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  • 1.
    Zhang, Yingfeng
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design and Integrated Manufacturing Technology, Ministry of Education, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Shaanxi, PR China.
    Ren, Shan
    Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design and Integrated Manufacturing Technology, Ministry of Education, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Shaanxi, PR China; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Honghe University, Yunnan, PR China.
    Liu, Yang
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Department of Production, University of Vaasa, Vaasa, Finland.
    Si, Shubin
    Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design and Integrated Manufacturing Technology, Ministry of Education, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Shaanxi, PR China.
    A big data analytics architecture for cleaner manufacturing and maintenance processes of complex products2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 142, no 2, 626-641 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cleaner production (CP) is considered as one of the most important means for manufacturing enterprises to achieve sustainable production and improve their sustainable competitive advantage. However, implementation of the CP strategy was facing barriers, such as the lack of complete data and valuable knowledge that can be employed to provide better support on decision-making of coordination and optimization on the product lifecycle management (PLM) and the whole CP process. Fortunately, with the wide use of smart sensing devices in PLM, a large amount of real-time and multi-source lifecycle big data can now be collected. To make better PLM and CP decisions based on these data, in this paper, an overall architecture of big data-based analytics for product lifecycle (BDA-PL) was proposed. It integrated big data analytics and service-driven patterns that helped to overcome the above-mentioned barriers. Under the architecture, the availability and accessibility of data and knowledge related to the product were achieved. Focusing on manufacturing and maintenance process of the product lifecycle, and the key technologies were developed to implement the big data analytics. The presented architecture was demonstrated by an application scenario, and some observations and findings were discussed in details. The results showed that the proposed architecture benefited customers, manufacturers, environment and even all stages of PLM, and effectively promoted the implementation of CP. In addition, the managerial implications of the proposed architecture for four departments were analyzed and discussed. The new CP strategy provided a theoretical and practical basis for the sustainable development of manufacturing enterprises.

  • 2.
    Kiflemariam, Jordanos
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    A Biomimetic Manganese Model for Artificial Photosynthesis: Q-band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of a Novel Mn2(II,III) Complex2005Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In natural oxygen-producing photosynthesis solar energy is stored as chemical energy, in carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, using water as electron source. The large transmembrane protein complex, PSII, is the key enzyme in the light-driven reactions. Water oxidation is accomplished by a triad in PSII in which the Mn-cluster plays an important role. In the artificial photosynthetic system, nature’s photosynthesis will be mimicked such that hydrogen, a sustainable energy source, can be produced from solar energy and water alone. Since water oxidiation requires the catalytic activity of a Mn-cluster in photosynthesis, different artificially constructed manganese complexes are investigated.

    The dinuclear ([Mn2(II,III)L(µ-OAc)2]ClO4), where L is the X-anion of 2-(N,N-Bis(2-methylpyridyl)aminomethyl)-6-(N-(3,5-ditert-butylbenzyl-2-hydroxy)-N-(pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl)-4-methylphenol, an unsymmetric ligand with two coordinating phenolate groups, has been studied. The two Mn-ions are linked via a mono-µ-oxo bridge and two acetate ligands. Q-band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance was conducted on the Unsymmetric Mn2(II,III) Complex. Aquired results show that the complex has a 2600 Gauss broad signal (11 400-14 000 Gauss) with 14-17 lines at g~2 and hyperfines of 120 Gauss. This is consistent with previous X-band studies. Q-band spectra of the Unsymmetric Mn(II,III) display increased hyperfine resolution compared to Qband spectra of the symmetric complex, Mn2(bpmp)(µ-OAC)2. This is noticeable since Unsymmetric Mn2(II,III) and Mn2 (bpmp)(µ-OAC)2 partly overlap in low-frequency experiments (X-band EPR).

    Further investigations are yet to be expected. Nevertheless, the conducted thesis study provides important knowledge in the futuristic goal of building an artificial super-complex.

  • 3.
    Evangelista, Pietro
    et al.
    IRAT-CNR and Department of Management and Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sweeney, Edward
    National Institute for Transport and Logistics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland.
    A case study investigation on purchasing green transport and logistics services2012In: Purchasing & Supply Management in a Changing World: IPSERA 2012 Conference Proceedings / [ed] Esposito, E., Evangelista, P., Pastore, G., Raffa, M., Napoli, Italia: Edizioni Scientifiche Italiane , 2012, WP17-1-WP17-13 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n the context of green supply chain management, green purchasing has received increased attention over the past decade and the strategic importance of introducing green aspects into purchasing practices has been recognised. Despite this growing importance, little has been written in relation to purchasing green transport and logistics services. Considering the strong environmental impact associated with transport and logistics activities, much remains to be learned concerning buyer’s practices when sourcing more sustainable services from third party logistics companies (3PLs). The aim of this paper is to explore practices of buying green transport and logistics services in three different European countries (Italy, Ireland and Sweden) using a multiple case study research approach. The paper analyses how general environmental company ambitions and environmental purchasing practices are reflected when green transport and logistics services are purchased. The results of the paper indicate that while the case companies show a relatively high concern of green issues at company level, a lower importance is attributed to green issues at the purchasing function level. When green concerns in purchasing transport and logistics services are analysed the level of importance decrease dramatically. It emerges a conflicting attitude among the overall company level and the purchasing of transport and logistics services. This suggests that there is the potential for improvements especially in the area of green collaboration in buyer and supplier relationships. 

  • 4.
    Sundin, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hedlund, Gun
    A characteristic strategy of the period2012In: Gender Mainstreaming as a Sustainable Process / [ed] Lindholm, Kristina.Lindholm, Kristina.Sjöberg, Karin.Svensson, Lennart, Studentlitteratur, 2012, 249-270 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Mejía-Dugand, Santiago
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A city’s utility company as an axis for its sustainable development: A case study of EPM of Medellín, ColombiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the central role that a utility company can play in the sustainable development of a city by studying the case of EPM of Medellín, Colombia. After presenting a brief history of the development of public services in Colombia, the article discusses the company’s management model, the local laws and regulations affecting it, the direct and indirect benefits for the city and the risks that come along with the power it has acquired. It is claimed that early decisions to maintain public ownership of key assets and provide the company with administrative autonomy have allowed it to remain competitive, despite the liberalization of the utilities market in the 1990s. This in turn has allowed the city to dramatically increase its municipal revenue and thus its spending on social projects. This case promises to contribute to the discussion on entrepreneurial cities looking to increase their citizens’ well-being through municipally-owned corporations that are commercial and social at the same time. It also contributes to the debate about operational efficiency between the private and the public sectors, and the central role that utility providers play in the construction of more sustainable cities. Ultimately, this case study can contribute with good practices from countries of which Academia knows so little.

  • 6.
    Sandberg, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrahamsson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Classification of Different Strategic Roles of Logistics2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Nordgren, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A climate tax on meat?2012In: Climate change and sustainable development :: ethical perspectives on land use and food production: ethical perspectives on land use and food production / [ed] Thomas Potthast, Simon Meisch, Wageningen: Wageningen Academic Publishers, 2012, 109-114 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is a major framing condition for sustainable development of agriculture and food. Global food production is a major contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions and at the same time it is among the sectors worst affected by climate change. This book brings together a multidisciplinary group of authors exploring the ethical dimensions of climate change and food. Conceptual clarifications provide a necessary basis for putting sustainable development into practice. Adaptation and mitigation demand altering both agricultural and consumption practices. Intensive vs. extensive produc.

