liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 6880
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Holmbom, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Giske, Christian G.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.; Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Östholm Balkhed, Åse
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Claesson, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    14-Year Survey in a Swedish County Reveals a Pronounced Increase in Bloodstream Infections (BSI). Comorbidity: An Independent Risk Factor for Both BSI and Mortality2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: we assessed the incidence, risk factors and outcome of BSI over a 14-year period (2000-2013) in a Swedish county.

    Methods: retrospective cohort study on culture confirmed BSI among patients in the county of Östergötland, Sweden, with approximately 440,000 inhabitants. A BSI was defined as either community-onset BSI (CO-BSI) or hospital-acquired BSI (HA-BSI).

    Results: of a total of 11,480 BSIs, 67% were CO-BSI and 33% HA-BSI. The incidence of BSI increased by 64% from 945 to 1,546 per 100,000 hospital admissions per year during the study period. The most prominent increase, 83% was observed within the CO-BSI cohort whilst HA-BSI increased by 32%. Prescriptions of antibiotics in outpatient care decreased with 24% from 422 to 322 prescriptions dispensed/1,000 inhabitants/year, whereas antibiotics prescribed in hospital increased by 67% (from 424 to 709 DDD per 1,000 days of care). The overall 30-day mortality for HA-BSIs was 17.2%, compared to 10.6% for CO-BSIs, with an average yearly increase per 100,000 hospital admissions of 2 and 5% respectively. The proportion of patients with one or more comorbidities, increased from 20.8 to 55.3%. In multivariate analyses, risk factors for mortality within 30 days were: HA-BSI (2.22); two or more comorbidities (1.89); single comorbidity (1.56); CO-BSI (1.21); male (1.05); and high age (1.04).

    Conclusion: this survey revealed an alarming increase in the incidence of BSI over the 14-year study period. Interventions to decrease BSI in general should be considered together with robust antibiotic stewardship programmes to avoid both over- and underuse of antibiotics.

  • 2.
    Nilsson, Line
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Norregaard, Rikke
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    15-Deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) Exerts Antioxidant Effects While Exacerbating Inflammation in Mice Subjected to Ureteral Obstruction2017In: Mediators of Inflammation, ISSN 0962-9351, E-ISSN 1466-1861, 3924912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urinary obstruction is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to renal dysfunction. Previous studies have shown that 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) has both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Using a unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) mouse model, we examined the effects of 15d-PGJ(2) on oxidative stress and inflammation in the kidney. Mice were subjected to UUO for 3 days and treated with 15d-PGJ(2). Protein and RNA expression were examined using immunoblotting and qPCR. 15d-PGJ(2) increased NF-E2-related nuclear factor erythroid-2 (Nrf2) protein expression in response to UUO, and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a downstream target of Nrf2, was induced by 15d-PGJ(2). Additionally, 15d-PGJ(2) prevented protein carbonylation, a UUO-induced oxidative stress marker. Inflammation, measured by nuclear NF-kappa B, F4/80, and MCP-1, was increased in response to UUO and further increased by 15d-PGJ(2). Renal injury was aggravated by 15d-PGJ(2) treatment as measured by kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and cortical caspase 3 content. No effect of 15d-PGJ(2) was observed on renal function in mice subjected to UUO. This study illustrates differentiated functioning of 15d-PGJ(2) on inflammation and oxidative stress in response to obstructive nephropathy. High concentrations of 15d-PGJ(2) protects against oxidative stress during 3-day UUO in mice; however, it aggravates the associated inflammation.

  • 3.
    Kallstrom, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Helsingborg Hospital.
    Salme, Rebecka
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jonsson, Per-Ebbe
    Helsingborg Hospital.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    17 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 as predictor of tamoxifen response in premenopausal breast cancer2010In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER, ISSN 0959-8049, Vol. 46, no 5, 892-900 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    17 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSDs) are involved in the local regulation of sex steroids. 17HSD1 converts oestrone (El) to the more potent oestradiol (E2) and 17HSD2 catalyses the reverse reaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of these enzymes in premenopausal breast cancers and to analyse if they have any prognostic or tamoxifen predictive value. Premenopausal patients with invasive breast cancer, stage II (UICC), were randomised to either 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen (n = 276) or no tamoxifen (n = 288). The median follow-up was 13.9 years (range 10.5-17.5). The expression of 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 was analysed with immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. The enzyme expression level (-/+/++/+++) was successfully determined in 396 and 373 tumours, respectively. Women with hormone-receptor positive tumours, with low levels (-/+/++) of 17HSD1, had a 43% reduced risk of recurrence, when treated with tamoxifen (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37-0.86; p = 0.0086). On the other hand high expression (+++) of 17HSD1 was associated with no significant difference between the two treatment arms (HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.43-1.95; p = 0.82). The interaction between 17HSD1 and tamoxifen was significant during the first 5 years of follow-up (p = 0.023). In the cohort of systemically untreated patients no prognostic importance was observed for 17HSD1. We found no predictive or prognostic value for 17HSD2. This is the first report of 17HSD1 in a cohort of premenopausal women with breast cancer randomised to tamoxifen. Our data suggest that 17HSD1 might be a predictive factor in this group of patients.

  • 4.
    Sivik, Tove
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 14 is a predictive marker for tamoxifen response in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 7, e40568- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17βHSDs) are important enzymes regulating the pool of bioactive steroids in the breast. The current study was undertaken in order to evaluate implications of 17βHSD14 in breast cancer, measuring 17βHSD14 protein expression in breast tumours.

    Methods: An antibody targeting the 17βHSD14 antigen was generated and validated using HSD17B14-transfected cells and a peptide-neutralising assay. Tissue microarrays with tumours from 912 post-menopausal women diagnosed with lymph node-negative breast cancer, and randomised to adjuvant tamoxifen or no endocrine treatment, were analysed for 17βHSD14 protein expression with immunohistochemistry.

    Results: Results were obtained from 847 tumours. Patients with oestrogen positive tumours with high 17βHSD14 expression had fewer local recurrences when treated with tamoxifen (HR 0.38; 95% C.I. 0.19–0.77, p = 0.007) compared to patients with lower tumoural 17βHSD14 expression, for whom tamoxifen did not reduce the number of local recurrences (HR 1.19; 95% C.I. 0.54–2.59; p = 0.66). No prognostic importance of 17βHSD14 was seen for systemically untreated patients.

    Conclusions: Using a highly specific validated antibody for immunohistochemical analysis of a large number of breast tumours, we have shown that tumoural expression levels of 17βHSD14 can predict the outcome of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment in terms of local recurrence-free survival in patients with lymph node-negative ER+ breast cancer. The results need be verified to confirm any clinical relevance.

  • 5.
    Lundberg, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Department of Biochemistry, University of Sydney, Australia.
    Dudman, Nicholas P.
    Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Prince Henry Hospital, University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Kuchel, Philip W.
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Sydney, Australia.
    Wilcken, David E. L.
    Present address: Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    1H NMR determination of urinary betaine in patients with premature vascular disease and mild homocysteinemia1995In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 41, no 2, 275-283 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urinary N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine) and N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) have been identified and quantified for clinical purposes by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) measurement in previous studies. We have assessed these procedures by using both one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D NMR spectroscopy, together with pH titration of urinary extracts to help assign 1H NMR spectral peaks. The betaine calibration curve linearity was excellent (r = 0.997, P = 0.0001) over the concentration range 0.2-1.2 mmol/L, and CVs for replicate betaine analyses ranged from 7% (n = 10) at the lowest concentration to 1% (n = 9) at the highest. The detection limit for betaine was < 15 mumol/L. Urinary DMG concentrations were substantially lower than those of betaine. Urinary betaine and DMG concentrations measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy from 13 patients with premature vascular disease and 17 normal controls provided clinically pertinent data. We conclude that 1H NMR provides unique advantages as a research tool for determination of urinary betaine and DMG concentrations.

