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  • 1.
    Dahlgaard Park, Su Mi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Business Administration.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management .
    10th QMOD Conference. Quality Management and Organizationel Development. Our Dreams of Excellence2008Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bergh, Torsten
    et al.
    Swedish Transport Adm, Sweden; Movea Trafikkonsult, Sweden.
    Remgard, Mats
    Swedish Transport Adm, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Arne
    Swedish National Rd and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Olstam, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Linköping, Sweden.
    Strömgren, Per
    Movea Trafikkonsult, Sweden.
    2+1-roads Recent Swedish Capacity and Level-of-Service Experience2016In: INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON ENHANCING HIGHWAY PERFORMANCE (ISEHP), (7TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON HIGHWAY CAPACITY AND QUALITY OF SERVICE, 3RD INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON FREEWAY AND TOLLWAY OPERATIONS), ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2016, Vol. 15, 331-345 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first Swedish 2+1 median barrier road was opened in 1998. The concept was to retrofit the standard existing two-lane 13 m paved width cross-section at 90 and 110 kph posted speed limit without widening. This design has one continuous lane in each direction, a middle lane changing direction every one to three kilometres with a median barrier separating the two traffic directions. Today over 2 700 km 2+1 median barrier roads are opened for traffic. AADTs vary from some 3 000 to 20 000 with an average just below 10 000 nowadays normally with 100 kph. The concept has lately been enhanced also to cover the existing 9 m paved width cross-section. The design concept is the same from a drivers viewpoint, one continuous lane in each direction with a middle lane changing direction and a separating median barrier. This is created by introducing a continuous median barrier and adding overtaking lanes within an overtaking strategy. The differences are the existence of 1+1-sections, less overtaking opportunities and a slightly more narrow cross-section. Some 15 projects are opened. The purpose of this paper is to summarize present knowledge on level-of-service issues as they are presented in Swedish design and assessment guidelines and to give an overview of field measurements and theoretical analytical and simulation studies supporting the recommendations.

  • 3.
    Seppänen, Timo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    248 nm cathodoluminescence in Al1-xInxN (0001) thin films grown on lattice-matched Ti1-yZryN (111) seed layers by low temperature magnetron sputter epitaxy2006In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 89, no 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single-crystal Al0.8 In0.2 N (0001) thin films were grown epitaxially onto lattice-matched Ti0.2 Zr0.8 N (111) seed layers on MgO(111) substrates at 300 °C by magnetron sputter epitaxy. Low-energy ion-assisted epitaxial growth conditions were achieved by applying a substrate potential of -15 V. Cross-sectional high-resolution electron microscopy verified the epitaxy and high-resolution x-ray diffraction ω -rocking scans of the Al0.8 In0.2 N 0002 peak (full width at half maximum ∼2400 arc sec) indicated a high structural quality of the films. Cathodoluminescence measurements performed in a scanning electron microscope at 5 K revealed Al0.8 In0.2 N luminescence at 248 nm, or equivalently 5.0 eV, showing that Al0.8 In0.2 N is a promising material for deep-ultraviolet optoelectronic devices. © 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  • 4.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    24th Anniversary World Congress on Biosensors – Biosensors 20142014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welcome to Biosensors 2014 and welcome to Melbourne, ranked as the world's most liveable city!

    This is the 24th anniversary edition of the World Congress on Biosensors and we continue to evolve, adapt and grow into new roles to serve the analytical needs of a rapidly changing society. Advances in telecommunications, expert systems and distributed diagnostics are prompting us to question the conventional ways we deliver healthcare, while robust industrial sensors are facilitating new paradigms in R&D and production. Personalisation of everything from medicine to environmental control, is giving new impetus to consumer choice and ownership of information, and will inevitably generate new payment structures and business models. Moreover, a deeper understanding of the bio/electronic interface leads us towards new horizons in areas such as bionics, power generation and computing.  Wearable, mobile and integrated sensors are becoming common place, but most current products have taken the easy path of incorporating physical sensors for parameters such as temperature, pressure, orientation or position. There is still a glaring absence of suitably robust and convenient commercial biosensors for body chemistries and ecosystems, and therein lies the real opportunities for progress.  We are a still-emerging technology that is fuelling scientific discovery and underpinning new products to enhance the length and quality of life.

    Always in a new country and always with fresh plenary speakers, we aim to reflect the latest and the best in Biosensors. This three-day event, organised by Elsevier in association with Biosensors & Bioelectronics, consists of two daily plenary presentations from leading figures in the field, followed by four parallel sessions, comprising a rigorously refereed selection of submitted papers. This year, we received 1,156 submissions of which 124 with be presented as regular Oral papers, with an additional 20 singled out as Invited talks and a further 12 selected for extended Keynote talks. The Keynote speakers have also been invited to submit full papers for consideration for the Biosensors and Bioelectronics Prize for the most original contribution to the Congress and the winners will be announced at the conference banquet on Thursday night. There will also be poster awards and you will find voting slips for each of the three days in your delegate bags. The winners of these awards and a prize draw, sponsored by Linköping University and Acreo Swedish ICT, will be announced at the closing ceremony on Friday. In order to enhance the valued medium of poster presentation, this year we have introduced a new Poster in my Pocket Ap.  Poster presenters have been able to upload a PDF of their poster prior to the conference to help increase the exposure of their work. This compliments the other new Ap introduced this year to place the full programme at your fingertips. Selected oral presentations will also have the opportunity to upload their talks online for future viewing.

    The academic programme, as usual, is enhanced by a fine collection of commercial exhibits and in addition to browsing their stands; you will be able to hear short elevator pitches during the breaks. We must thank our main commercial sponsor, Ercon for their generous and continued support of our congress. Thanks also to New Tools for Health for sponsoring the pre-congress Networking Event.  Now a regular feature for Biosensors, we have a pre-congress school, this year on Optical Biosensors, which is brought to you by Profs Fran Ligler and Tanya Monro. Last, but not least I must thank our marvellous Local Organising Committee chaired by Prof Justin Gooding, our hard working main Organising Committee, all the speakers and delegates, and the Elsevier team for all their support.

    Our delegates come from the four corners of the globe to hear the science, to grasp the opportunities and to meet the people; it’s going to be the best meeting yet. Enjoy and don’t forget to join us again in Gothenburg, Sweden, 24-27 May for Biosensor 2016!

  • 5.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    28-joint count disease activity score at 3 months after diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis is strongly associated with direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years: the Swedish TIRA project2011In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 50, no 7, 1259-1267 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods. Three-hundred and twenty patients with early (1 year) RA were assessed at regular intervals. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and patients reported health-care utilization and number of days lost from work. At 3-month follow-up, patients were divided into two groups according to disease activity, using DAS-28 with a cut-off level at 3.2. Direct and indirect costs and EuroQol-5D over the following 4 years were compared between the groups. Multivariate regression models were used to control for possible covariates. Results. Three months after diagnosis, a DAS-28 level of epsilon 3.2 was associated with high direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years. Patients with DAS-28 epsilon 3.2 at 3-month follow-up had more visits to physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and nurse, higher drug costs, more days in hospital and more extensive surgery compared with patients with 3-month DAS-28 less than 3.2. Number of days lost from work due to sick leave and permanent work disability was also higher in this group. The effect of disease activity on health-related quality of life was highly significant. In regression models, DAS-28 at 3-month follow-up was significantly associated with costs over the following years. Conclusions. Three months after diagnosis, DAS-28 is an important prognostic marker regarding health-care utilization and costs. Achieving remission or low disease activity 3 months after diagnosis is likely to decrease morbidity, increase quality of life and save costs for the patient and for society over the following years.

  • 6.
    Gustavson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    2D Shape Rendering by Distance Fields2012In: OpenGL Insights: OpenGL, OpenGL ES, and WebGL community experiences / [ed] Patrick Cozzi and Christophe Riccio, CRC Press, 2012, 173-182 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a method for real time rendering of anti-aliased curved contours, combining recent results from research on distance transforms and modern GPU shading using GLSL. The method is capable of rendering glyphs and symbols of very high quality at arbitrary levels of magnification and minification, and it is both versatile and easy to use.