  • 8.
    Lee, Hui Mien
    et al.
    Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology.
    Nasr, Nabil
    Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Comparative Study of the E-waste Systems in New York State and Sweden2010In: Proceedings of Going Green CARE INNOVATION 2010, 8th International Symposium, November 8-11, Vienna, Austria, paper 026 on CD., 2010, 026-026 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a comparative study of the e-waste management systems between New York State (NYS) in the U.S. and Sweden in the EU. E-waste challengeshave escalated to become an important focus of waste stream in the last decade, especiallyin light of increasing legislations across the world. NYS, being the latest state to join theother 21 states in U.S. to pass an e-waste bill, is the subject to study for evaluating thepotential impact of the bill. Thus the first step is to benchmark the current NYS situationwith the existing Swedish system, the best performing one in EU. The system will becharacterized by 5 major categories for evaluation and analysis. The similarities,differences and possible outcomes for NYS bill are identified and stated here.

  • 9.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Hagemann, Markus
    NewClimate Institute Climate Policy and Global Sustainab, Germany; University of Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Roeser, Frauke
    NewClimate Institute Climate Policy and Global Sustainab, Germany.
    Amars, Latif
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    A Comparison of Design and Support Priorities of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions2015In: Journal of Environment and Development, ISSN 1070-4965, E-ISSN 1552-5465, Vol. 24, no 2, 237-264 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In context of the 1992 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, developing countries are asked to contribute to greenhouse gas control objectives by proposing so-called Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs). Although the concept provides developing countries with complete flexibility to design NAMAs, a majority of proposals seek international support. This article improves our understanding of the matching of NAMA design and international support by exploring (mis-) alignment between support providers and NAMA developers prioritization for NAMAs. The article assesses survey responses from support providers in light of records of NAMAs. We conclude that there is a mismatch between support providers primary emphasis on systems for measuring emissions reductions and the lack of such provisions in existing NAMA proposals. Furthermore, sector preferences may create structural biases in NAMA support.

  • 10.
    He, Qing
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Comprehensive Analysis of Optimal Link Scheduling for Emptying a Wireless Network2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless communications have become an important part of modern life. The ubiquitous wireless networks and connectivities generate exponentially increasing data traffic. In view of this, wireless network optimization, which aims at utilizing the limited resource, especially spectrum and energy, as efficiently as possible from a network perspective, is essential for performance improvement and sustainable development of wireless communications.

    In the dissertation, we focus on a fundamental problem of wireless network optimization, link scheduling, as well as its subproblem, link activation. The problem type arises because of the nature of wireless media and hence it is of relevance to a wide range of networks with multiple access. We freshen these classic problems up by novel extensions incorporating new technologies of interference management or with new performance metrics. We also revisit the problems in their classic setup to gain new theoretical results and insights for problem-solving. Throughout the study, we consider the problems with a general setup, such that the insights presented in this dissertation are not constrained to a specific technology or network type. Since link activation and scheduling are key elements of access coordination in wireless communications, the study opens up new approaches that significantly improve network performance, and eventually benefit practical applications.

    The dissertation consists of five research papers. The first paper addresses maximum link activation with cooperative transmission and interference cancellation. Papers II and III investigate the minimum-time link scheduling problem in general and a particular class of networks, respectively. In Paper IV, we consider the scheduling problem of emptying a network in its broad form and provide a general optimality condition. In Paper V, we study the scheduling problem with respect to age of information.

    List of papers
    1. Maximum Link Activation with Cooperative Transmission and Interference Cancellation in Wireless Networks
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maximum Link Activation with Cooperative Transmission and Interference Cancellation in Wireless Networks
    2017 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, ISSN 1536-1233, E-ISSN 1558-0660, Vol. 16, no 2, 408-421 p.Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We address the maximum link activation problem in wireless networks with new features, namely when the transmitters can perform cooperative transmission, and the receivers are able to perform successive interference cancellation. In this new problem setting, which transmitters should transmit and to whom, as well as the optimal cancellation patterns at the receivers, are strongly intertwined. We present contributions along three lines. First, we provide a thorough tractability analysis, proving the NP-hardness as well as identifying tractable cases. Second, for benchmarking purposes, we deploy integer linear programming for achieving global optimum using off-theshelf optimization methods. Third, to overcome the scalability issue of integer programming, we design a sub-optimal but efficient optimization algorithm for the problem in its general form, by embedding maximum-weighted bipartite matching into local search. Numerical results are presented for performance evaluation, to validate the benefit of cooperative transmission and interference cancellation for maximum link activation and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IEEE, 2017
    National Category
    Communication Systems Telecommunications
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112447 (URN)10.1109/TMC.2016.2546906 (DOI)
    Conference
    2014 IEEE 25th Annual International Symposium on Personal, Indoor, and Mobile Radio Communications (PIMRC), September 2-5, Washington DC, DC, USA
    Note

    Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council; EU FP7 Marie Curie [324515, 329313]; National Science Foundation [CCF-0728966, CCF-1420651]; ONR [N000141410107]

    Available from: 2014-11-27 Created: 2014-11-27 Last updated: 2017-03-27Bibliographically approved
    2. Minimum-Time Link Scheduling for Emptying Wireless Systems: Solution Characterization and Algorithmic Framework
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Minimum-Time Link Scheduling for Emptying Wireless Systems: Solution Characterization and Algorithmic Framework
    2014 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, ISSN 0018-9448, Vol. 60, no 2, 1083-1100 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We consider a set of transmitter-receiver pairs, or links, that share a wireless medium and address the problem of emptying backlogged queues with given initial size at the transmitters in minimum time. The problem amounts to determining activation subsets of links, and their time durations, to form a minimum-time schedule. Scheduling in wireless networks has been studied under various formulations before. In this paper, we present fundamental insights and solution characterizations that include: 1) showing that the complexity of the problem remains high for any continuous and increasing rate function; 2) formulating and proving sufficient and necessary optimality conditions of two baseline scheduling strategies that correspond to emptying the queues using one-at-a-time or all-at-once strategies; and 3) presenting and proving the tractability of the special case in which the transmission rates are functions only of the cardinality of the link activation sets. These results are independent of physical-layer system specifications and are valid for any form of rate function. We then develop an algorithmic framework for the solution to this problem. The framework encompasses exact as well as sub-optimal, but fast, scheduling algorithms, all under a unified principle design. Through computational experiments, we finally investigate the performance of several specific algorithms from this framework.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2014
    Keyword
    Algorithm; optimality; scheduling; wireless networks
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104836 (URN)10.1109/TIT.2013.2292065 (DOI)000330286100022 ()
    Available from: 2014-02-28 Created: 2014-02-28 Last updated: 2016-09-15
    3. Polynomial Complexity Minimum-Time Scheduling in a Class of Wireless Networks
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Polynomial Complexity Minimum-Time Scheduling in a Class of Wireless Networks
    2015 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Control of Network Systems, ISSN 2325-5870, Vol. 3, no 3, 322-331 p.Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We consider a wireless network with a set of transmitter-receiver pairs, or links, that share a common channel, and address the problem of emptying finite traffic volume from the transmitters in minimum time. This, so called, minimum-time scheduling problem has been proved to be NP-hard in general. In this paper, we study a class of minimum-time scheduling problems in which the link rates have a particular structure. We show that global optimality can be reached in polynomial time and derive optimality conditions. Then we consider a more general case in which we apply the same approach and obtain an approximation as well as lower and upper bounds to the optimal solution. Simulation results confirm and validate our approach.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015
    Keyword
    algorithm, interference, optimality, scheduling, wireless networks
    National Category
    Communication Systems Telecommunications
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112446 (URN)10.1109/TCNS.2015.2512678 (DOI)
    Note