  • 6.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy .
    Fagard, Robert
    University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof
    University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain .
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Boehm, Michael
    University of Saarlandes Kliniken, Germany .
    Christiaens, Thierry
    University of Ghent, Belgium .
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    De Backer, Guy
    University Hospital, Belgium .
    Dominiczak, Anna
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Galderisi, Maurizio
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy .
    Grobbee, Diederick E.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Laurent, Stephane
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France .
    Manolis, Athanasios J.
    Asklepe Gen Hospital, Greece .
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ruilope, Luis Miguel
    Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain .
    Schmieder, Roland E.
    University Hospital, Germany .
    Sirnes, Per Anton
    Ostlandske Hjertesenter, Norway .
    Sleight, Peter
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England .
    Viigimaa, Margus
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia .
    Waeber, Bernard
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland .
    Zannad, Faiez
    University of Lorraine, France .
    2013 ESH/ESC Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 28, -+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy .
    Fagard, Robert
    KU Leuven University, Belgium .
    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain .
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Boehm, Michael
    University of Klinikum Saarlandes, Germany .
    Christiaens, Thierry
    University of Ghent, Belgium .
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    De Backer, Guy
    University Hospital, Belgium .
    Dominiczak, Anna
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Galderisi, Maurizio
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy .
    Grobbee, Diederick E.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Laurent, Stephane
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France .
    Manolis, Athanasios J.
    Asklepeion Gen Hospital, Greece .
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ruilope, Luis Miguel
    Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain .
    Schmieder, Roland E.
    University Hospital, Germany .
    Sirnes, Per Anton
    Ostlandske Hjertesenter, Norway .
    Sleight, Peter
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England .
    Viigimaa, Margus
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia .
    Waeber, Bernard
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland .
    Zannad, Faiez
    Centre Invest Clin 9501, France .
    2013 ESH/ESC Guidelines for themanagement of arterial hypertension The Task Force for the management ofarterial hypertension of the European Society ofHypertension (ESH) and of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)2013In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 31, no 7, 1281-1357 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 8.
    Mancia, Giuseppe
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy .
    Fagard, Robert
    KU Leuven University, Belgium .
    Narkiewicz, Krzysztof
    Medical University of Gdansk, Poland .
    Redon, Josep
    University of Valencia, Spain .
    Zanchetti, Alberto
    University of Milan, Italy .
    Boehm, Michael
    University of Saarlandes Kliniken, Germany .
    Christiaens, Thierry
    University of Ghent, Belgium .
    Cifkova, Renata
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    De Backer, Guy
    University Hospital, Belgium .
    Dominiczak, Anna
    University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Galderisi, Maurizio
    Federico II University Hospital, Italy .
    Grobbee, Diederick E.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kirchof, Paulus
    University of Birmingham, England .
    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Laurent, Stephane
    Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, France .
    Manolis, Athanasios J.
    Asklepe Gen Hospital, Greece .
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ruilope, Luis Miguel
    Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain .
    Schmieder, Roland E.
    University Hospital, Germany .
    Sirnes, Per Anton
    Ostlandske Hjertesenter, Norway .
    Sleight, Peter
    John Radcliffe Hospital, England .
    Viigimaa, Margus
    Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia .
    Waeber, Bernard
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland .
    Zannad, Faiez
    University of Lorraine, France .
    2013 Practice guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)2013In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 31, no 10, 1925-1938 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 9.
    Horner, Patrick J
    et al.
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK.
    Karla, Blee
    Bristol Sexual Health Centre, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
    Falk, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    van der Meijden, W
    Department of Dermatology, New Cross Hospital, UK..
    Moi, H.
    Olafia Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    2016 European Guideline on the management of non-gonococcal urethritis2016In: International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), ISSN 0956-4624, E-ISSN 1758-1052, Vol. 27, no 11, 928-937 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the updated International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections guideline for the management of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. This guideline recommends confirmation of urethritis in symptomatic men before starting treatment. It does not recommend testing asymptomatic men for the presence of urethritis. All men with urethritis should be tested for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and ideally M. genitalium using a NAAT as this is highly likely to improve clinical outcomes. If a NAAT is positive for gonorrhoea, a culture should be performed before treatment. In view of the increasing evidence that azithromycin 1 g may result in the development of antimicrobial resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium azithromycin 1 g is no longer recommended as first line therapy, which should be doxycycline 100 mg bd for 7 days. If azithromycin is to be prescribed an extended of 500 mg, then 250 mg daily for 4 days is to be preferred over 1 g stat. In men with persistent NGU, M. genitalium NAAT testing is recommended if not previously undertaken, as is Trichomonas vaginalis NAAT testing in populations where T. vaginalis is detectable in >2% of symptomatic women.

  • 10.
    Bengtsson, Finn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology .
    260 therapeutic drug monitorings (TDM) in relation to compliance and co-medication in psychiatric treatment2002In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, Vol. 17, 3S-3S p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Bengtsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sören, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brandejsky, Vaclav
    Depts Clinical Research and Radiology, University Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    31P MRS as a Potential Biomarker for Fibromyalgia2012In: Proceedings of the 20th Annaal Meeting & Exhibition, 5-11 May, Melbourne, Australia, 2012, 1493-1493 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major clinical symptoms in fibromyalgia (FM) are muscle pain, stiffness and fatigue. Studies have shown reduced voluntary strength and exercise capacity, lower endurance and more muscular pain even at low workload. An impaired muscle energy metabolism has therefore been proposed as a result of the disease. An earlier study using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) showed that at maximal dynamic and static contractions the concentration of inorganic phosphate was lower in FM [1]. A decrease in ATP, ADP and PCr and an increase in AMP and creatine was found in FM biopsies [2]. The purpose of this study was to non-invasively analyze the quantitative content of  phosphagens in the resting muscle in FM in comparison to healthy controls using 31P MRS of the quadriceps muscle.

  • 12.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    et al.
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Lê, Anh Dzung
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Hipskind, Philip A
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hamdouchi, Chafiq
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Lu, Jianliang
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hembre, Erik J.
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Cramer, Jeffrey
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Song, Min
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    McKinzie, David
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Morin, Michelle
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Ciccocioppo, Roberto
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    3-(4-Chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-thiazol-5-yl)-8-(1-ethylpropyl)-2,6-dimethyl-imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine: a novel brain-penetrant, orally available corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 antagonist with efficacy in animal models of alcoholism2007In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 27, no 10, 2718-2726 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a novel corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1) antagonist with advantageous properties for clinical development, and its in vivo activity in preclinical alcoholism models. 3-(4-Chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-thiazol-5-yl)-8-(1-ethylpropyl)-2,6-dimethyl-imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine (MTIP) inhibited 125I-sauvagine binding to rat pituitary membranes and cloned human CRF1 with subnanomolar affinities, with no detectable activity at the CRF2 receptor or other common drug targets. After oral administration to rats, MTIP inhibited 125I-sauvagine binding to rat cerebellar membranes ex vivo with an ED50 of approximately 1.3 mg/kg and an oral bioavailability of 91.1%. Compared with R121919 (2,5-dimethyl-3-(6-dimethyl-4-methylpyridin-3-yl)-7-dipropylamino-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine) and CP154526 (N-butyl-N-ethyl-4,9-dimethyl-7-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-3,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.3.0]nona-2,4,8,10-tetraen-2-amine), MTIP had a markedly reduced volume of distribution and clearance. Neither open-field activity nor baseline exploration of an elevated plus-maze was affected by MTIP (1-10 mg/kg). In contrast, MTIP dose-dependently reversed anxiogenic effects of withdrawal from a 3 g/kg alcohol dose. Similarly, MTIP blocked excessive alcohol self-administration in Wistar rats with a history of dependence, and in a genetic model of high alcohol preference, the msP rat, at doses that had no effect in nondependent Wistar rats. Also, MTIP blocked reinstatement of stress-induced alcohol seeking both in postdependent and in genetically selected msP animals, again at doses that were ineffective in nondependent Wistar rats. Based on these findings, MTIP is a promising candidate for treatment of alcohol dependence.

  • 13.
    Saraste, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abbott, Allan
    Katashev, A
    Murans, G
    3D analysis of spine and chest wall form and mobility. Application of a new method to evaluate treatment outcome in pediatric spine deformities2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary

    A new optical scanning method is applyed for a static and dynamic analysis of thorax and spine deformities in brace and surgically treated scoliosis patients to capture intervention dependent changes over time. The costs and additional information captured by the method is analysed.

    Introduction

    To evaluate the intervention dependent changes in spine and chest wall deformities, such as mobility of thorax, volume, symmetry of growth, and possible growth distorting factors are poorly known and should be studied. In patients with neuropathic spine deformities, the seat loading is of importance to enhance balanced sitting and preventing pressure problems. Quantitative methods to be used for over time comparisons need to be further developed.

    In adolescents the decision to treat a spine deformity is mainly based on radiographic findings, whereas many patients are more interested in how their body configuration deviates from the normality. There is a need to implement and evaluate a method for this purpose. In brace treated children and adolescents, a non-radiation producing examination is to prefer for repeated follow-up controls.

    Methods

    A consequtive series of children with spine deformity, who are enrolled in the treatment protocol, are invited to take part in the tests. In surgery group, tests are performed before and 3 months after surgery aimed to correct the spine and/or thorax deformity. In brace treatment and follow-up groups tests are made at the same time points as x-rays. The static and dynamic recordings are performed by and optic scanenr Artec 3D (Artec Group, San Diego, CA), and the sitting load distribution measurements with a sensor mat (Clin-seat Type 5315 by Tekscan, Boston, Massachusetts, USA). 60 children/year in brace treatment, 40 in surgery, and 50 in the follow-up group are estimated to be included. These methods´ costs and benefits as well as their added value for the clinical decision making will be evaluated after 2-3 years.

