegates, and the Elsevier team for all their support.

    Our delegates come from the four corners of the globe to hear the science, to grasp the opportunities and to meet the people; it’s going to be the best meeting yet. Enjoy and don’t forget to join us again in Gothenburg, Sweden, 24-27 May for Biosensor 2016!

  • 3.
    Auer, Cornelia
    et al.
    Zuse Institute Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Nair, Jaya
    IIIT – Bangalore, Electronics City, Hosur Road, Bangalore, India.
    Zobel, Valentin
    Zuse Institue Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Hotz, Ingrid
    Zuse Institue Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    2D Tensor Field Segmentation2011In: Dagstuhl Follow-Ups, E-ISSN 1868-8977, Vol. 2, 17-35 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a topology-based segmentation as means for visualizing 2D symmetric tensor fields. The segmentation uses directional as well as eigenvalue characteristics of the underlying field to delineate cells of similar (or dissimilar) behavior in the tensor field. A special feature of the resulting cells is that their shape expresses the tensor behavior inside the cells and thus also can be considered as a kind of glyph representation. This allows a qualitative comprehension of important structures of the field. The resulting higher-level abstraction of the field provides valuable analysis. The extraction of the integral topological skeleton using both major and minor eigenvector fields serves as a structural pre-segmentation and renders all directional structures in the field. The resulting curvilinear cells are bounded by tensorlines and already delineate regions of equivalent eigenvector behavior. This pre-segmentation is further adaptively refined to achieve a segmentation reflecting regions of similar eigenvalue and eigenvector characteristics. Cell refinement involves both subdivision and merging of cells achieving a predetermined resolution, accuracy and uniformity of the segmentation. The buildingblocks of the approach can be intuitively customized to meet the demands or different applications. Application to tensor fields from numerical stress simulations demonstrates the effectiveness of our method.

  • 4.
    Chau, Chieu Vinh
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    3D-modeling of Norrköping2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The interest for a detailed and high solution city model has been large within the project” Optical signature analysis” at the department for Sensor Technology in FOI, Linköping. Thus, a textured 3D-model over Norrköping is needed, which later can be imported into simulation software to study optical signature in urban environment.

    The aim with this thesis work is to be able to use the result as a multi-used 3D-model within applications of the Swedish defence force for future usage. It is important to have a realistic representation of the environment so that the exercises can be planned and analyzed at the current position.

    For the final result to be as good as possible, the thesis work has been concentrated and limited into a smaller area, i.e. the quarter of Svärdet at Nya torget. Thereafter the thesis work has been divided into different stages: photographing, laser measurement, photomontage, modeling and texturing.

    One of the most important and extensive stages is to make the high solution and detailed texture pictures with photomontage. These pictures are first created with photographing and then be performed into panorama pictures. Further, the thesis work has been performed with suitable software, such as 3ds Max and Photoshop CS.

    The finished 3D-model will be supplied as a 3ds-file and max-file, where the textured pictures from the model have been moved into a folder to facilitate future works, for example in classification of texture-pictures.

  • 5.
    ul-Hassan, Jawad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergman, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Norstel AB, Ramshällsvägen 15, S-60116 Norrköping, Sweden.
    Henry, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    McNally, P. J.
    cNanomaterials Processing Laboratory, Research Institute for Networks & Communications Engineering (RINCE), School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Ireland.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    4H-SiC Epitaxial Layers Grown on on-axis Si-face Substrate2007In: Materials Science Forum, Vols. 556-557, Trans Tech Publications , 2007, Vol. 556-557, 53-56 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the growth of 4H-SiC epitaxial layer on Si-face polished nominally on-axis 2” full wafer, using Hot-Wall CVD epitaxy. The polytype stability has been maintained over the larger part of the wafer, but 3C inclusions have not been possible to avoid. Special attention has given to the mechanism of generation and propagation of 3C polytype in 4H-SiC epilayer. Different optical and structural techniques were used to characterize the material and to understand the growth mechanisms. It was found that all 3C inclusions were generated at the interface between the substrate and the epitaxial layer, and no 3C inclusions were initiated at later stages of the growth.

  • 6.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Albers, Jan
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Wiberg, Jan
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Vaxjö University.
    6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - A case study from the couples perspective2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, Vol. 7, no 2, 103-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen. Aim: To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couples perspective.

    Methods and the case: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.

    Findings: Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.

    Conclusion: An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.

  • 7.
    Ziemssen, Tjalf
    et al.
    Klinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Germany.
    Bajenaru, Ovidiu A.
    Carol Davila University of Medical and Pharm, Romania.
    Carra, Adriana
    Hospital Britanico Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    de Klippel, Nina
    Virga Jessaziekenhuis, Belgium.
    de Sa, Joao C.
    Hospital Santa Mari, Belgium.
    Edland, Astrid
    Central Hospital Buskerud, Norway.
    Frederiksen, Jette L.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Heinzlef, Olivier
    Hop Tenon, France.
    Karageorgiou, Klimentini E.
    Gen Hospital Athens, Greece.
    Lander Delgado, Rafael H.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Macias Islas, Miguel A.
    Central University of Guadalajara, Mexico.
    Tubridy, Niall
    Dublin City University, Ireland.
    Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi
    Teva Pharmaceut Ind Ltd, Israel.
    A 2-year observational study of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis converting to glatiramer acetate from other disease-modifying therapies: the COPTIMIZE trial2014In: Journal of Neurology, ISSN 0340-5354, E-ISSN 1432-1459, Vol. 261, no 11, 2101-2111 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies suggest that patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who do not benefit from other disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) may benefit from converting to glatiramer acetate (GA). COPTIMIZE was a 24-month observational study designed to assess the disease course of patients converting to GA 20 mg daily from another DMT. Eligible patients had converted to GA and had received prior DMT for 3-6 months, depending on the reasons for conversion. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. In total, 672 patients from 148 centers worldwide were included in the analysis. Change of therapy to GA was prompted primarily by lack of efficacy (53.6 %) or intolerable adverse events (AEs; 44.8 %). Over a 24-month period, 72.7 % of patients were relapse free. Mean annual relapse rate decreased from 0.86 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.81-0.91] before the change to 0.32 (95 % CI 0.26-0.40; p less than 0.0001) at last observation, while the progression of disability was halted, as the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores remained stable. Patients improved significantly (p less than 0.05) on measures of fatigue, quality of life, depression, and cognition; mobility scores remained stable. The results indicate that changing RRMS patients to GA is associated with positive treatment outcomes.

  • 8.
    Quang-Thuy, Ha
    et al.
    Vietnam National University, Xuan Thuy, Hanoi.
    Thi-Lan-Giao, Hoang
    Hue University, Nguyen Hue, Hue city, Vietnam .
    Nguyen, Linh Anh
    University of Warsaw, Banacha, Poland .
    Hung-Son, Nguyen
    University of Warsaw, Banacha, Poland .
    Szalas, Andrzej
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Artificial Intelligence and Intergrated Computer systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thanh-Luong, Tran
    Hue University, Nguyen Hue, Hue city, Vietnam .
    A Bisimulation-based Method of Concept Learning for Knowledge Bases in Description Logics2012In: SoICT 2012 - 3rd International Symposium on Information and Communication Technology, ACM Press, 2012, 241-249 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We develop the first bisimulation-based method of concept learning, called BBCL, for knowledge bases in description logics (DLs). Our method is formulated for a large class of useful DLs, with well-known DLs like ALC, SHIQ, SHOIQ, SROIQ. As bisimulation is the notion for characterizing indis-cernibility of objects in DLs, our method is natural and very promising.

  • 9.
    Wallsten, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Cable Laid Is a Cable Played: On the Hibernation Logic behind Urban Infrastructure Mines2013In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 20, no 3, 85-103 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our societies are reliant on metals to such an extent that the total amounts of some of them in the built environment are comparable in size to the remaining amounts in known mountain ores. Because of concerns about mineral scarcity, the United Nations has assessed alternative sources for metal extraction and targeted urban areas in general and infrastructure systems in particular, since these are large, spatially concentrated and rich in metals. Referring to the possibility of recovering these metal stocks, infrastructure systems constitute what material flow researchers has conceptually termed “urban mines.” While most urban infrastructure is in use, significant amounts of cables and pipes have been disconnected and remain in their subsurface locations; they are “hibernating.” In this article, we analyze the occurrence of such hibernation in the Swedish city of Norrköping's urban infrastructure mine where, we know from a previous study, that every fourth kilo of infrastructure is discarded. Our applied perspective is different from the logic of system expansion as a way to meet increased demand often found in the field of infrastructure studies since we are interested in how systems are disconnected and left behind. This enables us to offer a refined understanding of the concepts of infrastructure “decline” and infrastructure “cold spots.” We argue that to prevent the increase of dormant infrastructures and to engage in the urban mining of already dormant infrastructures, we must develop a sensibility to the materiality of derelict infrastructure components and the underlying causes for why they form different kinds of spatial patterns.

  • 10.
    Lejon, Kjell O
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Religion and Culture, Theology and Religious Studies.
    A City upon a Hill? Aspects of U.S. Foreign Policy and Contemporary Theories On American Religion and Politics.2004In: Arkiv, fakultet, kyrka: festskrift till Ingmar Brohed / [ed] Anders Jarlert, Lund: Lunds Universitet/Lunds Universitets Kyrkohistoriska Arkiv , 2004, 325-347 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ingmar Brohed var 1978-97 professor i kyrkohistoria vid Lunds universitet, därefter forskningschef vid Svenska kyrkans forskningsråd. Festskriften innehåller 26 artiklar som i huvudsak behandlar svensk och internationell kyrkohistoria från 1700-tal till sent 1900-tal, med perspektiv även från etnologi, historia, kyrkovetenskap, missionsvetenskap, religionssociologi och rättshistoria. De speglar på olika sätt Broheds insatser som arkivarie, forskare, forskningsledare och administratör.

  • 11.
    Lejon, Kjell O
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Religion and Culture, Theology and Religious Studies.
    A City Upon a Hill? Aspects of U.S. Foreign Policy and Contemporary Theories on American Religion and Politics.2006In: Logia : a journal of Lutheran theology, ISSN 1064-0398, Vol. Vol. 15, no Issue 3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 12.
    Mejía-Dugand, Santiago
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A city’s utility company as an axis for its sustainable development: A case study of EPM of Medellín, ColombiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the central role that a utility company can play in the sustainable development of a city by studying the case of EPM of Medellín, Colombia. After presenting a brief history of the development of public services in Colombia, the article discusses the company’s management model, the local laws and regulations affecting it, the direct and indirect benefits for the city and the risks that come along with the power it has acquired. It is claimed that early decisions to maintain public ownership of key assets and provide the company with administrative autonomy have allowed it to remain competitive, despite the liberalization of the utilities market in the 1990s. This in turn has allowed the city to dramatically increase its municipal revenue and thus its spending on social projects. This case promises to contribute to the discussion on entrepreneurial cities looking to increase their citizens’ well-being through municipally-owned corporations that are commercial and social at the same time. It also contributes to the debate about operational efficiency between the private and the public sectors, and the central role that utility providers play in the construction of more sustainable cities. Ultimately, this case study can contribute with good practices from countries of which Academia knows so little.

