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  • 1.
    Eklöf, Motzi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    1: a internationella kongressen om evidensbaserad komplementär medicin2000In: Prosana : egenvård. Vetenskapligt visad., ISSN 1401-3444, no 2, 32-33 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Levi, Richard
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Carlberg, Lena
    Träff, Catrine
    Råsten, Malin
    West, Staffan
    115 frågor och svar om MS: Rehab Station Stockholm2007Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3. Khan, Tanweera
    et al.
    Sundin, Anders
    Juhlin, Claes
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Långström, Bengt
    Bergström, Mats
    Eriksson, Barbro
    11C-metomidate PET imaging of adrenocortical cancer2003In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, Vol. 30, 403-410 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Lundberg, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radio Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Ekblad, Alf
    Nilsson, Mats
    13C NMR spectroscopy studies of forest soil microbial activity: Glucose uptake and fatty acid biosynthesis2001In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, Vol. 33, no 4-5, 621-632 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intimate association of soil microorganisms with the soil matrix complicates analysis of their metabolism, since thorough separation of intact cells from the matrix is very difficult using standard protocols. Thus, in the study reported here, in situ glucose decomposition and metabolism in humus from a coniferous forest soil was monitored and evaluated using 'solution state' 13C NMR, which can be used in a non-invasive manner. [U-13C] glucose was added at a concentration of 1.73 mmol C g-1 dry organic matter, which is known to allow maximal substrate induced respiration (SIR), and the microbial metabolism of the added C was followed over a period of 28 days. The data showed that ~50% of the added glucose was consumed within three days, coinciding with the appearance of label in CH3, -CH2- and -CH = CH-groups, and in glycerol-carbons, suggesting that olefinic triacylglycerols were being formed, probably located in oil droplets. During days two to three, around 40% of the consumed glucose C was allocated into solid state components, about 40% was respired and about 20% was found as triglycerols. The triacylglycerol signal reached a maximum after 13 days, but subsequently declined by 60%, as the triacylglycerols were apparently consumed, by day 28 of the incubation. Our results indicate there was an initial formation of structural microbial C (solid state carbon) followed by formation of storage lipid C, which subsequently decreased, probably because it was used to provide the organisms with energy when the external energy source (i.e. the glucose) was depleted. The formation of unsaturated triacylglycerols, typical storage metabolites of eucaryotes, suggests that fungi were the most active organisms in the glucose degradation. ⌐ 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  • 5.
    Holmbom, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Giske, Christian G.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.; Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Östholm Balkhed, Åse
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Claesson, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    14-Year Survey in a Swedish County Reveals a Pronounced Increase in Bloodstream Infections (BSI). Comorbidity: An Independent Risk Factor for Both BSI and Mortality2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: we assessed the incidence, risk factors and outcome of BSI over a 14-year period (2000-2013) in a Swedish county.

    Methods: retrospective cohort study on culture confirmed BSI among patients in the county of Östergötland, Sweden, with approximately 440,000 inhabitants. A BSI was defined as either community-onset BSI (CO-BSI) or hospital-acquired BSI (HA-BSI).

    Results: of a total of 11,480 BSIs, 67% were CO-BSI and 33% HA-BSI. The incidence of BSI increased by 64% from 945 to 1,546 per 100,000 hospital admissions per year during the study period. The most prominent increase, 83% was observed within the CO-BSI cohort whilst HA-BSI increased by 32%. Prescriptions of antibiotics in outpatient care decreased with 24% from 422 to 322 prescriptions dispensed/1,000 inhabitants/year, whereas antibiotics prescribed in hospital increased by 67% (from 424 to 709 DDD per 1,000 days of care). The overall 30-day mortality for HA-BSIs was 17.2%, compared to 10.6% for CO-BSIs, with an average yearly increase per 100,000 hospital admissions of 2 and 5% respectively. The proportion of patients with one or more comorbidities, increased from 20.8 to 55.3%. In multivariate analyses, risk factors for mortality within 30 days were: HA-BSI (2.22); two or more comorbidities (1.89); single comorbidity (1.56); CO-BSI (1.21); male (1.05); and high age (1.04).

    Conclusion: this survey revealed an alarming increase in the incidence of BSI over the 14-year study period. Interventions to decrease BSI in general should be considered together with robust antibiotic stewardship programmes to avoid both over- and underuse of antibiotics.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Line
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Norregaard, Rikke
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    15-Deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) Exerts Antioxidant Effects While Exacerbating Inflammation in Mice Subjected to Ureteral Obstruction2017In: Mediators of Inflammation, ISSN 0962-9351, E-ISSN 1466-1861, 3924912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urinary obstruction is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to renal dysfunction. Previous studies have shown that 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) has both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Using a unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) mouse model, we examined the effects of 15d-PGJ(2) on oxidative stress and inflammation in the kidney. Mice were subjected to UUO for 3 days and treated with 15d-PGJ(2). Protein and RNA expression were examined using immunoblotting and qPCR. 15d-PGJ(2) increased NF-E2-related nuclear factor erythroid-2 (Nrf2) protein expression in response to UUO, and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a downstream target of Nrf2, was induced by 15d-PGJ(2). Additionally, 15d-PGJ(2) prevented protein carbonylation, a UUO-induced oxidative stress marker. Inflammation, measured by nuclear NF-kappa B, F4/80, and MCP-1, was increased in response to UUO and further increased by 15d-PGJ(2). Renal injury was aggravated by 15d-PGJ(2) treatment as measured by kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and cortical caspase 3 content. No effect of 15d-PGJ(2) was observed on renal function in mice subjected to UUO. This study illustrates differentiated functioning of 15d-PGJ(2) on inflammation and oxidative stress in response to obstructive nephropathy. High concentrations of 15d-PGJ(2) protects against oxidative stress during 3-day UUO in mice; however, it aggravates the associated inflammation.

  • 7.
    Browaldh, Nanna
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Friberg, Danielle
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Nerfeldt, Pia
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    15-year efficacy of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty based on objective and subjective data2011In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, Vol. 131, no 12, 1303-1310 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusions: This follow-up showed a stable and significant decrease in median oxygen desaturation index 4% (ODI(4)) values over the years. Approximately two-thirds of the patients fulfilled the success criteria (ODI4 reduction of 50% and andlt;20) after 15 years. A majority had improved/cured excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and were satisfied. No increased mortality rate was seen. Objectives: To evaluate sleep apnoea recordings and symptoms in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome 15 years after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) compared to baseline and previous follow-ups. Methods: This was a non-randomized, prospective intervention study on 50 patients who underwent UPPP during 1985-88. Their initial median age was 49 years (range 38-71) and ODI4 was 26.5 (4-82). Results: In all, 13 patients had died; 26 patients underwent sleep apnoea recordings. Median ODI4 had decreased from 26.5 (range 4-82) to 8.5 (0-60), p andlt; 0.01, a mean reduction of 52%; 65% of patients achieved the success criteria. One-third was objectively categorized as non-snorers. Median body mass index was unchanged. The questionnaires were answered by 32 of 37 patients; 88% reported improved or cured EDS and 78% were satisfied. Pharyngeal disturbances ratings were low. The standardized mortality rate did not differ from the general Swedish population.

  • 8.
    Kallstrom, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hospital.
    Salme, Rebecka
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jonsson, Per-Ebbe
    Helsingborg Hospital.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    17 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 as predictor of tamoxifen response in premenopausal breast cancer2010In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, ISSN 0959-8049, Vol. 46, no 5, 892-900 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    17 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSDs) are involved in the local regulation of sex steroids. 17HSD1 converts oestrone (El) to the more potent oestradiol (E2) and 17HSD2 catalyses the reverse reaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of these enzymes in premenopausal breast cancers and to analyse if they have any prognostic or tamoxifen predictive value. Premenopausal patients with invasive breast cancer, stage II (UICC), were randomised to either 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen (n = 276) or no tamoxifen (n = 288). The median follow-up was 13.9 years (range 10.5-17.5). The expression of 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 was analysed with immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. The enzyme expression level (-/+/++/+++) was successfully determined in 396 and 373 tumours, respectively. Women with hormone-receptor positive tumours, with low levels (-/+/++) of 17HSD1, had a 43% reduced risk of recurrence, when treated with tamoxifen (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37-0.86; p = 0.0086). On the other hand high expression (+++) of 17HSD1 was associated with no significant difference between the two treatment arms (HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.43-1.95; p = 0.82). The interaction between 17HSD1 and tamoxifen was significant during the first 5 years of follow-up (p = 0.023). In the cohort of systemically untreated patients no prognostic importance was observed for 17HSD1. We found no predictive or prognostic value for 17HSD2. This is the first report of 17HSD1 in a cohort of premenopausal women with breast cancer randomised to tamoxifen. Our data suggest that 17HSD1 might be a predictive factor in this group of patients.

  • 9.
    Jansson , Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    17Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes and breast cancer2009In: JOURNAL OF STEROID BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, ISSN 0960-0760 , Vol. 114, no 1-2, 64-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex steroids play an important role in the development and differentiation in several tissues. Biologically active hormones that are locally converted in endocrine organs in the tissue where they exert their effects without release into extracellular space is a field of endocrinology that has been called intracrinology. In pre-menopausal women the ovary is the main source of estrogens, but in post-menopausal women the estrogen production as main site of synthesis moves to peripheral tissues and almost all of the sex steroids are synthesised from precursors of adrenal origin. In breast cancer 60-80% of the tumors express high levels of oestrogen receptor (ER) alpha which gives estrogen a proliferative effect. Breast tumors tend to have a higher intratumoral estrogen concentration than normal breast tissue and plasma, and in situ synthesis and the metabolism of estrogens is believed to be of great importance for the development and progression of the disease. The activity of estrogen metabolizing enzymes in breast are mainly aromatase, estrone sulfatases and 17HSD enzymes. 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 are the family members known to be of main importance in breast cancer. High expression of 17HSD1 has been associated to poor prognosis in breast cancer and late relapse among patients with ER-positive tumors. One of the mechanisms behind high 17HSD1 expression is gene amplification. Low or absent expression of 17HSD2 is associated to decreased survival in ER-positive breast cancer. 17HSD14 is one of the latest discovered 17HSD enzymes, transfection of 17HSD14 in human breast cancer cells significantly decreased the levels of estradiol in the culture medium. Low expression of 17HSD14 mRNA expression in breast cancer was correlated to decreased survival.

    The understanding of intratumoral synthesis of sex steroids in breast cancer is crucial to understand the disease both in pre- and post-menopausal women. Further studies are desirable to state the direct role of these enzymes in breast cancer and which patients that may benefit from new therapeutic strategies targeting 17HSD enzymes. The new inhibitors targeting 17HSD1 have shown promising results in preclinical studies to have clinical potential in the future.

  • 10.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Cohen, Maja
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sivik, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 14 affects estradiol levels in breast cancer cells and is a prognostic marker in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer2006In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 66, no 23, 11471-11477 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estrogens have an important role in the progression of breast cancer. The 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) family has been identified to be of significance in hormone-dependent tissues. 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 are the main 17HSD enzymes involved in breast cancer investigated this far, but it is possible that other hormone-regulating enzymes have a similar role. 17HSD5 and 17HSD12 are associated with sex steroid metabolism, and 17HSD14 is a newly discovered enzyme that may be involved in the estrogen balance. The mRNA expression of 17HSD5, 17HSD12, and 17HSD14 were analyzed in 131 breast cancer specimens by semiquantitative real-time PCR. The results were compared with recurrence-free survival and breast cancer-specific survival of the patients. The breast cancer cell lines MCF7, SKBR3, and ZR75-1 were transiently transfected with 17HSD14 to investigate any possible effect on estradiol levels. We found that high 17HSD5 was related to significantly higher risk of late relapse in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients remaining recurrence-free later than 5 years after diagnosis (P = 0.02). No relation to 17HSD12 expression was found, indicating that 17HSD12 is of minor importance in breast cancer. Patients with ER-positive tumors with high expression levels of 17HSD14 showed a significantly better prognosis about recurrence-free survival (P = 0.008) as well as breast cancer-specific survival (P = 0.01), confirmed by multivariate analysis (P = 0.04). Transfection of 17HSD14 in the human breast cancer cells MCF7 and SKBR3 significantly decreased the levels of estradiol, presenting an effect of high expression levels of the enzyme. ©2006 American Association for Cancer Research.

  • 11.
    Sivik, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 14 is a predictive marker for tamoxifen response in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 7, e40568- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17βHSDs) are important enzymes regulating the pool of bioactive steroids in the breast. The current study was undertaken in order to evaluate implications of 17βHSD14 in breast cancer, measuring 17βHSD14 protein expression in breast tumours.

    Methods: An antibody targeting the 17βHSD14 antigen was generated and validated using HSD17B14-transfected cells and a peptide-neutralising assay. Tissue microarrays with tumours from 912 post-menopausal women diagnosed with lymph node-negative breast cancer, and randomised to adjuvant tamoxifen or no endocrine treatment, were analysed for 17βHSD14 protein expression with immunohistochemistry.

    Results: Results were obtained from 847 tumours. Patients with oestrogen positive tumours with high 17βHSD14 expression had fewer local recurrences when treated with tamoxifen (HR 0.38; 95% C.I. 0.19–0.77, p = 0.007) compared to patients with lower tumoural 17βHSD14 expression, for whom tamoxifen did not reduce the number of local recurrences (HR 1.19; 95% C.I. 0.54–2.59; p = 0.66). No prognostic importance of 17βHSD14 was seen for systemically untreated patients.

    Conclusions: Using a highly specific validated antibody for immunohistochemical analysis of a large number of breast tumours, we have shown that tumoural expression levels of 17βHSD14 can predict the outcome of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment in terms of local recurrence-free survival in patients with lymph node-negative ER+ breast cancer. The results need be verified to confirm any clinical relevance.

  • 12.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hellqvist, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in local oestrogen synthesis have prognostic significance in breast cancer2005In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 92, no 3, 547-552 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) enzymes are involved in the local regulation of sex steroids. The 17HSD type 1 enzyme catalyses the interconversion of the weak oestrone (E1) to the more potent oestradiol (E2), whereas 17HSD type 2 catalyses the oxidation of E2 to E1. The aim of this study was to correlate the expression of these enzymes in the tumour with the recurrence-free survival of tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients. We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to investigate the mRNA expression of 17HSD types 1 and 2 in tumour samples from 230 postmenopausal patients. For the patients with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, we found a statistically significant positive correlation between recurrence-free survival and expression of 17HSD type 2 (P = 0.026). We examined the ratio of 17HSD types 2 and 1, and ER-positive patients with low ratios showed a significantly higher rate of recurrence than those with higher ratios (P = 0.0047), ER positive patients with high expression levels of 17HSD type 1 had a significantly higher risk for late relapse (P = 0.0051). The expression of 17HSD types 1 and 2 in breast cancer differs from the expression of these enzymes in normal mammary gland, and this study indicates that the expression has prognostic significance in breast cancer.

  • 13.
    Wijma, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sjögren, Berit
    Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
    1900-talet och psykosocial obstetrik, gynekologi och sexologi2004In: Svensk kvinnosjukvård under ett sekel: [1904-2004 : jubileumsskrift] / [ed] Bo Lindberg, Stockholm: SFOG , 2004, -248 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Grindborg, J-E
    Stockholm.
    192-Ir source strength dosimetry audit in Sweden2007In: 9th Biennial ESTRO meeting on physics and radiation technology for clinical radiotherapy,2007, 2007, S143-S143 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Posters Brachytherapy, publicerad i Radiotherapy and Oncology.

  • 15.
    Lundberg, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Department of Biochemistry, University of Sydney, Australia.
    Dudman, Nicholas P.
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Prince Henry Hospital, University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Kuchel, Philip W.
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Sydney, Australia.
    Wilcken, David E. L.
    Present address: Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    1H NMR determination of urinary betaine in patients with premature vascular disease and mild homocysteinemia1995In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 41, no 2, 275-283 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urinary N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine) and N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) have been identified and quantified for clinical purposes by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) measurement in previous studies. We have assessed these procedures by using both one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D NMR spectroscopy, together with pH titration of urinary extracts to help assign 1H NMR spectral peaks. The betaine calibration curve linearity was excellent (r = 0.997, P = 0.0001) over the concentration range 0.2-1.2 mmol/L, and CVs for replicate betaine analyses ranged from 7% (n = 10) at the lowest concentration to 1% (n = 9) at the highest. The detection limit for betaine was < 15 mumol/L. Urinary DMG concentrations were substantially lower than those of betaine. Urinary betaine and DMG concentrations measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy from 13 patients with premature vascular disease and 17 normal controls provided clinically pertinent data. We conclude that 1H NMR provides unique advantages as a research tool for determination of urinary betaine and DMG concentrations.

  • 16.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    20 Things You Didn't Know About European Cardiac Nurses2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 4, 291-292 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Steinke, Elaine
    Wichita State University, KS, USA .
    20 Things You Didnt Know About Sex and Heart Disease2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 3, 207-208 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    du Bois, A
    et al.
    Department of Gynecology & Gynecologic Oncology, Wiesbaden, Germany..
    Quinn, M
    Thigpen, T
    Vermorken, J
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bookman, M
    Bowtell, D
    Brady, M
    Casado, A
    Cervantes, A
    Eisenhauer, E
    Friedlaender, M
    Fujiwara, K
    Grenman, S
    Guastalla, J P
    Harper, P
    Hogberg, T
    Kaye, S
    Kitchener, H
    Kristensen, G
    Mannel, R
    Meier, W
    Miller, B
    Neijt, J P
    Oza, A
    Ozols, R
    Parmar, M
    Pecorelli, S
    Pfisterer, J
    Poveda, A
    Provencher, D
    Pujade-Lauraine, E
    Randall, M
    Rochon, J
    Rustin, G
    Sagae, S
    Stehman, F
    Stuart, G
    Trimble, E
    Vasey, P
    Vergote, I
    Verheijen, R
    Wagner, U
    2004 consensus statements on the management of ovarian cancer: final document of the 3rd International Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (GCIG OCCC 2004).2005In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 16, no 8, viii7-viii12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. du Bois, A
    et al.
    Quinn, M
    Thigpen, T
    Vermorken, J
    Avall-Lundqvist, E
    Bookman, M
    Bowtell, D
    Brady, M
    Casado, A
    Cervantes, A
    Eisenhauer, E
    Friedlaender, M
    Fujiwara, K
    Grenman, S
    Guastalla, JP
    Harper, P
    Högberg, Thomas
    NSGO (Scandinavia).
    Kaye, S
    Kitchener, H
    Kristensen, G
    Mannel, R
    Meier, W
    Miller, B
    Neijt, JP
    Oza, S
    Ozols, R
    Parmar, M
    Pecorelli, S
    Pfisterer, J
    Poveda, A
    Provencher, D
    Pujade-Lauraine, E
    Randall, M
    Rochon, J
    Rustin, G
    Sagae, s
    Stehman, F
    Stuart, G
    Trimble, E
    Vasey, P
    Vergote, L
    Verheijen, R
    Wagner, U
    2004 consensus statements on the management of ovarian cancer: final document of the 3rd International Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (GCIG OCCC 2004)2005In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 16, no supplement 8, 36-38 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Diepenbrock, Stefan
    et al.
    University of Münster.
    Praßni, Jörg-Stefan
    University of Münster.
    Lindemann, Florian
    University of Münster.
    Bothe, Hans-Werner
    University Hospital Münster.
    Ropinski, Timo
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    2010 IEEE Visualization Contest Winner: Interactive Planning for Brain Tumor Resections2011In: IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, ISSN 0272-1716, E-ISSN 1558-1756, Vol. 31, no 5, 6-13 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 21.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy .
    Fagard, Robert
    University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof
    University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain .
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Boehm, Michael
    University of Saarlandes Kliniken, Germany .
    Christiaens, Thierry
    University of Ghent, Belgium .
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    De Backer, Guy
    University Hospital, Belgium .
    Dominiczak, Anna
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Galderisi, Maurizio
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy .
    Grobbee, Diederick E.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Laurent, Stephane
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France .
    Manolis, Athanasios J.
    Asklepe Gen Hospital, Greece .
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ruilope, Luis Miguel
    Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain .
    Schmieder, Roland E.
    University Hospital, Germany .
    Sirnes, Per Anton
    Ostlandske Hjertesenter, Norway .
    Sleight, Peter
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England .
    Viigimaa, Margus
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia .
    Waeber, Bernard
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland .
    Zannad, Faiez
    University of Lorraine, France .
    2013 ESH/ESC Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 28, -+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 22.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy .
    Fagard, Robert
    KU Leuven University, Belgium .
    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain .
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Boehm, Michael
    University of Klinikum Saarlandes, Germany .
    Christiaens, Thierry
    University of Ghent, Belgium .
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    De Backer, Guy
    University Hospital, Belgium .
    Dominiczak, Anna
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Galderisi, Maurizio
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy .
    Grobbee, Diederick E.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Laurent, Stephane
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France .
    Manolis, Athanasios J.
    Asklepeion Gen Hospital, Greece .
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ruilope, Luis Miguel
    Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain .
    Schmieder, Roland E.
    University Hospital, Germany .
    Sirnes, Per Anton
    Ostlandske Hjertesenter, Norway .
    Sleight, Peter
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England .
    Viigimaa, Margus
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia .
    Waeber, Bernard
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland .
    Zannad, Faiez
    Centre Invest Clin 9501, France .
    2013 ESH/ESC Guidelines for themanagement of arterial hypertension The Task Force for the management ofarterial hypertension of the European Society ofHypertension (ESH) and of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)2013In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 31, no 7, 1281-1357 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 23.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy IRCSS, Italy .
    Fagard, Robert
    KU Leuven University, Belgium .
    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia INCLIVA Research Institute, Spain CIBERobn, Spain .
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Boehm, Michael
    University of Klinikum Saarlandes, Germany .
    Christiaens, Thierry
    University of Ghent, Belgium .
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University of Medical School I, Czech Republic Thomayer Hospital, Czech Republic .
    De Backer, Guy
    University Hospital, Belgium .
    Dominiczak, Anna
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Galderisi, Maurizio
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy .
    Grobbee, Diederick E.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    University of Birmingham, England SWBH NHS Trust, England University of Munster, Germany .
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Laurent, Stephane
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France .
    Manolis, Athanasios J.
    Asklepe Gen Hospital, Greece .
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Miguel Ruilope, Luis
    Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain .
    Schmieder, Roland E.
    University Hospital, Germany .
    Sirnes, Per Anton
    Ostlandske Hjertesenter, Norway .
    Sleight, Peter
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England .
    Viigimaa, Margus
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia .
    Waeber, Bernard
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland .
    Zannad, Faiez
    INSERM, France University of Lorraine, France CHU, France .
    2013 ESH/ESC Practice Guidelines for the Management of Arterial Hypertension2014In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, Vol. 23, no 1, 3-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 24.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy .
    Fagard, Robert
    KU Leuven University, Belgium .
    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain .
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Boehm, Michael
    University of Saarlandes Kliniken, Germany .
    Christiaens, Thierry
    University of Ghent, Belgium .
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    De Backer, Guy
    University Hospital, Belgium .
    Dominiczak, Anna
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Galderisi, Maurizio
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy .
    Grobbee, Diederick E.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kirchof, Paulus
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Laurent, Stephane
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France .
    Manolis, Athanasios J.
    Asklepe Gen Hospital, Greece .
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ruilope, Luis Miguel
    Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain .
    Schmieder, Roland E.
    University Hospital, Germany .
    Sirnes, Per Anton
    Ostlandske Hjertesenter, Norway .
    Sleight, Peter
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England .
    Viigimaa, Margus
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia .
    Waeber, Bernard
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland .
    Zannad, Faiez
    University of Lorraine, France .
    2013 Practice guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)2013In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 31, no 10, 1925-1938 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 25.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Glasgow, Philip
    Sport Northern Ireland Sports Institute, North Ireland; University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Schneiders, Anthony
    Central Queensland University, Australia.
    Witvrouw, Erik
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Clarsen, Benjamin
    Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway; Olymp Elite Sports Program Olympiatoppen, Norway.
    Cools, Ann
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Gojanovic, Boris
    Hop La Tour, Switzerland; Lausanne University of and Hospital, Switzerland.
    Griffin, Steffan
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Khan, Karim M.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Moksnes, Havard
    Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway; Olymp Elite Sports Program Olympiatoppen, Norway.
    Mutch, Stephen A.
    SPACE Clin, Scotland; Murrayfield Stadium, Scotland.
    Phillips, Nicola
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Reurink, Gustaaf
    Sports Phys Grp, Netherlands.
    Sadler, Robin
    Manchester City Football Club, England.
    Gravare Silbernagel, Karin
    University of Delaware, DE USA.
    Thorborg, Kristian
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wangensteen, Arnlaug
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway.
    Wilk, Kevin E.
    Champ Sports Med, AL USA.
    Bizzini, Mario
    Schulthess Clin, Switzerland.
    2016 Consensus statement on return to sport from the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy, Bern2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 14, 853-864 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deciding when to return to sport after injury is complex and multifactorial-an exercise in risk management. Return to sport decisions are made every day by clinicians, athletes and coaches, ideally in a collaborative way. The purpose of this consensus statement was to present and synthesise current evidence to make recommendations for return to sport decision-making, clinical practice and future research directions related to returning athletes to sport. A half day meeting was held in Bern, Switzerland, after the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy. 17 expert clinicians participated. 4 main sections were initially agreed upon, then participants elected to join 1 of the 4 groups-each group focused on 1 section of the consensus statement. Participants in each group discussed and summarised the key issues for their section before the 17-member group met again for discussion to reach consensus on the content of the 4 sections. Return to sport is not a decision taken in isolation at the end of the recovery and rehabilitation process. Instead, return to sport should be viewed as a continuum, paralleled with recovery and rehabilitation. Biopsychosocial models may help the clinician make sense of individual factors that may influence the athletes return to sport, and the Strategic Assessment of Risk and Risk Tolerance framework may help decision-makers synthesise information to make an optimal return to sport decision. Research evidence to support return to sport decisions in clinical practice is scarce. Future research should focus on a standardised approach to defining, measuring and reporting return to sport outcomes, and identifying valuable prognostic factors for returning to sport.

  • 26.
    Horner, Patrick J
    et al.
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK.
    Karla, Blee
    Bristol Sexual Health Centre, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
    Falk, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    van der Meijden, W
    Department of Dermatology, New Cross Hospital, UK..
    Moi, H.
    Olafia Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    2016 European Guideline on the management of non-gonococcal urethritis2016In: International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), ISSN 0956-4624, E-ISSN 1758-1052, Vol. 27, no 11, 928-937 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the updated International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections guideline for the management of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. This guideline recommends confirmation of urethritis in symptomatic men before starting treatment. It does not recommend testing asymptomatic men for the presence of urethritis. All men with urethritis should be tested for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and ideally M. genitalium using a NAAT as this is highly likely to improve clinical outcomes. If a NAAT is positive for gonorrhoea, a culture should be performed before treatment. In view of the increasing evidence that azithromycin 1 g may result in the development of antimicrobial resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium azithromycin 1 g is no longer recommended as first line therapy, which should be doxycycline 100 mg bd for 7 days. If azithromycin is to be prescribed an extended of 500 mg, then 250 mg daily for 4 days is to be preferred over 1 g stat. In men with persistent NGU, M. genitalium NAAT testing is recommended if not previously undertaken, as is Trichomonas vaginalis NAAT testing in populations where T. vaginalis is detectable in >2% of symptomatic women.

  • 27.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    20:e internationella audiologikongressen. Intressanta resultat om binaural hörsel.1991In: Audio Nytt, Vol. 18, 30-31 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Salih, Isam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Pettersson, Håkan B. L.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radio Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Herrmann, Jürgen
    222Rn in coastal waters: onboard analysis of 222Rn depth-profiles and evaluation of non-supported contentManuscript (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    24th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors – Biosensors 20142014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welcome to Biosensors 2014 and welcome to Melbourne, ranked as the world's most liveable city!

    This is the 24th anniversary edition of the World Congress on Biosensors and we continue to evolve, adapt and grow into new roles to serve the analytical needs of a rapidly changing society. Advances in telecommunications, expert systems and distributed diagnostics are prompting us to question the conventional ways we deliver healthcare, while robust industrial sensors are facilitating new paradigms in R&D and production. Personalisation of everything from medicine to environmental control, is giving new impetus to consumer choice and ownership of information, and will inevitably generate new payment structures and business models. Moreover, a deeper understanding of the bio/electronic interface leads us towards new horizons in areas such as bionics, power generation and computing.  Wearable, mobile and integrated sensors are becoming common place, but most current products have taken the easy path of incorporating physical sensors for parameters such as temperature, pressure, orientation or position. There is still a glaring absence of suitably robust and convenient commercial biosensors for body chemistries and ecosystems, and therein lies the real opportunities for progress.  We are a still-emerging technology that is fuelling scientific discovery and underpinning new products to enhance the length and quality of life.

    Always in a new country and always with fresh plenary speakers, we aim to reflect the latest and the best in Biosensors. This three-day event, organised by Elsevier in association with Biosensors & Bioelectronics, consists of two daily plenary presentations from leading figures in the field, followed by four parallel sessions, comprising a rigorously refereed selection of submitted papers. This year, we received 1,156 submissions of which 124 with be presented as regular Oral papers, with an additional 20 singled out as Invited talks and a further 12 selected for extended Keynote talks. The Keynote speakers have also been invited to submit full papers for consideration for the Biosensors and Bioelectronics Prize for the most original contribution to the Congress and the winners will be announced at the conference banquet on Thursday night. There will also be poster awards and you will find voting slips for each of the three days in your delegate bags. The winners of these awards and a prize draw, sponsored by Linköping University and Acreo Swedish ICT, will be announced at the closing ceremony on Friday. In order to enhance the valued medium of poster presentation, this year we have introduced a new Poster in my Pocket Ap.  Poster presenters have been able to upload a PDF of their poster prior to the conference to help increase the exposure of their work. This compliments the other new Ap introduced this year to place the full programme at your fingertips. Selected oral presentations will also have the opportunity to upload their talks online for future viewing.

    The academic programme, as usual, is enhanced by a fine collection of commercial exhibits and in addition to browsing their stands; you will be able to hear short elevator pitches during the breaks. We must thank our main commercial sponsor, Ercon for their generous and continued support of our congress. Thanks also to New Tools for Health for sponsoring the pre-congress Networking Event.  Now a regular feature for Biosensors, we have a pre-congress school, this year on Optical Biosensors, which is brought to you by Profs Fran Ligler and Tanya Monro. Last, but not least I must thank our marvellous Local Organising Committee chaired by Prof Justin Gooding, our hard working main Organising Committee, all the speakers and delegates, and the Elsevier team for all their support.

    Our delegates come from the four corners of the globe to hear the science, to grasp the opportunities and to meet the people; it’s going to be the best meeting yet. Enjoy and don’t forget to join us again in Gothenburg, Sweden, 24-27 May for Biosensor 2016!