    At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

    Available from: 2014-11-27 Created: 2014-11-27 Last updated: 2016-11-25Bibliographically approved
    4. A general optimality condition of link scheduling for emptying a wireless network
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A general optimality condition of link scheduling for emptying a wireless network
    2016 (English)In: 2016 IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON INFORMATION THEORY, IEEE , 2016, 1446-1450 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider link scheduling in wireless networks for emptying the queues of the source nodes, and provide a unified mathematical formulation that accommodates all meaningful settings of link transmission rates and network configurations. We prove that, any scheduling problem is equivalent to solving a convex problem defined over the convex hull of the rate region. Based on the fundamental insight, a general optimality condition is derived, that yields a unified treatment of optimal scheduling. Furthermore, we demonstrate the implications and usefulness of the result. Specifically, by applying the theoretical insight to optimality characterization and complexity analysis of scheduling problems, we can both unify and extend previously obtained results.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    IEEE, 2016
    Series
    IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory. Proceedings, ISSN 2157-8095, E-ISSN 2157-8117
    Keyword
    convex programming;radio links;radio networks;telecommunication scheduling;convex hull;convex problem;general optimality condition;link scheduling;link transmission rates;network configurations;optimal scheduling;source nodes;wireless network;Complexity theory;Information theory;Interference;Optimal scheduling;Processor scheduling;Scheduling;Wireless networks;complexity;optimality;scheduling;wireless networks
    National Category
    Computer Engineering Information Systems Software Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131357 (URN)10.1109/ISIT.2016.7541538 (DOI)000390098701102 ()
    Conference
    IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory (ISIT), 2016, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain, July l0-l5, 2016
    Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2017-01-30Bibliographically approved
  • 11.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A comprehensive investigation of a low-energy building in Sweden2007In: Renewable Energy, ISSN 0960-1481, Vol. 32, no 11, 1830-1841 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the building sector alone accounts for almost 40% of the total energy demand and people spend more than 80% of their time indoors. Reducing energy demand in the buildings is essential to the achievement of a sustainable built environment. At the same time, it is important to not deteriorate people's health, well-being and comfort in buildings. Thus, designing healthy and energy efficient buildings are one of the most challenging tasks for building scientists. A low-energy building that uses less than half of the purchased energy of a comparable typical Swedish building has been investigated from different viewpoints in an attempt to represent the building at different system levels. First, the ventilation performance in different rooms using the tracer gas method is reported. Second, results from simulations and in situ measurements are used to analyse the building's power demand and energy performance. The household's behaviour and their impact on energy usage as well as acceptance are reported. Finally, the CO2 emissions with regard to the energy usage are analysed on the basis of different supply energy forms from surrounding energy systems, for example a Swedish and European electricity mix, or district heating as a substitute for electrical heating.

  • 12.
    Olsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design.
    Larsson, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Machine Design. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Conceptual Female Hygiene Product: Developed from Needs and Prerequisites in an Agricultural East African Context2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Menstruation is a large problem for females in development countries today. Studies have shown that around 40 percent of menstruating girls have been absent from school due to their menstruation. One of the challenges that need to be solved is the absence of female hygiene products amongst women, especially in low income and developing countries due to the cost of commercial products. In countries where the national economy is unstable or poorly comes a problem with importing products, it would be better if they could produce their own products so that the national economy is supported. Small factories and production sites that produce female hygiene products have started to form in some areas. This shows that it is possible to produce in the context where the product is going to be sold. One of the advantages of this system is from the environmental perspective, many of the local production sites use environmentally friendly materials and some products are up to 95 percent bio-degradable. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a concept for a sustainable female hygiene product that women in developing countries can afford to buy, this so that social effects can be enabled due to the security that a functioning protection can bring. To be able to do so a field study in Uganda has been conducted. During the study users and local producers were interviewed to find out what demands and prerequisites there are to create a female hygiene product that can be produced and used locally. The field study gave a deeper understanding and knowledge about both the subject as whole and the technical aspects to take into consideration when developing a female hygiene product. The study confirmed that female hygiene products, or rather the lack of them, are a big problem that needs to be solved quickly. It also revealed that the possibilities for producing in the context existed but was not developed enough. Through an analysis of the empirical findings as well as theories about, for example, material and production, six concepts were developed. The concepts and already existing products were evaluated and correlated to requirements collected in the field study. One concept was chosen for further development from this evaluation. This concept consists of a disposable napkin that is fastened by putting it in holders sewn in the panty. The panty can be bought as a product with existing holders or the holders can be sewn into the users own panties. The final concept has taken both technical aspects and social effects into account. Lists of requirements on material for the concept as well as the production of it are also included in the work. A prototype of the concept has been sewn and tested. The final concept in this work is not a finished product and needs further developing before being released as a product. More work need to be done on specifying the production and specific materials to implement the concept. For further developing, it is also important to have in mind in what context the product would be used due to the different possibilities and demands that the setting gives.

  • 13.
    Feiz, Roozbeh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fenton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Frändegård, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kanda, Wisdom
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Matschewsky, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mejía Dugand, Santiago
    Päivärinne, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wallsten, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A corridor striving for sustainability - Reflecting upon PhD education at a Swedish University2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present an overview of interdisciplinary research from Ph.D. students working at the Division of Environmental Technology and Management at Linköping University, Sweden. Each of the Ph.D. students addresses the overall challenge of sustainability transitions in their research, although the themes and content of research varies considerably between individuals, encompassing research on actors, networks, products, materials, services and systems from the public and private sector, operating locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. The scientific literature and methods used to frame and conduct studies varies considerably within the group, as does the individual focus on immediate issues of sustainability.

  • 14.
    Song, Wenyan
    et al.
    School of Economics and Management, Beihang University, Beijing, China.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A customization-oriented framework for design of sustainable product/service system2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, 1672-1685 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturers today are striving to offer high value-added Product/Service System (PSS) due to increasing competition and environmental pressure. PSS design activities face a variety of challenges such as a high level of customization as well as its resulting challenges, i.e., hidden requirements in product use phase, potential conflicts of design attributes, and internal complexity of service processes. However, existing insights for PSS customization are fragmented and insufficient to support manufacturers. Thus, it is necessary to develop a systematic and comprehensive support to solve those issues. In order to support PSS customization in early design phase, this paper proposes a design framework that involves a design process. The proposed design framework is module-based and thus flexible according to the user needs. In addition, it takes advantage of some existing methods. A case study of elevator PSS design shows the feasibility and potentials of the design framework and its associated design process to its broad usage in industry.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-09-19 13:21
  • 15.
    Holm, E
    et al.
    Umeå.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    A discrete time-space geography for epidemiology: from mixing groups to pockets of local order in pandemic simulations.2007In: MEDINFO 2007 - Proceedings of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics – Building Sustainable Health Systems / [ed] Klaus A. Kuhn, James R. Warren, Tze-Yun Leong, 2007, Vol. 12, no 1, 464- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization urges all nations to develop and maintain national influenza preparedness plans. Important components of such plans are forecasts of morbidity and mortality based on local social and geographic conditions. Most methodologies for simulations of epidemic outbreaks are implicitly based on the assumption that the frequency and duration of social contacts that lead to disease transmission is affected by geography, i.e. the spatial distribution of physical meeting places. In order to increase the effectiveness of the present methods for simulation of infectious disease outbreaks, the aim of this study is to examine two social geographic issues related to such models. We display how the social geographic characteristics of mixing networks, in particular when these significantly deviate from the random-mixing norm, can be represented in order to enhance the understanding and prediction of epidemic patterns in light of a possible future destructive influenza pandemic. We conclude that social geography, social networks and simulation models of directly transmitted infectious diseases are fundamentally linked.