  • 13.
    Lindqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Isaksson, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Samuelsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    A clonal outbreak of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus with concomitant resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tobramycin in a Swedish county2009In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES, ISSN 0036-5548, Vol. 41, no 5, 324-333 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contrast to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), studies on clonal distribution of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) are scarce. Since 2004, an increasing incidence of concomitant resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tobramycin (ECT) among MSSA has been detected in Ostergotland County, Sweden. The objectives of this study were to investigate the genetic relatedness among these isolates with 2 genotyping methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and sequence-based typing of the polymorphic region X of the staphylococcal protein A gene (spa typing), and to determine the incidence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene. When genotyping 54 ECT-resistant MSSA isolates from 49 patients (1 isolate per patient per y), 91% were shown to be part of a clonal outbreak with both methods used (spa type t002). The clonal outbreak was concentrated in 8 hospital departments and 2 primary care centres, all located in the city of Linkoping. All isolates were negative for the PVL gene. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an ongoing clonal outbreak of PVL-negative ECT-resistant MSSA. This stresses the need to continuously maintain basic hygiene rules, since nosocomial transmission of pathogens is not limited to known resistant bacteria such as MRSA.

  • 14.
    Doillon, CJ
    et al.
    CHUL Research Center, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
    Watsky, MA
    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee, Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.
    Hakim, M
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Wang, J
    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee, Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.
    Munger, R
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Laycock, N
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    Osborne, R
    The Procter and Gamble Company, Miami Valley Laboratories, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
    Griffith, M
    University of Ottawa Eye Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
    A collagen-based scaffold for a tissue engineered human cornea: Physical and physiological properties2003In: International Journal of Artificial Organs, ISSN 0391-3988, E-ISSN 1724-6040, Vol. 26, no 8, 764-773 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stabilized collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds for tissue engineered human corneas were characterized. Hydrated matrices were constructed by blending type I collagen with chondroitin sulphates (CS), with glutaraldehyde crosslinking. A corneal keratocyte cell line was added to the scaffolds with or without corneal epithelial and endothelial cells. Constructs were grown with or without ascorbic acid. Wound-healing was evaluated in chemical-treated constructs. Native, noncrosslinked gels were soft with limited longevity. Crosslinking strengthened the matrix yet permitted cell growth. CS addition increased transparency. Keratocytes grown within the matrix had higher frequencies of K+ channel expression than keratocytes grown on plastic. Ascorbic acid increased uncrosslinked matrix degradation in the presence of keratocytes, while it enhanced keratocyte growth and endogenous collagen synthesis in crosslinked matrices. Wounded constructs showed recovery from exposure to chemical irritants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that our engineered, stabilized matrix is well-suited to function as an in vitro corneal stroma.

  • 15.
    Hildebrand, Cisilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hörtin, Stina
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A comparative study between Emme and Visum with respect to public transport assignment2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Macroscopic traffic simulations are widely used in the world in order to provide assistance in the traffic infrastructure development as well as for the strategic traffic planning. When studying a large traffic network macroscopic traffic simulation can be used to model current and future traffic situations. The two most common software used for traffic simulation in Sweden today are Emme and Visum, developed by INRO respective PTV.

    The aim of the thesis is to perform a comparison between the software Emme and Visum with respect to the assignment of public transport, in other words how passengers choose their routes on the existing public transport lines. However, in order to make a complete software comparison the run-time, analysis capabilities, multi-modality, capacity to model various behavioural phenomena like crowding, fares etc. this will not be done in this comparison. It is of interest to study the differences between the two software algorithms and why they might occur because the Swedish Transport Administration uses Emme and the Traffic Administration in Stockholm uses Visum when planning public transport. The comparison will include the resulting volumes on transit lines, travel times, flow through specific nodes, number of boarding, auxiliary volumes and number of transits. The goal of this work is to answer the following objective: What are the differences with modelling a public transport network in Emme and in Visum, based on that the passengers only have information about the travel times and the line frequency, and why does the differences occur?

    In order to evaluate how the algorithms work in a larger network, Nacka municipality (in Stockholm) and the new metro route between Nacka Forum and Kungsträdgården have been used. The motivation for choosing this area and case is due to that it is interesting to see what differences could occur between the programs when there is a major change in the traffic network.

    The network of Nacka, and parts of Stockholm City, has been developed from an existing road network of Sweden and then restricted by "cutting out" the area of interest and then removing all public transportation lines outside the selected area. The OD-matrix was also limited and in order not to loose the correct flow of travellers portal zones was used to collect and retain volumes.

    To find out why the differences occur the headway-based algorithms in each software were studied carefully. An example of a small and simple network (consisting of only a start and end node) has been used to demonstrate and show how the algorithms work and why volumes split differently on the existing transit lines in Emme and Visum. The limited network of Nacka shows how the different software may produce different results in a larger public transport network.

    The results show that there are differences between the program algorithms but the significance varies depending on which output is being studied and the size of the network. The Visum algorithm results in more total boardings, i.e. more passengers have an optimal strategy including a transit. The algorithms are very similar in both software programs, since they include more or less parts of the optimal strategy. The parameters used are taken more or less into consideration in Emme and Visum. For example Visum will first of all focus on the shortest total travel time and then consider the other lines with respect to the maximum waiting time. Emme however, first focuses on the shortest travel time and then considers the total travel time for other lines with half the waiting time instead of the maximum wait time. This results in that less transit lines will be attractive in Emme compared to Visum. The thesis concludes that varying the parameters for public transport in each software algorithm one can obtain similar results, which implies that it is most important to choose the best parameter values and not to choose the "best" software when simulating a traffic network.

  • 16.
    Peng, Huatao
    et al.
    Wuhan University of Technology, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yang
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Hubei University of Technology, Peoples R China; University of Vaasa, Finland.
    A comprehensive analysis of cleaner production policies in China2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 135, 1138-1149 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of cleaner production have often focused on two domains: the applications and the effects. An ever-increasing importance of cleaner production is pushing researchers to pay more attention to the formulation and principles of cleaner production policies. However, there is nearly none of the previous research that systematically and comprehensively analyses the development processes of cleaner production policies and exploring their characteristics deeply. The missing study is important in not only contributing to the perfection of cleaner production policies but also influencing the strategic planning of firms. This paper bridges this gap by first presenting a comprehensive study of the development process of cleaner production policies and then exploring their characteristics. We choose China, the biggest developing country and one of the most challenging countries to implement cleaner production, as the main research target and in addition a number of other developed and developing countries for comparisons. To investigate deeper into the characteristics of cleaner production in China, all the major policies and regulations issued by central ministries from 1997 to 2013 have been studied, ensuring the accuracy and reliability of the research. By employing T-LAB software with linguistic and statistical content analysis method, this paper derives following conclusions. (1) "audit", "implementation" and "environmental" have the highest correlation coefficients with cleaner production; (2) cleaner production policies focus on four themes: "pilot", "indicator", "people" and "list"; (3) the formulation and implementation of cleaner production policies are endowed with typical characteristics of collaboration; (4) the characteristics of cleaner production policies are typically constraining types that evidently guide and regulate the behaviours of firms. This paper contributes as a general important reference of cleaner production policies for governments and firms especially in developing countries. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-07-01 11:04
  • 17.
    Gagnesjö, Sara
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Countryside Perspective of Queer: - queering the city/countryside divide2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis contributes with a countryside perspective to queer research by highlighting the countryside as a context where queer lives are lived. In the thesis I problematize the city/countryside divide with a view of the concept of queer as dependent on space and time.  The empirical materials are generated through a workshop on queerness, gathering people living within a countryside context; the materials consist of a discussion and written responses to questions on queerness and the city/countryside binary. Theoretically and methodologically, the thesis is inspired by the notion of agential realism (Barad 2007) and situated knowledge, (Haraway 1988); the use of creative writing, inspired by Richardson (1994 and 2000), has also been central to the development of the thesis. The analysis is carried out within themes focusing on conditions for queerness within city/countryside experienced by people situated in the countryside. The analysis shows how space, time, contexts and intersections are entangled and queering the city/countryside divide.

  • 18.
    Rantanen, V.-V.
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics, University of Turku, FIN-20014, Turku, Finland, Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Åbo Akademi University, Tykistökatu 6 BioCity 3A, FIN-20521, Turku, Finland.
    Denessiouk, K.A.
    Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Åbo Akademi University, Tykistökatu 6 BioCity 3A, FIN-20521, Turku, Finland.
    Gyllenberg, M.
    Department of Mathematics, University of Turku, FIN-20014, Turku, Finland.
    Koski, Timo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematical Statistics .
    Johnson, M.S.
    Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Åbo Akademi University, Tykistökatu 6 BioCity 3A, FIN-20521, Turku, Finland.
    A fragment library based on Gaussian mixtures predicting favorable molecular interactions2001In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, Vol. 313, no 1, 197-214 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, a protein atom-ligand fragment interaction library is described. The library is based on experimentally solved structures of protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and it is able to characterize binding sites given a ligand structure suitable for a protein. A set of 30 ligand fragment types were defined to include three or more atoms in order to unambiguously define a frame of reference for interactions of ligand atoms with their receptor proteins. Interactions between ligand fragments and 24 classes of protein target atoms plus a water oxygen atom were collected and segregated according to type. The spatial distributions of individual fragment - target atom pairs were visually inspected in order to obtain rough-grained constraints on the interaction volumes. Data fulfilling these constraints were given as input to an iterative expectation-maximization algorithm that produces as output maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of the finite Gaussian mixture models. Concepts of statistical pattern recognition and the resulting mixture model densities are used (i) to predict the detailed interactions between Chlorella virus DNA ligase and the adenine ring of its ligand and (ii) to evaluate the "error" in prediction for both the training and validation sets of protein-ligand interaction found in the PDB. These analyses demonstrate that this approach can successfully narrow down the possibilities for both the interacting protein atom type and its location relative to a ligand fragment. © 2001 Academic Press.

  • 19.
    Gustafsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    A Material Flow Evaluation at Scania Production Slupsk S.P.S2007Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master’s thesis is performed at Department of Management and Engineering Linköping University, for Scania Omni at Scania Production Slupsk (S.P.S). Omni is responsible for development, manufacturing and marketing of city, suburban and intercity buses. After acquisition of the production unit in Slupsk in 2002 lower production cost per bus is possible. But without control over the organisation costs are rising due to late delivery fees and high stock levels. At the outset, the thesis included three clearly defined objectives:

    - Map the present situation at Scania Production Slupsk regarding material flow from supplier to assembly line including a part and storage analysis.

    - Benchmark the current routines at Scania Production Slupsk with other successful companies. Furthermore, conduct literature research in order to find theories and philosophies that support problem analysis and thesis solution.

    - Develop standard routines for material control methods (MCM) and material supply methods (MSM).