    Results

    A feasibility test shows that clinically small enough differences can be recorded and numerically expressed and analysed. An application on a consecutive, clinical patient group will be carried on.

    Conclusion

    The optical scanning method by Artec, allows a static and dynamic capturing of respiratoryassociated thorax movements and the changes of a spine deformity over time. The new method will be applied in a consecutive series of patients.

  • 14.
    Rodríguez-Vila, Borja
    et al.
    Bioengineering and Telemedicine Group, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid Spain.
    Pettersson, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    García-Vicente, Feliciano
    Medical Physics, Radiotherapy Department, University Hospital La Princesa Spain.
    Gómez, Enrique J.
    Bioengineering and Telemedicine Group, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid Spain.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    3D deformable registration for monitoring radiotherapy treatment in prostate cancer2007In: Image Analysis: 15th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2007, Aalborg, Denmark, June 10-14, 2007, Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, 750-759 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two deformable registration methods, the Demons and the Morphon algorithms, have been used for registration of CT datasets to evaluate their usability in radiotherapy planning for prostate cancer. These methods were chosen because they can perform deformable registration in a fully automated way. The experiments show that for intrapatient registration both of the methods give useful results, although some differences exist in the way they deform the template. The Morphon method has, however, some advantageous compared to the Demons method. It is invariant to the image intensity and it does not distort the deformed data. The conclusion is therefore to recommend the Morphon method as a registration tool for this application. A more flexible regularization model is needed, though, in order to be able to catch the full range of deformations required to match the datasets.

  • 15.
    Rossitti, S.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Pfister, M.
    Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany.
    3D road-mapping in the endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations2009In: INTERVENTIONAL NEURORADIOLOGY, ISSN 1123-9344, Vol. 15, no 3, 283-290 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3D road-mapping with syngo iPilot was used as an additional tool for assessing cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for endovascular therapy. This method provides accurate superimposition of a live fluoroscopic image (native or vascular road-map) and its matching 2D projection of the 3D data set, delivering more anatomic information on one additional display. In the endovascular management of cases with complex anatomy, 3D road-mapping provides excellent image quality at the intervention site. This method can potentially reduce intervention time, the number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time and the amount of contrast media used in a procedure, with reservation for these factors being mainly operator-dependent. 3D road-mapping probably does not provide any advantage in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms or AVMs with very simple configuration, and it should not be used when acquisition of an optimum 3D data set is not feasible.

  • 16.
    Evaldsson, Chamilly
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rydén, Ingvar
    Division of Clinical Chemistry, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Rosén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    4-Thiouridine induces dose-dependent reduction of oedema, leucocyte influx and tumour necrosis factor in lung inflammation2009In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 155, no 2, 330-338 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent reports demonstrate a role for nucleotides as inflammatory modulators. Uridine, for example, reduces oedema formation and leucocyte infiltration in a Sephadex-induced lung inflammation model. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) concentration was also reduced. Previous in vivo observations indicated that 4-thiouridine might have similar effects on leucocyte infiltration and TNF release. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the effects of 4-thiouridine in greater detail. We used a Sephadex-induced acute lung inflammation model in Sprague-Dawley rats. The dextran beads were instilled intratracheally into the lungs, which were excised and examined after 24 h. Sephadex alone led to massive oedema formation and infiltration of macrophages, neutrophils and eosinophils. Microgranulomas with giant cell formations were clearly visible around the partially degraded beads. A significant increase in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) content of TNF and leukotrienes was also seen. 4-Thiouridine co-administration affected all variables investigated in this model, i.e. oedema, microscopic and macroscopic appearance of lung tissue, total leucocyte and differential leucocyte counts in BALF, TNF and leukotrienes C-4 (LTC4), LTD4 and LTE4 in BALF, indicating a reproducible anti-inflammatory effect. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that 4-thiouridine has anti-inflammatory effects similar to those of uridine. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of pharmacological 4-thiouridine effects in vivo. The results suggest nucleoside/nucleotide involvement in inflammatory processes, warranting further studies on nucleoside analogues as attractive new alternatives in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  • 17.
    Baron, Ralf
    et al.
    University Klinikum Schleswig Holstein.
    Mayoral, Victor
    Hospital Llobregat.
    Leijon, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Binder, Andreas
    University Klinikum Schleswig Holstein.
    Steigerwald, Ilona
    Grunenthal GmbH.
    Serpell, Michael
    University of Glasgow.
    5% lidocaine medicated plaster versus pregabalin in post-herpetic neuralgia and diabetic polyneuropathy: an open-label, non-inferiority two-stage RCT study2009In: CURRENT MEDICAL RESEARCH AND OPINION, ISSN 0300-7995, Vol. 25, no 7, 1663-1676 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare efficacy and safety of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster with pregabalin in patients with post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) or painful diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Study design and methods: This was a two-stage adaptive, randomized, open-label, multicentre, non-inferiority study. Data are reported from the initial 4-week comparative phase, in which adults with PHN or painful DPN received either topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster applied to the most painful skin area or twice-daily pregabalin capsules titrated to effect according to the Summary of Product Characteristics. The primary endpoint was response rate at 4 weeks, defined as reduction averaged over the last three days from baseline of greater than= 2 points or an absolute value of less than= 4 points on the 11-point Numerical Rating Scale (NRS-3). Secondary endpoints included 30% and 50% reductions in NRS-3 scores; change in allodynia severity rating; quality of life (QoL) parameters EQ-5D, CGIC, and PGIC; patient satisfaction with treatment; and evaluation of safety (laboratory parameters, vital signs, physical examinations, adverse events [AEs], drug-related AEs [DRAEs], and withdrawal due to AEs). Results: Ninety-six patients with PHN and 204 with painful DPN were analysed (full analysis set, FAS). Overall, 66.4% of patients treated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster and 61.5% receiving pregabalin were considered responders (cor-responding numbers for the per protocol set, PPS: 65.3% vs. 62.0%). In PHN more patients responded to 5% lidocaine medicated plaster treatment than to pregabalin (PPS: 62.2% vs. 46.5%), while response was comparable for patients with painful DPN (PPS: 66.7% vs 69.1%). 30% and 50% reductions in NRS-3 scores were greater with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster than with pregabalin. Both treatments reduced allodynia severity. 5% lidocaine medicated plaster showed greater improvements in QoL based on EQ-5D in both PHN and DPN. PGIC and CGIC scores indicated greater improvement for 5% lidocaine medicated plaster treated patients with PHN. Improvements were comparable between treatments in painful DPN. Fewer patients administering 5% lidocaine medicated plaster experienced AEs (safety set, SAF: 18.7% vs. 46.4%), DRAEs (5.8% vs. 41.2%) and related discontinuations compared to patients taking pregabalin. Conclusion: 5% lidocaine medicated plaster showed better efficacy compared with pregabalin in patients with PHN. Within DPN, efficacy was comparable for both treatments. 5% lidocaine medicated plaster showed a favourable efficacy/safety profile with greater improvements in patient satisfaction and QoL compared with pregabalin for both indications, supporting its first line position in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain.

  • 18.
    Hemdan, Tammer
    et al.
    University Hospital Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Robert
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Hellström, Pekka
    University Central Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Tasdemir, Ilker
    Central Hospital of Rogaland, Stavanger, Norway.
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    University Hospital Uppsala, Sweden.
    5-Year Outcome of a Randomized Prospective Study Comparing bacillus Calmette-Guerin with Epirubicin and Interferon-alpha 2b in Patients with T1 Bladder Cancer2014In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 191, no 5, 1244-1249 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In a multicenter, prospectively randomized study we evaluated the 5-year outcomes of bacillus Calmette-Guerin alone compared to a combination of epirubicin and interferon-alpha 2b in the treatment of patients with T1 bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: Transurethral resection was followed by a second resection and bladder mapping. Stratification was for grade and carcinoma in situ. Followup entailed regular cystoscopy and cytology during the first 5 years. The end points assessed in this analysis were recurrence-free survival, time to treatment failure and progression, cancer specific survival and prognostic factors. Results: The study recruited 250 eligible patients. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 38% in the combination arm and 59% in the bacillus Calmette-Guerin arm (p = 0.001). The corresponding rates for the other end points were not significantly different, as free of progression 78% and 77%, treatment failure 75% and 75%, and cancer specific survival 90% and 92%, respectively. The type of treatment, tumor size and tumor status at second resection were independent variables associated with recurrence. Concomitant carcinoma in situ was not predictive of failure of bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy. An independent factor for treatment failure was remaining T1 stage at second resection. Conclusions: Bacillus Calmette-Guerin was more effective than the tested combination therapy. The currently recommended management with second resection and 3-week maintenance bacillus Calmette-Guerin entails a low risk of cancer specific death. More aggressive treatment in patients with infiltrative tumors at second resection might improve these results. In particular, concomitant carcinoma in situ was not a predictive factor for poor outcome after bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Topooco, Naira
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Havik, Odd
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Nordgreen, Tine
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    6 Internet-supported versus face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for depression2016In: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, ISSN 1473-7175, E-ISSN 1744-8360, Vol. 16, no 1, 55-60 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depression and depressive symptoms are highly prevalent and there is a need for different forms of psychological treatments that can be delivered from a distance at a low cost. In the present review the authors contrast face-to-face and Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for depression. A total of five studies are reviewed in which guided ICBT was directly compared against face-to-face CBT. Meta-analytic summary statistics were calculated for the five studies involving a total of 429 participants. The average effect size difference was Hedges g=0.12 (95% CI: -0.06-0.30) in the direction of favoring guided ICBT. The small difference in effect has no implication for clinical practice. The overall empirical status of clinician-guided ICBT for depression is commented on and future challenges are highlighted. Among these are developing treatments for patients with more severe and long-standing depression and for children, adolescents and the elderly. Also, there is a need to investigate mechanisms of change.