  • 16.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    McLaren, J
    Jackson, T
    A Dynamic Life Cycle Energy Model of the UK Paper and Pulp Sector1998In: Con Account Workshop: Ecologizing Societal Metabolism - Designing Scenarios for Sustainable Materials Management, CML report 148,1998, 1998, 135- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 17.
    Zhang, Yingfeng
    et al.
    Northwestern Polytech University, Peoples R China.
    Ren, Shan
    Northwestern Polytech University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yang
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Vaasa, Finland.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Huisingh, Donald
    University of Tennessee, TN USA.
    A framework for Big Data driven product lifecycle management2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 159, 229-240 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimization of the process of product lifecycle management is an increasingly important objective for manufacturing enterprises to improve their sustainable competitive advantage. Originally, this approach was developed to integrate the business processes of an organization and more effectively manage and utilize the data generated during lifecycle studies. With emerging technologies, product embedded information devices such as radio frequency identification tags and smart sensors are widely used to improve the efficiency of enterprises routine management on an operational level. Manufacturing enterprises need a more advanced analysis approach to develop a solution on a strategic level from using such lifecycle Big Data. However, the application of Big Data in lifecycle faces several challenges, such as the lack of reliable data and valuable knowledge that can be employed to support the optimized decision-making of product lifecycle management. In this paper, a framework for Big Data driven product lifecycle management was proposed to address these challenges. Within the proposed framework, the availability and accessibility of data and knowledge related to lifecycle can be achieved. A case study was presented to demonstrate the proof-of-concept of the proposed framework. The results showed that the proposed framework was feasible to be adopted in industry, and can provide an overall solution for optimizing the decision-making processes in different phases of the whole lifecycle. The key findings and insights from the case study were summarized as managerial implications, which can guide manufacturers to ensure improvements in energy saving and fault diagnosis related decisions in the whole lifecycle. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Kanda, Wisdom
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gonzaléz, Pablo del Rio
    Institute for Public Policies and Goods Madrid, Spain..
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A function of innovation systems approach for analysing the roles of intermediaries in eco-innovation2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws from two bodies of literature, innovation intermediaries and technological innovation systems, to develop an approach for analysing the functions of intermediaries in eco-innovation. The link between the functions of innovation intermediaries and the functions of technological innovation systems has seldom been explicitly established in the scientific discourse and thus this article contributes to theoretical development in both literatures. To the technological innovation systems literature, this article addresses the lack of attention to the functions of innovation intermediaries who are a critical part in the formation of networks and also contribute to a number of innovation system functions. To the innovation intermediary literature, the functional approach advocates for a synthesis and consensus building in the literature regarding intermediary functions in view of the several redundancies and ambiguities on the subject matter. Empirical operationalization of the analytical approach including methodological choices from case studies in Region Scania, Sweden and North Rhine Westphalia, Germany are also discussed. The results of our analysis show that the functions of the innovation intermediaries are particularly relevant for the overall goals of an innovation system as compared to the configuration of intermediary actors. Particular challenges with a functional approach in this context include the difficulties of establishing a causal relation between the support functions of intermediaries and eco-innovation outcomes in firms.

  • 19.
    Fogelberg Eriksson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning in Working Life and Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A gender perspective and learning evaluation2009In: Learning Through Ongoing Evaluation / [ed] Svensson, Lennart; Brulin, Göran; Jansson, Sven & Sjöberg, Karin, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, 1, 203-215 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    This book presents a relatively new perspective of learning evaluation in interactive forms. The question is how long-term effects can be achieved, i.e. a sustainable development with the aid of projects. This is an important question, particularly in the context of EU Structural Funds. In the book learning evaluation concepts are grounded in theory. The majority of chapters also include practical examples of learning evaluation and discuss these in some depth. Important aspects of the evaluation process include the researcher?s or evaluator?s constructive dialogue with the participants, the importance of critical examination, and that approaches shift between proximity and distance. Common knowledge formation is important in a learning evaluation and analysis seminars are presented as a way of achieving this. The book?s target groups include university students in the fields of sociology, education, business economics and management and human resources management. The book could also be used in university courses and in-service training for managers, developers, consultants, project managers

  • 20. Sommarin, Anders
    et al.
    Svensson, Anders
    Thollander, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A method for bottom-up energy end-use data collection – results and experience2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved energy efficiency is one of the most important means of reducing the threat of increased global warming. However, one of the major challenges today related to improved energy efficiency in industry is the lack of well-structured bottom-up data for various sectors. The aim of this paper is to present a structured method on the collection of industrial bottom-up data, and unique results from a case study of the Swedish foundry industry where the method has been applied. Results show that the method is useful in receiving unique energy-end-use data for the industry, and shows that the energy end-use for similar companies in regard to different process-specific energy users can be very large. Results also show how different energy end-users can be categorized and thus benchmarked in a structured way. The study was a part of the project Foundrybench, with the effort to develop a guideline on how an energy audit may be carried out in the foundry industry, and to develop industry-specific key performance indicators.

  • 21.
    Broström, Tor
    et al.
    Gotland University.
    Eriksson, Petra
    Gotland University.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    A method to assess the effect of energy saving interventions in the Swedish stock of historic buildings2012In: HERITAGE 2012, Green Lines Institute, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Tokyo Metropolitan University.
    A methodology for designing services: modeling method, design method, CAD tool, and their industrial applications2009In: Introduction to Service Engineering / [ed] Gavriel Salvendy and Waldemar Karwowski, USA: John Wiley , 2009, 1, 268-293 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     Servicification is a key toward sustainable business in the secondary industry. It is needless to say that services are sources of core value in the tertiary industry. Thus, this chapter addresses a critical issue for both of those industries, designing services. This chapter demonstrates the effectiveness of our service-design methodology to support service design processes through applications to two service examples in industries- real operation. Before that, a theory for the methodology is explained.

  • 23.
    Ardi, Shanai
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, IISLAB - Laboratory for Intelligent Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Model and Implementation of a Security plug-in for the Software Life Cycle2008Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, security is frequently considered late in software life cycle. It is often bolted on late in development, or even during deployment or maintenance, through activities such as add-on security software and penetration-and-patch maintenance. Even if software developers aim to incorporate security into their products from the beginning of the software life cycle, they face an exhaustive amount of ad hoc unstructured information without any practical guidance on how and why this information should be used and what the costs and benefits of using it are. This is due to a lack of structured methods.

    In this thesis we present a model for secure software development and implementation of a security plug-in that deploys this model in software life cycle. The model is a structured unified process, named S3P (Sustainable Software Security Process) and is designed to be easily adaptable to any software development process. S3P provides the formalism required to identify the causes of vulnerabilities and the mitigation techniques that address these causes to prevent vulnerabilities. We present a prototype of the security plug-in implemented for the OpenUP/Basic development process in Eclipse Process Framework. We also present the results of the evaluation of this plug-in. The work in this thesis is a first step towards a general framework for introducing security into the software life cycle and to support software process improvements to prevent recurrence of software vulnerabilities.

  • 24.
    Fayle, Tom M
    et al.
    University Museum Zoology, Cambridge.
    Bakker, Lieneke
    University Putra Malaysia.
    Mui Ching, Tan
    University Putra Malaysia.
    Davey, Alexandra
    New Guinea Binatang Research Centre.
    Earl, Adam
    Tmn Kingfisher.
    Hyland, Steve
    Linköping University. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ligtermoet, Emma
    Danum Valley Field Centre.
    Kai Lin, Ling
    University Malaysia Sabah.
    Phouthakone, Luangyotha
    Wildlife Conservation Society.
    Herlander Martins, Bruno
    Wildlife Conservation Society.
    Kepfer Rojas, Sebastian
    New Guinea Binatang Research Centre.
    Phuong Thi, Thanh Sam
    Bogor Agriculture University.
    Wahyudi, Agus
    Dipterocarp Research Centre.
    Walsh, Judy
    Malahide Co.
    Weigl, Stefanie
    University of Bristol.
    Jehle, Robert
    University of Salford.
    Metcalfe, Dan
    CSIRO Sustainable Ecosyst, Atherton.
    Trevelyan, Rosie
    Trop Biol Association.
    A positive relationship between ant biodiversity (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and rate of scavenger-mediated nutrient redistribution along a disturbance gradient in a south-east Asian rain forest2011In: MYRMECOLOGICAL NEWS, ISSN 1994-4136, Vol. 14, 5-12 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human modification of pristine habitats almost always leads to the local extinction of a subset of the species present. This means that the ecosystem processes carried out by the remaining species may change. It is well documented that particular species of ants carry out important ecosystem processes. However, while much work has been carried out to investigate the link between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in other taxa, this has received relatively little attention for ant communities. In particular, no attempt has been made to link levels of ant diversity with the rates of nutrient redistribution carried out by scavenging species. Here we investigate the impacts of anthropogenic disturbance on the rate of scavenger-mediated nutrient redistribution, using bait-removal rate as a surrogate measure. We found that although ant species richness, diversity, biomass and rates of bait removal did not change systematically across the disturbance gradient, the rate of bait removal was related to ant species richness. Sites with more ant species experienced a faster rate of bait removal. This is the first documented positive relationship between ant species richness and the rate of an ecosystem process. If these results are applicable at larger spatial scales for a wider range of nutrient sources, loss of ant species could lead to important changes in the way that ecosystems function.