    A complimentary objective is to work as a catalyst during the time of the thesis.

    The mapping of the present situation showed that MCM and MSM are very tight connected to each other. It was questioned whether this structure was the best way to manage the material flow. After a parts and storage analysis, material was divided into different segments depending of price, consumption and movement.

    The benchmarking studies showed different ways to manage the material flow. Implementation of unit load, kanban and clear defined interface between departments showed potential to improve the material handling and increase effectiveness.

    New routines and part segment definitions described in a logistics manual (Appendix I) were made align with a comparison between previous and recommended definitions.

    The result showed that some parts needs to be controlled differently. Primary recommendations are that logistics manual shall be used when new parts are introduced into the Scala system. Responsible personnel are suppose to give suggestion concerning decision making of MCM and MSM and with help of the logistics manual the work can be more efficient, resulting in a material flow that is flexible and have potential for improvements.

    Secondary, to avoid material handling to some extent implementation of two-bin system is recommended. Additional recommendations regarding two-bin system is to handle material according to unit load, which enable FIFO, traceability and higher turn over rate

  • 20.
    Ding, Yuan C
    et al.
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA, USA .
    McGuffog, Lesley
    University of Cambridge Worts Causeway, England .
    Healey, Sue
    Royal Brisbane Hospital, Australia .
    Friedman, Eitan
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel Tel Aviv University, Israel .
    Laitman, Yael
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel Tel Aviv University, Israel .
    Paluch-Shimon, Shani
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel Tel Aviv University, Israel .
    Kaufman, Bella
    Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel Chaim Sheba Medical Centre, Israel Tel Aviv University, Israel .
    Liljegren, Annelie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Olsson, Hakan
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden .
    Kristoffersson, Ulf
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden .
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Domchek, Susan M
    University of Penn, PA, USA .
    Nathanson, Katherine L
    University of Penn, PA, USA .
    Rebbeck, Timothy R
    University of Penn, PA, USA .
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland .
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland .
    Jaworska, Katarzyna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland .
    Durda, Katarzyna
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland .
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland .
    Huzarski, Tomasz
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland .
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland .
    Byrski, Tomasz
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland .
    Osorio, Ana
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Spain Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Spain Spanish Network Rare Disease CIBERER, Spain .
    Ramony Cajal, Teresa
    Hospital Santa Creu and Sant Pau, Spain .
    Stavropoulou, Alexandra V
    National Centre Science Research Demokritos, Greece .
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Spain Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Spain Spanish Network Rare Disease CIBERER, Spain .
    Hamann, Ute
    Deutsch Krebsforschungszentrum DKFZ, Germany .
    Rookus, Matti
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands .
    Aalfs, Cora M
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    de Lange, Judith L
    Netherlands Cancer Institute, Netherlands .
    Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre, Netherlands .
    Oosterwijk, Jan C
    University of Groningen, Netherlands .
    van Asperen, Christi J
    Leiden University, Netherlands .
    Gomez Garcia, Encarna B
    MUMC, Netherlands .
    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands .
    Jager, Agnes
    Erasmus University, Netherlands .
    van der Luijt, Rob B
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Easton, Douglas F
    University of Cambridge, England .
    Peock, Susan
    University of Cambridge, England .
    Frost, Debra
    University of Cambridge, England .
    Ellis, Steve D
    University of Cambridge, England .
    Platte, Radka
    University of Cambridge, England .
    Fineberg, Elena
    University of Cambridge, England .
    Evans, D Gareth
    Central Manchester University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England .
    Lalloo, Fiona
    Central Manchester University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England .
    Izatt, Louise
    Guys and St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, England .
    Eeles, Ros
    Institute Cancer Research, England Royal Marsden NHS Fdn Trust, England .
    Adlard, Julian
    Yorkshire Regional Genet Serv, England .
    Davidson, Rosemarie
    Yorkhill Hospital, Scotland .
    Eccles, Diana
    University Hospital Southampton NHS Fdn Trust, England .
    Cole, Trevor
    Birmingham Womens Hospital Healthcare NHS Trust, England .
    Cook, Jackie
    Sheffield Childrens Hospital, England .
    Brewer, Carole
    Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, England .
    Tischkowitz, Marc
    University of Cambridge, England .
    Godwin, Andrew K
    University of Kansas, KS, USA .
    Pathak, Harsh
    University of Kansas, KS, USA .
    Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique
    Institute Curie, France Institute Curie, France University of Paris 05, France .
    Sinilnikova, Olga M
    University of Lyon 1, France Centre Hospital University of Lyon, France .
    Mazoyer, Sylvie
    University of Lyon 1, France .
    Barjhoux, Laure
    University of Lyon 1, France .
    Leone, Melanie
    Centre Hospital University of Lyon, France .
    Gauthier-Villars, Marion
    Institute Curie, France .
    Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie
    Institute Curie, France .
    de Pauw, Antoine
    Institute Curie, France .
    Hardouin, Agnes
    Centre Francois Baclesse, France .
    Berthet, Pascaline
    Centre Francois Baclesse, France .
    Dreyfus, Helene
    CHU Grenoble, France University of Grenoble, France .
    Fert Ferrer, Sandra
    Hotel Dieu Centre Hospital, France .
    Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnes
    CHU Besancon, France .
    Sokolowska, Johanna
    Nancy University, France .
    Buys, Saundra
    University of Utah, UT, USA .
    Daly, Mary
    Fox Chase Cancer Centre, PA, USA .
    Miron, Alex
    Dana Farber Cancer Institute, MA, USA .
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Columbia University, NY, USA .
    Chung, Wendy
    Columbia University, NY, USA .
    John, Esther M
    Cancer Prevent Institute Calif, CA, USA Stanford University, CA, USA Stanford Cancer Institute, CA, USA .
    Southey, Melissa
    University of Melbourne, Australia .
    Goldgar, David
    University of Utah, UT, USA .
    Singer, Christian F
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Tea, Muy-Kheng Maria
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Fink-Retter, Anneliese
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Hansen, Thomas V O
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark .
    Ejlertsen, Bent
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark .
    Johannsson, Oskar T
    Landspitali University Hospital, Iceland University of Iceland, Iceland .
    Offit, Kenneth
    Clin Cancer Genet Lab, NY, USA .
    Sarrel, Kara
    Clin Cancer Genet Lab, NY, USA .
    Gaudet, Mia M
    Amer Cancer Soc, GA, USA .
    Vijai, Joseph
    Clin Cancer Genet Lab, NY, USA .
    Robson, Mark
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY, USA .
    Piedmonte, Marion R
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY, USA .
    Andrews, Lesley
    Australia New Zealand Gynaecol Oncology Grp, Australia .
    Cohn, David
    Ohio State University, OH, USA .
    DeMars, Leslie R
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Centre, NH, USA .
    DiSilvestro, Paul
    Brown University, RI, USA .
    Rodriguez, Gustavo
    NorthShore University of Health Syst, IL, USA .
    Ewart Toland, Amanda
    Ohio State University, OH, USA Ohio State University, OH, USA .
    Montagna, Marco
    Ist Oncology Veneto IOV IRCCS, Italy .
    Agata, Simona
    Ist Oncology Veneto IOV IRCCS, Italy .
    Imyanitov, Evgeny
    NN Petrov Oncology Research Institute, Russia .
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Georgetown University, DC, USA .
    Janavicius, Ramunas
    Vilnius University Hospital, Lithuania .
    Lazaro, Conxi
    Institute Catala Oncol, Spain .
    Blanco, Ignacio
    IDIBELL Catalan Institute Oncol, Spain .
    Ramus, Susan J
    University of So Calif, CA, USA .
    Sucheston, Lara
    Roswell Pk Cancer Institute, NY, USA .
    Karlan, Beth Y
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA, USA .
    Gross, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Medical Centre, CA, USA .
    Ganz, Patricia A
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA, USA .
    Beattie, Mary S
    University of Calif San Francisco, CA, USA .
    Schmutzler, Rita K
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany .
    Wappenschmidt, Barbara
    University Hospital Cologne, Germany .
    Meindl, Alfons
    Technical University of Munich, Germany .
    Arnold, Norbert
    University of Kiel, Germany .
    Niederacher, Dieter
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Preisler-Adams, Sabine
    University of Munster, Germany .
    Gadzicki, Dorotehea
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany .
    Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda
    Charite, Germany .
    Deissler, Helmut
    University Hospital Ulm, Germany .
    Gehrig, Andrea
    University of Wurzburg, Germany .
    Sutter, Christian
    University of Heidelberg Hospital, Germany .
    Kast, Karin
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany .
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Aittomaki, Kristiina
    Centre Hospital University of Quebec, Canada University of Laval, Canada .
    Spurdle, Amanda B
    Royal Brisbane Hospital, Australia .
    Beesley, Jonathan
    Royal Brisbane Hospital, Australia .
    Chen, Xiaoqing
    Royal Brisbane Hospital, Australia .
    Tomlinson, Gail E
    University of Texas Health Science Centre San Antonio, TX, USA.
    Weitzel, Jeffrey
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA, USA .
    Garber, Judy E
    Harvard University, MA, USA .
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I
    University of Chicago, IL, USA .
    Rubinstein, Wendy S
    NorthShore University of HealthSyst, IL, USA .
    Tung, Nadine
    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, MA, USA .
    Blum, Joanne L
    Baylor Charles A Sammons Cancer Centre, TX, USA .
    Narod, Steven A
    Womens Coll Hospital, Canada .
    Brummel, Sean
    Harvard University, MA, USA .
    Gillen, Daniel L
    University of Calif Irvine, CA USA .
    Lindor, Noralane
    Mayo Clin, MN, USA .
    Fredericksen, Zachary
    Mayo Clin, MN, USA .
    Pankratz, Vernon S
    Mayo Clin, MN, USA .
    Couch, Fergus J
    Mayo Clin, MN, USA .
    Radice, Paolo
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy Fdn Ist FIRC Oncology Mol, Italy .
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Italy Fdn Ist FIRC Oncology Mol, Italy .
    Greene, Mark H
    NCI, MD, USA .
    Loud, Jennifer T
    NCI, MD, USA .
    Mai, Phuong L
    NCI, MD, USA .
    Andrulis, Irene L
    University of Toronto, Canada .
    Glendon, Gord
    University of Toronto, Canada .
    Gerdes, Anne-Marie
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark .
    Birk Jensen, Uffe
    Skejby Hospital, Denmark .
    Skytte, Anne-Bine
    Vejle Hospital, Denmark .
    Caligo, Maria A
    University of Pisa, Italy University Hospital Pisa, Italy .
    Lee, Andrew
    University of Cambridge Worts Causeway, England .
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    Royal Brisbane Hospital, Australia .
    Antoniou, Antonis C
    University of Cambridge Worts Causeway, England .
    Neuhausen, Susan L
    City Hope National Medical Centre, CA, USA .
    A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers2012In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 21, no 8, 1362-1370 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 (HR, 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.92; P = 0.019) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.39-3.52, P = 0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class II mutations than class I mutations (class II HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.28-2.70; class I HR, 0.86; 95%CI, 0.69-1.09; P-difference, 0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers (HR, 2.42; P = 0.03). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The IRS1 Gly972Arg single-nucleotide polymorphism, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanImpact: These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  • 21.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    A nurse's story : life, death, and in-between in an intensive care unit2004 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The team of nurses that Tilda Shalof found herself working with in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a big-city hospital was known as “Laura’s Line.” They were a bit wild: smart, funny, disrespectful of authority, but also caring and incredibly committed to their jobs. Laura set the tone with her quick remarks. Frances, from Newfoundland, was famous for her improvised recipes. Justine, the union rep, wore t-shirts emblazoned with defiant slogans, like “Nurses Care But It’s Not in the Budget.” Shalof was the one who had been to university. The others accused her of being “sooo sensitive.”They depended upon one another. Working in the ICU was both emotionally grueling and physically exhausting. Many patients, quite simply, were dying, and the staff strove mightily to prolong their lives. With their skill, dedication, and the resources of modern science, they sometimes were almost too successful. Doctors and nurses alike wondered if what they did for terminally-ill patients was not, in some cases, too extreme. A number of patients were admitted when it was too late even for heroic measures. A boy struck down by a cerebral aneurysm in the middle of a little-league hockey game. A woman rescued – too late – from a burning house. It all took its toll on the staff.And yet, on good days, they thrived on what they did. Shalof describes a colleague who is managing a “crashing” patient: “I looked at her. Nicky was flushed with excitement. She was doing five different things at the same time, planning ahead for another five. She was totally focused, in her element, in control, completely at home with the chaos. There was a huge smile on her face. Nurses like to fix things. If they can.”Shalof, a veteran ICU nurse, reveals what it is really like to work behind the closed hospital curtains. The drama, the sardonic humour, the grinding workload, the cheerful camaraderie, the big issues and the small, all are brought vividly to life in this remarkable book.