  • 20.
    Hau, Stephan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    6 papers on "psychodynamic treatment techique".2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Albers, Jan
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Wiberg, Jan
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Vaxjö University.
    6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - A case study from the couples perspective2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, Vol. 7, no 2, 103-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen. Aim: To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couples perspective.

    Methods and the case: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.

    Findings: Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.

    Conclusion: An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.

  • 22.
    Almer, Sven
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hindorf , U
    Lund University.
    6-Thioguanine therapy in Crohns disease-Observational data in Swedish patients2009In: Digestive and Liver Disease, ISSN 1590-8658, Vol. 41, no 3, 194-200 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Adverse events (AE) leading to discontinuation or dose-reduction of thiopurine therapy (TP) occur in 9-28% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. 6-Thioguanine (6-TG) has been proposed as an alternative treatment in patients intolerant for azathioprine (AZA), but some concerns have been raised about drug safety.

    Methods: We evaluated in a prospective manner the tolerance and efficacy of 6-TG in 23 Crohns disease (CD) patients (13 men, median age 41 (19-65) years) with prior intolerance (n = 18) or resistance (It = 5) to AZA and/or 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). In addition, eight patients had tried mycophenolate mofetil. Seventeen patients (74%) had undergone intestinal resection, often several times.

    Results: Patients were treated with a median daily dose of 40 mg 6-TG (range 20-60) for 259 (15-2272) days. Seven of 13 patients (54%) with active disease went into remission after 8 (4-26) weeks. Sixteen patients (70%) experienced AE that lead to discontinuation (n=10) after 85 (15-451) days or dose reduction (n=6) after 78 (10-853) days. Ten of 18 patients (56%) with prior TP-intolerance discontinued 6-TG treatment due to AE compared to none of five patients with TP-resistance (p=0.046). Of 13 patients that tolerated 6-TG, eight discontinued the drug due to therapeutic failure (n=5) or safety concerns (n=3). Eight patients (35%) continued treatment beyond 12 months. There was no significant difference in maximum thioguanine nucleotide levels between patients with AE leading to discontinuation/dose reduction and patients without AE, 652 (99-2488) vs. 551 (392-1574) pmol/8 x 10(8) RBC; p=0.80.

    Conclusions: In this cohort of CD patients with severe disease failing traditional thiopurine treatment, a small fraction (22%) had long-term benefit of 6-TG-treatment. 6-TG therapy seems to offer a limited therapeutic gain for patients intolerant to both AZA and 6-MP and other treatment options should be considered.

  • 23. de Boer, NKH
    et al.
    Reinisch, W
    Teml, A
    van Bodegraven, AA
    Schwab, M
    Lukas, M
    Ochsenkuhn, T
    Petritsch, W
    Knoflach, P
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    van der Merwe, SW
    Herrlinger, KR
    Seiderer, J
    Vogelsang, H
    Mulder, CJJ
    6-thioguanine treatment in inflammatory bowel disease: A critical appraisal by a European 6-TG working party2006In: Digestion, ISSN 0012-2823, Vol. 73, no 1, 25-31 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, the suggestion to use 6-thioguanine (6-TG) as an alternative thiopurine in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been discarded due to reports about possible (hepato) toxicity. During meetings arranged in Vienna and Prague in 2004, European experts applying 6-TG further on in IBD patients presented data on safety and efficacy of 6-TG. After thorough evaluation of its risk-benefit ratio, the group consented that 6-TG may still be considered as a rescue drug in stringently defined indications in IBD, albeit restricted to a clinical research setting. As a potential indication for administering 6-TG, we delineated the requirement for maintenance therapy as well as intolerance and/or resistance to aminosalicylates, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate and infliximab. Furthermore, indications are preferred in which surgery is thought to be inappropriate. The standard 6-TG dosage should not exceed 25 mg daily. Routine laboratory controls are mandatory in short intervals. Liver biopsies should be performed after 6-12 months, three years and then three-yearly accompanied by gastroduodenoscopy, to monitor for potential hepatotoxicity, including nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH) and veno-occlusive disease (VOD). Treatment with 6-TG must be discontinued in case of overt or histologically proven hepatotoxicity. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 24.
    Hau, Stephan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    7 papers on developmental psycholoigy and psychodynamic treatment techniques2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Hau, Stephan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    7 papers on "psychoanalysis today", "psychoanalytic treatment", "diagnosis", "working with dreams", and on "transference"2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Hau, Stephan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    7 papers on psychodynamic treatment technique2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Wedajo, W.
    et al.
    Armauer Hansen Research InstituteAddis Ababa, Ethiopia; Department of Biology, Jimma UniversityJimma, Ethiopia.
    Schön, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Kalmar County HospitalKalmar, Sweden.
    Bedru, A.
    Armauer Hansen Research InstituteAddis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Kiros, T.
    Armauer Hansen Research InstituteAddis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Hailu, E.
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Mebrahtu, T.
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Yamuah, L.
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Angeby, K.
    Department of Clinical Microbiology MTC, Karolinska Hospital, Karolinska University HospitalStockholm, Sweden.
    Werngren, J.
    Department of Preparedness, Unit of Highly Pathogenic Microorganisms, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI)Solna, Sweden.
    Onyebujoh, P.
    World Health Organization, Regional Office for Africa, Inter-country Support Team for East0/Southern AfricaHarare, Zimbabwe.
    Dagne, K.
    Addis Ababa University, Faculty of Life SciencesAddis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Aseffa, A.
    Armauer Hansen Research Institute Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    A 24-well plate assay for simultaneous testing of first and second line drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a high endemic setting2014In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 7, no 1, 512- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Early detection of drug resistance is one of the priorities of tuberculosis (TB) control programs as drug resistance is increasing. New molecular assays are only accessible for a minority of the second line drugs and their availability in high endemic settings is also hampered by high cost and logistic challenges. Therefore, we evaluated a previously developed method for drug susceptibility testing (DST) including both first- and second line anti-TB drugs for use in high endemic areas. Results: Baseline mycobacterial isolates from 78 consecutive pulmonary TB patients from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia who were culture positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis at the end of a two-month directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) were included. The isolates were simultaneously tested for isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, streptomycin, amikacin, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ethionamide and para-aminosalicylic acid susceptibility using the indirect proportion method adopted for 24-well agar plates containing Middlebrook 7H10 medium. Applying the 24-well plate assay, 43 (55.1%) isolates were resistant to one or more of the first line drugs tested (isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol). MDR-TB was identified in 20.5% of this selected group and there was a perfect correlation for rifampicin resistance with the results from the genotype MTBDRplus assay. All isolates were susceptible to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in agreement with the genotype MTBDRsl assay. The only tested second line drug associated to resistance was ethionamide (14.1% resistant). The method was reproducible with stable results for internal controls (one multi-drug resistant (MDR) and one pan-susceptible strain (H37Rv) and DST results could be reported at two weeks. Conclusions: The 24-well plate method for simultaneous DST for first- and second line drugs was found to be reproducible and correlated well to molecular drug susceptibility tests. It is likely to be useful in high-endemic areas for surveillance as well as for the detection of second line drug resistance in targeted groups such as in those who fail empirical MDR treatment.