  • 25.
    Knutsson, Per
    et al.
    Göteborg University.
    Ostwald, Madelene
    Göteborg University.
    A process-oriented Sustainable Livelihoods Approach – a tool for increased understanding of vulnerability, adaptation and resilience2006In: Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, ISSN 1381-2386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sustainable Livelihoods Approach (SLA) is often proposed to holistically capture

    vulnerability in assessments of livelihoods in aid and development programs. The full capacity of the approach has however only rarely been used in these assessments, lacking a clear account of processes of change and flexibility of assets, as well as the ability to quantify all capital assets of a livelihood system. The descriptions of livelihoods so far are in fact non-holistic. This paper attempts to use SLA in its full capacity through a quantification of the different capitals covered; natural, physical, economic, social and human. Further, the relationships between capitals are explored in a Chinese rural context of changing climate and land-use, and examples are given on how investments in one capital in reality can end up being accounted for in other capitals. The results indicate that through an analytical and process-oriented SLA, an effective tool for assessment of vulnerability can be developed. Such a tool would assist development organizations and policy-makers to target poverty traps and escape routes in the face of rapid and multiple changes.

  • 26.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A prospective cohort study on newly sick-listed patients with musculoskeletal disorders and sustainable return to work2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Backlund, Sandra
    et al.
    Naturvårdsverket, Sweden.
    Thollander, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Paramonova, Svetlana
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A regional method for increased resource-efficiency in industrial energy systems2014In: eceee Industrial Summer Study Proceedings, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of global climate change as a result of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), primarily from the use of fossil fuels, is demanding actions from all sectors of society. The industry sector is one of the world’s largest energy using sectors and GHG emitters. Improved energy efficiency in industry is one of the foremost means of improving energy efficiency and reducing GHG emissions. Research shows that despite large untapped potentials for improved energy efficiency in industry, cost-efficient energy efficiency measures are not always implemented, explained by the existence of barriers to energy efficiency, e.g. information imperfections and asymmetries. Moreover, research shows that a major energy efficiency potential lies in the energy system and the way it is governed. For regional governments, the industrial energy use is difficult to affect as they only have indirect power to influence the decisions in those organizations. This underlies the importance of developing methods on how a region can support and effectively contribute to energy efficiency improvements in the local industry. So far, methods are limited related to regional governance of industrial energy systems. The aim of this paper is to present a structured methodology for improved regional resource efficiency in the local industry from a regional perspective, inspired by the Triple Helix Model. Results display the county administrative board of administration’s current method how to target industry, and ends with a proposal for how the methods could be improved.

  • 28.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pahuja, Neha
    TERI, Indien.
    A Registry of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Goals, Outcomes, and Institutional Requisites2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, Vol. 41, no S1, 56-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This article examines key issues in operationalizing

    a registry of nationally appropriate mitigation actions

    (NAMAs) undertaken by developing countries party to the

    United Nations framework convention on climate change. It

    analyzes goals, outcomes, and institutional prerequisites

    underlying various proposals to determine how a NAMA

    mechanism could work in international climate cooperation.

    The different proposals for how NAMA shall be designed

    relate to three basic effort-sharing arrangements in a future

    climate regime: binding commitments for all Parties, purely

    voluntary commitments for all, and legally binding commitments

    for Annex I countries but voluntary ones for others.

    We conclude that a NAMA registry could be designed so as

    initially to suit all three types of effort-sharing regimes. The

    article identifies three areas of potential common ground in a

    registry irrespective of effort-sharing type: the principle of

    common but differentiated responsibilities, the sustainable

    development objectives of the Convention, and the need for

    a systemic transition toward low-carbon energy technologies.