  • 7.
    Henry, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Li, Xun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jacobson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Boulle, Alexandre
    CNRS UMR 7315, Centre Européen de la Céramique, Limoges Cedex, France.
    Chaussende, Didier
    LMGP, CNRS UMR 5628, Grenoble, France.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    3C-SiC Heteroepitaxy on Hexagonal SiC Substrates2013In: Silicon Carbide and Related Materials 2012 / [ed] Alexander A. Lebedev, Sergey Yu. Davydov, Pavel A. Ivanov and Mikhail E. Levinshtein, Trans Tech Publications , 2013, Vol. 740-742, 257-262 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growth of 3C-SiC on hexagonal polytype is addressed and a brief review is given for various growth techniques. The Chemical Vapor Deposition is shown as a suitable technique to grow single domain 3C epilayers on 4H-SiC substrate and a 12.5 µm thick layer is demonstrated; even thicker layers have been obtained. Various characterization techniques including optical microscopy, X-ray techniques and photoluminescence are compared for the evaluation of the crystal quality and purity of the layers.

  • 8.
    Magnusson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brynolfsson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Thyr, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Brain - Novel Radial Sampling, Filtering and Reconstruction2010In: Proc of the 12th IASTED International Conference on Signal and Image Processing (SIP 2010), August 23 - 25, 2010, Lahaina, Maui, USA / [ed] B. Flinchbaugh, Calgary, AB, Canada: ACTA Press, 2010, Track: 710-042-(8 pages) p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have suggested a novel method PRESTO-CAN including radial sampling, filtering and reconstruction of k-space data for 3D-plus-time resolved MRI. The angular increment of the profiles was based on the golden ratio, but the number of angular positions N was locked to be a prime number which guaranteed fix angle positions.The time resolution increased dramatically when the pro-files were partly removed from the k-space using the hourglass filter.We aim for utilizing the MRI-data for fMRI, where the echo times are long, TE ≈ 37-40 ms. This will result in field inhomogeneities and phase variations in the reconstructed images. Therefore, a new calibration and correction procedure was developed. We show that we are able to reconstruct images of the human brain with an image quality in line with what can be obtained by conventional Cartesian sampling.The pulse sequence for PRESTO-CAN was implemented by modifying an existing PRESTO sequence for Cartesian sampling. The effort involved was relatively small and a great advantage will be that we are able to use standard procedures for speeding up data acquisition, i.e. parallel imaging with SENSE.

  • 9.
    Lundqvist, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision.
    3D mapping with iPhone2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, 3D models of cities are created from aerial images using a camera rig. Images, together with sensor data from the flights, are stored for further processing when building 3D models. However, there is a market demand for a more mobile solution of satisfactory quality. If the camera position can be calculated for each image, there is an existing algorithm available for the creation of 3D models.

    This master thesis project aims to investigate whether the iPhone 4 offers good enough image and sensor data quality from which 3D models can be created. Calculations on movements and rotations from sensor data forms the foundation of the image processing, and should refine the camera position estimations.

    The 3D models are built only from image processing since sensor data cannot be used due to poor data accuracy. Because of that, the scaling of the 3D models are unknown and a measurement is needed on the real objects to make scaling possible. Compared to a test algorithm that calculates 3D models from only images, already available at the SBD’s system, the quality of the 3D model in this master thesis project is almost the same or, in some respects, even better when compared with the human eye.

  • 10.
    Rossitti, S.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Pfister, M.
    Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany.
    3D road-mapping in the endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations2009In: INTERVENTIONAL NEURORADIOLOGY, ISSN 1123-9344, Vol. 15, no 3, 283-290 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3D road-mapping with syngo iPilot was used as an additional tool for assessing cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for endovascular therapy. This method provides accurate superimposition of a live fluoroscopic image (native or vascular road-map) and its matching 2D projection of the 3D data set, delivering more anatomic information on one additional display. In the endovascular management of cases with complex anatomy, 3D road-mapping provides excellent image quality at the intervention site. This method can potentially reduce intervention time, the number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time and the amount of contrast media used in a procedure, with reservation for these factors being mainly operator-dependent. 3D road-mapping probably does not provide any advantage in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms or AVMs with very simple configuration, and it should not be used when acquisition of an optimum 3D data set is not feasible.

  • 11.
    Hall, Henning
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Luckey, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    3G Transmission Energy Savings through Adaptive Traffic Shaping Policies2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This bachelor thesis will explore how two traffic shaping mechanisms can help preserve battery power while retaining a certain Quality of Service (QoS) in an Android based application developed for crisis management. The implemented user-space mechanisms will delay all elastic data requests in order to reduce the number of times the 3G transmission radio enters high power states. This lowers the QoS but extends the user equipment's battery life. The thesis will show that a shaping mechanism has the capability to reduce radio energy usage by up to 50% for the given Android application at the cost of added transmission delays by up to 134 seconds for background traffic. The study also presents two policies that help the application adapt to the current battery level and lower the QoS accordingly, namely one that has a lenient savings effect and one that has an aggressive savings effect.

  • 12.
    Baron, Ralf
    et al.
    University Klinikum Schleswig Holstein.
    Mayoral, Victor
    Hospital Llobregat.
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Binder, Andreas
    University Klinikum Schleswig Holstein.
    Steigerwald, Ilona
    Grunenthal GmbH.
    Serpell, Michael
    University of Glasgow.
    5% lidocaine medicated plaster versus pregabalin in post-herpetic neuralgia and diabetic polyneuropathy: an open-label, non-inferiority two-stage RCT study2009In: CURRENT MEDICAL RESEARCH AND OPINION, ISSN 0300-7995, Vol. 25, no 7, 1663-1676 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare efficacy and safety of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster with pregabalin in patients with post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) or painful diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Study design and methods: This was a two-stage adaptive, randomized, open-label, multicentre, non-inferiority study. Data are reported from the initial 4-week comparative phase, in which adults with PHN or painful DPN received either topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster applied to the most painful skin area or twice-daily pregabalin capsules titrated to effect according to the Summary of Product Characteristics. The primary endpoint was response rate at 4 weeks, defined as reduction averaged over the last three days from baseline of greater than= 2 points or an absolute value of less than= 4 points on the 11-point Numerical Rating Scale (NRS-3). Secondary endpoints included 30% and 50% reductions in NRS-3 scores; change in allodynia severity rating; quality of life (QoL) parameters EQ-5D, CGIC, and PGIC; patient satisfaction with treatment; and evaluation of safety (laboratory parameters, vital signs, physical examinations, adverse events [AEs], drug-related AEs [DRAEs], and withdrawal due to AEs). Results: Ninety-six patients with PHN and 204 with painful DPN were analysed (full analysis set, FAS). Overall, 66.4% of patients treated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster and 61.5% receiving pregabalin were considered responders (cor-responding numbers for the per protocol set, PPS: 65.3% vs. 62.0%). In PHN more patients responded to 5% lidocaine medicated plaster treatment than to pregabalin (PPS: 62.2% vs. 46.5%), while response was comparable for patients with painful DPN (PPS: 66.7% vs 69.1%). 30% and 50% reductions in NRS-3 scores were greater with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster than with pregabalin. Both treatments reduced allodynia severity. 5% lidocaine medicated plaster showed greater improvements in QoL based on EQ-5D in both PHN and DPN. PGIC and CGIC scores indicated greater improvement for 5% lidocaine medicated plaster treated patients with PHN. Improvements were comparable between treatments in painful DPN. Fewer patients administering 5% lidocaine medicated plaster experienced AEs (safety set, SAF: 18.7% vs. 46.4%), DRAEs (5.8% vs. 41.2%) and related discontinuations compared to patients taking pregabalin. Conclusion: 5% lidocaine medicated plaster showed better efficacy compared with pregabalin in patients with PHN. Within DPN, efficacy was comparable for both treatments. 5% lidocaine medicated plaster showed a favourable efficacy/safety profile with greater improvements in patient satisfaction and QoL compared with pregabalin for both indications, supporting its first line position in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain.