  • 22.
    Husberg, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering.
    A Portable DARC Fax Service2002Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree)Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    DARC is a technique for data broadcasting over the FM radio network. Sectra Wireless Technologies AB has developed a handheld DARC receiver known as the Sectra CitySurfer. The CitySurfer is equipped with a high-resolution display along with buttons and a joystick that allows the user to view and navigate through various types of information received over DARC.

    Sectra Wireless Technologies AB has, among other services, also developed a paging system that enables personal message transmission over DARC. The background of this thesis is a wish to be able to send fax documents using the paging system and to be able to view received fax documents in the CitySurfer.

    The presented solution is a central PC-based fax server. The fax server is responsible for receiving standard fax transmissions and converting the fax documents before redirecting them to the right receiver in the DARC network. The topics discussed in this thesis are fax document routing, fax document conversion and fax server system design.

  • 23.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Australia .
    A Preliminary Evaluation of the Active Communication Education Program in a Sample of 87-Year-Old Hearing Impaired Individuals2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 25, no 2, 219-228 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research suggests that audiological rehabilitation for older adults could include group communication programs in addition to hearing aid fitting or as an alternative to hearing aid fitting for those people who do not wish to proceed with hearing aids. This pilot study was a first attempt to evaluate a Swedish version of such a program, Active Communication Education (ACE), which had been developed and previously evaluated in Australia (Hickson et.al, 2007a). Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the use of the ACE program in an older-old population of people aged 87 yr in Sweden. Research Design: A within-subject intervention study. Study Sample: The participants were recruited from the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment (ELSA), a population-based study of the functional abilities of all inhabitants of the city of Linkoping aged 85 yr in 2007. Participants who responded to the hearing related items in the ELSA study were approached for this study; 29 people agreed to undertake ACE, and 23 (79%) completed three or more sessions. Intervention: The ACE program consists of five weekly 2 hr group sessions with six to ten participants per group. Data Collection and Analysis: Self-report measures of communication strategy use, activity and participation, health-related quality of life, and depression were obtained preprogram, 3 wk postprogram, and 6 mo postprogram. Within-group changes and effect sizes were calculated. In addition, outcomes were measured postprogram using the International Outcome Inventory Alternative Interventions (IOI-AI; Noble, 2002) and a modified version of the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement (COSI; Dillon et al, 1997; Hickson et al, 2007b), and qualitative feedback was obtained. Results: The effect size of ACE was small (0.03-0.27), and, in the sample of 23 included in this pilot study, differences in pre- and postprogram assessments were not statistically significant. Results from the IOI-Al and the modified COSI indicated that these elderly participants found the program to be beneficial, and 90% stated that the course had increased their ability to deal with hearing loss and the problems it creates. Conclusions: This preliminary investigation indicates the potential benefits of ACE for older adults, and further research is needed with larger numbers of participants in different age groups to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the ACE program for a general Swedish population.

  • 24.
    Tyler, Richard S
    et al.
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Pienkowski, Martin
    Salus University, Elkins Park, PA, USA.
    Roncancio, Eveling Rojas
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Jun, Hyung Jin
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Brozoski, Tom
    Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, USA.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    University of Poitiers, France.
    Barros Coelho, Claudia
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keiner, Andrew J
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Cacace, Anthony T
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA.
    Martin, Nora
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Moore, Brian C J
    University of Cambridge, England.
    A review of hyperacusis and future directions: part I. Definitions and manifestations.2014In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 23, no 4, 402-19 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Hyperacusis can be extremely debilitating, and at present, there is no cure. We provide an overview of the field, and possible related areas, in the hope of facilitating future research.

    METHOD: We review and reference literature on hyperacusis and related areas. We have divided the review into 2 articles. In Part I, we discuss definitions, epidemiology, different etiologies and subgroups, and how hyperacusis affects people. In Part II, we review measurements, models, mechanisms, and treatments, and we finish with some suggestions for further research.

    RESULTS: Hyperacusis encompasses a wide range of reactions to sound, which can be grouped into the categories of excessive loudness, annoyance, fear, and pain. Many different causes have been proposed, and it will be important to appreciate and quantify different subgroups. Reasonable approaches to assessing the different forms of hyperacusis are emerging, including psychoacoustical measures, questionnaires, and brain imaging.

    CONCLUSIONS: Hyperacusis can make life difficult for many, forcing sufferers to dramatically alter their work and social habits. We believe this is an opportune time to explore approaches to better understand and treat hyperacusis.

  • 25.
    Pienkowski, Martin
    et al.
    Salus University, Elkins Park, PA, USA.
    Tyler, Richard S
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Roncancio, Eveling Rojas
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Jun, Hyung Jin
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Brozoski, Tom
    Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, USA.
    Dauman, Nicolas
    University of Poitiers, France.
    Coelho, Claudia Barros
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Keiner, Andrew J
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Cacace, Anthony T
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA.
    Martin, Nora
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Moore, Brian C J
    University of Cambridge, England.
    A review of hyperacusis and future directions: part II. Measurement, mechanisms, and treatment.2014In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 23, no 4, 420-436 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Hyperacusis can be extremely debilitating, and at present, there is no cure. In this detailed review of the field, we consolidate present knowledge in the hope of facilitating future research.

    METHOD: We review and reference the literature on hyperacusis and related areas. This is the 2nd of a 2-part review.

    RESULTS: Hyperacusis encompasses a wide range of reactions to sounds, which can be grouped into the categories of excessive loudness, annoyance, fear, and pain. Reasonable approaches to assessing the different forms of hyperacusis are emerging, including brain-imaging studies. Researchers are only beginning to understand the many mechanisms at play, and valid animal models are still evolving. There are many counseling and sound-therapy approaches that some patients find helpful, but well-controlled studies are needed to measure their long-term efficacy and to test new approaches.

    CONCLUSIONS: Hyperacusis can make life difficult in this increasingly noisy world, forcing sufferers to dramatically alter their work and social habits. We believe this is an opportune time to explore approaches to better understand and treat hyperacusis.

  • 26.
    Nastic, Denis
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Shanwell, Emma
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wallin, Keng-Ling
    Equalis, Sweden.
    Valla, Marit
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Masback, Anna
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Mateoiu, Claudia
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lidang, Marianne
    Herlev University Hospital, Denmark.
    Liakka, Annikki
    Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Lappi-Blanco, Elisa
    Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Grove, Anni
    Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Davidson, Ben
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Carpen, Olli
    University of Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Bertelsen, Bjorn I.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Bak, Julia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abusland, Anne B.
    Trondheim Regional and University Hospital, Norway.
    Selling, Jonas
    Statsoft AB, Sweden.
    Carlson, Joseph W.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    A Selective Biomarker Panel Increases the Reproducibility and the Accuracy in Endometrial Biopsy Diagnosis2017In: International Journal of Gynecological Pathology, ISSN 0277-1691, E-ISSN 1538-7151, Vol. 36, no 4, 339-347 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grading and histologic typing of endometrial cancer in biopsy material has a direct impact on the decision to perform lymphadenectomy and/or omentectomy in many cancer centers. Endometrial biopsies are among the most common general surgical pathology specimens. Multiple studies have shown that biopsy diagnosis suffers from a lack of reproducibility. Although many biomarkers have been proposed, none have been demonstrated to improve the diagnosis in the biopsy setting. In this study, 70 biopsies with endometrial carcinoma were supplemented with a biomarker panel consisting of ER, PR, P53, and DNA ploidy. A representative Hamp;E slide was scanned digitally and made available to 12 gynecologic pathologists in 4 Nordic countries: Finland, Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. Reviewers diagnosed the cases both before and after being provided with the biomarker results. The interobserver percent agreement and Cohen kappa improved from 75.8% (kappa = 0.52, moderate) to 84% (kappa = 0.68, substantial) with inclusion of the biomarker panel. Agreement with the subsequent hysterectomy diagnosis also improved from 83.6% (kappa = 0.67) to 88.7% (kappa = 0.77). There was no statistical improvement between a reflex (84% agreement) and a reflective testing algorithm (82.9% agreement), suggesting that the selective use of biomarkers is appropriate. Difficult cases were almost exclusively high-grade tumors. Finally, a statistical model indicated that only P53 and DNA ploidy, in conjunction with an Hamp;E review, had an impact on the decision to upgrade or downgrade cases.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultstrand Klint, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A smart poster? Visual design of marketing material for an exhibition of the concept Smart City2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Företaget HiQ i Norrköping vill skapa en bättre värld genom att förenkla och förbättra människors liv med hjälp av teknik. Konceptet Smart City handlar om utmaningar inom områden som energi, miljö och trafik som Norrköping kommun kommer att ställas inför i framtiden. HiQ anordnar i maj 2015 ett hackathon där studenter under några timmar ska komma fram till olika Smart City-lösningar. Dessa idéer kommer sedan presenteras i en utställning på Visualiseringscenter i Norrköping. För att dra besökare till utställningen krävs det att utställningen marknadsförs mot en intresserad och relevant målgrupp. Marknadsföringen till utställningen ska verka för att övertyga målgruppen att gå på utställningen. En affisch togs därför fram efter teorier och utvärderades sedan under sex kvalitativa intervjuer. Därefter transkriberades de insamlade data och analyserades med hjälp av meningskoncentrering.Studien syftar till att undersöka hur en affisch bör utformas visuellt för att locka målgruppen, Medieteknikstudenter vid Linköpings universitet, till utställningen. För att locka målgruppen till utställningen bör affischen innehålla fler visuella element i form av bilder, det vill säga illustrationer eller fotografier som är kopplade till konceptet och utställningen. Den textbaserade informationen bör tydligare förklara vad det är utställningen handlar om. Affischen bör utformas mer utmärkande om den ska bli ihågkommen. För att affischen som utformades i denna studie ska generera det förväntade intrycket krävs en del justeringar.