  • 28.
    Ziemssen, Tjalf
    et al.
    Klinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Germany.
    Bajenaru, Ovidiu A.
    Carol Davila University of Medical and Pharm, Romania.
    Carra, Adriana
    Hospital Britanico Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    de Klippel, Nina
    Virga Jessaziekenhuis, Belgium.
    de Sa, Joao C.
    Hospital Santa Mari, Belgium.
    Edland, Astrid
    Central Hospital Buskerud, Norway.
    Frederiksen, Jette L.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Heinzlef, Olivier
    Hop Tenon, France.
    Karageorgiou, Klimentini E.
    Gen Hospital Athens, Greece.
    Lander Delgado, Rafael H.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Macias Islas, Miguel A.
    Central University of Guadalajara, Mexico.
    Tubridy, Niall
    Dublin City University, Ireland.
    Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi
    Teva Pharmaceut Ind Ltd, Israel.
    A 2-year observational study of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis converting to glatiramer acetate from other disease-modifying therapies: the COPTIMIZE trial2014In: Journal of Neurology, ISSN 0340-5354, E-ISSN 1432-1459, Vol. 261, no 11, 2101-2111 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies suggest that patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who do not benefit from other disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) may benefit from converting to glatiramer acetate (GA). COPTIMIZE was a 24-month observational study designed to assess the disease course of patients converting to GA 20 mg daily from another DMT. Eligible patients had converted to GA and had received prior DMT for 3-6 months, depending on the reasons for conversion. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. In total, 672 patients from 148 centers worldwide were included in the analysis. Change of therapy to GA was prompted primarily by lack of efficacy (53.6 %) or intolerable adverse events (AEs; 44.8 %). Over a 24-month period, 72.7 % of patients were relapse free. Mean annual relapse rate decreased from 0.86 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.81-0.91] before the change to 0.32 (95 % CI 0.26-0.40; p less than 0.0001) at last observation, while the progression of disability was halted, as the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores remained stable. Patients improved significantly (p less than 0.05) on measures of fatigue, quality of life, depression, and cognition; mobility scores remained stable. The results indicate that changing RRMS patients to GA is associated with positive treatment outcomes.

  • 29.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hummerdal, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bergman Nordgren, Lise
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Psychology , Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    A 3.5-year follow-up of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for major depression2013In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 22, no 2, 155-164 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInternet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression has been tested in several trials, but only with follow-ups up to 1.5 years.

    AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of ICBT 3.5 years after treatment completion.Methods

    A total of 88 people with major depression were randomized to either guided self-help or e-mail therapy in the original trial. One-third was initially on a waiting-list. Treatment was provided for eight weeks and in this report long-term follow-up data were collected. Also included were data from post-treatment and six-month follow-up. A total of 58% (51/88) completed the 3.5-year follow-up. Analyses were performed using a random effects repeated measures piecewise growth model to estimate trajectory shape over time and account for missing data.

    ResultsResults showed continued lowered scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). No differences were found between the treatment conditions. A large proportion of participants (55%) had sought and received additional treatments in the follow-up period. A majority (56.9%) of participants had a BDI score lower than 10 at the 3.5-year follow-up.

    ConclusionsPeople with mild to moderate major depression may benefit from ICBT 3.5-years after treatment completion.

  • 30.
    Braian, Clara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Mattias
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Brighenti, Susanna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Parasa, Venkata R.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    A 3D Human Lung Tissue Model for Functional Studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection2015In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, ISSN 1940-087X, E-ISSN 1940-087X, no 104, 1-9 p., e53084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tuberculosis (TB) still holds a major threat to the health of people worldwide, and there is a need for cost-efficient but reliable models to help us understand the disease mechanisms and advance the discoveries of new treatment options. In vitro cell cultures of monolayers or co-cultures lack the three-dimensional (3D) environment and tissue responses. Herein, we describe an innovative in vitro model of a human lung tissue, which holds promise to be an effective tool for studying the complex events that occur during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). The 3D tissue model consists of tissue-specific epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which are cultured in a matrix of collagen on top of a porous membrane. Upon air exposure, the epithelial cells stratify and secrete mucus at the apical side. By introducing human primary macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis to the tissue model, we have shown that immune cells migrate into the infected-tissue and form early stages of TB granuloma. These structures recapitulate the distinct feature of human TB, the granuloma, which is fundamentally different or not commonly observed in widely used experimental animal models. This organotypic culture method enables the 3D visualization and robust quantitative analysis that provides pivotal information on spatial and temporal features of host cell-pathogen interactions. Taken together, the lung tissue model provides a physiologically relevant tissue micro-environment for studies on TB. Thus, the lung tissue model has potential implications for both basic mechanistic and applied studies. Importantly, the model allows addition or manipulation of individual cell types, which thereby widens its use for modelling a variety of infectious diseases that affect the lungs.

  • 31.
    Magnusson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Vision. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    A 3D-Plus-Time Radial-Cartesian Hybrid Sampling of K-Space With High Temporal Resolution and Maintained Image Quality for MRI and FMRI2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Olsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, EMK-endokrin.
    Eriksson, M
    Johnson, O
    Kjellström, T
    Lanke, J
    Lytken Larsen, M
    Pedersen, T
    Tikkanen, MJ
    Wiklund, O
    A 52-week, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, double-dummy study to assess the efficacy of atorvastatin and simvastatin in reaching low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride targets: The Treat-to-Target (3T) Study2003In: Clinical Therapeutics, ISSN 0149-2918, Vol. 25, no 1, 119-138 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Guidelines for the prevention of coronary heart disease call for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction as the primary target of treatment and reduction of triglycerides (TG) as an additional target. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of atorvastatin and simvastatin to reduce LDL-C and TG concentrations and to meet 3 target lipid levels: LDL-C =2.6 mmol/L, TG =1.5 mmol/L, and both LDL-C =2.6 mmol/L and TG =1.5 mmol/L. Methods: The Treat-to-Target (3T) Study was a 52-week, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group study. Using the double-blind, double-dummy technique, adult patients aged 35 to 75 years with cardiovascular disease and dyslipidemia, defined as LDL-C concentration =4.0 mmol/L (=155 mg/dL), were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive once-daily oral treatment with 20 mg atorvastatin or 20 mg simvastatin. Fasting (12-hour) blood samples for the estimation of lipid levels and clinical laboratory values were collected after 4, 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks. The dose was doubled after 12 weeks if the target National Cholesterol Education Program level of LDL-C (=2.6 mmol/L [100 mg/dL]) was not reached at 8 weeks. Results: The intent-to-treat analysis included 552 patients (418 men, 134 women) randomized to receive atorvastatin and 535 (404 men, 131 women) randomized to receive simvastatin. The number of patients enrolled in the study allowed the evaluation of the drugs' effects on YG. Patient demographic characteristics were similar for the 2 treatment groups, and there were no differences in baseline lipid values. Compared with simvastatin, atorvastatin produced significantly greater reductions in LDL-C (8 weeks: -46% vs -40%, P < 0.001, 52 weeks: -49% vs -44%, P < 0.001) and in YG (8 weeks: -23% vs -14%, P < 0.001, 52 weeks: -24% vs -16%, P < 0.001). Compared with simvastatin-treated patients, a significantly greater number of atorvastatin-treated patients reached the LDL-C target after 8 weeks (45% vs 24%, P < 0.001). Fewer atorvastatin patients needed to have their dose doubled, nevertheless more atorvastatin patients reached the LDL-C target after 52 weeks (61% vs 41%, P < 0.001). Both statins were well tolerated. Muscular symptoms occurred in 12 patients (2.2%) in the atorvastatin group and in 13 patients (2.4%) in the simvastatin group. Conclusions: Atorvastatin 20 or 40 mg/d for up to 1 year of treatment was significantly more effective than simvastatin 20 or 40 mg/d m reducing LDL-C and YG levels and at achieving recommended lipid targets in this selected patient population with cardiovascular disease and dyslipidemia. Both statins were well tolerated.

  • 33. Amin, AI
    et al.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Lee, AJ
    Sexton, R
    Moran, BJ
    Heald, RJ
    A 5-cm colonic J pouch colo-anal reconstruction following anterior resection for low rectal cancer results in acceptable evacuation and continence in the long term2003In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, Vol. 5, no 1, 33-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Optimal treatment for low rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision, with most patients suitable for low colo-rectal or colo-anal anastomosis. A colon pouch has early functional benefits, although long-term function, especially evacuation, might mitigate against its routine use. The aim of this study was to assess evacuation and continence in patients with a colon pouch, and to examine the impact of possible risk factors. Methods. In 1998, all 102 surviving patients with a colon pouch, whose stoma had been closed for more than one year, were sent a postal questionnaire. A composite incontinence score was calculated from questions on urgency, use of a pad, incontinence of gas, liquid or faeces, and a composite evacuation score from questions on medication taken to evacuate, straining, the need and number of times returned to evacuate. Results. The response rate was 90% (50 M, 42 F), with a median age of 68 years (IQR 60-78) and median follow-up of 2.6 years (IQR 1.7-3.9). The anastomosis was 3 cm or less from the anus in 45/92 (49%), and incontinence scores were worse in this group (P = 0.001). There were significantly higher incontinence scores in females (P = 0.014). Age, preoperative radiotherapy, part of colon used for anastomosis, post-operative leak and length of follow-up had no demonstrable effect on either score. Conclusion. Gender and anastomotic height were the only variables which influenced incontinence. Ninety percent of patients reported that their bowel function did not affect their overall wellbeing, and none would have preferred to have a stoma.