  • 13.
    Hultman, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fredriksson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Perimed AB, Järfälla-Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alvandpour, Atila
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Circuits and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A 15.6 frames per second 1 megapixel Multiple Exposure Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging setup2017In: Journal of Biophotonics, ISSN 1864-063X, E-ISSN 1864-0648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multiple exposure laser speckle contrast imaging (MELSCI) setup for visualizing blood perfusion was developed using a field programmable gate array (FPGA), connected to a 1000 frames per second (fps) 1-megapixel camera sensor. Multiple exposure time images at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 milliseconds were calculated by cumulative summation of 64 consecutive snapshot images. The local contrast was calculated for all exposure times using regions of 4 × 4 pixels. Averaging of multiple contrast images from the 64-millisecond acquisition was done to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The results show that with an effective implementation of the algorithm on an FPGA, contrast images at all exposure times can be calculated in only 28 milliseconds. The algorithm was applied to data recorded during a 5 minutes finger occlusion. Expected contrast changes were found during occlusion and the following hyperemia in the occluded finger, while unprovoked fingers showed constant contrast during the experiment. The developed setup is capable of massive data processing on an FPGA that enables processing of MELSCI data in 15.6 fps (1000/64 milliseconds). It also leads to improved frame rates, enhanced image quality and enables the calculation of improved microcirculatory perfusion estimates compared to single exposure time systems.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-08-07 12:43
  • 14.
    Ziemssen, Tjalf
    et al.
    Klinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Germany.
    Bajenaru, Ovidiu A.
    Carol Davila University of Medical and Pharm, Romania.
    Carra, Adriana
    Hospital Britanico Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    de Klippel, Nina
    Virga Jessaziekenhuis, Belgium.
    de Sa, Joao C.
    Hospital Santa Mari, Belgium.
    Edland, Astrid
    Central Hospital Buskerud, Norway.
    Frederiksen, Jette L.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Heinzlef, Olivier
    Hop Tenon, France.
    Karageorgiou, Klimentini E.
    Gen Hospital Athens, Greece.
    Lander Delgado, Rafael H.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Macias Islas, Miguel A.
    Central University of Guadalajara, Mexico.
    Tubridy, Niall
    Dublin City University, Ireland.
    Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi
    Teva Pharmaceut Ind Ltd, Israel.
    A 2-year observational study of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis converting to glatiramer acetate from other disease-modifying therapies: the COPTIMIZE trial2014In: Journal of Neurology, ISSN 0340-5354, E-ISSN 1432-1459, Vol. 261, no 11, 2101-2111 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies suggest that patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who do not benefit from other disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) may benefit from converting to glatiramer acetate (GA). COPTIMIZE was a 24-month observational study designed to assess the disease course of patients converting to GA 20 mg daily from another DMT. Eligible patients had converted to GA and had received prior DMT for 3-6 months, depending on the reasons for conversion. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. In total, 672 patients from 148 centers worldwide were included in the analysis. Change of therapy to GA was prompted primarily by lack of efficacy (53.6 %) or intolerable adverse events (AEs; 44.8 %). Over a 24-month period, 72.7 % of patients were relapse free. Mean annual relapse rate decreased from 0.86 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.81-0.91] before the change to 0.32 (95 % CI 0.26-0.40; p less than 0.0001) at last observation, while the progression of disability was halted, as the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores remained stable. Patients improved significantly (p less than 0.05) on measures of fatigue, quality of life, depression, and cognition; mobility scores remained stable. The results indicate that changing RRMS patients to GA is associated with positive treatment outcomes.

  • 15.
    Magnusson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    A 3D-Plus-Time Radial-Cartesian Hybrid Sampling of K-Space With High Temporal Resolution and Maintained Image Quality for MRI and FMRI2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Waller, Niels
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, N657 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
    John, Mike T.
    Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    Feuerstahler, Leah
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, N657 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
    Baba, Kazuyoshi
    Department of Prosthodontics, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care.
    Peršić, Sanja
    Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kende, Dóra
    Department of Prosthodontics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Reißmann, Daniel R.
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany..
    Rener-Sitar, Ksenija
    Department of Prosthodontics, Dental Division, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Department of Prosthodontics, University Dental Clinics, University Medical Center of Ljubljan, Ljubljan, Slovenia.
    A 7-day recall period for a clinical application of the oral health impact profile questionnaire.2016In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 20, no 1, 91-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Aims were to investigate and compare the validity and reliability of Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) scores referencing 7-day and 1-month recall periods in international prosthodontic patients.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A sample of 267 patients (mean age = 54.0 years, SD = 17.2 years, 58 % women) with stable oral health-related quality of life was recruited from prosthodontic treatment centers in Croatia, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Slovenia, and Sweden. These patients completed the OHIP on two occasions using a new 7-day recall period and the traditional 1-month recall period. OHIP score validity and reliability were investigated with structural equation models (SEMs) that included OHIP(past 7 days) and OHIP(1 month) latent factors and single indicator measures of global oral health status. The SEMs assessed measurement invariance and the relative validities of the two OHIP latent factors (representing the two recall periods).

    RESULTS: The SEMs provided cogent evidence for recall period measurement invariance for the two OHIP forms and equal validities (r = .48) with external measures of global oral health status.

    CONCLUSION: When assessed in international prosthodontic patients, OHIP scores using the new 7-day recall period were as reliable and valid as the scores using the 1-month recall period.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Conceptual advantages make a 7-day recall period a preferred frame of reference in clinical applications of the OHIP questionnaire.

  • 17.
    Hu, Xiao-Li
    et al.
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ljung, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Basic Convergence Result for Particle Filtering2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The basic nonlinear filtering problem for dynamical systems is considered. Approximating the optimal filter estimate by particle filter methods has become perhaps the most common and useful method in recent years. Many variants of particle filters have been suggested, and there is an extensive literature on the theoretical aspects of the quality of the approximation. Still a clear cut result that the approximate solution, for unbounded functions, converges to the true optimal estimate as the number of particles tends to infinity seems to be lacking. It is the purpose of this contribution to give such a basic convergence result for a rather general class of unbounded functions. Furthermore, a general framework, including many of the particle filter algorithms as special cases, is given.

  • 18.
    Hu, Xiao-Li
    et al.
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ljung, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Basic Convergence Result for Particle Filtering2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The basic nonlinear filtering problem for dynamical systems is considered. Approximating the optimal filter estimate by particle filter methods has become perhaps the most common and useful method in recent years. Many variants of particle filters have been suggested, and there is an extensive literature on the theoretical aspects of the quality of the approximation. Still a clear cut result that the approximate solution, for unbounded functions, converges to the true optimal estimate as the number of particles tends to infinity seems to be lacking. It is the purpose of this contribution to give such a basic convergence result for a rather general class of unbounded functions. Furthermore, a general framework, including many of the particle filter algorithms as special cases, is given.

  • 19.
    Hu, Xiao-Li
    et al.
    China Jiliang University, China.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ljung, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Basic Convergence Result for Particle Filtering2007In: Proceedings of the 7th IFAC Symposium on Nonlinear Control Systems, 2007, 288-293 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basic nonlinear filtering problem for dynamical systems is considered. Approximating the optimal filter estimate by particle filter methods has become perhaps the most common and useful method in recent years. Many variants of particle filters have been suggested, and there is an extensive literature on the theoretical aspects of the quality of the approximation. Still, a clear cut result that the approximate solution, for unbounded functions, converges to the true optimal estimate as the number of particles tends to infinity seems to be lacking. It is the purpose of this contribution to give such a basic convergence result.  

