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  • 1.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning professional practice through education2012In: Practice, Learning and Change: Practice-theory perspectives on professional learning. / [ed] Paul Hager, Ann Reich & Alison Lee, Dordrecht: Springer Publishing Company, 2012, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The three concepts central to this volume--practice, learning and change--have received very different treatments in the educational literature, an oversight directly confronted here. While learning and change have been extensively theorised, their various contexts articulated and analysed, practice is notably underrepresented. Where much of the literature on learning and change takes the notion of 'practice' as an unexamined given, its co-location as a term with various classifiers, as in 'legal practice' and 'teaching practice', render it curiously devoid of semantic force. In this book, 'practice' is the super-ordinate organising idea. Drawing on what has been termed the 'practice turn in contemporary theory', the work develops a conceptual framework for researching learning in, and on, practice. It challenges received notions of practice, questioning the assumptions, elisions, conflations and silences on the subject. In so doing, it offers fresh insights into learning and change, and how they relate to practice. In tandem with this conceptual work, the book details site-ontological studies of practice and learning in diverse professional and workplace contexts, examining the work of occupations as various as doctors, chefs and orchestral musicians. It demonstrates the value of theorising practice, learning and change, as well as exploring the connections between them amid our evolving social and institutional structures.

  • 2.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hopwood, Nick
    University of Technology, Sydney.
    Lee, Alison
    University of Technology, Sydney.
    Researching Professional Learning and Practice: What does it mean to 'be there'?2012In: “Professions and Professional Learning in Troubling Times:Emerging Practices and Transgressive Knowledges. UNIVERSITY OF STIRLING, UK Wednesday 9thMay – Friday 11th May 2012, 2012, p. 11-11Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    If we aim to understand professional learning and practice in material, embodied and discursive terms,then one obvious place to turn methodologically is to ethnography and observation. Ethnographicmethods normally presuppose the physical presence of the researcher in the research setting. In thispaper we explore what it might mean to observe, document and represent practices throughethnographic work in contexts of (i) interdisciplinary collaboration; (ii) economic and time pressures,making extended periods of observation difficult; and (iii)multi-sited, including international, collaboration.As we conduct and plan projects that involve scholars from different national and disciplinarybackgrounds, and imagine the temporal and spatial opportunities and constraints within which ourresearch unfolds, we are forced to think through what it means to ‘be there’, observing, in the field, aspractices and learning unfold. The material contexts in which we now work challenge the notion of thesingle ethnographer whose embodied presence in the field underpins an embodied understanding of theworld. We have to rely on others’ experiences, read field notes we didn’t write ourselves, engage withsituations where we don’t share a common language with participants, and make sense of the differentways data, analysis and theory have meaning for us as collaborators from health, geography andeducation backgrounds, drawing on a range of theoretical frames in our research.In order to grapple more fully and tangibly with these issues, we undertook a piece of observational workin a health professional education setting in Linköping, Sweden. An experienced gynaecologist andeducator, ‘Birgit’, runs evening sessions for small groups of medical students. Central to these are the‘professional patients’ – women who make themselves, their bodies, available so that students can learnand practise pelvic examination. Two of us, Madeleine and Nick, were present at one evening’s session;Alison was not. In the paper we will present excerpts from Nick’s and then Madeleine’s account of thesame ‘moment’ during the session. These will be followed by reflections from Alison as a remote‘participant’, on the sorts of understandings and questions that arise for her in this different position. Wewill then develop a collective response to the ‘data’, foregrounding ways in which our personal,professional, and disciplinary backgrounds or ways of being shape our engagement with the world, thedifferent accounts, and our responses to each other. We complicate notions of ‘being there’ to exploremultiple ‘beings there’ and ‘beings apart’, highlighting important theoretical and methodological issuesaround observation, representation, and analysis, and reflecting on these in terms of theoreticalgroundings of our substantive analysis in practice theory.

  • 3.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Lee, Alison
    University of Technology, Sydney.
    Materialities of Professional Learning: Troubling the Urban/Rural Divide in Sites of Professional Knowledge Enactments: Professional learning within the frames of higher education. How is this possible?2011In: 'Urban Education'.  European Conference for Educational Research, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This symposium presents studies of different professional groups – educators, nurses, police and social workers in Italy, Norway, Scotland and Sweden - to address two main themes in professional learning and knowledge construction. First, it outlines ways of understanding professional learning as material enactments of knowledge. Second, it troubles the category of ‘urban’ spaces of professional knowledge, exploring the ways that professionals enact different forms of knowledge work and objectual relationships at different sites. These sites of practice may be more urban or more rural, but together form the machinery of professionals’ knowledge production.