  • 34.
    Engquist, Markus
    et al.
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Håkan
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holtz, Anders
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Vavruch, Ludek
    Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Lind, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Spine Centre Göteborg, Sweden.
    A 5-to 8-year randomized study on the treatment of cervical radiculopathy: anterior cervical decompression and fusion plus physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone2017In: JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY-SPINE, ISSN 1547-5654, Vol. 26, no 1, 19-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the 5- to 8-year outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) combined with a structured physiotherapy program as compared with that following the same physiotherapy program alone in patients with cervical radiculopathy. No previous prospective randomized studies with a follow-up of more than 2 years have compared outcomes of surgical versus nonsurgical intervention for cervical radiculopathy. METHODS Fifty-nine patients were randomized to ACDF surgery with postoperative physiotherapy (30 patients) or to structured physiotherapy alone (29 patients). The physiotherapy program included general and specific exercises as well as pain coping strategies. Outcome measures included neck disability (Neck Disability Index [NDI]), neck and arm pain intensity (visual analog scale [VAS]), health state (EQ-5D questionnaire), and a patient global assessment. Patients were followed up for 5-8 years. RESULTS After 5-8 years, the NDI was reduced by a mean score% of 21 (95% CI 14-28) in the surgical group and 11% (95% CI 4%-18%) in the nonsurgical group (p = 0.03). Neck pain was reduced by a mean score of 39 mm (95% CI 26-53 mm) compared with 19 mm (95% CI 7-30 mm; p = 0.01), and arm pain was reduced by a mean score of 33 mm (95% CI 18-49 mm) compared with 19 mm (95% CI 7-32 mm; p = 0.1), respectively. The EQ-5D had a mean respective increase of 0.29 (95% CI 0.13-0.45) compared with 0.14 (95% CI 0.01-0.27; p = 0.12). Ninety-three percent of patients in the surgical group rated their symptoms as "better" or "much better" compared with 62% in the nonsurgical group (p = 0.005). Both treatment groups experienced significant improvement over baseline for all outcome measures. CONCLUSIONS In this prospective randomized study of 5- to 8-year outcomes of surgical versus nonsurgical treatment in patients with cervical radiculopathy, ACDF combined with physiotherapy reduced neck disability and neck pain more effectively than physiotherapy alone. Self-rating by patients as regards treatment outcome was also superior in the surgery group. No significant differences were seen between the 2 patient groups as regards arm pain and health outcome.

  • 35.
    Hedman, Erik
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University.
    Carlbring, Per
    Umea University.
    Ljotsson, Brjann
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Ruck, Christian
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    A 5-Year Follow-up of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder2011In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has been shown to be a promising method to disseminate cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Several trials have demonstrated that Internet-based CBT can be effective for SAD in the shorter term. However, the long-term effects of Internet-based CBT for SAD are less well known. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective: Our objective was to investigate the effect of Internet-based CBT for SAD 5 years after completed treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod: We conducted a 5-year follow-up study of 80 persons with SAD who had undergone Internet-based CBT. The assessment comprised a diagnostic interview and self-report questionnaires. The main outcome measure was the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale-Self-Report (LSAS-SR). Additional measures of social anxiety were the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) and the Social Phobia Scale (SPS). Attrition rates were low: 89% (71/80) of the participants completed the diagnostic interview and 80% (64/80) responded to the questionnaires. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Mixed-effect models analysis showed a significant effect of time on the three social anxiety measures, LSAS-SR, SIAS, and SPS (F(3,98-102) = 16.05 -29.20, P andlt; .001) indicating improvement. From baseline to 5-year follow-up, participants mean scores on the LSAS-SR were reduced from 71.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 66.1-76.5) to 40.3 (95% CI 35.2 - 45.3). The effect sizes of the LSAS-SR were large (Cohens d range 1.30 - 1.40, 95% CI 0.77 - 1.90). Improvements gained at the 1-year follow-up were sustained 5 years after completed treatment. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Internet-based CBT for SAD is a treatment that can result in large and enduring effects. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01145690; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01145690 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/5ygRxDLfK)

  • 36. Dieperink, Willem
    et al.
    van der Horst, Iwan C C
    Nannenberg-Koops, Jaqueline W
    Brouwer, Henk W
    Jaarsma, T
    Nieuwland, Wybe
    Zijlstra, Felix
    Nijsten, Maarten W N
    A 64-year old man who sustained many episodes of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema successfully treated with Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure: a case report.2007In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 119, no 2, 268-70 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is standard treatment for patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema. We describe a patient who had 21 episodes of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema due to very poor patient compliance. This 64-year old man had end-stage congestive heart failure based on systolic left ventricular dysfunction following two myocardial infarctions. In addition to routine medical treatment 15 episodes of pulmonary edema were successfully treated with Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP). The BCPAP system is a simple, disposable, FDA-approved device that delivers positive pressure without a ventilator. This extraordinary case underscores the utility of the BCPAP system to avoid repeated intubation and mechanical ventilation in patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

  • 37. Balldin, J
    et al.
    Berglund, M
    Borg, S
    Mansson, M
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Beroendekliniken IHS. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dependency.
    Franck, J
    Gustafsson, L
    Halldin, J
    Nilsson, LH
    Stolt, G
    Willander, A
    A 6-month controlled naltrexone study: Combined effect with cognitive behavioral therapy in outpatient treatment of alcohol dependence2003In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, Vol. 27, no 7, 1142-1149 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In several studies, patients with alcohol dependence treated with the opioid antagonist naltrexone have shown fewer relapses to heavy drinking than those receiving placebo. An interaction between the naltrexone effect and the type of psychological therapy has been observed. Methods: A 6-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was performed at 10 different investigation sites. After a placebo run-in period of 1 week, 118 patients were randomized into 4 treatment groups - 50 mg of naltrexone daily or placebo in combination with either cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or supportive therapy. The CBT was performed over nine sessions according to the manual of Project MATCH (Matching Alcoholism Treatments to Client Heterogeneity). The supportive therapy was defined as "the treatment as usual." Alcohol consumption, craving, carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, medication compliance by tablet count, and adverse clinical events were assessed at all visits. Other liver enzymes and psychiatric symptoms were also determined. Results: Ninety-one (77%) patients completed the study, and 92 (78%) were 80% compliant with the medication regimen. A lower percentage of heavy-drinking days was shown in the naltrexone group (p = 0.045) compared with the placebo group, as was a lower craving score (p = 0.029). These results are supported by the lower levels of liver enzyme activities (p < 0.010 for aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and ?-glutamyltransferase), but not by the carbohydrate-deficient transferrin levels, in the naltrexone group. The mean time period before the first day of heavy drinking was longer for the group treated with CBT (p = 0.010), especially in combination with naltrexone (p = 0.007). Naltrexone was well tolerated, and no patients discontinued the study due to side effects. Conclusions: This study supports the effect of naltrexone in outpatient treatment of alcohol dependence and suggests that a beneficial interaction effect with CBT can be expected.

  • 38.
    Waller, Niels
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, N657 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
    John, Mike T.
    Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
    Feuerstahler, Leah
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, N657 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
    Baba, Kazuyoshi
    Department of Prosthodontics, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Larsson, Pernilla
    Region Östergötland, Public Dental Health Care.
    Peršić, Sanja
    Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kende, Dóra
    Department of Prosthodontics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.
    Reißmann, Daniel R.
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany..
    Rener-Sitar, Ksenija
    Department of Prosthodontics, Dental Division, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Department of Prosthodontics, University Dental Clinics, University Medical Center of Ljubljan, Ljubljan, Slovenia.
    A 7-day recall period for a clinical application of the oral health impact profile questionnaire.2016In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 20, no 1, 91-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Aims were to investigate and compare the validity and reliability of Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) scores referencing 7-day and 1-month recall periods in international prosthodontic patients.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A sample of 267 patients (mean age = 54.0 years, SD = 17.2 years, 58 % women) with stable oral health-related quality of life was recruited from prosthodontic treatment centers in Croatia, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Slovenia, and Sweden. These patients completed the OHIP on two occasions using a new 7-day recall period and the traditional 1-month recall period. OHIP score validity and reliability were investigated with structural equation models (SEMs) that included OHIP(past 7 days) and OHIP(1 month) latent factors and single indicator measures of global oral health status. The SEMs assessed measurement invariance and the relative validities of the two OHIP latent factors (representing the two recall periods).

    RESULTS: The SEMs provided cogent evidence for recall period measurement invariance for the two OHIP forms and equal validities (r = .48) with external measures of global oral health status.