  • 20.
    Hu, Xiao-Li
    et al.
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ljung, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Basic Convergence Result for Particle Filtering2008In: IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, ISSN 1053-587X, E-ISSN 1941-0476, Vol. 56, no 4, 1337-1348 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basic nonlinear filtering problem for dynamical systems is considered. Approximating the optimal filter estimate by particle filter methods has become perhaps the most common and useful method in recent years. Many variants of particle filters have been suggested, and there is an extensive literature on the theoretical aspects of the quality of the approximation. Still a clear-cut result that the approximate solution, for unbounded functions, converges to the true optimal estimate as the number of particles tends to infinity seems to be lacking. It is the purpose of this contribution to give such a basic convergence result for a rather general class of unbounded functions. Furthermore, a general framework, including many of the particle filter algorithms as special cases, is given.

  • 21.
    Curescu, C.
    et al.
    Ericsson Research, Torshamnsgatan 23, Kista, 164 83 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, RTSLAB - Real-Time Systems Laboratory.
    A bidding algorithm for optimized utility-based resource allocation in ad hoc networks2008In: IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, ISSN 1536-1233, Vol. 7, no 12, 1397-1414 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a scheme for bandwidth allocation in wireless ad hoc networks. The quality-of-service (QoS) levels for each end-to-end flow are expressed using a resource-utility function, and our algorithms aim to maximize aggregated utility. The shared channel is modeled as a bandwidth resource defined by maximal cliques of mutual interfering links. We propose a novel resource allocation algorithm that employs an auction mechanism in which flows are bidding for resources. The bids depend both on the flow's utility function and the intrinsically derived shadow prices. We then combine the admission control scheme with a utility-aware on-demand shortest path routing algorithm where shadow prices are used as a natural distance metric. As a baseline for evaluation, we show that the problem can be formulated as a linear programming (LP) problem. Thus, we can compare the performance of our distributed scheme to the centralized LP solution, registering results very close to the optimum. Next, we isolate the performance of price-based routing and show its advantages in hotspot scenarios, and also propose an asynchronous version that is more feasible for ad hoc environments. Further experimental evaluation compares our scheme with the state of the art derived from Kelly's utility maximization framework and shows that our approach exhibits superior performance for networks with increased mobility or less frequent allocations. © 2008 IEEE.

  • 22.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Gothenburg University.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A bisphosphonate-coating improves the fixation of metal implants in human bone. A randomized trial of dental implants2012In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 50, no 5, 1148-1151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many surgical procedures use metal implants in bone. The clinical results depend on the strength of the bone holding these implants. Our objective was to show that a drug released from the implant surface can improve parameters reflecting the quality or amount of this bone. Sixteen patients received paired dental titanium implants in the maxilla, in a randomized, double-blinded fashion. One implant in each pair was coated with a thin fibrinogen layer containing 2 bisphosphonates. The other implant was untreated. Fixation was evaluated by measurement of resonance frequency (implant stability quotient; ISQ) serving as a proxy for stiffness of the implant-bone construct. Increase in ISQ at 6 months of follow-up was the primary variable. None of the patients had any complications. The resonance frequency increased 6.9 ISQ units more for the coated implants (p = 0.0001; Cohens d = 1.3). The average difference in increase in ISQ and the effect size, suggested a clinically relevant improvement. X-ray showed less bone resorption at the margin of the implant both at 2 months (p = 0.012) and at 6 months (p = 0.012). In conclusion, a thin, bisphosphonate-eluting fibrinogen coating might improve the fixation of metal implants in human bone. This might lead to new possibilities for orthopedic surgery in osteoporotic bone and for dental implants.

  • 23.
    Quast, Ulrich
    et al.
    Ex University Hospital, Germany.
    Kaulich, Theodor W.
    University Hospital, Germany.
    Alvarez-Romero, Jose T.
    ININ, Mexico.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Enger, Shirin A.
    McGill University, Canada.
    Medich, David C.
    Worcester Polytech Institute, MA 01609 USA.
    Mourtada, Firas
    Helen F Graham Cancer Centre and Research Institute, DE 19713 USA.
    Perez-Calatayud, Jose
    University Hospital La Fe, Spain; Clin Benidorm, Spain.
    Rivard, Mark J.
    Tufts University, MA 02111 USA.
    Abu Zakaria, G.
    University of Cologne, Germany; Gono University, Bangladesh.
    A brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) for probe-type dosimetry2016In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 32, no 6, 741-748 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In photon brachytherapy (BT), experimental dosimetry is needed to verify treatment plans if planning algorithms neglect varying attenuation, absorption or scattering conditions. The detectors response is energy dependent, including the detector material to water dose ratio and the intrinsic mechanisms. The local mean photon energy E(r) must be known or another equivalent energy quality parameter used. We propose the brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) ((E) over bar), to characterize the photon radiation quality in view of measurements of distributions of the absorbed dose to water, D-w, around BT sources. Materials and methods: While the external photon beam radiotherapy (EBRT) radiation quality index Q(EBRT) ((E) over bar) = TPR1020((E) over bar) is not applicable to BT, the authors have applied a novel energy dependent parameter, called brachytherapy photon radiation quality index, defined as Q(BT) ((E) over bar) = D-prim(r = 2 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees)/D-prim(r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees), utilizing precise primary absorbed dose data, D-prim, from source reference databases, without additional MC-calculations. Results and discussion: For BT photon sources used clinically, Q(BT) ((E) over bar) enables to determine the effective mean linear attenuation coefficient (mu) over bar (E) and thus the effective energy of the primary photons E-prim(eff)(r(0), theta(0)) at the TG-43 reference position P-ref (r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees) being close to the mean total photon energy (E) over bar (tot)(r(0), theta(0)). If one has calibrated detectors, published (E) over bar (tot)(r) and the BT radiation quality correction factor k(Q, Q0)(BT) ((E) over bar, r, theta) for different BT radiation qualities Q and Q(0), the detectors response can be determined and D-w(r, theta) measured in the vicinity of BT photon sources. Conclusions: This novel brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) characterizes sufficiently accurate and precise the primary photon` s penetration probability and scattering potential. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica.

  • 24.
    Rattfält, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ahlström, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berglin, Lena
    The Swedish School of Textiles, University College of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Lindén, Maria
    Dept. of Computer Science and Electronics, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Dept. of Biomedical Engineering & Informatics, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    A Canonical correlation approach to heart beat detection in textile ECG measurements2006In: IET 3rd International Conference On Advances in Medical, Signal and Information Processing, 2006. MEDSIP 2006, IEEE , 2006, 1-4 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in textile sensors has lead to new ways to measure electrocardiograms (ECG). However, additional disturbances from e.g. muscular noise and high skin-electrode impedances often result in poor signal quality. The paper contains a simple application of canonical correlation analysis (CCA) on multi channel ECG signals recorded with textile electrodes. Using CCA to solve the blind source separation (BSS) problem, we intend to separate the ECG signal from the various noise sources. The method (CCABSS) was compared to simple averaging of the ECG channels and to the independent component analysis method (ICA). A heart beat detector was used to evaluate the signal quality. Results show that the signal was completely lost while simulating various noise in 33%, 17% and 7% of the cases for averaging, ICA and CCA, respectively.

  • 25.
    Bernfort, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eckard, Nathalie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A case of community-based fall prevention: Survey of organization and content of minor home help services in Swedish municipalities2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 7, 643-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to survey minor home help services provided by Swedish municipalities with the main purpose to prevent fall injuries.

    METHODS: If minor home help services were presented on the homepage of a municipality, an initial telephone contact was taken. Thereafter a questionnaire was administered, including questions about target groups, aim with the services, tasks included, costs and restrictions for users, budget, and experienced gains with the services. Municipalities not providing minor home help services were asked about the reason therefore and if the municipality had previously provided the services Results: The questionnaire response rate was 92%. In 191 of Sweden's 290 municipalities services were provided by, or in cooperation with, the municipality. Reasons for not providing the services were mainly financial and lack of demand. Services were more often provided in larger cities and in municipalities located in populous regions. In some municipalities services were performed by persons with functional disabilities or unemployed persons. CONCLUSIONS: BOTH PROVIDERS AND USERS EXPRESSED SATISFACTION WITH THE SERVICES ASPECTS EXPRESSED WERE THAT SERVICES LEAD TO GREATER SENSE OF SAFETY AND SOCIAL GAINS THE EFFECT OF THE SERVICES IN TERMS OF FALL PREVENTION IS YET TO BE PROVED WITH ONLY A SMALL FALL-PREVENTIVE EFFECT SERVICES ARE PROBABLY COST-EFFECTIVE IMPROVED QUALITY OF LIFE, SENSE OF SAFETY, AND BEING ABLE TO OFFER MEANINGFUL WORK TO OTHERWISE UNEMPLOYED PERSONS ARE IMPORTANT ASPECTS THAT MIGHT IN THEMSELVES MOTIVATE THE PROVISION OF MINOR HOME HELP SERVICES.

  • 26.
    Bäckman, Carl G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    A case-control study of the influence of the ICU-diary concept on mastery and hopelessness six months after critical illnessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICU-diary concept is associated with less post-traumatic stress syndrome and improved perceived health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) after critical illness, but little is known about its effect on the coping- mastery process, or whether it reduces hopelessness.

    Objective: To see if the ICU-diary concept improves the patient’s ability to master his/her situation after critical illness, and if it reduces the feeling of hopelessness.

    Design: Case control study (subgroup analysis of a multi-centre study on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL).

    Setting: Non-academic 8-bed general ICU.

    Patients: Adults admitted between March 2002 and June 2004.

    Measurements: Mastery and hopelessness were determined using validated questionnaires (the Mastery-Coping scale and a consolidated 2–item hopelessness questionnaire) which were sent home to patients 6 months after critical illness. Responses were compared between patients that received (Cases: n=38) or did not receive an ICU-diary (Controls: n=76) . Diaries were used when a long and complicated stay on the ICU was expected. Controls were matched with diary patients by gender and age. The effect of the ICU-diary was also examined using a multiple regression model.

    Results: The ICU-diary concept group scored significantly higher than the No-diary group in mastery (22.1 vs. 20.4, P<0.05) and lower in hopelessness scores (1.3 vs. 1.6, P<0.05). The positive influence of the ICU-diary disappeared after adjustment for confounding factors in a multiple regression model.

    Conclusion: We were unable to verify any positive influence of the ICU-diary concept on mastery and hopelessness 6 months after critical illness.

  • 27.
    Pham, M K
    et al.
    IAEA.
    Betti, M
    IAEA.
    Povinec, P P
    Comenius University.
    Benmansour, M
    Centre Natl Energie Science and Tech Nucl, Rabat.
    Buenger, V
    Senatsverwaltung Gesundheit Umwelt and Verbraucher.
    Drefvelin, J
    Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority.
    Engeler, C
    WGMLA Radiochem.
    Flemal, J M
    Science Institute for Public Health.
    Gasco, C
    Centre Invest Energet MedioAmbient and Technology.
    Guillevic, J
    Institute Radioprotect and Surette Nucl.
    Gurriaran, R
    IRSN DEI STEME LMRE.
    Groening, M
    IAEA.
    Happel, J D
    University of Miami.
    Herrmann, J
    Bundesamt Seeschifffahrt and Hydrog.
    Klemola, S
    Radiat and Nucl Safety Author.
    Kloster, M
    Senatsverwaltung Gesundheit Umwelt and Verbraucher.
    Kanisch, G
    Johann Heinrich von Thunen Institute.
    Leonard, K
    Centre Environm Fisheries and Aquaculture Science.
    Long, S
    Radiol Protect Institute Ireland.
    Nielsen, S
    Riso Natl Lab.
    Oh, J-S
    Natl Oceanog Centre Southampton.
    Rieth, P U
    Johann Heinrich von Thunen Institute.
    Oestergren, I
    Swedish Radiat Safety Author.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Pinhao, N
    Institute Tecnol and Nucl, Sacavem, Portugal .
    Pujol, L
    Centre Estudios Expt and Obras Publ.
    Sato, K
    Japan Chemistry Anal Centre.
    Schikowski, J
    University of Gottingen.
    Varga, Z
    Hungarian Academy of Science.
    P Vartti, V
    Radiat and Nucl Safety Author.
    Zheng, J
    Natl Institute Radiol Science.
    A certified reference material for radionuclides in the water sample from Irish Sea (IAEA-443)2011In: JOURNAL OF RADIOANALYTICAL AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY, ISSN 0236-5731, Vol. 288, no 2, 603-611 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new certified reference material (CRM) for radionuclides in sea water from the Irish sea (IAEA-443) is described and the results of the certification process are presented. Ten radionuclides (H-3, K-40, Sr-90, Cs-137, U-234, U-235, U-238, Pu-238, Pu239+240 and Am-241) have been certified, and information values on massic activities with 95% confidence intervals are given for four radionuclides (Th-230, Th-232, Pu-239 and Pu-240). Results for less frequently reported radionuclides (Tc-99, Th-228, Np-237 and Pu-241) are also reported. The CRM can be used for quality assurance/quality control of the analysis of radionuclides in water samples, for the development and validation of analytical methods and for training purposes. The material is available in 5 L units from IAEA (http://nucleus.iaea.org/rpst/index.htm).

  • 28.
    Norrman, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro.
    Gårdestig, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics.
    Persliden, Jan
    Örebro.
    Geijer, Håkan
    Örebro.
    A clinical evaluation of the image quality computer program, CoCIQ2005In: Journal of digital imaging, ISSN 0897-1889, Vol. 18, no 2, 138-144 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To provide an objective way of measuring image quality, a computer program was designed that automatically analyzes the test images of a contrast-detail (CD) phantom. The program gives a quantified measurement of image quality by calculating an Image Quality Figure (IQF). The aim of this work was to evaluate the program and adjust it to clinical situations in order to find the detectable level where the program gives a reliable figure of the contrast resolution. The program was applied on a large variety of images with lumbar spine and urographic parameters, from very low to very high image qualities. It was shown that the computer program produces IQFs with small variations and there were a strong linear statistical relation between the computerized evaluation and the evaluation performed by human observers (R 2 = 0.98). This method offers a fast and easy way of conducting image quality evaluations. Copyright © 2005 by SCAR (Society for Computer Applications in Radiology).

  • 29.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    A cohort study of patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss in a Swedish population2013In: Auris, nasus, larynx, ISSN 0385-8146, E-ISSN 1879-1476, Vol. 40, no 1, 41-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe a large cohort of patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in Sweden, and also to explore the possibility of finding potential possible differences between various diagnoses within SNHL. It is also of great interest to see how a multidisciplinary team was used in the different subgroups and the frequency of hearing aids use in patients with tinnitus.

    METHODS: Medical records of all patients who had received the diagnosis SNHL in Östergötland County, Sweden between 2004 and 2007 were reviewed. Patients between 20 and 80 years with tinnitus and a pure tone average (PTA) lower than 70dB HL were included in the study. Patients were excluded from the analyses if they had a cochlear implantation, middle ear disorders or had a hearing loss since birth or childhood. The investigators completed a form for each included patient, covering background facts, and audiograms taken at the yearly check up.

    RESULTS: Of a total 1672 patients' medical record review, 714 patients were included. The majority of patients (79%) were in the age group over 50 years. In male patients with bilateral tinnitus, the PTA for the left ear was significantly higher than for the right ear. The results regarding the configuration of hearing loss revealed that 555 patients (78%) had symmetric and 159 (22%) asymmetric hearing loss. Retrocochlear examinations were done in 372 patients and MRI was the most common examination. In all patients, 400 had no hearing aids and out of those 220 had unilateral tinnitus and 180 patients had bilateral tinnitus. 219 patients had a PTA>20dB HL and did not have any hearing aid. Results demonstrated that the Stepped Care model was not used widely in the daily practice. In our study, patients with bilateral-, unilateral hearing loss or Mb Ménière were the most common patients included in the Stepped Care model.

    CONCLUSION: In a large cohort of patients with SNHL and tinnitus, despite their hearing loss only 39% had hearing aids. It was observed that the medical record review often showed a lack of information about many background factors, such as; patients' general health condition, which could be a quality factor that needs improvement. Our results show that the Stepped Care model could be an effective option for providing a better access for tinnitus-focused treatment, although the number of patients in this study who were included in the Stepped Care model was low.

  • 30.
    Björklund, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Värbrand, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Yuan, Di
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems.
    A Column Generation Method for Spatial TDMA Scheduling in Ad Hoc Networks2004In: Ad hoc networks, ISSN 1570-8705, Vol. 2, no Issue 4, 405-418 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ad hoc network can be set up by a number of units without the need of any permanent infrastructure. Two units establish a communication link if the channel quality is sufficiently high. As not all pairs of units can establish direct links, traffic between two units may have to be relayed through other units. This is known as the multi-hop functionality. In military command and control systems, ad hoc networks are also referred to as multi-hop radio networks. Spatial TDMA (STDMA) is a scheme for access control in ad hoc networks. STDMA improves TDMA by allowing simultaneous transmission of multiple units. In this paper, we study the optimization problem of STDMA scheduling, where the objective is to find minimum-length schedules. Previous work for this problem has focused on heuristics, whose performance is difficult to analyze when optimal solutions are not known. We develop novel mathematical programming formulations for this problem, and present a column generation solution method. Our numerical experiments show that the method generates a very tight bound to the optimal schedule length, and thereby enables optimal or near-optimal solutions. The column generation method can be used to provide benchmarks when evaluating STDMA scheduling algorithms. In particular, we use the bound obtained in the column generation method to evaluate a simple greedy algorithm that is suitable for distributed implementations.

  • 31.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Central County Primary Health Care.
    A combination of systematic review and clinicians’ beliefs in interventions for subacromial pain2002In: British Journal of General Practice, ISSN 0960-1643, Vol. 52, no 475, 145-152 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to determine which treatments for patients with subacromial pain are trusted by general practitioners (GPs) and physiotherapists, and to compare trusted treatments with evidence from a systematic critical review of the scientific literature. A two-step process was used: a questionnaire (written case simulation) and a systematic critical review. The questionnaire was mailed to 18 GPs and 71 physiotherapists in Sweden. The total response rate was 72% (186/259). The following treatments were trusted: ergonomics/adjustments at work, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs, movement exercises, acupuncture, ultrasound therapy, strengthening exercises, stretching, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, and superficial heat or ice therapy. The review, including efficacy studies for the treatments found to be trusted, was conducted using the CINAHL, EMBASE and MEDLINE databases. Evidence for efficacy was recorded in relation to methodological quality and to diagnostic criteria that labelled participants as having subacromial pain or a non-specific shoulder disorder. Forty studies were included. The methodological quality varied and only one treatment had definitive evidence for efficacy for non-specific patients, namely injection of corticosteroids. The trust in corticosteroids, injected in the subacromial bursa, was supported by definitive evidence for short-term efficacy. Acupuncture had tentative evidence for short-term efficacy in patients with subacromial pain. Ultrasound therapy was ineffective for subacromial pain. This is supported by tentative evidence and, together with earlier reviews, this questions both the trust in the treatment and its use. The clinicians' trust in treatments had a weak association with available scientific evidence.

  • 32.
    Field, M. R.
    et al.
    RMIT University, Australia.
    Carlsson, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Partridge, J. G.
    RMIT University, Australia.
    McCulloch, D. G.
    RMIT University, Australia.
    McKenzie, D. R.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Bilek, M. M. M.
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    A combinatorial comparison of DC and high power impulse magnetron sputtered Cr2AlC2014In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 259, 746-750 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a combinatorial approach, Cr, Al and C have been deposited onto sapphire wafer substrates by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) and DC magnetron sputtering. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed to determine the composition and microstructure of the coatings and confirm the presence of the Cr2AlC MAX phase within both coatings. One location in both the DCMS and HiPIMS coatings contained only MAX phase Cr2AlC. The electrical resistivity was also found to be nearly identical at this location and close to that reported from the bulk, indicating that the additional energy in the HiPIMS plasma was not required to form high quality MAX phase Cr2AlC.

  • 33.
    Sjöqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    González-Cano, Rafael C.
    University of Málaga, Spain.
    López Navarette, Juan T.
    University of Málaga, Spain.
    Casado, Juan
    University of Málaga, Spain.
    Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen
    University of Málaga, Spain.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Norman, Patrick
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Computational Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A combined MD/QM and experimental exploration of conformational richness in branched oligothiophenes2014In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 16, no 45, 24841-24852 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infrared (IR) absorption and vibrational Raman spectra of a family of branched oligothiophenes have been determined experimentally as well as theoretically. The molecular spectra have been compared to those of the linear analogues, with identification made of spectral features due to structural properties that are valued in organic solar cell applications. The theoretical spectra have been obtained through a newly developed method in which individual conformer spectra, calculated at the time-dependent DFT level in this work, are weighted by statistics extracted from classical molecular dynamics trajectories. The agreement with experiment for the resulting averaged spectra is at least as good as, and often better than, what is observed for Boltzmann-weighted spectra. As the weights are available before the costly step of spectrum calculation, the method has the additional advantage of enabling efficient approximations. For simulating the molecular dynamics of the studied α,β-linked thiophenes and 2-methylthiophenes, high quality parameters have been derived for the CHARMM force field. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the IR and Raman spectra have been investigated, both experimentally and theoretically.

  • 34.
    McKelvey, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Combined State-Space Identification Algorithm Applied to Data From a Modal Analysis Experiment on a Separation System1994Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses identification of state-space models from impulse response or initial value experiments. Kung's geometrical realization algorithm is combined with classical nonlinear parametric optimization to improve the quality of the estimated state-space model. These ideas are applied on real data originating from a modal analysis experiment on a separation system. The results indicate that the parametric optimization step increases the model quality significantly compared with the initial model the realization algorithm provides.

  • 35.
    McKelvey, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Combined State-Space Identification Algorithm Applied to Data From a Modal Analysis Experiment on a Separation System1994In: Proceedings of the 33rd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, 1994, 2286-2287 vol.3 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses identification of state-space models from impulse response or initial value experiments. Kung's geometrical realization algorithm is combined with classical nonlinear parametric optimization to improve the quality of the estimated state-space model. These ideas are applied on real data originating from a modal analysis experiment on a separation system. The results indicate that the parametric optimization step increases the model quality significantly compared with the initial model the realization algorithm provides.

  • 36.
    Eilertsen, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mantiuk, R. K.
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Unger, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A comparative review of tone-mapping algorithms for high dynamic range video2017In: Computer graphics forum (Print), ISSN 0167-7055, E-ISSN 1467-8659, Vol. 36, no 2, 565-592 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tone-mapping constitutes a key component within the field of high dynamic range (HDR) imaging. Its importance is manifested in the vast amount of tone-mapping methods that can be found in the literature, which are the result of an active development in the area for more than two decades. Although these can accommodate most requirements for display of HDR images, new challenges arose with the advent of HDR video, calling for additional considerations in the design of tone-mapping operators (TMOs). Today, a range of TMOs exist that do support video material. We are now reaching a point where most camera captured HDR videos can be prepared in high quality without visible artifacts, for the constraints of a standard display device. In this report, we set out to summarize and categorize the research in tone-mapping as of today, distilling the most important trends and characteristics of the tone reproduction pipeline. While this gives a wide overview over the area, we then specifically focus on tone-mapping of HDR video and the problems this medium entails. First, we formulate the major challenges a video TMO needs to address. Then, we provide a description and categorization of each of the existing video TMOs. Finally, by constructing a set of quantitative measures, we evaluate the performance of a number of the operators, in order to give a hint on which can be expected to render the least amount of artifacts. This serves as a comprehensive reference, categorization and comparative assessment of the state-of-the-art in tone-mapping for HDR video.

  • 37.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, L
    n/a.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    A comparative study addressing health-related quality of life, symptoms of depression, perceived control and knowledge in patients with heart failure and their partners.2009In: Esc congress, Barcelona, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Gustavsson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Zenterio.
    A Comparative Study of Automated Test Explorers2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With modern computer systems becoming more and more complicated, theimportance of rigorous testing to ensure the quality of the product increases.This, however, means that the cost to perform tests also increases. In orderto address this problem, a lot of research has been conducted during thelast years to find a more automated way of testing software systems. Inthis thesis, different algorithms to automatically explore and test a systemhave been implemented and evaluated. In addition to this, a second setof algorithms have been implemented with the objective to isolate whichinteractions with the system were responsible for a failure. These algorithmswere also evaluated and compared against each other. In the first evaluationtwo explorers, which I called DeBruijn and LStarExplorer, were consideredsuperior to the other. The first used a DeBruijn sequence to brute forcea solution while the second used the L*-algorithm to build an FSM overthe system under test. This FSM could then be used to provide a moreaccurate description for when the failure occurred. The result from thesecond evaluation were two reducers which both tried to recreate a failureby first applying interactions performed just before the failure occurred. Ifthis was not successful, they tried interactions further and further away, untilthe failure was triggered. In addition to this, the thesis contains descriptionsabout the framework used to run the different strategies.

  • 39.
    Östh, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Serban, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gong, Shaofang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Comparative Study of Single-Ended vs. Differential Six-Port Modulators for Wireless Communications2015In: IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems Part 1: Regular Papers, ISSN 1549-8328, E-ISSN 1558-0806, Vol. 62, no 2, 564-570 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If present, nonlinear effects in a six-port modulator cause distortion and degradation of the quality of the modulated output waveform. How nonlinear effects occur and their impact on system performance were derived in a mathematical model. The model shows that non-ideal performance of the passive six-port correlator is the main contributor to nonlinear distortion. Simulations and measurements on two manufactured six-port modulators were used to validate the theory and to give deeper insight on system performance. It is shown that by using a differentially signaled six-port modulator instead of a single-ended six-port modulator, better performance is achieved over a wide bandwidth. For an error vector magnitude of less than 10%, the relative bandwidth was measured to 12% for the single-ended but 30% for the differentially signaled modulator

  • 40.
    Götherström, Ulla-Christel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A comparative study of text telephone and videophone relay services2004In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, Vol. 16, no 2, 101-109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to compare text telephone relay service and videophone relay service. The target group was people borne deaf. The following aspects were investigated: (1) socioeconomic costs, (2) costs of different actors, (3) qualitative aspects of the services, (4) outcomes (intermediate effects and quality of life). The study was longitudinal and measurements were made at three occasions. Data collection was made by post-mailed questionnaires. Of the 41 respondents, 16 persons had access to the text telephone relay service only and 25 persons had access to text telephone relay service supplemented with videophone relay service. The ratings of the quality of the services and the outcomes were significantly higher for videophone relay service than for text telephone relay service (at a 95%-level). The incremental cost was approximately SEK 40 000, or EUR 4 510 (1 EUR = 8.87 SEK, as of 31 December 2000) higher per person and year for the group with access to both text telephone relay service and videophone relay service compared with the group with access to text telephone relay service only.

  • 41. Axelsson, B
    et al.
    Bodén, K
    Fransson, Sven Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Hansson, I B
    Persliden, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radio Physics.
    Witt, Hans
    A comparison of analogue and digital techniques in upper gastrointestinal examinations: absorbed dose and diagnostic quality of the images.2000In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, Vol. 10, 1351-1354 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Diószegi, Attila
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Organisation / Component Technology, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Svensson, Ingvar L
    Department of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Organisation / Component Technology, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    A comparison of Fourier vs. Newtonian thermal analyse and its influence on the inverse kinetic growth calculationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal analysis of cooling curves is a metallurgical process control tool. Any phase transformations and their kinetics are reflected in the cooling rate. An interpretation of the cooling rate and temperatures is coupled to critical parameters, which are needed to assure correct quality of the melt and to give recommendations to modify the melt. This paper was inspired by the question, how well does a thermal ana lysis with one or two thermocouples and subsequent numerical analysis reflect the real phase transformations which occur?

    Inverse kinetic analysis using Fourier Thermal Analysis and Newtonian Thermal Analysis has been investigated using simulated cooling curves. The present study uses a direct simulation including a kinetic model for simulation of a eutectic phase. In this case, since the solidification sequence is well defined the inverse kinetic analysis should recreate the relation between the growth rate and supercooling of the eutectic phase. The Newtonian Thermal Analysis is based on an interpretation of a single thermal point with respect to solidification and contains a series of assumptions which are not entirely undoubted physically.

    Consequently the inverse kinetic analysis results in random quality growth parameters. The Fourier Thermal Analysis is based on interpretation of temperature differences between two thermal points with respect to solidification. The calculations conducted, in combination with the inverse kinetic analysis reveal a stable procedure. The decisive parameter determining the quality of inverse analysis is the distance between the thermal points analysed. Closely situated thermal points assure the best quality. The Fourier Thermal Analysis reflects the solidification most correctly.

  • 43.
    Sundell, Anna Lena
    et al.
    Department of Paediatric Dentistry, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Törnhage, Carl-Johan
    Department of Paediatrics, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden / Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg's University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    A comparison of health-related quality of life in 5- and 10-year-old Swedish children with and without cleft lip and/or palate2017In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 27, no 4, 238-246 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The current understanding on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in young Swedish children with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) is sparse, and therefore, research on impact of CL/P on HRQoL in children is needed.

    Aims To investigate HRQoL in 5- and 10-year-old Swedish children with CL/P in comparison with non-cleft controls. Also to analyse whether there were any differences in HRQoL between children with cleft lip (with or without cleft palate, CL ± P) and cleft palate only (CP) and/or gender differences. Design A total of 137 children with CL/P and 305 non-cleft controls participated. HRQoL was measured with KIDSCREEN-52.

    Results All children in the study exhibited HRQoL within or above the age-matched reference interval of the method with similar results in both groups; however, in the dimension ‘social support and peers’, the 10-year-old children with CL/P perceived lower HRQoL than the non-cleft controls, but it did not reach statistical significance. Type of cleft or gender did not influence HRQoL.

    Conclusions Both 5- and 10-year-old Swedish children with CL/P had HRQoL in the normal reference interval. Their general life situations were well adjusted to their clefts, but the older children with CL/P felt more excluded and less supported by peers.

  • 44.
    Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    A comparison of persons who got Motivational Interviewing (MI) or not to promote physical activity, and prediction of factors influencing change of physical activity level after two years2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical inactivity, related lifestyle diseases and back pain are severe problems in today’s society. One way to increase physical activity level is through Motivational Interviewing (MI).

     

    Purpose: Comparing participants who were in need of MI for physical activity due to risk of heart- and coronary disease with participants not in need of MI, and to describe whether MI for physical activity and other factors can predict change of physical activity level.

     

    Method: A cohort was followed during two years and measured on lifestyle factors, socioeconomic and psychological factors, general health, motivation to change lifestyle and back pain by questionnaires. Based on risk of heart and coronary disease, participants underwent an MI-session for increased physical activity (n=393) or no MI-session (n=380) at baseline.

     

    Results: Besides having a deteriorated lifestyle, the majority of participants who received MI were females, had lower self-estimated economy, had lower health-related quality of life, scored lower on psychological factors and had comorbidity and back pain to a larger extent. Factors related to increase of physical activity level included being physically inactive at baseline, being a female, not having MI and not having disability due to back pain.

     

    Conclusion: Participants in the MI-group had poorer health and more back pain. Having MI did not predict an increase of physical activity, but a low level of physical activity in the past and being a female did play a part in the prediction. More research is needed on MI for increase of physical activity level for an individual with risk of heart- and coronary disease and/or with back pain.

  • 45.
    Gudnason, Thorarinn
    et al.
    Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Broddadottir, Hallveig
    Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Skuladottir, Frida
    Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Halldorsdottir, Hulda
    Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Thorgeirsson, Gestur
    Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Andersen, Karl
    Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    A comparison of quality indicators in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction in two Nordic countries2009In: in CARDIOLOGY, vol 113, 2009, Vol. 113, 86-86 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Chuasomboon, Sasit
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Communication Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A comparison of ranging and localization techniques in indoor, urban, and tunnel environments2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Localization in wireless network sensors is an attractive research area nowadays. It is widely used in many applications e.g., indoor/outdoor asset tracking, intrusion detection, search-and-rescue, road traffic monitoring, and water quality monitoring. An accuracy and robustness to noise are important issues for localization which is needed to study and research to find the best solution. This thesis compares a ranging and localization techniques in indoor, urban and tunnel through a high performance ray-tracing simulator, Wireless InSiteR . Ranging techniques are based on two standard distance related measurement schemes e.g., RSS and TOA. A linearized least squares technique with reference node selection approach is chosen to estimate unknown nodes positions. Indoor and urban area are built-in floor plan and terrain available in simulator program, while tunnel is designed. In general, localization accuracy suffers from multipath and NLOS condition. This thesis also observes characteristic of them from ray-tracing method perspective. Firstly, important simulation parameters such as number ofreflections/diffractions, types of waveform, and types of antenna are analyzed oneach environments. Then, the models for distance estimation based on RSS and TOA measurements are created using measurements in simulated environments. The thesis proposes four scenarios for distance estimation model. They are line-of-sight (LOS), non-line-of-sight (NLOS), combination of LOS and NLOS, and NLOS with obstacle. All four scenarios models are derived along with model error distribution to observe characteristic of noise due to multipath and NLOS condition. Finally, the localization using only LOS condition measurements, is tested on each environment and compared results in term of accuracy.

  • 47.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Brandt, Signe Kofoed
    Habilitation Services, Kullbergska Hospital, Katrineholm, Sweden.
    A Comparison of Recordings of Sentences and Spontaneous Speech: Perceptual and Acoustic Measures in Preschool Children's Voices.2012In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1557-8658, Vol. 26, no 5, 13- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-controlled recording in a studio is fundamental in most voice rehabilitation. However, this laboratory like recording method has been questioned because voice use in a natural environment may be quite different. In children's natural environment, high background noise levels are common and are an important factor contributing to voice problems. The primary noise source in day-care centers is the children themselves. The aim of the present study was to compare perceptual evaluations of voice quality and acoustic measures from a controlled recording with recordings of spontaneous speech in children's natural environment in a day-care setting. Eleven 5-year-old children were recorded three times during a day at the day care. The controlled speech material consisted of repeated sentences. Matching sentences were selected from the spontaneous speech. All sentences were repeated three times. Recordings were randomized and analyzed acoustically and perceptually. Statistic analyses showed that fundamental frequency was significantly higher in spontaneous speech (P<0.01) as was hyperfunction (P<0.001). The only characteristic the controlled sentences shared with spontaneous speech was degree of hoarseness (Spearman's rho=0.564). When data for boys and girls were analyzed separately, a correlation was found for the parameter breathiness (rho=0.551) for boys, and for girls the correlation for hoarseness remained (rho=0.752). Regarding acoustic data, none of the measures correlated across recording conditions for the whole group.

  • 48.
    Lagerqvist, Victor
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, TCSLAB - Theoretical Computer Science Laboratory.
    A comparison of SL- and unit-resolution search rules for stratified logic programs2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There are two symmetrical resolution rules applicable to logic programs - SL-resolution which yields a top-down refutation and unit-resolution which yields a bottom-up refutation. Both resolution principles need to be coupled with a search rule before they can be used in practice. The search rule determines in which order program clauses are used in the refutation and affects both performance, completeness and quality of solutions. The thesis surveys exhaustive and heuristic search rules for SL-resolution and transformation techniques for (general) logic programs that makes unit-resolution goal oriented.

    The search rules were implemented as meta-interpreters for Prolog and were benchmarked on a suite of programs incorporating both deterministic and nondeterministic code. Whenever deemed applicable benchmark programs were permuted with respect to clause and goal ordering to see if it affected the interpreters performance and termination.

    With the help of the evaluation the conclusion was that alternative search rules for SL-resolution should not be used for performance gains but can in some cases greatly improve the quality of solutions, e.g. in planning or other applications where the quality of an answer correlates with the length of the refutation. It was also established that A* is more flexible than exhaustive search rules since its behavior can be fine-tuned with weighting, and can in some cases be more efficient than both iterative deepening and breadth-first search. The bottom-up interpreter based on unit-resolution and magic transformation had several advantages over the top-down interpreters. Notably for programs where subgoals are recomputed many times. The great disparity in implementation techniques made direct performance comparisons hard however, and it is not clear if even an optimized bottom-up interpreter is competitive against a top-down interpreter with tabling of answers.

  • 49.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    A comparison of studio recordings and recordings of spontaneous speech: assessments of voice quality in pre-school children2011In: Pan European Voice Conference (PEVOC9), Marseille, France / [ed] Antoine Giovanni & Nathalie Henrich, Marseille, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well controlled recording in a studio is the basis for voice rehabilitation. However, this laboratory like recording method can be questioned since voice use in a natural environment may be quite different. In children’s natural environment high background noise levels are common and an important factor contributing to voice problems. The noise exposure often occurs in day-care centers with the children themselves as the primary noise source (McAllister, Granqvist, Sjölander, Sundberg 2009). The aim of the present study was to compare perceptual evaluations of voice quality from a controlled recording to recordings of spontaneous speech in children’s natural environment in a day-care setting. Ten five-year-old children were recorded three times during a day at the day-care. The controlled speech material consisted of repeated sentences. Matching sentences were selected from the spontaneous speech. All sentences were repeated times three. The recordings were randomized and analyzed acoustically and evaluated perceptually by three expert listeners. Statistic analyses of all recordings showed that the laboratory sentences represent spontaneous speech characteristics regarding degree of hoarseness (r=.52) and to a lesser extent also for breathiness (r=. 401). For boys a correlation was found only for the parameter breathiness (r=.539) and for girls only for hoarseness (r=.648).  

     

    References

    McAllister, A., Granqvist, S. Sjölander, P. Sundberg, J. (2009). Child voice and noise: A pilot study of the effect of a day at the day-care on ten children’s voice quality according to perceptual evaluation. J Voice, Sep;23(5):587-93.

  • 50.
    Druid, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Forensic Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmgren, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Forensic Science and Toxicology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A compilation of fatal and control concentrations of drugs in postmortem femoral blood1997In: Journal of Forensic Sciences, ISSN 0022-1198, E-ISSN 1556-4029, Vol. 42, no 1, 79-87 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A compilation of postmortem femoral blood concentrations of drugs is presented. The samples are collected from cases in which the cause of death was: A) certified intoxication by one substance alone, B) certified intoxication by more than one substance and/or alcohol, and C) certified other cause of death without incapacitation due to drugs. The concentrations were compared with blood concentrations detected in suspected drugged drivers (D), and with previously published fatal and therapeutic concentrations. The special features of this compilation are: 1) exclusively femoral blood concentrations are quoted, 2) all analyses are based on samples handled according to a standardized, quality-controlled procedure, 3) two control groups are included, and 4) one-substance-only intoxications are separated from other intoxications. The material is based on a selection of 15,800 samples sent to the Department of Forensic Chemistry in Linkoping, Sweden, during 1992 to 1995 from the six forensic pathology units in Sweden, and the list includes 83 drugs. The compilation includes drugs, where previously published data are scarce. Furthermore, the data gathered from cases with other cause of death than intoxication (group C) constitute a new kind of reference information, which probably offers a better estimate of obviously non fatal levels in postmortem blood than any compilation of therapeutic concentrations in living subjects. The possible factors influencing postmortem drug concentrations are discussed.

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