     

    To the first theme, all four papers draw from theoretical perspectives that step aside from subject-centred, reflectivist orientations of professional learning to focus on the socio-material webs of practice. They explore the ways that professional knowledge is distributed and constructed or performed differently in different local sites. The paper authors, drawing from actor-network theory, science and technology studies, complexity science, Knorr-Cetina’s object-relations, and practice-based theory are all conceptualising professional learning as a matter of negotiating different knowledge resources to assemble and order strategies, objects, texts, technologies and values in moments of activity.

     

    To the second theme, the papers each show how professional knowledge seems intended to flow outwardly from urban-based centres of research and practice, where resources are concentrated to develop ‘evidence-based’ universalised best practices that are then incorporated into regulatory codes and professional development for all practitioners, including those operating in very different settings such as remote ‘rural’ and community-based sites. For example, paper one examines police work and knowledge in Scotland, showing how models of best practice for police work are often derived from large urban environments, but then become reconfigured and recoded in non-urban environments where professionals must draw from other knowledge strategies such as community relationships and local resources. In paper two, hospital nurses in Norway engage in validating and explicating knowledge-based procedures in some working sites, while other sites are dominated by application of these in the interaction with patients/clients. If we are to understand the knowledge production and knowledge relations comprising professional learning, we need to take into account these different sites.

     

    Furthermore, the papers show how professional practice and knowledge is difficult to conceive as bordered in particular static spaces designated as ‘urban’ or ‘rural’. The Scottish police case study shows that communities which some may describe as rural are in fact considered to be urban by many inhabitants, and also that certain ‘urban’ characteristics are enacted in more remote spaces. Professionals themselves can be highly mobile, transporting objects and texts embedding particular practices and knowledge across more rural or more urban sites of practice. The social workers case shows how professionals move across sites that encapsulate elements of both rurality and urbanity. All four cases show, in different ways, how professional knowledge is produced as professionals learn through combining very different, even conflicting, resources in everyday enactments of knowledge: local practices and values, organisational traditions and policies, disciplinary knowledge bases and commitments of their particular professions, regulatory standards for practice, transnational and web-based knowledge, improvised work-arounds, and so forth.

     

    These two themes – the materiality of professionals’ learning and the diverse but connected enactments of professional knowledge at different sites – have important implications for continuing professional development. Each paper shows why and how to reconceptualise notions of ‘developing’ professionals to focus instead on professionals’ attunement to the different knowledge resources available, the knowledge strategies that can be most productive for them, and the ways that knowledge is enacted differently across different sites of practice.

  • 4.
    Grundberg, Åke
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Britt, Ebbeskog
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Religa, Dorota
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity conceive the concept of mental health and factors that may influence it: A phenomenographic study2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, p. 19716-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multimorbidity, that is, the coexistence of chronic diseases, is associated with mental health issues among elderly people. In Sweden, seniors with multimorbidity often live at home and receive care from nursing aides and district nurses. The aim of this study was to describe the variation in how community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity perceive the concept of mental health and what may influence it. Thirteen semi-structured interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Six qualitatively different ways of understanding the concept of mental health and factors that may influence it, reflecting key variations of meaning, were identified. The discerned categories were: mental health is dependent on desirable feelings and social contacts, mental health is dependent on undesirable feelings and social isolation, mental health is dependent on power of the mind and ability to control thoughts, mental health is dependent on powerlessness of the mind and inability to control thoughts, mental health is dependent on active behaviour and a healthy lifestyle, and mental health is dependent on passive behaviour and physical inactivity. According to the respondents' view, the concept of mental health can be defined as how an individual feels, thinks, and acts and also includes a positive as well as a negative aspect. Social contacts, physical activity, and optimism may improve mental health while social isolation, ageing, and chronic pain may worsen it. Findings highlight the importance of individually definitions of mental health and that community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity may describe how multiple chronic conditions can affect their life situation. It is essential to organize the health care system to provide individual health promotion dialogues, and future research should address the prerequisites for conducting mental health promotion dialogues.

  • 5.
    Johannesson, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Simulating the real - manual clinical skills training: Conditions and practices of learning through simulation2013In: Realising exemplary practice-based education / [ed] Joy Higgs, Rotterdam, Nederländerna: Sense Publishers, 2013, p. 187-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For educators, scholars, practitioners and researchers this book offers an opportunity to explore and engage with practice-based education theories and concepts in real life teaching spaces. It is a place to see theory embodied and situated within PBE practices. It is also an opportunity to see how educators and scholars from other disciplines are applying theory to understand teaching and learning in their particular area. This volume provides an opportunity for readers to deepen their understanding of practice-based education and broaden and critically appraise their strategies for engaging

  • 6.
    Lindh Falk, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Professional Responsibility as conflict: Practices that 'matter': Socio-material enactments of health care students’ professional responsibilities in an interprofessional training ward2012In: “Professions and Professional Learning in Troubling Times: Emerging Practices and Transgressive KnowledgesUNIVERSITY OF STIRLING, UK  Wednesday 9thMay – Friday 11th May 2012, 2012, p. 68-70Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the context for discussing socio-material arrangements for professional practice andresponsibilities is a student-led interprofessional training ward in health care. These realistic hospitaltraining wards have been implemented in response to the ongoing debate about the need of collaborationin order to increase quality and safety for patients in the health care system. In Linköping, medicalstudents, nursing students, physiotherapy and occupational therapy students work together in the trainingwards during a two week period, taking a joint responsibility for the total care of the patient, as well as forcontributing their own professional perspective.A survey evaluation shows an overall positive attitude and perception among the students regarding thepossibility to collaborate and how they have developed the understanding of their own professional roleas well as other professional roles – but medical students rate a number of factors significantly lower thanother students. A qualitative analysis of the open answers, focusing on socio-material aspects give adifferentiated picture of how the arrangements of the training ward produce i) produce enactments ofdifferent kinds of professional responsibilities ii) deal with the ‘unexpected’ -conflicting understandings inthe enactment of caring work iii) proximity opens for negotiations and boundary work. In the paper, wediscuss how the material arrangements create a clash between the ‘expected’ professionalresponsibilities and the ‘unexpected’ responsibilities of caring work and we problematize the implicationsfor professional learning within the framework of health care education.

  • 7.
    Sjögren, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Uhlin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ragnemalm, Eva L
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Academics reflections on the use of eportfolio documentation of pedagogical skills: a pilot study2012In: The quality of higher education, ISSN 1822-1645, Vol. 9, p. 98-119Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Uhlin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Supporting Transition into Higher Education using a Portfolio2009In: Proceedings Utvecklingskonferensen NU2008 / [ed] A. Sonesson & M. Hedberg, Lund, 2009, p. 61-74Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Österberg, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ways of experiencing participation and factors affecting the activity level after nonreconstructed anterior cruciate ligament injury: a qualitative study2013In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 172-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Phenomenographic, cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES: To describe ways of experiencing participation in activities of individuals with a nonreconstructed anterior cruciate ligament injury and to describe the emotional aspects related to participation. Further, the objective was to explore factors affecting the activity level. BACKGROUND: The importance of assessing different factors (knee status, muscle performance, psychological factors, performance-based tests, and subjective rating of knee function) after an anterior cruciate ligament injury has been emphasized. However, the results of these assessments do not answer the question of how the individuals themselves experience their participation in activities. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 strategically selected informants (age range, 18-43 years) who had sustained an anterior cruciate ligament injury 18 to 67 months previously. A phenomenographic approach, which describes individuals' ways of experiencing a phenomenon, was used. RESULTS: Five qualitatively different categories were identified: (A) unconditioned participation, (B) participation as conditioned by risk appraisal, (C) participation as conditioned by experienced control of the knee, (D) participation as conditioned by experienced knee impairment, and (E) participation as conditioned by neglecting the knee injury. Within each category, 5 interrelated aspects were discerned: focus, level of performance, activities, strategies, and feelings. Categories A, C, and E reflected experiences of full participation, whereas categories B and D reflected experiences of modified participation. There were mostly positive feelings regarding participation. Negative feelings were expressed in category D. Factors affecting the activity level were grouped according to the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and described as facilitating or hindering the activity level. Facilitating factors included regaining and maintaining physical function, regaining confidence in knee function, and learning/relearning movement patterns. Hindering factors included fear of injury/reinjury, uncontrollable giving way, and loss of motivation. CONCLUSION: With different strategies, most of the informants achieved a satisfactory activity level, despite impairments and decreased activity level. Both physical and psychological factors were described to affect the activity level, as well as time since injury.

  • 10.
    Österberg, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ways of experiencing participation and factors affecting the current activity level after non-reconstructed ACL injury2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Current assessment methods after an ACL injury do not consider how the individuals themselves experience their participation in activities or what factors they think have affected their current activity level.

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