  • 29.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thollander, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A review of barriers to and driving forces for improved energy efficiency in Swedish industry: Recommendations for successful in-house energy management2018In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 82, no Part 1, 618-628 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From an environmental point of view, reduced use of energy remains a cornerstone in global greenhouse gas mitigation. However, without full internalization of external costs, greenhouse gas mitigation as such may not be highly prioritized among business leaders. Rather, it is the magnitude of production costs and ultimately the size of market revenue that articulates success or failure for business leaders. Nevertheless, reduced energy use or improved energy efficiency can have a vast impact on profitability even for companies with low energy costs, as the reduced energy costs directly lead to increased profits. In this paper, a review of ten years of empirical research in the field of industrial energy management in Swedish industry is presented. Based on the review, the paper proposes success factors for efficient energy management, factors which could help guide individual energy managers as well as policy makers in order to close the energy efficiency and management gaps. The paper also presents an overview of important industrial energy management tools, which would facilitate in-house energy management in industry.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-10-06 12:45
  • 30.
    Thollander, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kimura, Osamu
    Central Research Institute Elect Power Ind, Japan.
    Wakabayashi, Masayo
    Central Research Institute Elect Power Ind, Japan.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A review of industrial energy and climate policies in Japan and Sweden with emphasis towards SMEs2015In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 50, 504-512 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The threat of increased global warming resulting from the use of fossil fuels stresses decision-makers to formulate and adopt policies towards different sectors of the economy. In light of the great earthquake in Japan 2011, energy efficiency also plays an important role in meeting the challenge of power supply shortage. Energy policies towards industry are of particular importance as a major part of the energy in the economy is used in industrial production. The number of papers investigating and presenting experience from energy end-use policies are scarce. Furthermore, for those present, they often only include a very brief analysis. From a public point of view, evaluations of energy programs are of major importance to measure the performance of the programs. From an energy policy designer point of view, it is of major importance to not only see the cost-effectiveness of the policy but also to understand the fundamental mechanisms for the success or failure of an industrial energy program, in order to learn how to improve future programs. The aim of this paper is to present a review of energy end-use policy instrument in Japan and Sweden towards the industrial sector from 1990 to 2014, with special emphasis on industrial SMEs. From the results presented some general-conclusions can be made, (1) results show that the cost-effectiveness differs substantially between the evaluated programs, and (2) that from a governmental point of view, subsidies towards energy audit programs seem like the most cost-effective policy. In addition to this (3) the results from the review also stress the importance of a clear strategy for every energy program on how the program is going to be evaluated, ex-ante or ex-post, and how the performance of the program is to be measured. This structure should be included from the start of the program. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 31.
    Krebs, Frederik C
    et al.
    Tech University Denmark, Riso Natl Lab Sustainable Energy, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark .
    Gevorgyan, Suren A
    Tech University Denmark, Riso Natl Lab Sustainable Energy, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark .
    Gholamkhass, Bobak
    Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 Canada .
    Holdcroft, Steven
    Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 Canada .
    Schlenker, Cody
    University So Calif, Department Chemistry, Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA Centre Energy Nanosci and Technology, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA .
    Thompson, Mark E
    University So Calif, Department Chemistry, Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA Centre Energy Nanosci and Technology, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA .
    Thompson, Barry C
    University So Calif, Department Chemistry, Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA Centre Energy Nanosci and Technology, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA .
    Olson, Dana
    NREL, Golden, CO 80401 USA .
    Ginley, David S
    NREL, Golden, CO 80401 USA .
    Shaheen, Sean E
    NREL, Golden, CO 80401 USA University Denver, Department Phys and Astron, Denver, CO 80208 USA .
    Alshareef, Husam N
    University Texas Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 USA .
    Murphy, John W
    University Texas Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 USA .
    Youngblood, W Justin
    University N Texas, Department Chemistry, Denton, TX 76201 USA .
    Heston, Nathan C
    University Florida, Department Phys, Centre Macromol Science and Engn, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA .
    Reynolds, John R
    University Florida, Department Chemistry, Centre Macromol Science and Engn, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA .
    Jia, Shijun
    Plextronics Inc, Pittsburgh, PA 15238 USA .
    Laird, Darin
    Plextronics Inc, Pittsburgh, PA 15238 USA .
    Tuladhar, Sachetan M
    University London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, Department Phys, Blackett Lab, London SW7 2AZ, England .
    Dane, Justin G A
    University London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, Department Phys, Blackett Lab, London SW7 2AZ, England .
    Atienzar, Pedro
    University London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, Department Phys, Blackett Lab, London SW7 2AZ, England .
    Nelson, Jenny
    University London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, Department Phys, Blackett Lab, London SW7 2AZ, England .
    Kroon, Jan M
    ECN Solar Energy, NL-1755 ZG Petten, Netherlands .
    Wienk, Martijn M
    Eindhoven University Technology, Lab Macromol and Organ Chemistry, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands .
    Janssen, Rene A J
    Eindhoven University Technology, Lab Macromol and Organ Chemistry, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven, Netherlands .
    Tvingstedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lira-Cantu, Monica
    Centre Invest Nanociencia and Nanotecnol, E-08193 Barcelona, Spain .
    de Bettignies, Remi
    CEA INES DRI, Lab Composants Solaires, F-73377 Le Bourget Du lac, France .
    Guillerez, Stephane
    CEA INES DRI, Lab Composants Solaires, F-73377 Le Bourget Du lac, France .
    Aernouts, Tom
    IMEC, PV Department, B-3001 Louvain, Belgium .
    Cheyns, David
    IMEC, PV Department, B-3001 Louvain, Belgium .
    Lutsen, Laurence
    IMEC, IMOMEC, B-3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium .
    Zimmermann, Birger
    Fraunhofer Institute Solare Energiesyst ISE, Department Mat Research and Appl Opt, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany .
    Wuerfel, Uli
    Fraunhofer Institute Solare Energiesyst ISE, Department Mat Research and Appl Opt, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany .
    Niggemann, Michael
    Fraunhofer Institute Solare Energiesyst ISE, Department Mat Research and Appl Opt, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany .
    Schleiermacher, Hans-Frieder
    Fraunhofer Institute Solare Energiesyst ISE, Department Mat Research and Appl Opt, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany .
    Liska, Paul
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, LPI, Institute Chemistry Science and Engn, Fac Basic Science, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Graetzel, Michael
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, LPI, Institute Chemistry Science and Engn, Fac Basic Science, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Lianos, Panagiotis
    University Patras, Department Engn Science, Patras 26500, Greece .
    Katz, Eugene A
    Ben Gurion University Negev, Jacob Blaustein Institute Desert Research, Department Solar Energy and Environm Phys, IL-84990 Sede Boqer, Israel .
    Lohwasser, Wolfgang
    Alcan Packaging Singen GmbH, D-78221 Singen, Germany .
    Jannon, Bertrand
    Alcan Packaging Singen GmbH, D-78221 Singen, Germany .
    A round robin study of flexible large-area roll-to-roll processed polymer solar cell modules2009In: SOLAR ENERGY MATERIALS AND SOLAR CELLS, ISSN 0927-0248, Vol. 93, no 11, 1968-1977 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A round robin for the performance of roll-to-roll coated flexible large-area polymer solar-cell modules involving 18 different laboratories in Northern America, Europe and Middle East is presented. The study involved the performance measurement of the devices at one location (Riso DTU) followed by transportation to a participating laboratory for performance measurement and return to the starting location (Riso DTU) for re-measurement of the performance. It was found possible to package polymer solar-cell modules using a flexible plastic barrier material in such a manner that degradation of the devices played a relatively small role in the experiment that has taken place over 4 months. The method of transportation followed both air-mail and surface-mail paths.

  • 32.
    Borén, Sven
    et al.
    Department of Strategic Sustainable Development, Blekinge Institute of Technology, 37179 Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Nurhadi, Lisiana
    Department of Strategic Sustainable Development, Blekinge Institute of Technology, 37179 Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Ny, Henrik
    Department of Strategic Sustainable Development, Blekinge Institute of Technology, 37179 Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Robért, Karl-Henrik
    Department of Strategic Sustainable Development, Blekinge Institute of Technology, 37179 Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Broman, Göran
    Department of Strategic Sustainable Development, Blekinge Institute of Technology, 37179 Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Trygg, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A strategic approach to sustainable transport system development – part 2: the case of a vision for electric vehicle systems in southeast Sweden2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 140, 62-71 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric vehicles seem to offer a great potential for sustainable transport development. The Swedish pioneer project GreenCharge Southeast is designed as a cooperative action research approach that aims to explore a roadmap for a fossil-free transport system by 2030 with a focus on electric vehicles. In the first paper of this tandem publication, the authors propose a new generic process model embedding the Framework of Strategic Sustainable Development. The purpose of applying it in an action-research mode as described in this paper was twofold: (i) to develop a vision for sustainable regional transport and a coarse roadmap towards that vision, and, while doing so, (ii) get additional empirical experiences to inform the development of the new generic process model. Experts from many sectors and organizations involved in the GreenCharge project provided vital information and reviewed all planning perspectives presented in Paper 1 in two sequential multi-stakeholder seminars. The results include a sustainable vision for electric vehicle systems in southeast Sweden within a sustainable regional transport system within a sustainable global society, as well as an initial development plan towards such a vision for the transport sector. The vision is framed by the universal sustainability principles, and the development plan is informed by the strategic guidelines, of the above-mentioned framework. Among other things, the vision and plan imply a shift to renewable energy and a more optimized use of areas and thus a new type of spatial planning. For example, the vision and plan implies a lower built-in demand for transport, more integrated traffic modes, and more multi-functional use of areas for energy and transport infrastructures, for example. Some inherent benefits of electric vehicles are highlighted in the vision and plan, including near-zero local emissions and flexibility as regards primary energy sources. The vision and plan also imply improved governance for more effective cross-sector collaboration to ensure coordinated development within the transport sector and between the transportation sector and other relevant sectors. Meanwhile, the new generic process model was refined and is ready to be applied and further tested in the GreenCharge project and in other projects within the transport sector as well as other sectors. The study confirmed that the new generic process model suggested in support of sustainable transport system and community development is helpful for giving diverse stakeholders, with various specialties and perspectives, a way of working that is goal-oriented and builds on effective, iterative learning loops and co-creation.

  • 33.
    Park Dahlgaard, Su Mi
    et al.
    Institute of Service Management Lunds universitet.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management .
    A Strategy for Building Sustainable Innovation Excellence - A Danish Study2007In: International Symposium on Human Factors and Comprehensive Management Concepts as Precondition for Corporate Sustainability and 8th International Conference of Quality Managers,2007, 2007, 47- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 34.
    Dahlgaard, Jens Jörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Dahlgaard, Su Mi Park
    Helsingbors universitet.
    A Strategy for Building Sustainable Innovation Excellence - A Danish Study2008In: Corporate Sustainability as a Challenge for Comprehensive Management / [ed] Klaus J. Zink., Heidelberg, Germany: Physica Verlag, 2008, 1, 268- p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability has become a topic of global relevance: Corporations and other economically acting organizations increasingly need to realize economic, environmental and social objectives in order to survive. Supplementary to "classical" environmental management, realizing corporate sustainability requires comprehensive approaches which allow the integration of social and economic aspects. Such concepts can be found e.g. in international excellence models mainly based on a TQM thinking but also in the field of human factors in organizational design and management. Understood as systems approaches, they include the interests of all relevant stakeholders with a mid- or long-term time perspective and are thus highly linked with the principles of sustainable development. In this book internationally leading scientists discuss the issue of sustainability from their perspective, resulting in an innovative view on different management approaches under the umbrella of corporate sustainability.