  • 30.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MC - Medicincentrum, EMT-endo.
    Himmelman, Anders
    Göteborg.
    24-timmars blodtrycksmätning2003In: 24-timmars blodtrycksmätning. / [ed] Fredrik Nyström och Anders Himmelmann, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, -62 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Wohlfarth, Ariane
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, 58758 Linköping, Sweden.
    Roman, Markus
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, 58758 Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Mikael
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, 58758 Linköping, Sweden.
    Kugelberg, Fredrik C
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, 58758 Linköping, Sweden.
    Diao, Xingxing
    Chemistry and Drug Metabolism Section, Clinical Pharmacology & TherapeuticsResearch Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on DrugAbuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA.
    Carlier, Jeremy
    Chemistry and Drug Metabolism Section, Clinical Pharmacology & TherapeuticsResearch Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on DrugAbuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA.
    Eriksson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wu, Xiongyu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Josefsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board ofForensic Medicine, 58758 Linköping, Sweden.
    Huestis, Marilyn A
    School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, 21201, USA.
    Kronstrand, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, 58758 Linköping, Sweden.
    25C-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe metabolite studies in human hepatocytes, in vivo mouse and human urine with high-resolution mass spectrometry.2017In: Drug Testing and Analysis, ISSN 1942-7603, E-ISSN 1942-7611, Vol. 9, no 5, 680-698 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    25C-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe are potent hallucinogenic drugs that recently emerged as new psychoactive substances. To date, a few metabolism studies were conducted for 25I-NBOMe, whereas 25C-NBOMe metabolism data are scarce. Therefore, we investigated the metabolic profile of these compounds in human hepatocytes, an in vivo mouse model and authentic human urine samples from forensic cases. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes were incubated for 3 h with 10 μM 25C-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe; samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) on an Accucore C18 column with a Thermo QExactive; data analysis was performed with Compound Discoverer software (Thermo Scientific). Mice were administered 1.0 mg drug/kg body weight intraperitoneally, urine was collected for 24 h and analyzed (with or without hydrolysis) by LC-HRMS on an Acquity HSS T3 column with an Agilent 6550 QTOF; data were analyzed manually and with WebMetabase software (Molecular Discovery). Human urine samples were analyzed similarly. In vitro and in vivo results matched well. 25C-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe were predominantly metabolized by O-demethylation, followed by O-di-demethylation and hydroxylation. All methoxy groups could be demethylated; hydroxylation preferably occurred at the NBOMe ring. Phase I metabolites were extensively conjugated in human urine with glucuronic acid and sulfate. Based on these data and a comparison with synthesized reference standards for potential metabolites, specific and abundant 25C-NBOMe urine targets are 5'-desmethyl 25C-NBOMe, 25C-NBOMe and 5-hydroxy 25C-NBOMe, and for 25I-NBOMe 2' and 5'-desmethyl 25I-NBOMe and hydroxy 25I-NBOMe. These data will help clinical and forensic laboratories to develop analytical methods and to interpret results. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 32.
    Tondel, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Murgia, Nicola
    University of Perugia.
    Persson, Bodil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    2,5-Hexanedione in the General Population: Environmental Exposure or Endogenous Production? in EPIDEMIOLOGY, vol 22, issue 1, pp S34-S352011In: EPIDEMIOLOGY, Williams and Wilkins , 2011, Vol. 22, no 1, S34-S35 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 33.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology .
    260 therapeutic drug monitorings (TDM) in relation to compliance and co-medication in psychiatric treatment2002In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, Vol. 17, 3S-3S p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    28-joint count disease activity score at 3 months after diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis is strongly associated with direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years: the Swedish TIRA project2011In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 50, no 7, 1259-1267 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods. Three-hundred and twenty patients with early (1 year) RA were assessed at regular intervals. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and patients reported health-care utilization and number of days lost from work. At 3-month follow-up, patients were divided into two groups according to disease activity, using DAS-28 with a cut-off level at 3.2. Direct and indirect costs and EuroQol-5D over the following 4 years were compared between the groups. Multivariate regression models were used to control for possible covariates. Results. Three months after diagnosis, a DAS-28 level of epsilon 3.2 was associated with high direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years. Patients with DAS-28 epsilon 3.2 at 3-month follow-up had more visits to physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and nurse, higher drug costs, more days in hospital and more extensive surgery compared with patients with 3-month DAS-28 less than 3.2. Number of days lost from work due to sick leave and permanent work disability was also higher in this group. The effect of disease activity on health-related quality of life was highly significant. In regression models, DAS-28 at 3-month follow-up was significantly associated with costs over the following years. Conclusions. Three months after diagnosis, DAS-28 is an important prognostic marker regarding health-care utilization and costs. Achieving remission or low disease activity 3 months after diagnosis is likely to decrease morbidity, increase quality of life and save costs for the patient and for society over the following years.

  • 35.
    Eidenvall, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    2D Doppler Flowvelocity profiles can be time corrected with an external ECG delay device1992In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, Vol. 5, 405-413 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Eklöf, H
    et al.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ljungman, C
    Karacagil, S
    Bergqvist, D
    Ahlström, H
    2D inflow MR angiography in severe chronic leg ischemia1998In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 39, no 6, 663-668 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The agreement between MRA and XRA was good in the calf but questionable in the foot.

  • 37.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    30th anniversary commentary on Hamrin E. (1982) attitudes of nursing staff in general medical wards towards activation of stroke patients. Journal of Advanced Nursing 7, 33-422006In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 53, no 1, 43-44 p.43-44 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 38.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Bengtsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sören, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brandejsky, Vaclav
    Depts Clinical Research and Radiology, University Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    31P MRS as a Potential Biomarker for Fibromyalgia2012In: Proceedings of the 20th Annaal Meeting & Exhibition, 5-11 May, Melbourne, Australia, 2012, 1493-1493 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major clinical symptoms in fibromyalgia (FM) are muscle pain, stiffness and fatigue. Studies have shown reduced voluntary strength and exercise capacity, lower endurance and more muscular pain even at low workload. An impaired muscle energy metabolism has therefore been proposed as a result of the disease. An earlier study using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) showed that at maximal dynamic and static contractions the concentration of inorganic phosphate was lower in FM [1]. A decrease in ATP, ADP and PCr and an increase in AMP and creatine was found in FM biopsies [2]. The purpose of this study was to non-invasively analyze the quantitative content of  phosphagens in the resting muscle in FM in comparison to healthy controls using 31P MRS of the quadriceps muscle.

  • 39.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    et al.
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Lê, Anh Dzung
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Hipskind, Philip A
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hamdouchi, Chafiq
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Lu, Jianliang
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hembre, Erik J.
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Cramer, Jeffrey
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Song, Min
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    McKinzie, David
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Morin, Michelle
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Ciccocioppo, Roberto
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    3-(4-Chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-thiazol-5-yl)-8-(1-ethylpropyl)-2,6-dimethyl-imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine: a novel brain-penetrant, orally available corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 antagonist with efficacy in animal models of alcoholism2007In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 27, no 10, 2718-2726 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a novel corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1) antagonist with advantageous properties for clinical development, and its in vivo activity in preclinical alcoholism models. 3-(4-Chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-thiazol-5-yl)-8-(1-ethylpropyl)-2,6-dimethyl-imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine (MTIP) inhibited 125I-sauvagine binding to rat pituitary membranes and cloned human CRF1 with subnanomolar affinities, with no detectable activity at the CRF2 receptor or other common drug targets. After oral administration to rats, MTIP inhibited 125I-sauvagine binding to rat cerebellar membranes ex vivo with an ED50 of approximately 1.3 mg/kg and an oral bioavailability of 91.1%. Compared with R121919 (2,5-dimethyl-3-(6-dimethyl-4-methylpyridin-3-yl)-7-dipropylamino-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine) and CP154526 (N-butyl-N-ethyl-4,9-dimethyl-7-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-3,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.3.0]nona-2,4,8,10-tetraen-2-amine), MTIP had a markedly reduced volume of distribution and clearance. Neither open-field activity nor baseline exploration of an elevated plus-maze was affected by MTIP (1-10 mg/kg). In contrast, MTIP dose-dependently reversed anxiogenic effects of withdrawal from a 3 g/kg alcohol dose. Similarly, MTIP blocked excessive alcohol self-administration in Wistar rats with a history of dependence, and in a genetic model of high alcohol preference, the msP rat, at doses that had no effect in nondependent Wistar rats. Also, MTIP blocked reinstatement of stress-induced alcohol seeking both in postdependent and in genetically selected msP animals, again at doses that were ineffective in nondependent Wistar rats. Based on these findings, MTIP is a promising candidate for treatment of alcohol dependence.

  • 40.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hägglund, Sture
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pettersson, Nils-Erik
    Sjöqvist, Bengt-Arne
    Åhlfeldt, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    36-nätet och "pensionärsdatorer" kan bidra till att lösa sjukvårdens problem2003In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 100, no 14, 1257-1258 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Li, Wei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yuan, Ximing
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Ivanova, S.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, North Shore-LIE Research Institute, Manhasset, NY 11030, United States.
    Tracey, K.J.
    Laboratory of Biomedical Science, North Shore-LIE Research Institute, Manhasset, NY 11030, United States.
    Eaton, John Wallace
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Brunk, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology .
    3-Aminopropanal, formed during cerebral ischaemia, is a potent lysosomotropic neurotoxin2003In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, Vol. 371, no 2, 429-436 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytotoxic polyamine-derived amino aldehydes, formed during cerebral ischaemia, damage adjacent tissue (the so-called 'penumbra') not subject to the initial ischaemic insult. One such product is 3-aminopropanal (3-AP), a potent cytotoxin that accumulates in ischaemic brain, although the precise mechanisms responsible for its formation are still unclear. More relevant to the present investigations, the mechanisms by which such a small aldehydic compound might be cytotoxic are also not known, but we hypothesized that 3-AP, having the structure of a weak lysosomotropic base, might concentrate within lysosomes, making these organelles a probable focus of initial toxicity. Indeed, 3-AP leads to lysosomal rupture of D384 glioma cells, a process which clearly precedes caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Immunohistochemistry reveals that 3-AP concentrates in the lysosomal compartment and prevention of this accumulation by the lysosomotropic base ammonia, NH3, protects against 3-AP cytotoxicity by increasing lysosomal pH. A thiol compound, N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine, reacts with and neutralizes 3-AP and significantly inhibits cytoxocity. Both amino and aldehyde functions of 3-AP are necessary for toxicity: the amino group confers lysosomotropism and the aldehyde is important for additional, presently unknown, reactions. We conclude that 3-AP exerts its toxic effects by accumulating intralysosomally, causing rupture of these organelles and releasing lysosomal enzymes which initiate caspase activation and apoptosis (or necrosis if the lysosomal rupture is extensive). These results may have implications for the development of new therapeutics designed to lessen secondary damage arising from focal cerebral ischaemia.

  • 42.
    Yu, Zhengquan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Li, Wei
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brunk, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    3-Aminopropanal is a lysosomotropic aldehyde that causes oxidative stress and apoptosis by rupturing lysosomes2003In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 111, no 6, 643-652 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During cerebral ischemia and following trauma, potent cytotoxic polyamine-derived aminoaldehydes form, diffuse, and damage adjacent tissues not directly subjected to the initial insult. One such aldehyde is 3-aminopropanal (3-AP). The mechanisms by which such a small aldehydic compound is excessively cytotoxic have been unclear until recently when we showed that 3-AP, having the structure of a weak lysosomotropic base, concentrates within the acidic vacuolar compartment and causes lysosomal rupture that, in turn, induces caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Here, using cultured J774 cells and 3-AP as a way to selectively burst lysosomes, we show that moderate lysosomal rupture induces a transient wave of oxidative stress. The start of this oxidative stress period is concomitant with a short period of enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential that later fades and is replaced by a decreased potential before the oxidative stress diminishes. The result of the study suggests that oxidative stress, which has often been described during apoptosis induced by agonists other than oxidative stress per se, may be a consequence of lysosomal rupture with direct and/or indirect effects on mitochondrial respiration and electron transport causing a period of passing enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species.

  • 43.
    Saraste, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Katashev, A
    Murans, G
    3D analysis of spine and chest wall form and mobility. Application of a new method to evaluate treatment outcome in pediatric spine deformities2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary

    A new optical scanning method is applyed for a static and dynamic analysis of thorax and spine deformities in brace and surgically treated scoliosis patients to capture intervention dependent changes over time. The costs and additional information captured by the method is analysed.

    Introduction

    To evaluate the intervention dependent changes in spine and chest wall deformities, such as mobility of thorax, volume, symmetry of growth, and possible growth distorting factors are poorly known and should be studied. In patients with neuropathic spine deformities, the seat loading is of importance to enhance balanced sitting and preventing pressure problems. Quantitative methods to be used for over time comparisons need to be further developed.

    In adolescents the decision to treat a spine deformity is mainly based on radiographic findings, whereas many patients are more interested in how their body configuration deviates from the normality. There is a need to implement and evaluate a method for this purpose. In brace treated children and adolescents, a non-radiation producing examination is to prefer for repeated follow-up controls.

    Methods

    A consequtive series of children with spine deformity, who are enrolled in the treatment protocol, are invited to take part in the tests. In surgery group, tests are performed before and 3 months after surgery aimed to correct the spine and/or thorax deformity. In brace treatment and follow-up groups tests are made at the same time points as x-rays. The static and dynamic recordings are performed by and optic scanenr Artec 3D (Artec Group, San Diego, CA), and the sitting load distribution measurements with a sensor mat (Clin-seat Type 5315 by Tekscan, Boston, Massachusetts, USA). 60 children/year in brace treatment, 40 in surgery, and 50 in the follow-up group are estimated to be included. These methods´ costs and benefits as well as their added value for the clinical decision making will be evaluated after 2-3 years.

    Results

    A feasibility test shows that clinically small enough differences can be recorded and numerically expressed and analysed. An application on a consecutive, clinical patient group will be carried on.

    Conclusion

    The optical scanning method by Artec, allows a static and dynamic capturing of respiratoryassociated thorax movements and the changes of a spine deformity over time. The new method will be applied in a consecutive series of patients.

  • 44.
    Ong, Jeb A.
    et al.
    Maisonneuve Rosemt Hospital, Canada; University of Montreal, Canada.
    Auvinet, Edouard
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Forget, Karolyn J.
    Maisonneuve Rosemt Hospital, Canada.
    Lagali, Neil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Maisonneuve Rosemt Hospital, Canada.
    Meunier, Jean
    University of Montreal, Canada; University of Montreal, Canada.
    Brunette, Isabelle
    Maisonneuve Rosemt Hospital, Canada; University of Montreal, Canada.
    3D Corneal Shape After Implantation of a Biosynthetic Corneal Stromal Substitute2016In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 57, no 6, 2355-2365 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE. The current and projected shortage of transplantable human donor corneas has prompted the development of long-term alternatives to human donor tissue for corneal replacement. The biosynthetic stromal substitutes (BSS) characterized herein represent a potentially safe alternative to donor organ transplantation for anterior corneal stromal diseases. The goal of this phase 1 safety study was to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) corneal shape of the first 10 human patients implanted with a BSS and assess its stability over time. METHODS. Ten patients underwent anterior lamellar keratoplasty using a biosynthetic corneal stromal implant for either advanced keratoconus or central corneal scarring. Surgeries were performed at Linkoping University Hospital, between October and November 2007. Serial corneal topographies were performed on all eyes up to a 4-year follow-up when possible. Three-dimensional shape average maps were constructed for the 10 BSS corneas and for 10 healthy controls. Average 3D shape corneal elevation maps, difference maps, and statistics maps were generated. RESULTS. The biosynthetic stromal substitutes implants remained stably integrated into the host corneas over the 4-year follow-up period, without signs of wound dehiscence or implant extrusion. The biosynthetic stromal substitutes corneas showed steeper surface curvatures and were more irregular than the healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS. Corneal astigmatism and surface steepness were observed 4 years after BSS implantation, while the implants remained stably integrated in the host corneas. Future studies will indicate if biomaterials technology will allow for the optimization of postoperative surface irregularity after anterior stromal replacement, a new window of opportunity that is not available with traditional corneal transplantation techniques.

  • 45.
    Rodríguez-Vila, Borja
    et al.
    Bioengineering and Telemedicine Group, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid Spain.
    Pettersson, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    García-Vicente, Feliciano
    Medical Physics, Radiotherapy Department, University Hospital La Princesa Spain.
    Gómez, Enrique J.
    Bioengineering and Telemedicine Group, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid Spain.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    3D deformable registration for monitoring radiotherapy treatment in prostate cancer2007In: Image Analysis: 15th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2007, Aalborg, Denmark, June 10-14, 2007, Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, 750-759 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two deformable registration methods, the Demons and the Morphon algorithms, have been used for registration of CT datasets to evaluate their usability in radiotherapy planning for prostate cancer. These methods were chosen because they can perform deformable registration in a fully automated way. The experiments show that for intrapatient registration both of the methods give useful results, although some differences exist in the way they deform the template. The Morphon method has, however, some advantageous compared to the Demons method. It is invariant to the image intensity and it does not distort the deformed data. The conclusion is therefore to recommend the Morphon method as a registration tool for this application. A more flexible regularization model is needed, though, in order to be able to catch the full range of deformations required to match the datasets.

  • 46. Imura, M
    et al.
    Kuroda, T
    Oshiro, O
    Chihara, K
    Brandberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    3-D flow visualization for construction of the model of the blood flow in the heart2000In: Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-4922, Vol. 39, no 5 B, 3246-3251 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors have been developing a model of blood flow in the heart. The flow model of the heart enables us to estimate the entire blood flow of the heart from a couple of 2-D color Doppler images. Therefore, the load on patients is expected to be reduced. To develop the model of the heart, precise observation and an understanding of the blood flow are indispensable, because the flow is strongly related to the diagnosis of heart diseases. The visualization method must have the following features: (1) 3-D (2) objectivity (3) interactivity and (4) multi-aspect. The authors have developed visualization methods to meet the above-mentioned requirements and evaluated the proposed methods with the in-vitro flow data set. The results clearly reveal that the proposed system enables the researchers of the modeling group to obtain the state of entire flow, such as the occurrence of turbulence.

  • 47.
    Kovacsovics, Bea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Davidsson, L
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Magnusson, B
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    3D FSE T2 MR bilder vid ponsvinkelundersökningar2000In: Vårmöte i Linköping 18-19/5 2000 / Svensk förening för otorhinolaryngologi, huvud halskirurgi,2000, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Magnusson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brynolfsson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Thyr, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Brain - Novel Radial Sampling, Filtering and Reconstruction2010In: Proc of the 12th IASTED International Conference on Signal and Image Processing (SIP 2010), August 23 - 25, 2010, Lahaina, Maui, USA / [ed] B. Flinchbaugh, Calgary, AB, Canada: ACTA Press, 2010, Track: 710-042-(8 pages) p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have suggested a novel method PRESTO-CAN including radial sampling, filtering and reconstruction of k-space data for 3D-plus-time resolved MRI. The angular increment of the profiles was based on the golden ratio, but the number of angular positions N was locked to be a prime number which guaranteed fix angle positions.The time resolution increased dramatically when the pro-files were partly removed from the k-space using the hourglass filter.We aim for utilizing the MRI-data for fMRI, where the echo times are long, TE ≈ 37-40 ms. This will result in field inhomogeneities and phase variations in the reconstructed images. Therefore, a new calibration and correction procedure was developed. We show that we are able to reconstruct images of the human brain with an image quality in line with what can be obtained by conventional Cartesian sampling.The pulse sequence for PRESTO-CAN was implemented by modifying an existing PRESTO sequence for Cartesian sampling. The effort involved was relatively small and a great advantage will be that we are able to use standard procedures for speeding up data acquisition, i.e. parallel imaging with SENSE.

  • 49.
    Babic, Ankica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    Zganec, Mario
    University of Ljubljana .
    Palcic, Branko
    Cancer Research Centre BC Canada.
    3D presentation of the nuclear cell features in quantitative cytometry1996In: AMIA 1996,1996, Washington: Hanley & Belfus , 1996, 679- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Rossitti, S.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Pfister, M.
    Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany.
    3D road-mapping in the endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations2009In: INTERVENTIONAL NEURORADIOLOGY, ISSN 1123-9344, Vol. 15, no 3, 283-290 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3D road-mapping with syngo iPilot was used as an additional tool for assessing cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for endovascular therapy. This method provides accurate superimposition of a live fluoroscopic image (native or vascular road-map) and its matching 2D projection of the 3D data set, delivering more anatomic information on one additional display. In the endovascular management of cases with complex anatomy, 3D road-mapping provides excellent image quality at the intervention site. This method can potentially reduce intervention time, the number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time and the amount of contrast media used in a procedure, with reservation for these factors being mainly operator-dependent. 3D road-mapping probably does not provide any advantage in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms or AVMs with very simple configuration, and it should not be used when acquisition of an optimum 3D data set is not feasible.

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