  • 28.
    Martinsen, Uni
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Study of Environmental and Other Sustainable Activities in supply Chain Relationships at Clas Ohlson2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is the result of a case study conducted at the Swedish retail company Clas Ohlson. The study has been conducted as one step in the PhD process of the author of this report and is financed by the Swedish Energy Agency (Energimyndigheten). In this first chapter, some background information to the case study is given: the aim of the study, the rationale behind choosing Clas Ohlson as the case company and data collection methods. Finally, the structure of the remaining parts of the report is presented.

    The aim of this case study is to illustrate how environmental work can be conducted in different types of supply chain relationships, seen from the perspective of one focal shipper in a supply chain. The relationships include both upstream (such as suppliers and inbound logistics service providers) and downstream (such as outbound logistics service providers and stores in a city logistics context) parts of the supply chain. As these examples illustrate, the supply chain relationships can include shippers as well as logistics service providers (LSPs).

  • 29.
    LIU, ZHI
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Study of the Relationship between Socialization Tactics, Motives to Study and Mental Health in Chinese College Students2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    College students constitute a particular social group that carries hopes and expectations from both parents and society. However, in recent years there have been  reports about increasing problems in many universities in China: students suspension from school, skipping classes, or even committing suicide,. As social isolation, anxiety, fragility etc are possible reasons, the importance of university student’s mental health has been taken seriously more and more. University students’ socialization refers to the process in which college students grow up into independent and mature individuals by learning social and culture knowledge. From social perspective, on one hand, they still need to learn professional knowledge, on the other hand, they have to construct a good philosophy for themselves, a correct world outlook and value conception. This study mainly explores undergraduate students’ mental health in relation to socialization tactics and motives to study. That means that the focus of this survey is not on the degree of socialization, but on the tactic the students have chosen to get into the university society.

    In this study totally 120 students were examined via two questionnaires, the University Personality Inventory(UPI) introduced from Japan, and the combined Motives to Study and Socialization Tactics questionnaire from Israel. Both of them  passed homogeneity testing. The 120 students were from four universities, two  located in Hangzhou city and two in Beijing. Statistical analysis including correlation analysis, multiple regression and t-test, showed that motives to study had little to do with students’ mental health, while scholastic and collegiate socialization tactics were associated with good mental health of the students. There was no big difference in study motives and socialization tactics between the male and the female students in this study.

  • 30.
    Forsslund, Jonas
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm Sweden.
    Sallnäs, Eva-Lotta
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm Sweden.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A User Centered Designed FOSS Implementation of Bone Surgery Simulations2009In: Proceedings - 3rd Joint EuroHaptics Conference and Symposium on Haptic Interfaces for Virtual Environment and Teleoperator Systems, World Haptics 2009, Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE , 2009, 391-392 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different aspects of bone surgery simulation has been a popular topic in haptics research field. This demonstration paper has two major results: a Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) implementation of a well known algorithm for tool-bone interaction force estimation, and an evaluation conducted as part of a suggested User-centered design approach for creation of a surgery simulator targeting Oral Surgery in particular.

  • 31.
    Kemani, M. K.
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Zetterqvist, Vendela
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kanstrup, M.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Holmstrom, L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wicksell, R. K.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    A validation of the pain interference index in adults with longstanding pain2016In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 60, no 2, 250-258 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic pain is a major health problem and more knowledge is needed regarding the interference of pain on behaviors in different life domains. Clinically useful and statistically sound pain interference measures are highly important. Studies on youths have shown that the Pain Interference Index (PII) is a reliable and valid instrument that is sensitive to change following behavioral treatment. This measure may also have utility for adults, but no study has so far evaluated the statistical properties of the PII for long-standing pain in adults. Methods: Data were collected from 239 consecutive adults with non-specific chronic pain referred to a tertiary pain clinic. We investigated the factor structure of items using a principal component analysis. Cronbachs alpha was calculated to assess internal consistency. The questionnaires ability to predict levels of, e.g., disability was analyzed by means of regression analyses. Results: Analyses illustrated the adequacy of a one-factor solution with six items. Cronbachs alpha (0.85) suggested a satisfactory internal consistency among items. The PII explained significant amounts of variance in pain disability, physical, and mental health-related quality of life and depression, suggesting concurrent criteria validity. Conclusion: The PII is a brief questionnaire with reliable and valid statistical properties to assess pain interference in adults. Other studies support the reliability and validity of PII for use with youths, and now the PII can be used to analyze the influence of pain on behaviors across age groups. Potentially, the PII can also be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  • 32.
    Ljotsson, Brjann
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Erik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hedman, Erik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lindfors, Perjohan
    Sabbatsberg Hospital.
    Andreewitch, Sergej
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ruck, Christian
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Karolinska Institute.
    Acceptability, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of internet-based exposure treatment for irritable bowel syndrome in a clinical sample: a randomized controlled trial2011In: BMC Gastroenterology, ISSN 1471-230X, Vol. 11, no 110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has shown promising effects in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, to date no study has used a design where participants have been sampled solely from a clinical population. We aimed to investigate the acceptability, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of ICBT for IBS using a consecutively recruited sample from a gastroenterological clinic. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Sixty-one patients were randomized to 10 weeks of ICBT (n = 30) or a waiting list control (n = 31). The ICBT was guided by an online therapist and emphasized acceptance of symptoms through exposure and mindfulness training. Severity of IBS symptoms was measured with the Gastrointestinal symptom rating scale - IBS version (GSRS-IBS). Patients in both groups were assessed at pre- and post-treatment while only the ICBT group was assessed 12 months after treatment completion. Health economic data were also gathered at all assessment points and analyzed using bootstrap sampling. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Fifty of 61 patients (82%) completed the post-treatment assessment and 20 of 30 patients (67%) in the ICBT group were assessed at 12-month follow-up. The ICBT group demonstrated significantly (p andlt; .001) larger improvements on the IBS-related outcome scales than the waiting list group. The between group effect size on GSRS-IBS was Cohens d = 0.77 (95% CI: 0.19-1.34). Similar effects were noted on measures of quality of life and IBS-related fear and avoidance behaviors. Improvements in the ICBT group were maintained at 12-month follow-up. The ICBT condition was found to be more cost-effective than the waiting list, with an 87% chance of leading to reduced societal costs combined with clinical effectiveness. The cost-effectiveness was sustained over the 12-month period. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: ICBT proved to be a cost-effective treatment when delivered to a sample recruited from a gastroenterological clinic. However, many of the included patients dropped out of the study and the overall treatment effects were smaller than previous studies with referred and self-referred samples. ICBT may therefore be acceptable and effective for only a subset of clinical patients. Study dropout seemed to be associated with severe symptoms and large impairment. Objective and empirically validated criteria to select which patients to offer ICBT should be developed.

  • 33.
    Grönwall, Jenny T.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Access to water: Rights, obligations and the Bangalore situation2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The city of Bangalore in southern India is undergoing rapid urbanisation and administrative transition. Its growth puts pressure on the available water sources – being mainly the disputed inter-State River Cauvery and the hard-rock aquifers – with ensuing problems of access. These aspects affect how rights to and over water are fulfilled and perceived. Competition for drinking water is intensifying worldwide and over a billion people are estimated to lack safe access to it. Urbanisation and other demographic trends, along with globalisation and climate change, are adding to the changing patterns of water scarcity. The role of rights in attaining and improving access to water is undoubtedly great and often referred to in the general water management debate. The notion is analysed here as having three interlinked dimensions: the right to water as a human right; water in terms of property rights; and water rights. Law treats these rights, and thereby water, differently. For instance, groundwater has traditionally been thought of as invisible and unpredictable. Partly for this reason, it is still left largely unregulated in many parts of the world. In India, according to the proverb, ‘the landlord is a water lord’. This has effects on the claim for water as a human right. The dissertation shows that we cannot talk in terms of water and rights until we are aware of how complex rights apply simultaneously, and how they correspond to obligations.

  • 34.
    Ge, Xiaoming
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Accident Analysis for Pedestrians and Cyclists at Intersection Areas by Using RSA, A Case Study from Norrköping City, Sweden2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Pedestrians and cyclists safety is one of the biggest safety issues all over the world. Both pedestrians and cyclists suffered most from the traffic accidents compared with the vehicle drivers and passengers. There are many factors such as traffic factors, human factors, physical elements factors and etc which can lead to traffic accidents for pedestrians and cyclists. Compared with vehicle users, the pedestrians and cyclists have fewer or no protection equipments on them. Therefore, they are more likely to be serious injury or even death in a road traffic accident. Both pedestrians and cyclist face more danger at intersection areas. Each year, many vehicle to pedestrian and vehicle to cyclist accidents happen at intersection areas because of the traffic condition are more complex at intersection than others.

    In this paper, a case study concerns the evaluation both pedestrians and cyclists safety in two hazard intersections (Fenixrondellen and Hörngatan-Södra promenaden) in Norrkoping city. In order to evaluate the safety level and inappropriate road design for pedestrians and cyclists, the Traffic Conflict Technique and Road Safety Audit have been used. Traffic Conflict Technique is the most suitable and useful method applied in traffic safety audit of a road network to explain different types and reasons of conflicts and accidents. Road Safety Audit is systematic process for checking the safety of new schemes on roads. It considers the safety of all road users and in particular in vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, cyclists, children, elderly and etc. Finally, some inappropriate road designs and possible improvement for the future have been stated which may reduce the safety risks for pedestrians and cyclists in two hazard intersections (Fenixrondellen and Hörngatan-Södra promenaden) in Norrköping.

  • 35.
    Bergek, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Hahn, Robert G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Accuracy of noninvasive haemoglobin measurement by pulse oximetry depends on the type of infusion fluid2012In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 29, no 12, 586-592 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Measurement of blood haemoglobin concentration by pulse oximetry could be of value in determining when erythrocytes should be transfused during surgery, but the effect of infusion fluids on the results is unclear.

    Objective: To study the effect of crystalloid and colloid fluid on the accuracy (bias) and precision of pulse oximetry haemoglobin estimation to indicate the venous haemoglobin concentration in volunteers.

    Design: Open interventional crossover study.

    Setting: Single university hospital.

    Participants: Ten male volunteers aged 18–28 (mean 22) years.

    Interventions: Each volunteer underwent three infusion experiments on separate days and in random order. The infusions were Ringer's acetate (20 ml kg−1), hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (10 ml kg−1) and a combination of both.