  • 35.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Division of Logistics and Transportation, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wänström, Carl
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Johansson, Mats I.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Medbo, Lars
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    A structured procedure for materials planning during production transfer2015In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 26, no 9, 738-752 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores materials planning procedures to ensure the materials’ availability during production transfers. The paper defines a production transfer as the preparation, physical transfer, and start-up of relocated production. A structured procedure of materials planning during production transfer is developed based on theory, and then validated and refined based on the analysis of four case studies. The paper shows that there is a need for a structured procedure of materials planning during production transfers. It also explains the importance of activities that create prerequisites for the materials’ availability during production transfer, such as updating and adapting documentation, planning and control systems, and describes the activities that ensure the materials’ availability, such as preventive and corrective actions. A valid estimation of the time needed to reach a steady state and a combination of several preventive actions improves the ability to ensure that materials are available. The cases showed differences across company size, because large companies took more and farther-reaching preventive actions.

  • 36.
    Martinsen, Uni
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Study of Environmental and Other Sustainable Activities in supply Chain Relationships at Clas Ohlson2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is the result of a case study conducted at the Swedish retail company Clas Ohlson. The study has been conducted as one step in the PhD process of the author of this report and is financed by the Swedish Energy Agency (Energimyndigheten). In this first chapter, some background information to the case study is given: the aim of the study, the rationale behind choosing Clas Ohlson as the case company and data collection methods. Finally, the structure of the remaining parts of the report is presented.

    The aim of this case study is to illustrate how environmental work can be conducted in different types of supply chain relationships, seen from the perspective of one focal shipper in a supply chain. The relationships include both upstream (such as suppliers and inbound logistics service providers) and downstream (such as outbound logistics service providers and stores in a city logistics context) parts of the supply chain. As these examples illustrate, the supply chain relationships can include shippers as well as logistics service providers (LSPs).

  • 37.
    Baniya, Bishal
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A theoretical study of the potential for metal extraction from the incinerated ashes residing in Swedish landfills2013In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, Vol. 34, no 7, 891-900 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, waste incineration has played a major role in sustainable waste management, as well as generating combined heat and electricity for many years. Incineration of combustible waste produces residues such as fly ash and bottom ash. The chemical composition of both ashes shows that they consist of bulk metals and scarce metals in significant quantity, in elemental form as well as in small metal pieces, which remain unsorted from the incinerated residues. This shows the potential for metal extraction from the ashes, which are deposited in Swedish landfills. Thus with the aim of quantifying selected metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Zn, Sb, Sn, Ni, Co, Mo, Ti and V), and assessing their flows and stocks in different deposits, this study has been carried out. Approximately 50% of grate plants and 30% of fluidized bed plant in Sweden were sampled for the study. The data collected from the sampled plants were the basis for the calculation of flow of ashes and metals through all the plants. First of all, annual metal flows for 19852010 were estimated, based on which accumulated stocks at different deposits were calculated.

  • 38.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Assmo, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Time-Spatial Approach towards Integrated Sustainable Development of Post-Monetarism2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Hjelm, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Rennie, A.E.W
    Lambert, C.G
    Baker, N.J.
    A transnational approach to the implementation of eco-design methodologies in SMEs2007In: 5th International Conference on Design and Manufacture for Sustainable Development,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Rundqvist, Mikael
    et al.
    Statsvetenskapliga institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    A capacity builiding evaluation of integration and diversity in regional projects2009In: Learning Through Ongoing Evaluation / [ed] Lennart Svensson, Göran Brulin, Sven Jansson, Karin Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, 1, 253-266 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book presents a relatively new perspective of learning evaluation in interactive forms. The question is how long-term effects can be achieved, i.e. a sustainable development with the aid of projects. This is an important question, particularly in the context of EU Structural Funds. In the book learning evaluation concepts are grounded in theory. The majority of chapters also include practical examples of learning evaluation and discuss these in some depth. Important aspects of the evaluation process include the researcher?s or evaluator?s constructive dialogue with the participants, the importance of critical examination, and that approaches shift between proximity and distance. Common knowledge formation is important in a learning evaluation and analysis seminars are presented as a way of achieving this. The book?s target groups include university students in the fields of sociology, education, business economics and management and human resources management. The book could also be used in university courses and in-service training for managers, developers, consultants, project managers and evaluators.

  • 41.
    Fenton, Paul David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Accelerating local transitions to sustainable mobility2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper addresses the challenge of developing policies and incentives to achieve sustainable mobility in urban areas. Urban transport systems must undergo a profound transition in order to contribute to sustainable urban development and improve quality of life for residents and other users of urban spaces. There is substantial knowledge about the range of policy options available to decision-makers, planners and other stakeholders, yet past research has focused less on the practical organisation and implementation of policies aiming for sustainable mobility. Although many municipalities have adopted policies that promote sustainable mobility, organisational hinders and other behavioural practices have obstructed progress towards goals. Transport planning remains highly normative, prioritising the use of cars, yet some European municipalities achieve much higher modal splits for walking, cycling and public transport than many others. Basel, Göttingen and Odense are examples of three cities with strong performance: attractive, competitive cities in which the modal split for cars is low and other forms of mobility thrive. How are these cities succeeding and what can other municipalities learn from their examples? What organisational processes, methods, activities and innovations have influenced their strong performance?

  • 42.
    Al Farra, Hussni
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management.
    Acceptance Tests – FAT & SAT: An Empirical Case Study of Utility Poles2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this project is to devise improved quality acceptance procedures to examine quality characteristics of utility poles at the factory of the supplier (FAT) and on-site upon receipt by the customer (SAT). To that end, the thesis draws upon available standards, literature, and industry practices regarding wood, fiberglass and steel poles. As far as the design of the research, a single case study of a major power company was chosen. Then, a data collection plan was developed in order to build upon the existing knowledge found in the literature, and upon the data that can be collected from three of the Company’s suppliers, in addition to the Technical Research Institute of Sweden (SP). Documents’ analysis, interviews, observations, and a survey were the tools of that plan. It was found that criteria, inspection and test methods of wood poles are all sufficiently covered in the standards and the literature; for wood is the most commonly used material for utility poles. Next, in coverage of research, are the steel poles; while there is currently no standard that covers fiberglass utility poles. Indeed, quality characteristics, criteria, and acceptance procedures can altogether form parts of a sustainable solution, as long as the quality is managed as a process whether at the Company’s end or at the fabrication sites; that is especially true if there is some form of backward partnership between the Company and its suppliers.

  • 43.
    Mirzataghi Chaharmahali, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Amir Siadat, Seyed
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Achieving Organizational Ambidexterity: Understanding and explaining ambidextrous organizations2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Responding to fast technological and environmental changes brings about challenges and paradoxes for companies that should be resolved in order to survive long-term and to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage. Ambidexterity is considered a solution to organizational paradoxes.

    Aim: The purpose of this research is to explore how firms can achieve ambidexterity to handle organizational paradoxes in different market conditions using their dynamic capabilities.

    • Definitions: Ambidexterity: The ability of organizations to handle adaptability and alignment, exploration and exploitation at the same time
    • Dynamic capabilities: The firm’s ability to integrate, build and reconfigure internal and external competencies to address rapidly changing environments
    • Exploration: Activities such as innovation, discovering new opportunities, variation
    • Exploitation: Activities that concern efficiency, implementation and execution

    Results: There are possible options that companies can follow to achieveambidexterity. These sets of options are distinguished as external vs.internal, sequential vs. parallel, structural vs. contextual and the role ofsenior management behaviour. Depending on market dynamism andenvironmental conditions, a different set of options could be suitable fordifferent companies. In addition, companies can enhance the likelihoodof achieving ambidexterity using their dynamic capabilities.

  • 44.
    Närvänen, Anna-Liisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Action research in after-school care units: Analysis of teacher's interpretative frames in talking visions and making action plans2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Wilk, Julie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Rydhagen, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. School of Planning and Media Design, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Adaptation spinoffs from technological and socio-economic changes2015In: Climate Change Adaptation and Development: Transforming Paradigms and Practices / [ed] Tor Håkon Inderberg, Siri Eriksen, Karen O'Brien & Linda Sygna, London and New York: Routledge, 2015, 161-177 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have shown that societal change related to economic growth and development policies can affect the adaptive capacity of communities to a multitude of stressors including climate variability and change. Concerns have recently been raised about the consequences of climate mitigation and adaptation on vulnerable groups and the impacts of large-scale globalization processes on the adaptive capacities of local communities. This chapter addresses how side effects of technological and socioeconomic changes, which we refer to as spinoffs have potential to strengthen climate adaptation strategies. The spinoff examples fall under a two-dimensional framework according to whether they arise from orchestrated or opportunity-driven initiatives and technological or socio-economic changes. Three cases in developing countries undergoing rapid economic growth have been chosen as examples of different types of spinoffs and how they can positively influence climate adaptation and more particularly adaptive capacity. They are: information and communication technology (ICT) in South Africa, changing lifestyles in China and empowerment in India. The cases illustrate that new objects, inventions and trends constantly emerge which have potential to help people improve their livelihoods in ways that can be climate smart. People working as development workers and policy makers need to be observant and engage in open-minded dialogue with communities in order to recognize emergent technologies, lifestyles and trends to facilitate the use and development of on-going or potential spinoffs that positively affect adaptation to climate change.

  • 46.
    Wilk, Julie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Lotta
    Hydrological Unit, Swedish Meterological and Hydrological Institute, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Warburton, Michele
    The School of Bioresources Engineering & Environmental Hydrology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Scottsville, South Africa .
    Adaptation to climate change and other stressors among commercial and small-scale South African farmers2013In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 13, no 2, 273-286 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commercial and small-scale farmers in South Africa are exposed to many challenges. Interviews with 44 farmers in the upper Thukela basin, KwaZulu-Natal, were conducted to identify common and specific challenges for the two groups and adaptive strategies for dealing with the effects of climate and other stressors. This work was conducted as part of a larger participatory project with local stakeholders to develop a local adaptation plan for coping with climate variability and change. Although many challenges related to exposure to climate variability and change, weak agricultural policies, limited governmental support, and theft were common to both farming communities, their adaptive capacities were vastly different. Small-scale farmers were more vulnerable due to difficulties to finance the high input costs of improved seed varieties and implements, limited access to knowledge and agricultural techniques for water and soil conservation and limited customs of long-term planning. In addition to temperature and drought-related challenges, small-scale farmers were concerned about soil erosion, water logging and livestock diseases, challenges for which the commercial farmers already had efficient adaptation strategies in place. The major obstacle hindering commercial farmers with future planning was the lack of clear directives from the government, for example, with regard to issuing of water licences and land reform. Enabling agricultural communities to procure sustainable livelihoods requires implementation of strategies that address the common and specific challenges and strengthen the adaptive capacity of both commercial and small-scale farmers. Identified ways forward include knowledge transfer within and across farming communities, clear governmental directives and targeted locally adapted finance programmes.

  • 47.
    Drangert, Jan-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sharatchandra, H. C.
    Karnataka State Pollut Control Board, India.
    Addressing urban water scarcity: reduce, treat and reuse - the third generation of management to avoid local resources boundaries2017In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 19, no 5, 978-996 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban growth leads to geographically concentrated demand for water and food -and to growing volumes of wastewater and organic waste. Left unattended by city authorities, both local and planetary resources boundaries for water and nutrients will be transgressed. A novel partly dynamic flexible water balance is developed to explore ways to address a looming water crisis. A systems-based flow chart shows how rainwater, groundwater and recycled water interact. Measures from supply-, demand-, and reuse management are combined to manipulate the water flows. Water management in Bangalore, India, focused on supply management over the period 1964 to 2015, tapping distant rivers. This mind-set was challenged by a Water Disputes Tribunal and international financiers. Residents and industry were losing faith in the erratic water supply, and met part or all their water needs by digging or drilling wells. The flexible water balance is tested on Bangalore for the year 2050 when the population has increased from 8 to 20 million. New housing complexes can provide opportunities for effective arrangements to recycle water and nutrients, save energy, and reduce water pollution and air emissions. The flexible water balance indicates that Bangaloreans can get enough household water without tapping river water and still recharge groundwater.

  • 48.
    Brulin, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Advances in Project Management Series: Sustainable Change in Large Projects2012In: PM World Journal, ISSN 2330-4480, Vol. 1, no 5, 1-5 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    McCormick, Kes
    et al.
    International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics (IIIEE), Lund University, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), Lund University, Sweden.
    Coenen, Lars
    Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University, Sweden; Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and Education (NIFU), Norway.
    Neij, Lena
    International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics (IIIEE), Lund University, Sweden.
    Advancing Sustainable Urban Transformation.2013In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 50, 1-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increased awareness of the urgency to respond to climate change and to promote sustainable development, there are few powerful initiatives that are decisively shifting urban development in a sustainable, resilient and low-carbon direction. This Special Volume of the Journal of Cleaner Production explores sustainable urban transformation focusing on structural transformation processes – multi-dimensional and radical change – that can effectively direct urban development towards ambitious sustainability goals. The 20 articles are based on 35 cases and over 130 surveyed examples of urban initiatives on sustainability in many countries. While cities in Europe dominate, there are also examples from North America, South America, Africa, Asia and Oceania. The combined articles in this Special Volume contribute to knowledge and understanding on sustainable urban transformation across a range of areas, including governance and planning, innovation and competitiveness, lifestyle and consumption, resource management and climate mitigation and adaptation, transport and accessibility, buildings, and the spatial environment and public space. Overall, this Special Volume documents and analyses real-life action in cities and communities around the world to respond to sustainability challenges and it provides critical insights into how to catalyse, intensify and accelerate sustainable urban transformation globally. A main finding of the articles is that governance and planning are the key leverage points for transformative change.

  • 50.
    Hjelm, Olof
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Advantage Eco-design - A partnership for promoting ecodesign activities in small companies2004In: Partnership for Sustainable Development,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper evaluates a project that promotes eco-design activities in small companies. Small companies have special needs when it comes to eco-design. Here I present a way of working that uses partnerships between small companies, authorities, consultants, and universities to promote such activities. The project addresses two connected parts: training and network activities as well as individual product development at each company. At the start, the companies were given advice about environmental work, eco-design, and life-cycle thinking. Before starting the eco-design activities, the project actively tried to find the right resources (consultants) needed for each company. The product development activities greatly differed between companies, depending on the type of project and the ambitions of the companies. After some time, we had more network meetings that included training, exchange of experience during the individual project work, and site-visits at companies in the project. The project was finalised by an official exhibition where the companies displayed new products or product ideas developed in the project. With support from the project, four companies developed a new generation of an existing product and introduced it on the market, one developed new concepts to be used in further development, two made initial work and changes on existing products, and finally one company developed a design tool to be used in coming eco-design-activities. These examples are now used for marketing eco-design activities in the work with regional economic development. This paper describes the network of actors, way of working, and outcomes of -Advantage Ecodesign-. In addition, the paper discusses how good examples can be used in the regional economic development and the importance of creating good partnerships to build a platform for continuous eco-design activities in small companies.

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