    CONCLUSION: When assessed in international prosthodontic patients, OHIP scores using the new 7-day recall period were as reliable and valid as the scores using the 1-month recall period.

    CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Conceptual advantages make a 7-day recall period a preferred frame of reference in clinical applications of the OHIP questionnaire.

  • 39.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Gothenburg University.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A bisphosphonate-coating improves the fixation of metal implants in human bone. A randomized trial of dental implants2012In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 50, no 5, 1148-1151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many surgical procedures use metal implants in bone. The clinical results depend on the strength of the bone holding these implants. Our objective was to show that a drug released from the implant surface can improve parameters reflecting the quality or amount of this bone. Sixteen patients received paired dental titanium implants in the maxilla, in a randomized, double-blinded fashion. One implant in each pair was coated with a thin fibrinogen layer containing 2 bisphosphonates. The other implant was untreated. Fixation was evaluated by measurement of resonance frequency (implant stability quotient; ISQ) serving as a proxy for stiffness of the implant-bone construct. Increase in ISQ at 6 months of follow-up was the primary variable. None of the patients had any complications. The resonance frequency increased 6.9 ISQ units more for the coated implants (p = 0.0001; Cohens d = 1.3). The average difference in increase in ISQ and the effect size, suggested a clinically relevant improvement. X-ray showed less bone resorption at the margin of the implant both at 2 months (p = 0.012) and at 6 months (p = 0.012). In conclusion, a thin, bisphosphonate-eluting fibrinogen coating might improve the fixation of metal implants in human bone. This might lead to new possibilities for orthopedic surgery in osteoporotic bone and for dental implants.

  • 40.
    Aspenberg, Per
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    A bisphosphonate-coating improves the fixation of metal implants in human bone. A randomized trial with internal controls in BONE, vol 50, issue , pp S56-S562012In: BONE, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 50, S56-S56 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 41.
    Quast, Ulrich
    et al.
    Ex University Hospital, Germany.
    Kaulich, Theodor W.
    University Hospital, Germany.
    Alvarez-Romero, Jose T.
    ININ, Mexico.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Enger, Shirin A.
    McGill University, Canada.
    Medich, David C.
    Worcester Polytech Institute, MA 01609 USA.
    Mourtada, Firas
    Helen F Graham Cancer Centre and Research Institute, DE 19713 USA.
    Perez-Calatayud, Jose
    University Hospital La Fe, Spain; Clin Benidorm, Spain.
    Rivard, Mark J.
    Tufts University, MA 02111 USA.
    Abu Zakaria, G.
    University of Cologne, Germany; Gono University, Bangladesh.
    A brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) for probe-type dosimetry2016In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 32, no 6, 741-748 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In photon brachytherapy (BT), experimental dosimetry is needed to verify treatment plans if planning algorithms neglect varying attenuation, absorption or scattering conditions. The detectors response is energy dependent, including the detector material to water dose ratio and the intrinsic mechanisms. The local mean photon energy E(r) must be known or another equivalent energy quality parameter used. We propose the brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) ((E) over bar), to characterize the photon radiation quality in view of measurements of distributions of the absorbed dose to water, D-w, around BT sources. Materials and methods: While the external photon beam radiotherapy (EBRT) radiation quality index Q(EBRT) ((E) over bar) = TPR1020((E) over bar) is not applicable to BT, the authors have applied a novel energy dependent parameter, called brachytherapy photon radiation quality index, defined as Q(BT) ((E) over bar) = D-prim(r = 2 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees)/D-prim(r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees), utilizing precise primary absorbed dose data, D-prim, from source reference databases, without additional MC-calculations. Results and discussion: For BT photon sources used clinically, Q(BT) ((E) over bar) enables to determine the effective mean linear attenuation coefficient (mu) over bar (E) and thus the effective energy of the primary photons E-prim(eff)(r(0), theta(0)) at the TG-43 reference position P-ref (r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees) being close to the mean total photon energy (E) over bar (tot)(r(0), theta(0)). If one has calibrated detectors, published (E) over bar (tot)(r) and the BT radiation quality correction factor k(Q, Q0)(BT) ((E) over bar, r, theta) for different BT radiation qualities Q and Q(0), the detectors response can be determined and D-w(r, theta) measured in the vicinity of BT photon sources. Conclusions: This novel brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) characterizes sufficiently accurate and precise the primary photon` s penetration probability and scattering potential. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica.

  • 42.
    Borga, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Friman, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Knutsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A canonical correlation approach to exploratory data analysis in fMRI2002Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A computationally efficient data-driven method for exploratory analysis of functional MRI data is presented. The basic idea is to reveal underlying components in the fMRI data that have maximum autocorrelation. The tool for accomplishing this task is Canonical Correlation Analysis. The proposed method is more robust and much more computationally efficient than independent component analysis, which previously has been applied in fMRI.

  • 43.
    Palfi, Miodrag
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hildén, Jan-Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Selbing, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A case of severe Rh (D) alloimmunization treated by intensive plasma exchange and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin2006In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, Vol. 35, no 2, 131-136 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In extremely severe Rh (D) alloimmunization, during pregnancy, early diagnosis and treatment is essential to avoid hydrops fetalis. Intrauterine transfusion (IUT) is of utmost importance in the prevention of fetal anemia but it is usually feasible only after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Therefore, additional treatment options in early pregnancy are needed. Study design and methods: A 27-year-old severely D + C immunized woman was admitted at 8 weeks of gestation in her fifth pregnancy with an extremely high concentration of anti-D. Her first pregnancy was uneventful but resulted in D + C alloimmunization. The next two pregnancies were unsuccessful, because of hydrops fetalis resulting in fetal death in pregnancy week 20 and 24, respectively, despite treatment with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and IUT treatment. A fourth pregnancy was terminated with legal abortion. The patient was eager and persistent to accomplish a successful pregnancy. Therefore, a combination of treatments consisting of plasma exchange (PE) three times/week and IVIG 100 g/week was started in pregnancy week 12. PE was performed 53 times and totally 159 L of plasma was exchanged. Results: The anti-D concentration was 12 μg/mL (IAT titer 2000) before start of treatment by PE and IVIG in pregnancy week 12. The concentration of anti-D was gradually reduced to approximately 3 μg/mL after only two weeks of treatment and was maintained at that level until pregnancy week 22. In pregnancy week 26 and 27, signs of hydrops were detected by ultrasonography and IUT were performed at each occasion. Sectio was inevitable at pregnancy week 28 + 1 and a male baby was born: Hb 58 g/L (cord sample) and 68 g/L (venous sample), weight 1385 g, Apgar score = 4-5-7, Bilirubin 56-150 mmol/L (4 h). Exchange transfusion was performed on day two and day five. Phototherapy was also implemented for eight days. The newborn's recovery thereafter was uneventful and complete. Conclusion: A combination of PE and IVIG may be an efficient treatment possible to start in early pregnancy in patients with extremely severe Rh (D) alloimmunization, with a history of hydrops fetalis in previous pregnancies. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 44.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lindvall, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A case report of plasmapheresis treatment in a patient with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration and high anti-Yo antibody titers2008In: Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis, ISSN 1744-9979, Vol. 12, no 1, 82-85 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A patient with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration due to anti-Purkinje cell antibodies (anti-Yo) arising from ovarian carcinoma with metastases was treated with three plasmapheresis (PP) series (a total of 22 PP treatments) over one year and was monitored by repeated otoneurological testing, balance tests and clinical investigations. Blood samples for antibody titers were checked on several occasions. Initially there was a weak clinical response and significantly improved test results regarding the caloric response, as well as a possible effect on visual suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex after caloric ear irrigation. After the first series of PP treatment, new metastases were found. A half year later there was a progressive course with increasing general symptoms. Serology tests showed continuously high titers of anti-Yo antibody, although somewhat lower after PP. We thus report a minor and short-lived effect of PP, possibly inhibited by the natural course of metastatic disease. © 2008 International Society for Apheresis.

  • 45.
    Höst, Gunnar E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad J.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundin Palmerius, Karljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Case-Based Study of Students' Visuohaptic Experiences of Electric Fields around Molecules: Shaping the Development of Virtual Nanoscience Learning Environments2013In: Education Research International, ISSN 2090-4002, E-ISSN 2090-4010, Vol. 2013, 194363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent educational research has suggested that immersive multisensory virtual environments offer learners unique and exciting knowledge-building opportunities for the construction of scientific knowledge. This paper delivers a case-based study of students’ immersive interaction with electric fields around molecules in a multisensory visuohaptic virtual environment. The virtual architecture presented here also has conceptual connections to the flourishing quest in contemporary literature for the pressing need to communicate nanoscientific ideas to learners. Five upper secondary school students’ prior conceptual understanding of electric fields and their application of this knowledge to molecular contexts, were probed prior to exposure to the virtual model. Subsequently, four students interacted with the visuohaptic model while performing think-aloud tasks. An inductive and heuristic treatment of videotaped verbal and behavioural data revealed distinct interrelationships between students’ interactive strategies implemented when executing tasks in the virtual system and the nature of their conceptual knowledge deployed. The obtained qualitative case study evidence could serve as an empirical basis for informing the rendering and communication of overarching nanoscale ideas. At the time of composing this paper for publication in the current journal, the research findings of this study have been put into motion in informing a broader project goal of developing educational virtual environments for depicting nanophenomena.