    Results: At the end of the infusions of Ringer's acetate, pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration had decreased more than the true haemoglobin concentration (15 vs. 8%; P < 0.005; n  = 10) whereas starch solution decreased pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration less than true haemoglobin concentration (7 vs. 11%; P < 0.02; n  = 20). The same differences were seen when the fluids were infused separately and when they were combined. The overall difference between all 956 pairs of pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration and true haemoglobin concentrations (the bias) averaged only −0.7 g l−1 whereas the 95% prediction interval was wide, ranging from −24.9 to 23.7 g l−1. In addition to the choice of infusion fluid, the bias was strongly dependent on the volunteer (each factor, P < 0.001).

    Conclusion: The bias of measuring haemoglobin concentration by pulse oximetry is dependent on whether a crystalloid or a colloid fluid is infused.

  • 36.
    Bergek, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Hahn, Robert G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Accuracy of noninvasive haemoglobin measurement by pulse oximetry depends on the type of infusion fluid2013In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 30, no 2, 73-79 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Measurement of blood haemoglobin concentration by pulse oximetry could be of value in determining when erythrocytes should be transfused during surgery, but the effect of infusion fluids on the results is unclear.

    Objective: To study the effect of crystalloid and colloid fluid on the accuracy (bias) and precision of pulse oximetry haemoglobin estimation to indicate the venous haemoglobin concentration in volunteers.

    Design: Open interventional crossover study.

    Setting: Single university hospital.

    Participants: Ten male volunteers aged 18–28 (mean 22) years.

    Interventions: Each volunteer underwent three infusion experiments on separate days and in random order. The infusions were Ringer's acetate (20 ml kg−1), hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (10 ml kg−1) and a combination of both.

    Results: At the end of the infusions of Ringer's acetate, pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration had decreased more than the true haemoglobin concentration (15 vs. 8%; P < 0.005; n  = 10) whereas starch solution decreased pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration less than true haemoglobin concentration (7 vs. 11%; P < 0.02; n  = 20). The same differences were seen when the fluids were infused separately and when they were combined. The overall difference between all 956 pairs of pulse oximetry haemoglobin concentration and true haemoglobin concentrations (the bias) averaged only −0.7 g l−1 whereas the 95% prediction interval was wide, ranging from −24.9 to 23.7 g l−1. In addition to the choice of infusion fluid, the bias was strongly dependent on the volunteer (each factor, P < 0.001).

    Conclusion: The bias of measuring haemoglobin concentration by pulse oximetry is dependent on whether a crystalloid or a colloid fluid is infused.

  • 37.
    Gunnarsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Actionplanering och Samarbete (APAC) mellan multipla AI-agenter2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis covers an implementation of an artificial intelligence (AI) system for cooperation between multiple AI-agents. It was done as a part of a master thesis in Media Technology and a master thesis in Computer Engineering at Linköping University, campus Norrköping. The aim of the project was to explore modern techniques in AI and also develop a platform where this AI is implemented for the upcoming educational purposes. The idea is that students can use the system as a base to extend, learn and implement their own AI algorithms. Based on a literature study in AI systems the decision was made to base APAC on the GOAP system, a scalable planning architecture designed for real-time control of autonomous character behavior in games. The result of the thesis is a virtual world, made in Unity3D and C#, where the system is being used by virtual agents to build a city.

  • 38.
    Hirai, S.
    et al.
    Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Japan.
    Izawa, M.
    Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Japan.
    Osada, S.
    Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Japan.
    Spyrou, Giannis
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ohno, S.
    Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Japan.
    Activation of the JNK pathway by distantly related protein kinases, MEKK and MUK1996In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 12, no 3, 641-650 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    JNK/SAPKs are identified as new members of the MAPK family; they phosphorylate c-Jun protein in response to several cellular stimuli including ultraviolet irradiation, TNF and osmotic shock. We have identified a protein kinase, MUK, as an activator of the JNK-pathway, whose kinase domain shows significant homology to MAPKKK-related proteins such as c-Raf and MEKK. The over-expression of MUK or MEK kinase (MEKK) in NIH3T3 or COS1 cells results in the activation of JNK1 and the accumulation of a hyper-phosphorylated form of c-Jun. While MEKK also activates the ERK pathway, MUK is a rather selective activator of the JNK pathway. On the other hand, c-Raf activates the JNK pathway only slightly despite its remarkable ability to activate the ERK pathway. Even though we originally identified MUK as a MAPKKK-related protein kinase, a greater similarity to mixed lineage kinase (MLK) is found not only in the catalytic domain but also in the 'leucine-zipper'-like motifs located at the C-terminal side of the catalytic domain. The structural divergence between MUK and MEKK reveals the multiplicity of signaling pathways that activate JNK/SAPKs.

  • 39.
    Oscarson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Actual and Perceived Information Systems Security2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As the Internet becomes the major information infrastructure in most sectors, the importance of Information Systems (IS) security steadily increases. While reaching a certain level of actual IS security is vital for most businesses, this level must also be perceived as acceptable by stakeholders. Businesses have to maintain a certain level of security and be able to assess the level of other actors’ security. IS security is abstract and complex, however, and difficult to estimate and measure. This thesis uses epistemic and ontological frameworks to study the conceptual nature of IS security and separate the concepts of actual and perceived IS security. A well-known event is used to illustrate the conceptual discussion: the Sasser worm that was spread around the world in 2004. This study also includes a smaller case study from the City of Stockholm, where about 4,000 computers were infected by Sasser.

    The outcome of the study is that actual IS security should be treated as a dynamic condition that is influenced by three different objects: information assets, threat objects and security mechanisms. Incidents are processes that are ruled by the conditions of these three objects and affect the states of confidentiality, integrity and availability of information assets. The concepts of threat, risk and trust remain at epistemic level, i.e. perceptions. Perceptions of IS security can differ depending on their social establishment and are classified as subjective judgements, inter-subjective judgements or institutional facts. While actual IS security conditions can influence actors’ perceptions of IS security, perceived IS security can also influence actual IS security.

  • 40.
    Suhonen, Riitta
    et al.
    University of Turku.
    Berg, Agneta
    University of Kristianstad.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalafati, Maria
    University of Athens.
    Katajisto, Jouko
    University of Turku.
    Land, Lucy
    Birmingham City University.
    Lemonidou, Chryssoula
    University of Athens.
    A Schmidt, Lee
    Loyola University.
    Valimaki, Maritta
    University of Turku.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    University of Turku.
    Adapting the Individualized Care Scale for cross-cultural comparison2010In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF CARING SCIENCES, ISSN 0283-9318, Vol. 24, no 2, 392-403 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: Cross-cultural comparative studies using reliable and valid instruments can increase awareness of the differences and similarities between health workers ability to respond to patients individual needs within different health systems. This will enable a better understanding of cultural perspectives in individualized nursing care. Aim: To describe the translation and adaptation process of the Individualized Care Scale (ICS) and examine its reliability and validity in a cross-cultural study. Design: A cross-sectional comparative study. Settings: Twenty-seven orthopaedic and trauma in-patient units at 14 hospitals in 5 countries. Participants: A total of 1126 patients were included in the study: Finland (n = 425), Greece (n = 315), Sweden (n = 218), UK (n = 135) and USA (n = 33). Methods: A systematic forward-and back-translation procedure using bilingual techniques, a committee approach, pretest techniques and pilot testing were used with a convenience sample to produce a valid ICS for each participating group. Psychometric evaluation of the adapted ICS was based on means, SD, missing data analysis, Cronbachs alpha coefficients and average inter-item correlations. Construct validity was examined using sub-scale correlations to total scales and principal components analysis. Results: The use of the range of options and the sub-scale mean scores ranging from 2.72 to 4.30 demonstrated the sensitivity of the scale. Cronbachs alpha coefficients (0.77-0.97) and average inter-item correlations (0.37-0.77) were acceptable. The sub-scale correlations to total scales were high (0.83-0.97). The underlying theoretical construct of the ICS was demonstrated by the explained variances ranging from 58% to 79%. Conclusions: The ICS shows promise as a tool for evaluating individualized care in European cultures. The international expansion of an existing instrument developed for one country facilitates comparative studies across countries. There is a need to further test the construct validity and appropriateness of the ICS in different settings in European and nonwestern cultures.

  • 41.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sharatchandra, H. C.
    Karnataka State Pollut Control Board, India.
    Addressing urban water scarcity: reduce, treat and reuse - the third generation of management to avoid local resources boundaries2017In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 19, no 5, 978-996 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban growth leads to geographically concentrated demand for water and food -and to growing volumes of wastewater and organic waste. Left unattended by city authorities, both local and planetary resources boundaries for water and nutrients will be transgressed. A novel partly dynamic flexible water balance is developed to explore ways to address a looming water crisis. A systems-based flow chart shows how rainwater, groundwater and recycled water interact. Measures from supply-, demand-, and reuse management are combined to manipulate the water flows. Water management in Bangalore, India, focused on supply management over the period 1964 to 2015, tapping distant rivers. This mind-set was challenged by a Water Disputes Tribunal and international financiers. Residents and industry were losing faith in the erratic water supply, and met part or all their water needs by digging or drilling wells. The flexible water balance is tested on Bangalore for the year 2050 when the population has increased from 8 to 20 million. New housing complexes can provide opportunities for effective arrangements to recycle water and nutrients, save energy, and reduce water pollution and air emissions. The flexible water balance indicates that Bangaloreans can get enough household water without tapping river water and still recharge groundwater.

  • 42.
    Fornäs, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden.
    Advancing Cultural Studies in Sweden: An Infrastructural Initiative2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Societal changes make culture increasingly central but also problematise it. New per-spectives are needed to meet these challenges. The international field of cultural studies is a promising effort to answer these challenges and vitalise cultural research. Sweden may make a significant and indeed unique contribution to this effort, but im-portant steps remain to be taken with this purpose. One such step would be to install a new national-international research institute on a higher level, in order to connect disciplines, universities and regions, and push innovative developments forward.

    Against such a background, this report leads up to an outline of a proposed new Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden (ACSIS). This is yet only a proposal, writ-ten at a time when ACSIS yet only exists as an imaginary utopia – though living with an extraordinary vitality in the minds of a wide intellectual network of committed scholars. Funding is presently being sought for, but it is not yet decided in what exact manner the ideas presented here will eventually be made real. The formulation of tasks, organisation and budget is thus yet a hypothetical model.

    Still, this bold adventure has reached a long way since its first inception. The ACSIS has long been an attractive dream for me and for many of my colleagues among cultural researchers. It is a very great pleasure to see the plans crystallised thus far, as the journey towards an ACSIS has reached its last and decisive phase.

    The report results from a committee work funded by the Bank of Sweden Tercen-tenary Foundation (Riksbankens jubileumsfond), and the Swedish Council for Re-search in the Humanities and Social Sciences (Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga forskningsrådet). I had the great pleasure to work together with Svante Beckman, Ulf Hannerz, Lisbeth Larsson, Britta Lundgren, Orvar Löfgren, Ove Sernhede and Ulf Lindberg, and was reliably assisted by Åsa Bäckström. The group started working in January 2000, with a series of working meetings. Each member of the group has also had intense discussions of the basic ideas with other Swedish and international scholars, in meetings and by personal communication.

    Many therefore deserve warm thanks for making this report possible. The material and mental support by the two research funding bodies was essential, as was the generous and always stimulating collaboration in the committee. Linköping Univer-sity and the City of Norrköping have been overwhelmingly supportive towards this unique proposal, further strengthening our faith in its potential. We are also grateful to all those many Swedish and foreign researchers with whom these ideas have been discussed. The National Institute for Working Life programme for Work and Culture in Norrköping was a most hospitable host for this whole planning project.

  • 43.
    Sultan, Zahid
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Agenda 21 As A Tool For Implementing An Improved Traffic Environment And Safety For Developing Countries, A Case Study of Faisalabad, Pakistan2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Agenda 21 deals with the sustainability and sustainable transportation strategies are those that can meet the basic mobility needs of all and be sustained into the foreseeable future without destruction of our resource base. In the developing countries transportation is one of the main growing crisis. This crisis is the product of multiple forces, including the rapid pace of urbanisation and a mismatch between the supply of transportation infrastructure, services, and technologies and the mobility needs of the majority of the people, whose incomes are very low. Transportation development policies and investments in most developing countries are focused on encouraging motorization and are indifferent or hostile to low-cost, informal, nonmotorised transportation modes, despite the vital role they play in mobility for lower-income groups.

    My main focus in this study is Asian developing countries, one country – Pakistan – is selected as an example and 3rd largest city in Pakistan named Faisalabad is selected for detailed study. Transportation scenario and problems in this city are closely observed and studied which lead to interesting findings and facts. These include congestion index, loss in working hours, average speed, expenses and commuter satisfaction. Sustainable transportation and environmental problems are also studied for the City of Faisalabad, and recommendations made to improve them. It is finally inferred that there is an urgent need for comprehensive transportation planning, managing Kachi Abadies population, curbing private vehicle use and effectively facilitating the public transportation in the City of Faisalabad.

    Keywords: Sustainable Transportation; Agenda 21; Traffic Safety; Environmental Problem; Developing Countries; Transportation Problems in Faisalabad, Pakistan; Indicators of sustainability;

  • 44.
    Jung, Seungyoun
    et al.
    Harvard TH Chan School Public Heatlh, MA USA; University of Maryland, MD 21201 USA.
    Wang, Molin
    Harvard TH Chan School Public Heatlh, MA USA; Harvard TH Chan School Public Heatlh, MA USA.
    Anderson, Kristin
    University of Minnesota, MN USA; University of Minnesota, MN USA.
    Baglietto, Laura
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden; Central Hospital Vasteras, Sweden.
    Bernstein, Leslie
    Beckman Research Institute, CA USA; City Hope National Medical Centre, CA 91010 USA.
    van den Brandt, Piet A.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Brinton, Louise
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Buring, Julie E.
    Harvard TH Chan School Public Heatlh, MA USA; Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Eliassen, A. Heather
    Harvard TH Chan School Public Heatlh, MA USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA USA; Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Falk, Roni
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Amer Cancer Soc, GA 30329 USA.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Cancer Council Victoria, Australia; University of Melbourne, Australia.
    Goodman, Gary
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, WA 98104 USA.
    Hoffman-Bolton, Judith
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Heatlh, MD USA.
    Horn-Ross, Pamela L.
    Cancer Prevent Institute Calif, CA USA.
    Inoue, Manami
    National Cancer Centre, Japan; University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Kolonel, Laurence N.
    University of Hawaii, HI 96822 USA.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Maas, Paige
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Miller, Anthony B.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Neuhouser, Marian L.
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, WA 98104 USA.
    Park, Yikyung
    Washington University, MO 63110 USA.
    Robien, Kim
    George Washington University, DC USA.
    Rohan, Thomas E.
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, NY 10467 USA.
    Scarmo, Stephanie
    NYU, NY USA.
    Schouten, Leo J.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Sieri, Sabina
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Stevens, Victoria L.
    Amer Cancer Soc, GA 30329 USA.
    Tsugane, Schoichiro
    National Cancer Centre, Japan.
    Visvanathan, Kala
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Public Heatlh, MD USA.
    Wilkens, Lynne R.
    University of Hawaii, HI 96822 USA.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Tromso, Norway; Cancer Registry Norway, Norway; Folkhalsan Research Centre, Finland.
    Willett, Walter C.
    Harvard TH Chan School Public Heatlh, MA USA; Harvard TH Chan School Public Heatlh, MA USA; Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA USA; Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne
    NYU, NY USA.
    Zhang, Shumin M.
    Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Zhang, Xuehong
    Brigham and Womens Hospital, MA USA; Harvard Medical Sch, MA USA.
    Ziegler, Regina G.
    NCI, MD 20892 USA.
    Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.
    Harvard TH Chan School Public Heatlh, MA USA.
    Alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor status: in a pooled analysis of 20 studies2016In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 45, no 3, 916-928 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Breast cancer aetiology may differ by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Associations of alcohol and folate intakes with risk of breast cancer defined by ER status were examined in pooled analyses of the primary data from 20 cohorts. Methods: During a maximum of 6-18 years of follow-up of 1 089 273 women, 21 624 ER+ and 5113 ER- breast cancers were identified. Study-specific multivariable relative risks (RRs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models and then combined using a random-effects model. Results: Alcohol consumption was positively associated with risk of ER+ and ER- breast cancer. The pooled multivariable RRs (95% confidence intervals) comparing amp;gt;= 30 g/d with 0 g/day of alcohol consumption were 1.35 (1.23-1.48) for ER+ and 1.28 (1.10-1.49) for ER+ breast cancer (P-trend amp;lt;= 0.001; Pcommon-effects by ER status: 0.57). Associations were similar for alcohol intake from beer, wine and liquor. The associations with alcohol intake did not vary significantly by total (from foods and supplements) folate intake (P-interaction amp;gt;= 0.26). Dietary (from foods only) and total folate intakes were not associated with risk of overall, ER+ and ER- breast cancer; pooled multivariable RRs ranged from 0.98 to 1.02 comparing extreme quintiles. Following-up US studies through only the period before mandatory folic acid fortification did not change the results. The alcohol and folate associations did not vary by tumour subtypes defined by progesterone receptor status. Conclusions: Alcohol consumption was positively associated with risk of both ER+ and ER- breast cancer, even among women with high folate intake. Folate intake was not associated with breast cancer risk.

  • 45.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy: Prevalence, predictors and prevention2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well established that fetal alcohol exposure can disturb the development of the fetus and cause a range of effects for the affected child. However, research on the effects of exposure to lower levels is inconclusive and the subject is debated. Based on the precautionary principle women in many countries, Sweden included, are advised to maintain total abstinence throughout pregnancy. Regardless, studies have shown that a significant proportion of women consume alcohol around conception and throughout pregnancy. The overall aim of this thesis was to generate knowledge about the prevalence, predictors and prevention of alcohol consumption among women before and during pregnancy.

    The aim was addressed in five studies using several datasets and methods. A systematic review of the international literature was undertaken to identify predictors of alcohol consumption during pregnancy (Study I). Questionnaires to midwives were used to investigate the alcohol-preventive work in antenatal care in Sweden (Study II). Questionnaires were also used to gather data on alcohol consumption before and during pregnancy from pregnant women across Sweden and from women who had given birth to a child in one area of Sweden (Study III and IV). Focus group interviews were used to assess non-pregnant women’s voices on alcohol consumption and pregnancy in Sweden (Study V).

    The results from the studies showed that alcohol consumption was common among women of childbearing age in Sweden (Study III-V) and that there were social expectations for women to drink (Study V). During pregnancy, the expectation was the opposite, as pregnant women were expected to abstain from all alcohol consumption (Study V), which is in line with the total abstinence recommendation from antenatal care. The national “Risk Drinking” project led to revised alcohol-preventive routines in Swedish antenatal care, including screening of all pregnant women for hazardous alcohol use in the year preceding pregnancy, an important predictor of drinking during pregnancy (Study II). A great majority of pregnant women and new mothers reported abstinence from alcohol after pregnancy recognition (Study III and IV), yet the level of reported alcohol consumption during pregnancy appeared to be affected by formulation of the question (Study IV). Factors associated with more drinking during pregnancy in Sweden were: living in a major city, older maternal age, tobacco use, low social support, stronger pre-pregnancy drinking habits and stronger social drinking motives (Study III). In the international research, pre-pregnancy drinking habits, exposure to abuse or violence, high income or social class and positive screen for dependence were the factors most consistently reported to be associated with more drinking during pregnancy (Study I). Women of childbearing age were uncertain about the potential effects of drinking in the period around conception and the social expectations to abstain did not seem to be as strong in this period as after pregnancy  recognition (Study V). A majority of women reported having reduced their alcohol consumption only after they became aware that they are pregnant, meaning that they could have been dinking for several weeks in early pregnancy (Study III).

    List of papers
    1. Predictors of Drinking During Pregnancy: A Systematic Review
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of Drinking During Pregnancy: A Systematic Review
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1540-9996, E-ISSN 1931-843X, Vol. 20, no 6, 901-913 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many pregnant women continue to drink alcohol despite clinical recommendations and public health campaigns about the risks associated with alcohol use during pregnancy. This review examines the predictors of prenatal alcohol use, with the long-term goal of developing more effective preventive efforts. Methods: A literature search of several databases for relevant articles was undertaken. Studies were included if they occurred in the context of antenatal care, collected data during the womans pregnancy (between 1999 and 2009), investigated predictors of any drinking, had a population-based orientation (e. g., did not focus only on high-risk drinkers), and were published in English in a scientific peer-reviewed journal between 1999 and 2009. Results: Fourteen studies published between 2002 and 2009 fulfilled the inclusion criteria (United States, 4; Europe, 4; Australia and New Zealand, 3; Japan, 2; and Uganda, 1). The predictors of prenatal alcohol use most consistently identified were prepregnancy alcohol consumption and having been abused or exposed to violence. Less consistent predictors of drinking during pregnancy were high income/social class and positive dependence screen. Unemployment, marital status, and education level were examined in many studies but found to be predictive only infrequently. Conclusions: Womens prepregnancy alcohol consumption (i.e., quantity and frequency of typical drinking) and exposure to abuse or violence were consistently associated with drinking during pregnancy. Antenatal care providers should assess these factors for improved detection of women at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., 2011
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69901 (URN)10.1089/jwh.2010.2216 (DOI)000291590700010 ()
    Note

    Original Publication: Janna Skagerstrom, Grace Chang and Per Nilsen, Predictors of Drinking During Pregnancy: A Systematic Review, 2011, Journal of Women's Health, (20), 6, 901-913. http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2010.2216 Copyright: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. http://www.liebertpub.com/

    Available from: 2011-08-09 Created: 2011-08-08 Last updated: 2015-10-30
    2. Towards improved alcohol prevention in Swedish antenatal care?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards improved alcohol prevention in Swedish antenatal care?
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 28, no 3, 314-320 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to evaluate an education effort and revised alcohol-preventive routine in Swedish antenatal care; to generate more knowledge for further development of alcohol issues in antenatal care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: two national cross-sectional surveys of Swedish midwives were conducted. Baseline data were collected in 2006 and follow-up data in 2009. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting: antenatal care centres in Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanParticipants: 974 midwives in 2006 and 1108 midwives in 2009. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMeasurement: amount and content of continuing professional education, work with alcohol-related issues, identification of women with risky consumption of alcohol, and action after identifying women with risky consumption. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFindings: the amount of continuing professional education undertaken by midwives on handling risky drinking increased significantly between 2006 and 2009. The routine to detect risky drinking changed between the baseline and follow-up data collection, as nearly all midwives reported the use of an alcohol screening questionnaire in 2009. The most confident midwives in 2009 had taken part in more days of education, more often stated it was their own initiative to participate, and had more often taken part in education regarding MI, provision of advice and information on the health risks associated with alcohol and, screening. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanKey conclusions: our results indicate that a broad, national education effort can be successful in enhancing knowledge and changing antenatal care practice. However, generalisation to other countries or cultures may be limited because the usage of new routines is affected by many organisational and contextual factors.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2012
    Keyword
    Antenatal care, Alcohol, Education
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78573 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2011.04.008 (DOI)000304441400006 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish National Institute of Public health||

    Available from: 2012-06-15 Created: 2012-06-15 Last updated: 2015-10-30
    3. Prevalence of alcohol use before and during pregnancy and predictors of drinking during pregnancy: a cross sectional study in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of alcohol use before and during pregnancy and predictors of drinking during pregnancy: a cross sectional study in Sweden
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, no 780Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is a paucity of research on predictors for drinking during pregnancy among women in Sweden and reported prevalence rates differ considerably between studies conducted at different antenatal care centres. Since this knowledge is relevant for preventive work the aim of this study was to investigate these issues using a multicenter approach.

    Methods

    The study was conducted at 30 antenatal care centers across Sweden from November 2009 to December 2010. All women in pregnancy week 18 or more with a scheduled visit were asked to participate in the study. The questionnaire included questions on sociodemographic data, alcohol consumption prior to and during the pregnancy, tobacco use before and during pregnancy, and social support.

    Results

    Questionnaires from 1594 women were included in the study. A majority, 84%, of the women reported alcohol consumption the year prior to pregnancy; about 14% were categorized as having hazardous consumption, here defined as a weekly consumption of > 9 standard drinks containing 12 grams of pure alcohol or drinking more than 4 standard drinks at the same occasion. Approximately 6% of the women consumed alcohol at least once after pregnancy recognition, of which 92% never drank more than 1 standard drink at a time. Of the women who were hazardous drinkers before pregnancy, 19% reduced their alcohol consumption when planning their pregnancy compared with 33% of the women with moderate alcohol consumption prior to pregnancy. Factors predicting alcohol consumption during pregnancy were older age, living in a large city, using tobacco during pregnancy, lower score for social support, stronger alcohol habit before pregnancy and higher score for social drinking motives.

    Conclusions

    The prevalence of drinking during pregnancy is relatively low in Sweden. However, 84% of the women report drinking in the year preceding pregnancy and most of these women continue to drink until pregnancy recognition, which means that they might have consumed alcohol in early pregnancy. Six factors were found to predict alcohol consumption during pregnancy. These factors should be addressed in the work to prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97660 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-13-780 (DOI)000323754500003 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish National Institute of Public Health||

    Available from: 2013-09-19 Created: 2013-09-19 Last updated: 2015-10-30
    4. Asking about alcohol consumption during pregnancy: how prevalence rate is affected by the formulation of the question
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asking about alcohol consumption during pregnancy: how prevalence rate is affected by the formulation of the question
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of alcohol consumption during pregnancy in Sweden have reported prevalence rates from 6% to 30%. The reason for these differences is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare how alcohol consumption is reported by pregnant women when asked explicitly to report drinking after pregnancy recognition compared with asking about drinking during pregnancy without stating if the time before pregnancy recognition should be included. Data were collected from two groups of women. The women in group A were asked to estimate their alcohol consumption during pregnancy and the women in group B were asked to estimate their alcohol consumption during pregnancy, after pregnancy recognition. There was a significant difference in the reported prevalence rate between the cohorts: 9.3% in cohort A (n=1041) and 6.8% in cohort B (n=933). The results from this study may explain some of the variations in previously reported prevalence rates. To be able to compare different studies, it is important to be clear about the methodological aspects.

    Keyword
    Prevalence rate, alcohol consumption, pregnancy
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122373 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-10-30 Created: 2015-10-30 Last updated: 2015-10-30Bibliographically approved
    5. The voice of non-pregnant women on alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a focus group study among women in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The voice of non-pregnant women on alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a focus group study among women in Sweden
    2015 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, 1193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Consensus is that fetal exposure to alcohol is harmful. Abstinence while trying to conceive and throughout pregnancy is recommended. Despite this, there are many women who consume alcohol around conception and until pregnancy recognition. The aim of this study was to explore the voice of non-pregnant women concerning alcohol consumption and its relation to pregnancy.

    Methods: Data were collected through seven focus groups interviews with 34 women of fertile age, who were neither pregnant nor mothers. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken, recorded and transcribed verbatim and then analysed using thematic analysis.

    Results: Three main themes were identified in the analysis: an issue that cannot be ignored; awareness and uncertainty concerning alcohol and pregnancy; and transition to parenthood. Alcohol was an integral part of the women’s lives. A societal expectation to drink alcohol was prevalent and the women used different strategies to handle this expectation. Most women agreed not to drink alcohol during pregnancy although their knowledge on the specific consequences was scanty and they expressed a need for more information. Most of the participants found drinking alcohol during pregnancy to be irresponsible and saw pregnancy as a start of a new way of life.

    Conclusions: Social expectations concerning women’s alcohol use change with pregnancy when women are suddenly expected to abstain. Although most study participants shared an opinion for zero tolerance during pregnancy, their knowledge regarding consequences of drinking during pregnancy were sparse. In order for prospective mothers to make informed choices, there is a need for public health initiatives providing information on the relationship between alcohol consumption and reproduction.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2015
    Keyword
    Alcohol consumption, Pregnancy, Fertile age, Pregnancy planning, Health education, Focus group
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122374 (URN)10.1186/s12889-015-2519-2 (DOI)000365477300002 ()
    Note

    On the day of the defence day the status of this article was Manuscript.

    Funding agencies: Systembolaget Alcohol Research Council (Systembolagets alkoholforskningsrad)

    Available from: 2015-10-30 Created: 2015-10-30 Last updated: 2016-02-24Bibliographically approved
  • 46.
    Amirijoo, Mehdi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, RTSLAB - Real-Time Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hansson, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, RTSLAB - Real-Time Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Son, Sang H
    University of Virginia.
    Algorithms for managing QoS for real-time data services using imprecise computation2004In: Real-Time and Embedded Computing Systems and Applications 9th International Conference, RTCSA 2003, Tainan City, Taiwan, February 18-20, 2003. Revised Papers / [ed] Jing Chen and Seongsoo Hong, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2004, Vol. 2968, 136-157 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lately the demand for real-time data services has increased in applications where it is desirable to process user requests within their deadlines using fresh data. The real-time data services are usually provided by a real-time database (RTDB). Here, since the workload of the RTDBs cannot be precisely predicted, RTDBs can become overloaded. As a result, deadline misses and freshness violations may occur. To address this problem we propose a QoS-sensitive approach to guarantee a set of requirements on the behavior of RTDBs. Our approach is based on imprecise computation, applied on both data and transactions. We propose two algorithms to dynamically balance the workload and the quality of the data and transactions. Performance evaluations show that our algorithms give a robust and controlled behavior of RTDBs, in terms of transaction and data quality, even for transient overloads and with inaccurate run-time estimates of the transactions.

  • 47.
    Adeniji, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Alla säger I Love You. Om orden som gör känslor och känsliga formuleringar.2007In: Bang : feministisk kulturtidskrift, ISSN 1102-4593, Vol. 3, 91-93 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln handlar om hur orden "jag älskar dig" respektive "I love you" får betydelse både personligt, socialt och politiskt. Exempel hämtas från tv-serierna "Förhäxad" och "Sex and the City" och författaren resonerar kring hur orden skapar affektiva betydelser i kropp och genuspositioner. 

  • 48.
    Larsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundgren, Jan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems.
    Peterson, Anders
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems.
    Allocation of Link Flow Detectors for Origin-Destination Matrix Estimation-A Comparative Study2010In: COMPUTER-AIDED CIVIL AND INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING, ISSN 1093-9687, Vol. 25, no 2, 116-131 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Origin-destination (OD) matrices are essential for various analyses in the field of traffic planning, and they are often estimated from link flow observations. We compare methods for allocating link flow detectors to a traffic network with respect to the quality of the estimated OD-matrix. First, an overview of allocation methods proposed in the literature is presented. Second, we construct a controlled experimental environment where any allocation method can be evaluated, and compared to others, in terms of the quality of the estimated OD-matrix. Third, this environment is used to evaluate and compare three fundamental allocation methods. Studies are made on the Sioux Falls network and on a network modeling the city of Linkoping. Our conclusion is, that the most commonly studied approach for detector allocation, maximizing the coverage of OD-pairs, seems to be unfavorable for the quality of the estimated OD-matrix.

  • 49.
    Peña, Jose M.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alternative Markov and Causal Properties for Acyclic Directed Mixed Graphs2016In: Proceedings of the 32nd Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI 2016), 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Pasha, Imtiyaz
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Ambulance management system using GIS2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Magister), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For emergency service providers, giving their service in least time shows their best performance. Emergency hospitals will be at their best if the ambulance reaches the site in Golden hour where life of injured persons can be saved. Ambulance uses the road network to reach the accident site. Today there are many GIS based systems being developed for routing of ambulance using GPS and other real-time technologies. These systems are useful and play a major role in solving the routing problem. But now roads are so congested that it difficult for the Ambulance drivers to travel and reach the accident.

    In this thesis present study area is studied and problems faced by emergency service providers on road network are identified. In this thesis GIS/GPS/GSM based prototype system has been developed for routing of ambulance on road network of Hyderabad city (AMS). This prototype is designed such that it finds the accident location on the road network and locates the nearest ambulance to incident site using the real-time technologies (GPS/GSM). AMS creates the fastest route from nearest ambulance to accident site, and from there to nearest hospital. Congestion on roads during peak hours is considered, and the fastest route on both major and minor roads is created.

    In this thesis AMS user interface has been developed using VBA, ArcGIS (network analyst). This Ambulance management system has been developed using software engineering model rapid prototyping model and has been evaluated by GIS users

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