  • 46.
    Hammarström, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ali Malik, Muhammad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mishra, Rajesh
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation2008In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hydrophobic surface incubated in a solution of protein molecules (insulin monomers) was made into a catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation by repeatedly incubate, rinse and dry the surface. The present contribution describes how this unexpected transformation occurred and its relation to rapid fibrillation of insulin solutions in contact with the surface. A tentative model of the properties of the catalytic surface is given, corroborated by ellipsometric measurements of the thickness of the organic layer on the surface and by atomic force microscopy. The surfaces used were spontaneously oxidized silicon made hydrophobic through treatment in dichlorodimethylsilane.

  • 47.
    La Fleur, Linnea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    A CD44(high)/EGFR(low) Subpopulation within Head and Neck Cancer Cell Lines Shows an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype and Resistance to Treatment2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mortality in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is high due to emergence of therapy resistance which results in local and regional recurrences that may have their origin in resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) or cells with an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of using the cell surface expression of CD44 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), both of which have been used as stem cell markers, to identify subpopulations within HNSCC cell lines that differ with respect to phenotype and treatment sensitivity. Three subpopulations, consisting of CD44(high)/EGFR(low), CD44(high)/EGFR(high) and CD44(low) cells, respectively, were collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The CD44(high)/EGFR(low) population showed a spindle-shaped EMT-like morphology, while the CD44(low) population was dominated by cobblestone-shaped cells. The CD44(high)/EGFR(low) population was enriched with cells in G0/G1 and showed a relatively low proliferation rate and a high plating efficiency. Using a real time PCR array, 27 genes, of which 14 were related to an EMT phenotype and two with stemness, were found to be differentially expressed in CD44(high)/EGFR(low) cells in comparison to CD44(low) cells. Moreover, CD44(high)/EGFR(low) cells showed a low sensitivity to radiation, cisplatin, cetuximab and gefitinib, and a high sensitivity to dasatinib relative to its CD44(high)/EGFR(high) and CD44(low) counterparts. In conclusion, our results show that the combination of CD44 (high) and EGFR (low) cell surface expression can be used to identify a treatment resistant subpopulation with an EMT phenotype in HNSCC cell lines.

  • 48.
    Jung, Michaela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holmqvist, Annica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Albertsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    A clinical study of metastasized rectal cancer treatment: assessing a multimodal approach2014In: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 31, no 3, 839- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastasized rectal cancer has long been considered incurable. During recent years, the treatment of rectal cancer patients has been improved, and nowadays, a subgroup of patients might even be cured. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal timing of treatment in a multimodal therapy schedule in order to see whether the addition of bevacizumab (Avastin) to conventional chemotherapy was effective. The study included 39 patients with metastatic rectal cancer between 2009 and 2011, and three were excluded due to the lack of metastases or lack of follow-up information. The remaining 36 patients were divided into groups by treatment intention. The group with curative intention received mainly oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) in combination with capecitabine (Xeloda) with or without bevacizumab (Avastin) for 2 months followed by preoperative radiotherapy (RT) and surgery. Palliative patients had very different treatments depending on their needs of palliation. The median survival time for patients with curative intention was 31 months and for the palliative patients 12 months. Four of the patients (11%) with curative intention were considered cured at the end of follow-up. The response to chemotherapy after 2-month treatment is a good prognostic sign for which patients can be cured. Long-lasting palliation can be obtained with this treatment schedule. The main side effects were gastrointestinal events, including bowel perforation, neuropathy, thrombo-embolic disease and reduced general condition. All side effects are known, and the treatment is considered tolerable. We conclude that a good treatment schedule would be oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) in combination with capecitabine (Xeloda) with or without bevacizumab (Avastin) for 2 months, followed by preoperative RT and surgery.

  • 49.
    Olafsdottir, Arndis F.
    et al.
    NU Hospital Grp, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Attvall, Stig
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandgren, Ulrika
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, Sofia
    NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Pivodic, Aldina
    Statistiska Konsultgruppen, Sweden.
    Skrtic, Stanko
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; AstraZeneca Rand D, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Lind, Marcus
    NU Hospital Grp, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A Clinical Trial of the Accuracy and Treatment Experience of the Flash Glucose Monitor FreeStyle Libre in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes2017In: Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, ISSN 1520-9156, E-ISSN 1557-8593, Vol. 19, no 3, 164-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, FreeStyle Libre a flash glucose monitoring system came onto the market in 2014 as a complement to self-monitoring of blood glucose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and treatment experience of the FreeStyle Libre system. Methods: Fifty-eight adults with type 1 diabetes used FreeStyle Libre for 10-14 days and measured capillary blood glucose levels with the HemoCue blood glucose measurement system at least six times a day simultaneously. Results: For the entire study period, the mean absolute relative difference (MARD) was 13.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.0%-14.4%). MARD was 13.6% (95% CI 12.1%-15.4%) during week 1 and 12.7% (95% CI 11.5%-13.9%) during week 2. The mean absolute difference (MAD) for the whole study period was 19.8mg/dL (1.1mmol/L) (95% CI 17.8-21.8 mg/dL), including 20.5 mg/dL (1.14 mmol/L) during week 1 and 19.0 mg/dL (1.05 mmol/L) during week 2. The overall correlation coefficient was 0.96. For glucose values amp;lt; 72, 72-180, and amp;gt; 180mg/dL (amp;lt; 4, 4-10, and amp;gt; 10 mmol/L), the MARD was 20.3% (95% CI 17.7%-23.1%), 14.7% (95% CI 13.4%-16%), and 9.6% (95% CI 8.5%-10.8%), respectively, and respective MAD values were 12.3, 17.8, and 23.6 mg/dL (0.69, 0.99, and 1.31mmol/L). Using the 10-item visual analog scale, patients rated their experience with FreeStyle Libre as generally positive, with mean values ranging from 8.22 to 9.8. Conclusions: FreeStyle Libre had a similar overall MARD as continuous blood glucose monitoring systems in earlier studies when studied in similar at-home conditions. The overall patient satisfaction was high.

  • 50.
    Zarenoe, Reza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    A cohort study of patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss in a Swedish population2013In: Auris, nasus, larynx, ISSN 0385-8146, E-ISSN 1879-1476, Vol. 40, no 1, 41-45 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe a large cohort of patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in Sweden, and also to explore the possibility of finding potential possible differences between various diagnoses within SNHL. It is also of great interest to see how a multidisciplinary team was used in the different subgroups and the frequency of hearing aids use in patients with tinnitus.

    METHODS: Medical records of all patients who had received the diagnosis SNHL in Östergötland County, Sweden between 2004 and 2007 were reviewed. Patients between 20 and 80 years with tinnitus and a pure tone average (PTA) lower than 70dB HL were included in the study. Patients were excluded from the analyses if they had a cochlear implantation, middle ear disorders or had a hearing loss since birth or childhood. The investigators completed a form for each included patient, covering background facts, and audiograms taken at the yearly check up.

    RESULTS: Of a total 1672 patients' medical record review, 714 patients were included. The majority of patients (79%) were in the age group over 50 years. In male patients with bilateral tinnitus, the PTA for the left ear was significantly higher than for the right ear. The results regarding the configuration of hearing loss revealed that 555 patients (78%) had symmetric and 159 (22%) asymmetric hearing loss. Retrocochlear examinations were done in 372 patients and MRI was the most common examination. In all patients, 400 had no hearing aids and out of those 220 had unilateral tinnitus and 180 patients had bilateral tinnitus. 219 patients had a PTA>20dB HL and did not have any hearing aid. Results demonstrated that the Stepped Care model was not used widely in the daily practice. In our study, patients with bilateral-, unilateral hearing loss or Mb Ménière were the most common patients included in the Stepped Care model.

    CONCLUSION: In a large cohort of patients with SNHL and tinnitus, despite their hearing loss only 39% had hearing aids. It was observed that the medical record review often showed a lack of information about many background factors, such as; patients' general health condition, which could be a quality factor that needs improvement. Our results show that the Stepped Care model could be an effective option for providing a better access for tinnitus-focused treatment, although the number of patients in this study who were included in the Stepped Care model was low.

1234567 1 - 50 of 6880
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf