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  • 1.
    Ail, Ujwala
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wang, Hui
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thermoelectric Properties of Polymeric Mixed Conductors2016In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 26, no 34, p. 6288-6296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermoelectric (TE) phenomena are intensively explored by the scientific community due to the rather inefficient way energy resources are used with a large fraction of energy wasted in the form of heat. Among various materials, mixed ion-electron conductors (MIEC) are recently being explored as potential thermoelectrics, primarily due to their low thermal conductivity. The combination of electronic and ionic charge carriers in those inorganic or organic materials leads to complex evolution of the thermovoltage (Voc) with time, temperature, and/or humidity. One of the most promising organic thermoelectric materials, poly(3,4-ethyelenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT-PSS), is an MIEC. A previous study reveals that at high humidity, PEDOT-PSS undergoes an ionic Seebeck effect due to mobile protons. Yet, this phenomenon is not well understood. In this work, the time dependence of the Voc is studied and its behavior from the contribution of both charge carriers (holes and protons) is explained. The presence of a complex reorganization of the charge carriers promoting an internal electrochemical reaction within the polymer film is identified. Interestingly, it is demonstrated that the time dependence behavior of Voc is a way to distinguish between three classes of polymeric materials: electronic conductor, ionic conductor, and mixed ionic–electronic conductor

  • 2.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Division of Organic Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Box 576, Uppsala University, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Colorimetric Protein Sensing by Controlled Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized with Synthetic Receptors2009In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, Vol. 5, no 21, p. 2445-2452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strategy for colorimetric sensing of proteins, based on the induced assembly of polypeptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles, is described. Recognition was accomplished using a polypeptide sensor scaffold designed to specifically bind the model analyte, human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII). The extent of particle aggregation, induced by the Zn2+-triggered dimerization and folding of a second polypeptide also present on the surface of the gold nanoparticle, gave a readily detectable colorimetric shift that was dependent on the concentration of the target protein. In the absence of HCAII, particle aggregation resulted in a major redshift of the plasmon peak whereas analyte binding prevented formation of dense aggregates, significantly reducing the magnitude of the redshift. The limit of detection of HCAII was estimated to be around 15 nM. The versatility of the technique was demonstrated using a second model system based on the recognition of a peptide sequence from the tobacco mosaic virus coat protein (TMVP by a recombinant antibody fragment. This strategy is proposed as a generic platform for robust and specific protein analysis that can be further developed for monitoring a wide range of target proteins.

  • 3.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Uppsala University .
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Colorimetric sensing: Small 21/20092009In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 5, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cover picture illustrates a novel concept for colorimetric protein sensing based on the controllable assembly of polypeptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles. Recognition of the analyte is accomplished by polypeptide-based synthetic receptors immobilized on gold nanoparticles. Also present on the particle surface is a de novo-designed helix-loop-helix polypeptide that homodimerizes and folds into four-helix bundles in the presence of Zn2+, resulting in particle aggregation. Analyte binding interferes with the folding-induced aggregation, giving rise to a clearly detectable colorimetric response.

  • 4.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Javad Jafari, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rebis, T.
    Poznan University of Tech, Poland.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Spectroelectrochemical investigation of redox states in a polypyrrole/lignin composite electrode material2015In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 3, no 24, p. 12927-12937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report spectroelectrochemical studies to investigate the charge storage mechanism of composite polypyrrole/lignin electrodes. Renewable bioorganic electrode materials were produced by electropolymerization of pyrrole in the presence of a water-soluble lignin derivative acting as a dopant. The resulting composite exhibited enhanced charge storage abilities due to a lignin-based faradaic process, which was expressed after repeated electrochemical redox of the material. The in situ FTIR spectroelectrochemistry results show the formation of quinone groups, and reversible oxidation-reduction of these groups during charge-discharge experiments in the electrode materials. The most significant IR bands include carbonyl absorption near 1705 cm(-1), which is attributed to the creation of quinone moieties during oxidation, and absorption at 1045 cm(-1) which is due to hydroquinone moieties.

  • 5.
    Alarcon, E I
    et al.
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Vulesevic, B
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Argawal, A
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Ross, A
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Bejjani, P
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Podrebarac, J
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suuronen, E J
    Bio-nanomaterials Chemistry and Engineering Laboratory, Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Rm H5229, Ottawa, Canada.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Coloured cornea replacements with anti-infective properties: expanding the safe use of silver nanoparticles in regenerative medicine.2016In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 6484-6489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the broad anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), their use in bioengineered corneal replacements or bandage contact lenses has been hindered due to their intense yellow coloration. In this communication, we report the development of a new strategy to pre-stabilize and incorporate AgNPs with different colours into collagen matrices for fabrication of corneal implants and lenses, and assessed their in vitro and in vivo activity.

  • 6.
    Aldred, Nick
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Gohad, Neeraj V.
    Clemson University, SC USA .
    Petrone, Luigi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Orihuela, Beatriz
    Duke University, NC USA .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mount, Andrew
    Clemson University, SC USA .
    Rittschof, Dan
    Duke University, NC USA .
    Clare, Anthony S.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Confocal microscopy-based goniometry of barnacle cyprid permanent adhesive2013In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 216, no 11, p. 1969-1972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological adhesives are materials of particular interest in the fields of bio-inspired technology and antifouling research. The adhesive of adult barnacles has received much attention over the years; however, the permanent adhesive of the cyprid - the colonisation stage of barnacles - is a material about which very little is presently known. We applied confocal laser-scanning microscopy to the measurement of contact angles between the permanent adhesive of barnacle cyprid larvae and self-assembled monolayers of OH- and CH3-terminated thiols. Measurement of contact angles between actual bioadhesives and surfaces has never previously been achieved and the data may provide insight into the physicochemical properties and mechanism of action of these functional materials. The adhesive is a dual-phase system post-secretion, with the behaviour of the components governed separately by the surface chemistry. The findings imply that the cyprid permanent adhesion process is more complex than previously thought, necessitating broad re-evaluation of the system. Improved understanding will have significant implications for the production of barnacle-resistant coatings as well as development of bio-inspired glues for niche applications.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nikkinen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kanmert, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A multiple-ligand approach to extending the dynamic range of analyte quantification in protein microarrays2009In: Biosensors and bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 2458-2464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes a concept for extending the dynamic range of quantification in an affinity biosensor assay by using a set of ligands with different affinities toward a common analyte. For a demonstration of the principle, three synthetic, biotinylated polypeptides capable of binding a model protein analyte with different affinities (10-9 M ≤ Kd ≤ 10-7 M) were immobilized in a microarray format on a gold slide covered with an oligo(ethylene glycol)-containing alkane thiolate self-assembled monolayer. For controllable immobilization, coupling was mediated by the biotinneutravidin interaction. A five-element affinity array, comprising single-peptide spots as well as spots where peptides were immobilized in mixtures, was realized by means of piezodispensation. Imaging surface plasmon resonance was used to study binding of the analyte to the different spots. The lower limit of quantification was ~3 nM and the corresponding upper limit was increased by more than an order of magnitude compared to if only the highest-affinity ligand would have been used. Affinity array sensors with multiple ligands for each analyte are particularly interesting for omitting dilution steps and providing highly accurate data in assays where several analytes such as disease biomarkers with extremely variable concentrations are quantified in parallel.

  • 8.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tunable and modular assembly of polypeptides and polypeptide-hybrid biomaterials2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomaterials are materials that are specifically designed to be in contact with biological systems and have for a long time been used in medicine. Examples of biomaterials range from sophisticated prostheses used for replacing outworn body parts to ordinary contact lenses. Currently it is possible to create biomaterials that can e.g. specifically interact with cells or respond to certain stimuli. Peptides, the shorter version of proteins, are excellent molecules for fabrication of such biomaterials. By following and developing design rules it is possible to obtain peptides that can self-assemble into well-defined nanostructures and biomaterials.

    The aim of this thesis is to create ”smart” and tunable biomaterials by molecular self-assembly using dimerizing –helical polypeptides. Two different, but structurally related, polypeptide-systems have been used in this thesis. The EKIV-polypeptide system was developed in this thesis and consists of four 28-residue polypeptides that can be mixed-and-matched to self-assemble into four different coiled coil heterodimers. The dissociation constant of the different heterodimers range from μM to < nM. Due to the large difference in affinities, the polypeptides are prone to thermodynamic social self-sorting. The JR-polypeptide system, on the other hand, consists of several 42-residue de novo designed helix-loop-helix polypeptides that can dimerize into four-helix bundles. In this work, primarily the glutamic acid-rich polypeptide JR2E has been explored as a component in supramolecular materials. Dimerization was induced by exposing the polypeptide to either Zn2+, acidic conditions or the complementary polypeptide JR2K.

    By conjugating JR2E to hyaluronic acid and the EKIV-polypeptides to star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol), respectively, highly tunable hydrogels that can be self-assembled in a modular fashion have been created. In addition, self-assembly of spherical superstructures has been investigated and were obtained by linking two thiol-modified JR2E polypeptides via a disulfide bridge in the loop region. ŒThe thesis also demonstrates that the polypeptides and the polypeptide-hybrids can be used for encapsulation and release of molecules and nanoparticles. In addition, some of the hydrogels have been explored for 3D cell culture. By using supramolecular interactions combined with bio-orthogonal covalent crosslinking reactions, hydrogels were obtained that enabled facile encapsulation of cells that retained high viability.

    The results of the work presented in this thesis show that dimerizing α–helical polypeptides can be used to create modular biomaterials with properties that can be tuned by specific molecular interactions. The modularity and the tunable properties of these smart biomaterials are conceptually very interesting andmake them useful in many emerging biomedical applications, such as 3D cell culture, cell therapy, and drug delivery

    .

    List of papers
    1. Self-sorting heterodimeric coiled coil peptides with defined and tuneable self-assembly properties
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-sorting heterodimeric coiled coil peptides with defined and tuneable self-assembly properties
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 14063Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Coiled coils with defined assembly properties and dissociation constants are highly attractive components in synthetic biology and for fabrication of peptide-based hybrid nanomaterials and nanostructures. Complex assemblies based on multiple different peptides typically require orthogonal peptides obtained by negative design. Negative design does not necessarily exclude formation of undesired species and may eventually compromise the stability of the desired coiled coils. This work describe a set of four promiscuous 28-residue de novo designed peptides that heterodimerize and fold into parallel coiled coils. The peptides are non-orthogonal and can form four different heterodimers albeit with large differences in affinities. The peptides display dissociation constants for dimerization spanning from the micromolar to the picomolar range. The significant differences in affinities for dimerization make the peptides prone to thermodynamic social self-sorting as shown by thermal unfolding and fluorescence experiments, and confirmed by simulations. The peptides self-sort with high fidelity to form the two coiled coils with the highest and lowest affinities for heterodimerization. The possibility to exploit self-sorting of mutually complementary peptides could hence be a viable approach to guide the assembly of higher order architectures and a powerful strategy for fabrication of dynamic and tuneable nanostructured materials.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2015
    National Category
    Physical Sciences Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121739 (URN)10.1038/srep14063 (DOI)000361177400001 ()26370878 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (VR); Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF)

    Available from: 2015-10-06 Created: 2015-10-05 Last updated: 2017-12-01
    2. Tailoring Supramolecular Peptide-Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels by Coiled Coil Self-Assembly and Self-Sorting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tailoring Supramolecular Peptide-Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels by Coiled Coil Self-Assembly and Self-Sorting
    2016 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 2260-2267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Physical hydrogels are extensively used in a wide range of biomedical applications. However, different applications require hydrogels with different mechanical and structural properties. Tailoring these properties demands exquisite control over the supramolecular peptides with different affinities for dimerization. Four different mechanical properties of hydrogels using de novo designed coiled coil interactions involved. Here we show that it is possible to control the nonorthogonal peptides, designed to fold into four different coiled coil heterodimers with dissociation constants spanning from mu M to pM, were conjugated to star-shaped 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The different PEG-coiled coil conjugates self-assemble as a result of peptide heterodimerization. Different combinations of PEG peptide conjugates assemble into PEG peptide networks and hydrogels with distinctly different thermal stabilities, supramolecular, and rheological properties, reflecting the peptide dimer affinities. We also demonstrate that it is possible to rationally modulate the self-assembly process by means of thermodynamic self-sorting by sequential additions of nonpegylated peptides. The specific interactions involved in peptide dimerization thus provides means for programmable and reversible self-assembly of hydrogels with precise control over rheological properties, which can significantly facilitate optimization of their overall performance and adaption to different processing requirements and applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2016
    National Category
    Polymer Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130135 (URN)10.1021/acs.biomac.6b00528 (DOI)000377924800038 ()27219681 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [621-2011-4319]; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research [ICA10-0002]; Linkoping University; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU) [2009 00971]

    Available from: 2016-07-12 Created: 2016-07-11 Last updated: 2017-11-28
    3. Zinc-Triggered Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Fibrous Helix-Loop-Helix Peptide Superstructures for Controlled Encapsulation and Release
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Zinc-Triggered Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Fibrous Helix-Loop-Helix Peptide Superstructures for Controlled Encapsulation and Release
    2016 (English)In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 49, no 18, p. 6997-7003Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate a novel route for hierarchical self-assembly of sub-micrometer-sized peptide superstructures that respond to subtle changes in Zn2+ concentration. The self-assembly process is triggered by a specific folding-dependent coordination of Zn2+ by a de novo designed nonlinear helix-loop-helix peptide, resulting in a propagating fiber formation and formation of spherical superstructures. The superstructures further form larger assemblies that can be completely disassembled upon removal of Zn2+ or degradation of the nonlinear peptide. This flexible and reversible assembly strategy of the superstructures enables facile encapsulation of nanoparticles and drugs that can be released by means of different stimuli.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2016
    National Category
    Polymer Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132215 (URN)10.1021/acs.macromol.6b01724 (DOI)000384399100030 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [621-2011-4319]; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research [ICA10-0002]; Linkoping University; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University [2009 00971]

    Available from: 2016-10-26 Created: 2016-10-21 Last updated: 2017-11-29
  • 9.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dånmark, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhou, Feng
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Öberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Vehicular Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Su, Haibin
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-sorting heterodimeric coiled coil peptides with defined and tuneable self-assembly properties2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 14063Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coiled coils with defined assembly properties and dissociation constants are highly attractive components in synthetic biology and for fabrication of peptide-based hybrid nanomaterials and nanostructures. Complex assemblies based on multiple different peptides typically require orthogonal peptides obtained by negative design. Negative design does not necessarily exclude formation of undesired species and may eventually compromise the stability of the desired coiled coils. This work describe a set of four promiscuous 28-residue de novo designed peptides that heterodimerize and fold into parallel coiled coils. The peptides are non-orthogonal and can form four different heterodimers albeit with large differences in affinities. The peptides display dissociation constants for dimerization spanning from the micromolar to the picomolar range. The significant differences in affinities for dimerization make the peptides prone to thermodynamic social self-sorting as shown by thermal unfolding and fluorescence experiments, and confirmed by simulations. The peptides self-sort with high fidelity to form the two coiled coils with the highest and lowest affinities for heterodimerization. The possibility to exploit self-sorting of mutually complementary peptides could hence be a viable approach to guide the assembly of higher order architectures and a powerful strategy for fabrication of dynamic and tuneable nanostructured materials.

  • 10.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zinc-Triggered Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Fibrous Helix-Loop-Helix Peptide Superstructures for Controlled Encapsulation and Release2016In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 49, no 18, p. 6997-7003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate a novel route for hierarchical self-assembly of sub-micrometer-sized peptide superstructures that respond to subtle changes in Zn2+ concentration. The self-assembly process is triggered by a specific folding-dependent coordination of Zn2+ by a de novo designed nonlinear helix-loop-helix peptide, resulting in a propagating fiber formation and formation of spherical superstructures. The superstructures further form larger assemblies that can be completely disassembled upon removal of Zn2+ or degradation of the nonlinear peptide. This flexible and reversible assembly strategy of the superstructures enables facile encapsulation of nanoparticles and drugs that can be released by means of different stimuli.

  • 11.
    Becker, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synthesis of silver nanowires in aqueous solutions2010In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 64, no 8, p. 956-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silver nanowires with a diameter of 30 nm and typical lengths of 5–10 μm have been synthesized in an aqueous medium. To initiate the reaction, citrate ions were used, and during the reaction the aromatic organicmolecules polymerize forming “straight” chain surfactants which support the formation of nanowires. Characterization by TEM and HRETM revealed the nanowires to be highly crystalline with a growth along the [110] direction.

  • 12.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Zhang, Boxi
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Wiman, Emanuel
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khalaf, Hazem
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Dual action of bacteriocin PLNC8 alpha beta through inhibition of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection and promotion of cell proliferation2017In: Pathogens and Disease, E-ISSN 2049-632X, Vol. 75, no 5, article id ftx064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is characterised by accumulation of pathogenic bacteria, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, in periodontal pockets. The lack of effective treatments has emphasised in an intense search for alternative methods to prevent bacterial colonisation and disease progression. Bacteriocins are bacterially produced antimicrobial peptides gaining increased consideration as alternatives to traditional antibiotics. We show rapid permeabilisation and aggregation of P. gingivalis by the two-peptide bacteriocin PLNC8 alpha beta. In a cell culture model, P. gingivalis was cytotoxic against gingival fibroblasts. The proteome profile of fibroblasts is severely affected by P. gingivalis, including induction of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PLNC8 alpha beta enhanced the expression of growth factors and promoted cell proliferation, and suppressed proteins associated with apoptosis. PLNC8 alpha beta efficiently counteracted P. gingivalis-mediated cytotoxicity, increased expression of a large number of proteins and restored the levels of inflammatory mediators. In conclusion, we show that bacteriocin PLNC8 alpha beta displays dual effects by acting as a potent antimicrobial agent killing P. gingivalis and as a stimulatory factor promoting cell proliferation. We suggest preventive and therapeutical applications of PLNC8 alpha beta in periodontitis to supplement the host immune defence against P. gingivalis infection and support wound healing processes.

  • 13.
    Borglin, Johan
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ericson, Marica B.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Peptide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles as a Stimuli Responsive Contrast Medium in Multiphoton Microscopy2017In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 2102-2108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for biochemical contrast mediators with high signal-to-noise ratios enabling noninvasive biomedical sensing, for example, for neural sensing and protein protein interactions, in addition to cancer diagnostics. The translational challenge is to develop a biocompatible approach ensuring high biochemical contrast while avoiding a raise of the background signal. We here present a concept where gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be utilized as a stimuli responsive contrast medium by chemically triggering their ability to exhibit multiphoton-induced luminescence (MIL) when performing multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPM). Proof-of-principle is demonstrated using peptide-functionalized AuNPs sensitive to zinc ions (Zn2+). Dispersed particles are invisible in the MPM until addition of millimolar concentrations of Zn2+ upon which MIL is enabled through particle aggregation caused by specific peptide interactions and folding. The process can be reversed by removal of the Zn2+ using a chelator, thereby resuspending the AuNPs. In addition, the concept was demonstrated by exposing the particles to matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) causing peptide digestion resulting in AuNP aggregation, significantly elevating the MIL signal from the background. The approach is based on the principle that aggregation shifts the plasmon resonance, elevating the absorption cross section in the near-infrared wavelength region enabling onset of MIL. This Letter demonstrates how biochemical sensing can be obtained in far-field MPM and should be further exploited as a future tool for noninvasive optical biosensing.

  • 14.
    Chen, Hu
    et al.
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore; Nanyang Technology University, Singapore; University of Loughborough, England.
    Chen, Peng
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore; Centre Biomimet Sensor Science, Singapore.
    Huang, Jingfeng
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore; Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Platt, Mark
    University of Loughborough, England.
    Palaniappan, Alagappan
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore; Centre Biomimet Sensor Science, Singapore.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Iing Yoong Tok, Alfred
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore; Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore; Centre Biomimet Sensor Science, Singapore.
    Detection of Matrilysin Activity Using Polypeptide Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide Field-Effect Transistor Sensor2016In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 2994-2998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel approach for rapid and sensitive detection of matrilysin (MMP-7, a biomarker involved in the degradation of various macromolecules) based on a polypeptide (JR2EC) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) field effect transistor (FET) is reported. MMP-7 specifically digests negatively charged JR2EC immobilized on rGO, thereby modulating the conductance of rGO-FET. The proposed assay enabled detection of MMP-7 at clinically relevant concentrations with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 ng/mL (400 pM), attributed to the significant reduction of the net charge of JR2EC upon digestion by MMP-7. Quantitative detection of MMP-7 in human plasma was further demonstrated with a LOD of 40 ng/mL, illustrating the potential for the proposed methodology for tumor detection and carcinoma diagnostic (e.g., lung cancer and salivary gland cancer). Additionally, excellent specificity of the proposed assay was demonstrated using matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP-1), a protease of the same family. With appropriate selection and modification of polypeptides, the proposed assay could be extended for detection of other enzymes with polypeptide digestion capability.

  • 15.
    Chen, Peng
    et al.
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Liu, Xiaohu
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore; Tsinghua Univ, Peoples R China.
    Goyal, Garima
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Tran, Nhung Thi
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore; Ho Chi Minh City Univ Technol and Educ, Vietnam.
    Ho, James Chin Shing
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Wang, Yi
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore; Wenzhou Med Univ, Peoples R China.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedbereg, Bo
    Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore; Nanyang Technol Univ, Singapore.
    Nanoplasmonic Sensing from the Human Vision Perspective2018In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 90, no 7, p. 4916-4924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) constitutes a versatile technique for biodetection, exploiting the sensitivity of plasmonic nanostructures to small changes in refractive index. The optical shift in the LSPR band caused by molecular interactions in the vicinity of the nanostructures are typically amp;lt;5 nm and can readily be detected by a spectrophotometer. Widespread use of LSPR-based sensors require cost-effective devices and would benefit from sensing schemes that enables use of very simple spectrophotometers or even naked-eye detection. This paper describes a new strategy facilitating visualization of minute optical responses in nanoplasmonic bioassays by taking into account the physiology of human color vision. We demonstrate, using a set of nine different plasmonic nanoparticles, that the cyan to green transition zone at similar to 500 nm is optimal for naked-eye detection of color changes. In this wavelength range, it is possible to detect a color change corresponding to a wavelength shift of similar to 2-3 nm induced by refractive index changes in the medium or by molecular binding to the surface of the nanoparticles. This strategy also can be utilized to improve the performance of aggregation-based nanoplasmonic colorimetric assays, which enables semiquantitative naked-eye detection of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) activity at concentrations that are at least 5 times lower than previously reported assays using spherical gold nanoparticles. We foresee significant potential of this strategy in medical diagnostic and environmental monitoring, especially in situations where basic laboratory infrastructure is sparse or even nonexistent. Finally, we demonstrate that the developed concept can be used in combination with cell phone technology and red-green-blue (RGB) analysis for sensitive and quantitative detection of MMP7.

  • 16.
    Choulier, Laurence
    et al.
    University of Strasbourg.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Environmentally Sensitive Fluorescent Sensors Based on Synthetic Peptides2010In: SENSORS, ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 3126-3144Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biosensors allow the direct detection of molecular analytes, by associating a biological receptor with a transducer able to convert the analyte-receptor recognition event into a measurable signal. We review recent work aimed at developing synthetic fluorescent molecular sensors for a variety of analytes, based on peptidic receptors labeled with environmentally sensitive fluorophores. Fluorescent indicators based on synthetic peptides are highly interesting alternatives to protein-based sensors, since they can be synthesized chemically, are stable, and can be easily modified in a site-specific manner for fluorophore coupling and for immobilization on solid supports.

  • 17.
    Di Fino, A.
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Petrone, Luigi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aldred, N.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Clare, A. S.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Correlation between surface chemistry and settlement behaviour in barnacle cyprids (Balanus improvisus)2014In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 143-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In laboratory-based biofouling assays, the influence of physico-chemical surface characteristics on barnacle settlement has been tested most frequently using the model organism Balanus amphitrite (= Amphibalanus amphitrite). Very few studies have addressed the settlement preferences of other barnacle species, such as Balanus improvisus (= Amphibalanus improvisus). This study aimed to unravel the effects of surface physico-chemical cues, in particular surface-free energy (SFE) and surface charge, on the settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus. The use of well-defined surfaces under controlled conditions further facilitates comparison of the results with recent similar data for B. amphitrite. Zero-day-old cyprids of B. improvisus were exposed to a series of model surfaces, namely self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols with varying end-groups, homogenously applied to gold-coated polystyrene (PS) Petri dishes. As with B. amphitrite, settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus was influenced by both SFE and charge, with higher settlement on low-energy (hydrophobic) surfaces and negatively charged SAMs. Positively charged SAMs resulted in low settlement, with intermediate settlement on neutral SAMs of similar SFE. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that despite previous suggestions to the contrary, these two species of barnacle show similar preferences in response to SFE; they also respond similarly to charge. These findings have positive implications for the development of novel antifouling (AF) coatings and support the importance of consistency in substratum choice for assays designed to compare surface preferences of fouling organisms.

  • 18.
    Dånmark, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tailoring Supramolecular Peptide-Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels by Coiled Coil Self-Assembly and Self-Sorting2016In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 2260-2267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical hydrogels are extensively used in a wide range of biomedical applications. However, different applications require hydrogels with different mechanical and structural properties. Tailoring these properties demands exquisite control over the supramolecular peptides with different affinities for dimerization. Four different mechanical properties of hydrogels using de novo designed coiled coil interactions involved. Here we show that it is possible to control the nonorthogonal peptides, designed to fold into four different coiled coil heterodimers with dissociation constants spanning from mu M to pM, were conjugated to star-shaped 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The different PEG-coiled coil conjugates self-assemble as a result of peptide heterodimerization. Different combinations of PEG peptide conjugates assemble into PEG peptide networks and hydrogels with distinctly different thermal stabilities, supramolecular, and rheological properties, reflecting the peptide dimer affinities. We also demonstrate that it is possible to rationally modulate the self-assembly process by means of thermodynamic self-sorting by sequential additions of nonpegylated peptides. The specific interactions involved in peptide dimerization thus provides means for programmable and reversible self-assembly of hydrogels with precise control over rheological properties, which can significantly facilitate optimization of their overall performance and adaption to different processing requirements and applications.

  • 19.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Neutrons for scattering: What they are, where to get them, and how to deal with them2018In: EPJ Web of Conferences, ISSN 2101-6275, E-ISSN 2100-014X, Vol. 188, article id 01002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In neutron scattering studies of soft matter, a diverse array of methods and instruments are used, providing information on structure and dynamics on various length and energy scales. However, much of the infrastructure needed for neutron scattering is common for many instruments. After a brief historical retrospect of neutron scattering, this chapter introduces the basic infrastructure needed to conduct scattering experiments. This includes equipment that is used to produce, spectrally adjust and purify, and to deliver neutrons to the instruments where scattering experiments are conducted. The basics of the interaction of neutrons with matter is also introduced, as a preparation for the final sections on the different means at hand for neutron detection.

  • 20.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. MariboHilleshog Res AB, Sweden.
    Swelling of Thin Poly(ethylene glycol)-Containing Hydrogel Films it Water Vapor-A Neutron Reflectivity Study2018In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 19, p. 5517-5526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogels are widely used in biomedicine and for bioanalytical purposes, normally under wet conditions. For certain applications, processing steps, or process monitoring, hydrogel films are used or treated under ambient conditions, and because they are hygroscopic, it is of interest to investigate how they respond to changes in atmospheric humidity. We have used neutron reflectometry to follow the swelling of thin UV-polymerized hydrogel films in air under different relative humidities (RHs). These polymers were prepared to similar thicknesses on silica and gold substrates, and the chemical similarity between them was verified by infrared spectroscopy. The swelling in response to variations in RH was different for the layers on the two substrate types, reflecting structural changes induced by differences in the UV exposure required to achieve a given polymer thickness, as demonstrated also by differences in the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, obtained by fitting a Flory-Huggins-type sorption model to the swelling data. Wetting studies show small changes in contact angles with surrounding humidity variations, indicating that structural reorganization at the interface in response to humidity changes is limited.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-04-19 12:32
  • 21.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettitt, Michala E
    University of Birmingham.
    Conlan, Sheelagh L
    Newcastle University.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Callow, Maureen E
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, James A
    University of Birmingham.
    Mutton, Robert
    Newcastle University.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle University.
    D`Souza, Fraddry
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Donnelly, Glen
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Bruin, Anouk
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Willemsen, Peter R
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Su, Xueju J
    University of Dundee.
    Wang, Su
    University of Dundee.
    Zhao, Qi
    University of Dundee.
    Hederos, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Resistance of Galactoside-Terminated Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers to Marine Fouling Organisms2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 3890-3901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of galactoside-terminated alkanethiols have protein-resistance properties which can be tuned via the degree of methylation [Langmuir 2005, 21, 2971-2980]. Specifically, a partially methylated compound was more resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption than the hydroxylated or fully methylated counterparts. We investigate whether this also holds true for resistance to the attachment and adhesion of a range of marine species, in order to clarify to what extent resistance to protein adsorption correlates with the more complex adhesion of fouling organisms. The partially methylated galactoside-terminated SAM was further compared to a mixed monolayer of omega-substituted methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols with wetting properties and surface ratio of hydroxyl to methyl groups matching that of the galactoside. The settlement (initial attachment) and adhesion strength of four model marine fouling organisms were investigated, representing both micro- and macrofoulers; two bacteria (Cobetia marina and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus), barnacle cypris larvae (Balanus amphitrite), and algal zoospores (Ulva linza). The minimum in protein adsorption onto the partially methylated galactoside surface was partly reproduced in the marine fouling assays, providing some support for a relationship between protein resistance and adhesion of marine fouling organisms. The mixed alkanethiol SAM, which was matched in wettability to the partially methylated galactoside SAM, consistently showed higher settlement (initial attachment) of test organisms than the galactoside, implying that both wettability and surface chemistry are insufficient to explain differences in fouling resistance. We suggest that differences in the structure of interfacial water may explain the variation in adhesion to these SAMs.

  • 22.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettitt, M E
    University of Birmingham.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhou, Ye
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Callow, M E
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, J A
    University of Birmingham.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interactions of Zoospores of Ulva linza with Arginine-Rich Oligopeptide Monolayers2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 16, p. 9375-9383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently reported oil the strong interactions of zoospores of the green alga, Ulva linza with all arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [Biofouling 2008, 24, 303-312], where the arginine-rich peptide induced not only high spore settlement, but also a form of abnormal settlement, or "pseudo-settlement", whereby it proportion of spores do not go through the normal process of surface exploration, adhesive exocytosis, and loss of flagella. Further. it was demonstrated that both the total number of settled spores and the fraction of pseudosettled spores were related to the surface density of the arginine-rich peptide. Here we present a further investigation of the interactions of zoospores of ulva with a set of oligomeric, de nom designed, arginine-rich peptides, specifically aimed to test the effect of peptide primary structure on the interaction. Via variations in the peptide length and by permutations in the amino acid sequences, we gain further insight into the spore-surface interactions. The interpretation of the biological assays is supported by physicochemical characterization of the SAMs using infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle measurement. Results confirm the importance of arginine residues for the anomalous pseudosettlement, and we found that settlement is modulated by variations in both the total length and peptide primary structure. To elucidate the Causes of the anomalous settlement and the possible relation to peptide-membrane interactions, we also compared the settlement of the "naked" zoospores of Ulva(which present it lipoprotein membrane to the exterior without a discrete polysaccharide cell wall), with the settlement of diatoms (unicellular algae that are surrounded by it silica cell wall), onto the peptide SAMs. Cationic SAMs do not notably affect settlement (attachment), adhesion strength, or viability of diatom cells, Suggesting that the effect of the peptides on zoospores of Ulva is mediated via specific peptide-membrane interactions.

  • 23.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wallmark, Nanny
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Tomas L.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Patterned Hydrogels for Controlled Platelet Adhesion from Whole Blood and Plasma2010In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 20, no 15, p. 2396-2403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the preparation and properties of hydrogel surface chemistries enabling controlled and well-defined cell adhesion. The hydrogels may be prepared directly on plastic substrates, such as polystyrene slides or dishes, using a quick and experimentally simple photopolymerization process, compatible with photolithographic and microfluidic patterning methods. The intended application for these materials is as substrates for diagnostic cell adhesion assays, particularly for the analysis of human platelet function. The adsorption of fibrinogen and other platelet promoting molecules is shown to be completely inhibited by the hydrogel, provided that the film thickness is sufficient (>5 nm). This allows the hydrogel to be used as a matrix for presenting selected bioactive ligands without risking interference from nonspecifically adsorbed platelet adhesion factors, even in undiluted whole blood and blood plasma. This concept is demonstrated by preparing patterns of proteins on hydrogel surfaces, resulting in highly controlled platelet adhesion. Further insights into the protein immobilization and platelet adhesion processes are provided by studies using imaging surface plasmon resonance. The hydrogel surfaces used in this work appear to provide an ideal platform for cell adhesion studies of platelets, and potentially also for other cell types.

  • 24.
    Ericson, Marica B.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thomsen, Hanna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    James, Jeemol
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kirejev, Vladimir
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Fluicell AB, Sweden.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio
    Univ Almeria, Spain.
    Exploring plasmonic coupling as a stimuli responsive contrast mechanism in multiphoton microscopy2018In: PLASMONICS IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE XV, SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING , 2018, Vol. 10509, article id 1050907Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel approach for optical biosensing can be obtained based multiphoton induced luminescence (MIL) and its dependence on plasmonic coupling. It has been shown that the proximity of spherical AuNPs determines the generation of MIL in far-field multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPM). A stimuli responsive contrast mediator with high sensitivity can be created by controlling the aggregated state of AuNP. In this study we explore a system based on spherical AuNPs functionalized with beta-cyclodextrin and multiple beta-D-lactose units (lacto-CD-AuNP). The aim of the beta-D- lactose units is to target cancer cells, based on overexpression of galectin3 (Gal-3) receptors. The results demonstrate that clustering of particles, and thereby MIL signal, was only acquired from tumor cell lines, i.e., SK-MEL-28 and A431, while not from normal keratinocytes (HEKn). Thus further studies should be undertaken to translate the concept to a preclinical setting.

  • 25.
    Ericsson, Emma
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bui, Lan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Site-Specific and Covalent Attachment of His-Tagged Proteins by Chelation Assisted Photoimmobilization: A Strategy for Microarraying of Protein Ligands2013In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 29, no 37, p. 11687-11694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel strategy for site-specific and covalent attachment of proteins has been developed, intended for robust and controllable immobilization of histidine (His)-tagged ligands in protein microarrays. The method is termed chelation assisted photoimmobilization (CAP) and was demonstrated using human IgG-Fc modified with C-terminal hexahistidines (His-IgGFc) as the ligand and protein A as the analyte. Alkanethiols terminated with either nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), benzophenone (BP); or oligo(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were prepared on gold and thoroughly characterized by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), ellipsometry, and contact angle goniometry. In the process of CAP, NTA chelates Ni2+ and the complex coordinates the His-tagged ligand in an oriented assembly. The ligand is then photoimmobilized via BP, which forms covalent bonds upon UV light activation. In the development of affinity biosensors and protein microarrays, site-specific attachment of ligands in a fashion where analyte binding sites are available is often preferred to random coupling. Analyte binding performance of ligands immobilized either by CAP or by standard amine coupling was characterized by surface plasmon resonance in combination with IRAS. The relative analyte response with randomly coupled ligand was 2.5 times higher than when site-specific attachment was used. This is a reminder that also when immobilizing ligands via residues far from the binding site, there are many other factors influencing availability and activity. Still, CAP provides a valuable expansion of protein immobilization techniques since it offers attractive microarraying possibilities amenable to applications within proteomics.

  • 26.
    Ericsson, Emma M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bui, Lan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Controlled orientation and covalent attachment of proteins on biosensor surfaces by Chelation Assisted Photoimmobilization2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of surface chemistry for affinity biosensor chips, it is widely accepted that uniform orientation of the immobilized recognition element (ligand) is preferred over random orientation. However, this assumption has often been based on studies where differences in ligand immobilization level have not been taken into account. In this contribution, we present a novel two-step method for homogenous orientation and covalent attachment of proteins to sensing surfaces, called Chelation Assisted Photoimmobilization (CAP). Careful quantification of the effect of ligand orientation on analyte responses was performed by comparing this strategy to immobilization by conventional amine coupling.

     In CAP, the chelation agent is nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) which chelates Ni2+. A His-tagged ligand forms an oriented assembly when binding Ni2+-NTA and is then covalently bound to the surface via photolabile benzophenone (BP), which attacks C-H bonds upon UV light activation. We relied on a surface chemistry based on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG)-containing alkanethiolates on gold. Alkanethiols terminated with either NTA, BP or OEG were synthesized and mixed SAMs were characterized by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), ellipsometry and contact angle goniometry. IRAS was also used to quantify ligand immobilization levels obtained either by CAP or by amine coupling via the carboxyl groups of an NTA-presenting surface. The model ligand was human IgG-Fc modified with a C-terminal 6xHis-tag and the analyte was Protein A. The ligand-analyte interaction was quantified by a surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

     Analyte responses were normalized with respect to the ligand amounts obtained by the two immobilization strategies. Interestingly, the normalized analyte response with randomly oriented ligand was >2 times higher than that with ligand immobilized by CAP. This shows that oriented ligand immobilization is not necessarily a means of increasing the sensitivity of a biosensor. Factors that may influence performance include the valency of the ligand and constraints related to the surface chemistry used for orientation.

  • 27.
    Fursatz, Marian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skog, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. S2Med AB, Linnegatan 9, SE-58225 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sivlér, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. S2Med AB, Linnegatan 9, SE-58225 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Palm, Eleonor
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Skallberg, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khalaf, Hazem
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Torbjorn
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Functionalization of bacterial cellulose wound dressings with the antimicrobial peptide epsilon-poly-L-Lysine2018In: Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1748-6041, E-ISSN 1748-605X, Vol. 13, no 2, article id 025014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound dressings based on bacterial cellulose (BC) can form a soft and conformable protective layer that can stimulate wound healing while preventing bacteria from entering the wound. Bacteria already present in the wound can, however, thrive in the moist environment created by the BC dressing which can aggravate the healing process. Possibilities to render the BC antimicrobial without affecting the beneficial structural and mechanical properties of the material would hence be highly attractive. Here we present methods for functionalization of BC with epsilon-poly-L-Lysine (epsilon-PLL), a non-toxic biopolymer with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Low molecular weight epsilon-PLL was crosslinked in pristine BC membranes and to carboxymethyl cellulose functionalized BC using carbodiimide chemistry. The functionalization of BC with epsilon-PLL inhibited growth of S. epidermidis on the membranes but did not affect the cytocompatibility to cultured human fibroblasts as compared to native BC. The functionalization had no significant effects on the nanofibrous structure and mechanical properties of the BC. The possibility to functionalize BC with epsilon-PLL is a promising, green and versatile approach to improve the performance of BC in wound care and other biomedical applications.

  • 28.
    Fyrner, Timmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore .
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping, .
    Synthesis of oligo(lactose)-based thiols and their self-assembly onto gold surfaces2013In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 105, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to produce monomolecular coatings with well-defined structural and functional properties is of key importance in biosensing, drug delivery, and many recently developed applications of nanotechnology. Organic chemistry has proven to be a powerful tool to achieve this in many research areas. Herein, we present the synthesis of three oligo(lactosides) glycosylated in a (1 → 3) manner, and which are further functionalized with amide-linked short alkanethiol spacers. The oligosaccharides (di-, tetra-, and hexasaccharide) originate from the inexpensive and readily available lactose disaccharide. These thiolated derivatives were immobilized onto gold surfaces, and the thus formed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on planar gold were characterized by wettability, ellipsometry and infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy. Further, the ability of these SAMs to stabilize gold nanoparticles in saline solutions was also demonstrated, indicating that the oligosaccharides may be used as stabilizing agents in gold nanoparticle-based assays.

  • 29.
    Fyrner, Timmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lee, Hung-Hsun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mangone, Alberto
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettitt, Michala E
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, Maureen E
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, James A
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Conlan, Sheelagh L
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Mutton, Robert
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle Universitym, UK.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Saccharide-Functionalized Alkanethiols for Fouling-Resistant Self-Assembled Monolayers: Synthesis, Monolayer Properties, and Antifouling Behavior2011In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 27, no 24, p. 15034-15047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the synthesis of a series of mono-, di-, and trisaccharide-functionalized alkanethiols as well as the formation of fouling-resistant self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) from these. The SAls,,Is were characterized using ellipsometry, wetting measurements, and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (WAS). We show that the structure of the carbohydrate moiety affects the packing density and that this also alters the alkane chain organization. Upon increasing the size of the sugar moieties (from mono- to di- and trisaccharides), the structural qualities of the monolayers deteriorated with increasing disorder, and for the trisaccharide, slow reorganization dynamics in response to changes in the environmental polarity were observed. The antifouling properties of these SAMs were investigated through protein adsorption experiments from buffer solutions as well as settlement (attachment) tests using two common marine fouling species, zoospores of the green macroalga Ulva linza and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. The SAMs showed overall good resistance to fouling by both the proteins and the tested marine organisms. To improve the packing density of the SAMs with bulky headgroups, we employed mixed SAMs where the saccharide-thiols are diluted with a filler molecule having a small 2-hydroxyethyl headgroup. This method also provides a means by which the steric availability of sugar moieties can be varied, which is of interest for specific interaction studies with surface-bound sugars. The results of the surface dilution study and the low nonspecific adsorption onto the SAMs both indicate the feasibility of this approach.

  • 30.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    ATR-FTIR: a simple and rapid tool for bacterial resistance detection2015In: Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy - ICAVS, Vienna, Austria, 12- 17 July 2015., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Golabi, Mohsen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
    Padiolleau, Laurence
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Cranfield University, England.
    Chen, Xi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Dundee, Scotland.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sheikhzadeh, Elham
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Sweden.
    Doping Polypyrrole Films with 4-N-Pentylphenylboronic Acid to Enhance Affinity towards Bacteria and Dopamine2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e0166548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we demonstrate the use of a functional dopant as a fast and simple way to tune the chemical affinity and selectivity of polypyrrole films. More specifically, a boronic-functionalised dopant, 4-N-Pentylphenylboronic Acid (PBA), was used to provide to polypyrrole films with enhanced affinity towards diols. In order to prove the proposed concept, two model systems were explored: (i) the capture and the electrochemical detection of dopamine and (ii) the adhesion of bacteria onto surfaces. The chemisensor, based on overoxidised polypyrrole boronic doped film, was shown to have the ability to capture and retain dopamine, thus improving its detection; furthermore the chemisensor showed better sensitivity in comparison with overoxidised perchlorate doped films. The adhesion of bacteria, Deinococcus proteolyticus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Klebsiella pneumoniae, onto the boric doped polypyrrole film was also tested. The presence of the boronic group in the polypyrrole film was shown to favour the adhesion of sugar-rich bacterial cells when compared with a control film (Dodecyl benzenesulfonate (DBS) doped film) with similar morphological and physical properties. The presented single step synthesis approach is simple and fast, does not require the development and synthesis of functional monomers, and can be easily expanded to the electrochemical, and possibly chemical, fabrication of novel functional surfaces and interfaces with inherent pre-defined sensing and chemical properties.

  • 32.
    Gormley, Adam J.
    et al.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Chandrawati, Rona
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Christofferson, Andrew J.
    RMIT University, Australia; RMIT University, Australia.
    Loynachan, Colleen
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Jumeaux, Coline
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Artzy-Schnirman, Arbel
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yarovsky, Irene
    RMIT University, Australia; RMIT University, Australia.
    Stevens, Molly M.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly of Polymer Films and Capsules through Coiled-Coil Peptides2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 16, p. 5820-5824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) technique is a simple and robust process for fabricating functional multilayer thin films. Here, we report the use of de novo designed polypeptides that self-assemble into coiled-coil structures (four-helix bundles) as a driving force for specific multilayer assembly. These pH- (sensitive between pH 4 and 7) and enzyme-responsive polypeptides were conjugated to polymers, and the LbL assembly of the polymer-peptide conjugates allowed the deposition of up to four polymer-peptide layers on planar surfaces and colloidal substrates. Stable hollow capsules were obtained, and by taking advantage of the peptides susceptibility to specific enzymatic cleavage, release of encapsulated cargo within the carriers can be triggered within 2 h in the presence of matrix metalloproteinase-7. The enormous diversity of materials that can form highly controllable and programmable coiled-coil interactions creates new opportunities and allows further exploration of the multilayer assembly and the formation of carrier capsules with unique functional properties.

  • 33.
    Gudlur, Sushanth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandén, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Matouskova, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fasciani, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liposomes as nanoreactors for the photochemical synthesis of gold nanoparticles2015In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 456, p. 206-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple and novel method for the photochemical synthesis of AuNPs in liposomes is described. Gold salt is co-encapsulated with the photoinitiator Irgacure-2959 in POPC liposomes prepared via traditional thin-film hydration technique. UVA irradiation for 15 min results in encapsulated AuNPs of 2.8 +/- 1.6 nm in diameter that are primarily dispersed in the aqueous interior of the liposomes. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 34.
    Halling Linder, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Glycation Contributes to Interaction Between Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Collagen Type I2016In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 284-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone is a biological composite material comprised primarily of collagen type I and mineral crystals of calcium and phosphate in the form of hydroxyapatite (HA), which together provide its mechanical properties. Bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP), produced by osteoblasts, plays a pivotal role in the mineralization process. Affinity contacts between collagen, mainly type II, and the crown domain of various ALP isozymes were reported in a few in vitro studies in the 1980s and 1990s, but have not attracted much attention since, although such interactions may have important implications for the bone mineralization process. The objective of this study was to investigate the binding properties of human collagen type I to human bone ALP, including the two bone ALP isoforms B1 and B2. ALP from human liver, human placenta and E. coli were also studied. A surface plasmon resonance-based analysis, supported by electrophoresis and blotting, showed that bone ALP binds stronger to collagen type I in comparison with ALPs expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. Further, the B2 isoform binds significantly stronger to collagen type I in comparison with the B1 isoform. Human bone and liver ALP (with identical amino acid composition) displayed pronounced differences in binding, revealing that post-translational glycosylation properties govern these interactions to a large extent. In conclusion, this study presents the first evidence that glycosylation differences in human ALPs are of crucial importance for protein–protein interactions with collagen type I, although the presence of the ALP crown domain may also be necessary. Different binding affinities among the bone ALP isoforms may influence the mineral-collagen interface, mineralization kinetics, and degree of bone matrix mineralization, which are important factors determining the material properties of bone.

  • 35.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ravichandran, Ranjithkumar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Olsen, D.
    FibroGen Inc, CA 94158 USA.
    Kozak Ljunggren, Monika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lee, Chyan-Jang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-assembled collagen-like-peptide implants as alternatives to human donor corneal transplantation2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 61, p. 55745-55749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extracellular matrix proteins like collagen promote regeneration as implants in clinical studies. However, collagens are large and unwieldy proteins, making small functional peptide analogs potentially ideal substitutes. Self-assembling collagen-like-peptides conjugated with PEG-maleimide were assembled into hydrogels. When tested pre-clinically as corneal implants in mini-pigs, they promoted cell and nerve regeneration, forming neo-corneas structurally and functionally similar to natural corneas.

  • 36.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Application of Vibrational Spectroscopy in Organic Electronics2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid technological developments enforce us to live in an increasingly electronic world, and the revolutionary usage of conjugated polymers in electronics in the late 1970s accelerated these developments, based on the unique characteristics of conjugated polymers, such as low cost, easy processing, mechanical flexibility, large-area application and compatibility with a variety of substrates. Organic electronic devices are commercially available in the form of, for example, solar cells, transistors, and organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. Scientists work on electroactive polymers to enhance their chemical, electrical and mechanical properties, to improve parameters such as charge carrier mobility and doping capacity, in order to reach acceptable efficiency and stability to fabricate organic electronic devices. A comprehensive understanding of the changes in chemical structure, in response to external factors such as applied potential and temperature gradients, which can disturb the chemical equilibrium of the constituent materials, and of the conduction mechanisms of the operating devices, can help to enhance the performance of organic electronics devices. Vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method for in-situ monitoring of such chemical or electrochemical reactions and associated structural changes of conjugated polymers in a working device.

    In this thesis, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to study the structural changes in electroactive organic materials, in response to chemical or electrochemical reactions, and to study electrical and thermal conduction mechanisms in different organic electronic devices. FTIR microscopy was used to approach a realistic conduction mechanism by time-resolved chemical imaging of active materials in planar light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs), investigated as an alternative to organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). These chemical images are used for in-situ mapping of anion density profiles, polymer doping, and dynamic junction formation in the active layer under an applied bias. Results confirm the electrochemical doping model and help the systematic improvement of function and manufacture of LECs. Mixed ion-electron polymeric conductor materials such as PEDOT-PSS are used as active materials in organic thermoelectric generators (OTEGs), where charge carrier transport through the active layer promotes internal electrochemical reactions under a temperature gradient. FTIR microscopy and FTIR-attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) were used to study thermoelectric and electrical properties of the conducting polymers. Recently, electrochemical supercapacitors have emerged as an alternative to conventional batteries, and polymeric materials are used to design polymer electrodes for renewable energy storage. To understand the charge transfer and structural changes of the polymer during the redox reaction, we have used FTIR-ATR as a tool for the in-situ spectroelectrochemical study of redox states in polypyrrole/lignin composites; we clarified the structural changes in the materials during charging and discharging of the composite. In further work, FTIR-ATR was also used for in-situ spectroelectrochemical studies of PEDOT:Cl, to monitor the effects of dissolved oxygen on PEDOT:Cl films, which are used as electrodes in renewable energy technologies. Further, time-resolved oxygen reduction reactions of PEDOT:Cl have been studied via polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) to reveal chemical changes in electrochemically doped PEDOT upon exposure to oxygen.

    Taken together, these studies provide an advancement in the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to understand electroactive materials under wet conditions, and have provided detailed chemical and electrochemical information of materials and devices under operation, that is not easily accessible with other methods.

    List of papers
    1. Time-Resolved Chemical Mapping in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time-Resolved Chemical Mapping in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells
    2017 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 2747-2757Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    An understanding of the doping and ion distributions in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) is required to approach a realistic conduction model which can precisely explain the electrochemical reactions, p-n junction formation, and ion dynamics in the active layer and to provide relevant information about LECs for systematic improvement of function and manufacture. Here, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy is used to monitor anion density profile and polymer structure in situ and for time-resolved mapping of electrochemical doping in an LEC under bias. The results are in very good agreement with the electrochemical doping model with respect to ion redistribution and formation of a dynamic p-n junction in the active layer. We also physically slow ions by decreasing the working temperature and study frozen-junction formation and immobilization of ions in a fixed-junction LEC device by FTIR imaging. The obtained results show irreversibility of the ion redistribution and polymer doping in a fixed-junction device. In addition, we demonstrate that infrared microscopy is a useful tool for in situ characterization of electroactive organic materials.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2017
    Keywords
    light-emitting electrochemical cell; FTIR spectroscopic imaging electrochemical doping doping profile; ion distribution; dynamic p-n junction; infrared microspectroscopy; principal component analysis
    National Category
    Inorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-135398 (URN)10.1021/acsami.6b14162 (DOI)000392909500086 ()28032741 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Power Papers project from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation [2011-0050]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University [SFO-Mat-LiU 2009-00971]

    Available from: 2017-03-14 Created: 2017-03-14 Last updated: 2017-11-29
    2. Thermoelectric Properties of Polymeric Mixed Conductors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermoelectric Properties of Polymeric Mixed Conductors
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 26, no 34, p. 6288-6296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The thermoelectric (TE) phenomena are intensively explored by the scientific community due to the rather inefficient way energy resources are used with a large fraction of energy wasted in the form of heat. Among various materials, mixed ion-electron conductors (MIEC) are recently being explored as potential thermoelectrics, primarily due to their low thermal conductivity. The combination of electronic and ionic charge carriers in those inorganic or organic materials leads to complex evolution of the thermovoltage (Voc) with time, temperature, and/or humidity. One of the most promising organic thermoelectric materials, poly(3,4-ethyelenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT-PSS), is an MIEC. A previous study reveals that at high humidity, PEDOT-PSS undergoes an ionic Seebeck effect due to mobile protons. Yet, this phenomenon is not well understood. In this work, the time dependence of the Voc is studied and its behavior from the contribution of both charge carriers (holes and protons) is explained. The presence of a complex reorganization of the charge carriers promoting an internal electrochemical reaction within the polymer film is identified. Interestingly, it is demonstrated that the time dependence behavior of Voc is a way to distinguish between three classes of polymeric materials: electronic conductor, ionic conductor, and mixed ionic–electronic conductor

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2016
    National Category
    Inorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133171 (URN)10.1002/adfm.201601106 (DOI)000383609300015 ()2-s2.0-84978042566 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    EU, European Research Council, 307596
    Note

    Funding agencies: European Research Council (ERC) [307596]

    Available from: 2016-12-12 Created: 2016-12-12 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
    3. Acido-basic control of the thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)tosylate (PEDOT-Tos) thin films
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acido-basic control of the thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)tosylate (PEDOT-Tos) thin films
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 3, p. 10616-10623Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PEDOT-Tos is one of the conducting polymers that displays the most promising thermoelectric properties. Until now, it has been utterly difficult to control all the synthesis parameters and the morphology governing the thermoelectric properties. To improve our understanding of this material, we study the variation in the thermoelectric properties by a simple acido-basic treatment. The emphasis of this study is to elucidate the chemical changes induced by acid (HCl) or base (NaOH) treatment in PEDOT-Tos thin films using various spectroscopic and structural techniques. We could identify changes in the nanoscale morphology due to anion exchange between tosylate and Cl- or OH-. But, we identified that changing the pH leads to a tuning of the oxidation level of the polymer, which can explain the changes in thermoelectric properties. Hence, a simple acid-base treatment allows finding the optimum for the power factor in PEDOT-Tos thin films.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
    National Category
    Polymer Chemistry Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121977 (URN)10.1039/C5TC01952D (DOI)000363251600035 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: European Research Council (ERC) [307596]

    Available from: 2015-10-14 Created: 2015-10-14 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
    4. Spectroelectrochemical investigation of redox states in a polypyrrole/lignin composite electrode material
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spectroelectrochemical investigation of redox states in a polypyrrole/lignin composite electrode material
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 3, no 24, p. 12927-12937Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We report spectroelectrochemical studies to investigate the charge storage mechanism of composite polypyrrole/lignin electrodes. Renewable bioorganic electrode materials were produced by electropolymerization of pyrrole in the presence of a water-soluble lignin derivative acting as a dopant. The resulting composite exhibited enhanced charge storage abilities due to a lignin-based faradaic process, which was expressed after repeated electrochemical redox of the material. The in situ FTIR spectroelectrochemistry results show the formation of quinone groups, and reversible oxidation-reduction of these groups during charge-discharge experiments in the electrode materials. The most significant IR bands include carbonyl absorption near 1705 cm(-1), which is attributed to the creation of quinone moieties during oxidation, and absorption at 1045 cm(-1) which is due to hydroquinone moieties.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY, 2015
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120069 (URN)10.1039/c5ta00788g (DOI)000356022800044 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation; Marie Curie network Renaissance; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University [2009-00971]

    Available from: 2015-07-06 Created: 2015-07-06 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    5. Oxygen-induced doping on reduced PEDOT
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxygen-induced doping on reduced PEDOT
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 4404-4412Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) has shown promise as air electrode in renewable energy technologies like metal-air batteries and fuel cells. PEDOT is based on atomic elements of high abundance and is synthesized at low temperature from solution. The mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) over chemically polymerized PEDOT: Cl still remains controversial with eventual role of transition metal impurities. However, regardless of the mechanistic route, we here demonstrate yet another key active role of PEDOT in the ORR mechanism. Our study demonstrates the decoupling of conductivity (intrinsic property) from electrocatalysis (as an extrinsic phenomenon) yielding the evidence of doping of the polymer by oxygen during ORR. Hence, the PEDOT electrode is electrochemically reduced (undoped) in the voltage range of ORR regime, but O-2 keeps it conducting; ensuring PEDOT to act as an electrode for the ORR. The interaction of oxygen with the polymer electrode is investigated with a battery of spectroscopic techniques.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY, 2017
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136229 (URN)10.1039/c6ta10521a (DOI)000395926100019 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|European Research Council (ERC) [307596]; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation; Wenner-Gren Foundations; Swedish Research Council; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research [0-3D]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University [2009 00971]

    Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2018-05-07
  • 37.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Jiang
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Time-Resolved Chemical Mapping in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 2747-2757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An understanding of the doping and ion distributions in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) is required to approach a realistic conduction model which can precisely explain the electrochemical reactions, p-n junction formation, and ion dynamics in the active layer and to provide relevant information about LECs for systematic improvement of function and manufacture. Here, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy is used to monitor anion density profile and polymer structure in situ and for time-resolved mapping of electrochemical doping in an LEC under bias. The results are in very good agreement with the electrochemical doping model with respect to ion redistribution and formation of a dynamic p-n junction in the active layer. We also physically slow ions by decreasing the working temperature and study frozen-junction formation and immobilization of ions in a fixed-junction LEC device by FTIR imaging. The obtained results show irreversibility of the ion redistribution and polymer doping in a fixed-junction device. In addition, we demonstrate that infrared microscopy is a useful tool for in situ characterization of electroactive organic materials.

  • 38.
    Kanmert, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brorsson, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Harald
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thermal Induction of an Alternatively Folded State in Human IgG-Fc2011In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 981-988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the formation of a non-native, folded state of human IgG4-Fc induced by a high temperature at neutral pH and at a physiological salt concentration. This structure is similar to the molten globule state in that it displays a high degree of secondary structure content and surface-exposed hydrophobic residues. However, it is highly resistant to chemical denaturation. The thermally induced state of human IgG4-Fc is thus associated with typical properties of the so-called alternatively folded state previously described for murine IgG, IgG-Fab, and individual antibody domains (V(L), V(H), C(H)1, and C(H)3) under acidic conditions in the presence of anions. Like some of these molecules, human IgG4-Fc in its alternative fold exists as a mixture of different oligomeric structures, dominated by an equilibrium between monomeric and heptameric species. Heating further induces the formation of fibrous structures in the micrometer range.

  • 39.
    Kanmert, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Enocsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kastbom, Alf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Designed Surface with Tunable IgG Density as an in Vitro Model for Immune Complex Mediated Stimulation of Leukocytes2010In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 3493-3497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the design of an in vitro for immune-complex-mediated stimulation of leukocytes and its functional characteristics with respect to monocyte adhesion. The model was based on orientation-controlled immobilization of a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) via its interaction with a biotinylated peptide epitope derived from the CD20 marker. The peptide was linked to neutravidin covalently attached to it mixed self-assembled monolayer of carboxyl- and methoxy-terminated oligo(ethylene glycol) alkane thiolates on gold. The surface adhesion propensity of human monocytes (cell line U917) was highly dependent on the lateral IgG density and indicated that there exists a distance between IgG-Fc on the surface where interactions with Fc gamma receptors are optimal. This well-defined platform allows for a careful control of the size and orientation of artificial IgG immune complexes, it is easily made compatible with, for example, cellular imaging, and it will become useful for in vitro studies on the importance of Fc gamma receptor interactions in chronic immune-mediated diseases.

  • 40.
    Kanmert, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kastbom, Alf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Almroth, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wetterö, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    IgG Rheumatoid Factors Against the Four Human Fc-gamma Subclasses in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (The Swedish TIRA Project)2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 115-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rheumatoid factor (RF), i.e. a family of autoantibodies against the Fc part of IgG, is an important seromarker of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Traditional particle agglutination without disclosing the antibody isotype remains the predominating diagnostic method in clinical routine. Although IgG-RF attracts pathogenic interest, its detection remains technically challenging. The present study aimed at developing a set of tests identifying IgG-RFs directed against the four IgG subclasses. IgG-RF against either subclass of human IgG-Fc were analysed with four novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) utilizing four recombinant human Fc-gamma fragments (hIgG14) as sources of antigen. Sera from 40 patients with recent onset RA (20 seropositive and 20 seronegative by IgM-RF and IgA-RF-isotype-specific ELISA) were analysed. Sera from 20 healthy blood donors served as reference. Among the IgM-/IgA-RF-positive RA-sera, IgG-RF was found directed against hIgG1 and hIgG2, but not against hIgG3 or hIgG4. Significant correlations were seen between IgG-RF against hIgG2-Fc and IgM-RF (r = 0.666) levels. Further prospective studies are warranted to elucidate any correlation to disease course and outcome.

  • 41.
    Kaushik, Priya Darshni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jamia Millia Islamia, India.
    Aziz, Anver
    Jamia Millia Islamia, India.
    Siddiqui, Azher M.
    Jamia Millia Islamia, India.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lakshmi, G. B. V. S.
    Interuniv Accelerator Centre, India.
    Avasthi, D. K.
    Interuniv Accelerator Centre, India; Amity Institute Nanotechnol, India.
    Syväjärvi, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yazdi, Gholamreza
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Modifications in structural, optical and electrical properties of epitaxial graphene on SiC due to 100 MeV silver ion irradiation2018In: Materials Science in Semiconductor Processing, ISSN 1369-8001, E-ISSN 1873-4081, Vol. 74, p. 122-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epitaxial graphene (EG) on silicon carbide (SiC) is a combination of two robust materials that are excellent candidates for post silicon electronics. In this work, we systematically investigate structural changes in SiC substrate as well as graphene on SiC and explore the potential for controlled applications due to 100 MeV silver swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. Raman spectroscopy showed fluence dependent decrease in intensity of first and second order modes of SiC, along with decrease in Relative Raman Intensity upon ion irradiation. Similarly, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) showed fluence dependent decrease in Si-C bond intensity with presence of C = O, Si-O-Si, Si-Si and C-H bond showing introduction of vacancy, substitutional and sp(3) defects in both graphene and SiC. C1s spectra in XPS shows decrease in C = C graphitic peak and increase in interfacial layer following ion irradiation. Reduction in monolayer coverage of graphene after ion irradiation was observed by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further, UV-Visible spectroscopy showed increase in absorbance of EG on SiC at increasing fluence. I-V characterization showed fluence dependent increase in resistance from 62.9 O in pristine sample to 480.1 Omega in sample irradiated at 6.6 x 10(12) ions/cm(2) fluence. The current study demonstrates how SHI irradiation can be used to tailor optoelectronic applicability of EG on SiC.

  • 42.
    Khalaf, Hazem
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Sowdamini Nakka, Sravya
    University of Örebro, Sweden; PEAS Institute AB, Soderleden 1, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sandén, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Svärd, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultenby, Kjell
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Scherbak, Nikolai
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bengtsson, Torbjorn
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Antibacterial effects of Lactobacillus and bacteriocin PLNC8 alpha beta on the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis2016In: BMC Microbiology, ISSN 1471-2180, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 16, no 188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The complications in healthcare systems associated with antibiotic-resistant microorganisms have resulted in an intense search for new effective antimicrobials. Attractive substances from which novel antibiotics may be developed are the bacteriocins. These naturally occurring peptides are generally considered to be safe and efficient at eliminating pathogenic bacteria. Among specific keystone pathogens in periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered to be the most important pathogen in the development and progression of chronic inflammatory disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of different Lactobacillus species and the two-peptide bacteriocin PLNC8 alpha beta on P. gingivalis. Results: Growth inhibition of P. gingivalis was obtained by viable Lactobacillus and culture media from L. plantarum NC8 and 44048, but not L. brevis 30670. The two-peptide bacteriocin from L. plantarum NC8 (PLNC8 alpha beta) was found to be efficient against P. gingivalis through binding followed by permeabilization of the membranes, using Surface plasmon resonance analysis and DNA staining with Sytox Green. Liposomal systems were acquired to verify membrane permeabilization by PLNC8 alpha beta. The antimicrobial activity of PLNC8 alpha beta was found to be rapid (1 min) and visualized by TEM to cause cellular distortion through detachment of the outer membrane and bacterial lysis. Conclusion: Soluble or immobilized PLNC8 alpha beta bacteriocins may be used to prevent P. gingivalis colonization and subsequent pathogenicity, and thus supplement the host immune system against invading pathogens associated with periodontitis.

  • 43.
    Koon Lim, Seng
    et al.
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Sandén, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tuning Liposome Membrane Permeability by Competitive Peptide Dimerization and Partitioning-Folding Interactions Regulated by Proteolytic Activity2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 21123, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membrane active peptides are of large interest for development of drug delivery vehicles and therapeutics for treatment of multiple drug resistant infections. Lack of specificity can be detrimental and finding routes to tune specificity and activity of membrane active peptides is vital for improving their therapeutic efficacy and minimize harmful side effects. We describe a de novo designed membrane active peptide that partition into lipid membranes only when specifically and covalently anchored to the membrane, resulting in pore-formation. Dimerization with a complementary peptide efficiently inhibits formation of pores. The effect can be regulated by proteolytic digestion of the inhibitory peptide by the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-7, an enzyme upregulated in many malignant tumors. This system thus provides a precise and specific route for tuning the permeability of lipid membranes and a novel strategy for development of recognition based membrane active peptides and indirect enzymatically controlled release of liposomal cargo.

  • 44.
    Lee, Hung-Hsun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gavutis, Martynas
    Department of Nanoengineering, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Ruželė, Živilė
    Department of Nanoengineering, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Valiokas, Ramu̅nas
    Department of Nanoengineering, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Center for Biomimetic Sensor Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Mixed Self-Assembled Monolayers with Terminal Deuterated Anchors: Characterization and Probing of Model Lipid Membrane Formation2018In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 122, no 34, p. 8201-8210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe herein a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold designed for adjustable tethering of model lipid membrane phases. The SAMs consist of deuterated aliphatic anchors, HS(CH2)(15)CONH-(CH2CH2O)(6)CH2CONH-X, where X is either -(CD2)(7)CD3 or -(CD2)(15)CD3, dispersed in a stable matrix of( )protein-repellent molecules, HS(CH2)(15)CONHCH2CH2OH. The mixed SAMs with variable surface densities of the anchors are thoroughly characterized before and after adsorption of phospholipids by means of ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). In all cases, the bottom portions of the mixed SAMs (i.e., the h-alkyl thiol segments of the molecules) are arranged in a highly ordered all-trans conformation stabilized by a network of lateral hydrogen bonds. The terminal portions of the anchors (the oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer and deuterated alkyl segments, respectively), however, possess less ordered conformations in the mixed composition regime. For the SAMs containing the longer anchors (-(CD2)(15)CD3), the contact angle and infrared data point toward partial phase segregation. These findings are in excellent agreement with molecular dynamics simulations by Schulze and Stein. Upon analysis in air, the IRRAS data also indicate strong interaction between the adsorbed phospholipid molecules and the d-alkyl tails of the mixed SAM constituents. In such assemblies are the alkyl tails of the phospholipids aligned perpendicularly with respect to the supporting substrate, regardless of the anchor length. We also probed the in situ formation of a tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM) via fusion of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) on the characterized SAMs using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Our experiments show that SUVs fuse efficiently of the two mixed SAMs with and without a pre-adsorbed lipid layer. Owing to the defined molecular composition and phase behavior, our SAM platform is attractive for detailed studies of tBLM formation and cell mimetic applications.

  • 45.
    Lee, Hung-Hsun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ruzele, Zivile
    Institute Phys, Department Funct Nanomat, LT-02300 Vilnius, Lithuania .
    Malysheva, Lyuba
    Bogolyubov Institute Theoret Phys, UA-03143 Kiev, Ukraine .
    Onipko, Alexander
    Bogolyubov Institute Theoret Phys, UA-03143 Kiev, Ukraine .
    Gutes, Albert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Valiokas, Ramunas
    Institute Phys, Department Funct Nanomat, LT-02300 Vilnius, Lithuania .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Long-Chain Alkylthiol Assemblies Containing Buried In-Plane Stabilizing Architectures2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 24, p. 13959-13971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of alkylthiol compounds were synthesized to study the formation and structure of complex self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) consisting of interchanging structural modules stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The chemical structure of the synthesized compounds, HS(CH2)(15)CONH(CH2CH2O)(6)CH2CONH-X, where X refers to the extended chains of either -(CH2)(n)CH3 or -(CD2)(n)CD3, with n = 0, 1, 7, 8, 15, was confirmed by NMR and elemental analysis. The formation of highly ordered, methyl-terminated SAMs oil gold from diluted ethanolic solutions of these compounds was revealed using contact angle goniometry, mill ellipsometry, cyclic voltammetry, and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The experimental work was complemented with extensive DFT modeling of infrared spectra and molecular orientation. New assignments were introduced for both nondeuterated and deuterated Compounds. The latter set of compounds also served as a convenient tool to resolve the packing, conformation, and orientation of the buried and extended modules within the SAM. Thus, it was shown that the lower alkyl portion together with the hexa(ethylene glycol) portion is stabilized by the two layers of lateral hydrogen bonding networks between the amide groups, and they provide it Structurally robust support for the extended alkyls, The presented system can be considered to be an extension of the well-known alkyl SAM platform, enabling precise engineering of nanoscopic architectures oil the length scale from a Few to similar to 60 angstrom for applications such as cell membrane mimetics, molecular nanolithography, and so forth.

  • 46.
    Li, Zaifang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Hengda
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hsiao, Ching-Lien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yao, Yulong
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
    Xiao, Yiqun
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Shahi, Maryam
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
    Jin, Yingzhi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cruce, Alex
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jiang, Youyu
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Meng, Wei
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Qin, Fei
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Xinhui
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brill, Joseph W.
    Univ Kentucky, KY 40506 USA.
    Zhou, Yinhua
    Huazhong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China; South China Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhang, Fengling
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Free-Standing High-Output Power Density Thermoelectric Device Based on Structure-Ordered PEDOT:PSS2018In: Advanced Electronic Materials, ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 1700496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A free-standing high-output power density polymeric thermoelectric (TE) device is realized based on a highly conductive (approximate to 2500 S cm(-1)) structure-ordered poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate film (denoted as FS-PEDOT:PSS) with a Seebeck coefficient of 20.6 mu V K-1, an in-plane thermal conductivity of 0.64 W m(-1) K-1, and a peak power factor of 107 mu W K-2 m(-1) at room temperature. Under a small temperature gradient of 29 K, the TE device demonstrates a maximum output power density of 99 +/- 18.7 mu W cm(-2), which is the highest value achieved in pristine PEDOT:PSS based TE devices. In addition, a fivefold output power is demonstrated by series connecting five devices into a flexible thermoelectric module. The simplicity of assembling the films into flexible thermoelectric modules, the low out-of-plane thermal conductivity of 0.27 W m(-1) K-1, and free-standing feature indicates the potential to integrate the FS-PEDOT:PSS TE modules with textiles to power wearable electronics by harvesting human bodys heat. In addition to the high power factor, the high thermal stability of the FS-PEDOT:PSS films up to 250 degrees C is confirmed by in situ temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction and grazing incident wide angle X-ray scattering, which makes the FS-PEDOT:PSS films promising candidates for thermoelectric applications.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-01-02 00:12
  • 47.
    Lloyd Spetz, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pearce, Ruth
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hedin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    New transducer material concepts for biosensors and surface functionalization2009In: Smart Sensors, Actuators,and MEMS IV / [ed] Ulrich Schmid, Carles Cané, Herbert Shea, Bellingham, WA United States: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2009, Vol. 7362, p. 736206-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wide bandgap materials like SiC, ZnO, AlN form a strong platform as transducers for biosensors realized as e.g. ISFET (ion selective field effect transistor) devices or resonators. We have taken two main steps towards a multifunctional biosensor transducer. First we have successfully functionalized ZnO and SiC surfaces with e.g. APTES. For example ZnO is interesting since it may be functionalized with biomolecules without any oxidation of the surface and several sensing principles are possible. Second, ISFET devises with a porous metal gate as a semi-reference electrode are being developed. Nitric oxide, NO, is a gas which participates in the metabolism. Resistivity changes in Ga doped ZnO was demonstrated as promising for NO sensing also in humid atmosphere, in order to simulate breath.

  • 48.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Garbrecht, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Probing Zinc-Protein-Chelant Interactions using Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized with Zinc-Responsive Polypeptides2014In: Particle & particle systems characterization, ISSN 0934-0866, E-ISSN 1521-4117, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 1127-1133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coordination of zinc by proteins and various other organic molecules is essential for numerous biological processes, such as in enzymatic catalysis, metabolism and signal transduction. Presence of small molecular chelants can have a profound effect on the bioavailability of zinc and affect critical Zn2+-protein interactions. Zn2+ chelators are also emerging therapeutics for Alzheimer’s diseases because of their preventive effect on zinc promoted amyloid formation. Despite the importance of zinc-protein-chelant interactions in biology and medicine, probing such interactions is  challenging. Here, we introduce an innovative approach for real-time characterization of zinc-protein-chelant interactions using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with a zinc-responsive protein mimetic polypeptide. The peptide functionalized AuNPs aggregate extensively in the presence of Zn2+, triggered by specific Zn2+-mediated polypeptide dimerization and folding, causing a massive red shift of the plasmon band. Chelants affects the Zn2+- polypeptide interaction and thus the aggregation differently depending on their concentrations, zincbinding affinities and coordination numbers, which affect the position of the plasmon band. This system is a simple and powerful tool that provides extensive information about the interactions of chelants in the formation of Zn2+ coordination complexes and is an interesting platform for development of bioanalytical techniques and characterization of chelation-based therapeutics.

  • 49.
    Maleshlijski, S.
    et al.
    Ruhr University of Bochum, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Sendra, G. H.
    Ruhr University of Bochum, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Aldred, N.
    Newcastle University, England.
    Clare, A. S.
    Newcastle University, England.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Grunze, M.
    Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosenhahn, A.
    Ruhr University of Bochum, Germany; Karlsruhe Institute Technology, Germany; Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Imaging SPR combined with stereoscopic 3D tracking to study barnacle cyprid-surface interactions2016In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 643, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barnacle larvae (cyprids) explore surfaces to identify suitable settlement sites. This process is selective, and cyprids respond to numerous surface cues. To better understand the settlement process, it is desirable to simultaneously monitor both the surface exploration behavior and any close interactions with the surface. Stereoscopic 3D tracking of the cyprids provides quantitative access to surface exploration and pre-settlement rituals. Imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPR) reveals any interactions with the surfaces, such as surface inspection during bipedal walking and deposition of temporary adhesives. We report on a combination of both techniques to bring together information on swimming behavior in the vicinity of the interface and physical interactions of the cyprid with the surface. The technical requirements are described, and we applied the setup to cyprids of Balanus amphitrite. Initial data shows the applicability of the combined instrument to correlate exploration and touchdown events on surfaces with different chemical termination. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 50.
    Malysheva, Lyuba
    et al.
    Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03680, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Onipko, Alexander
    Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03680, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Fyrner, Timmy
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lee, Hung-Hsun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Valiokas, Ramūnas
    Department of Nanoengineering, Center for Physical Sciences and Engineering, Savanoriu 231, LT-02300 Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Spectroscopic Characterization and Modeling of Methyl- and Hydrogen-Terminated Oligo (ethylene glycol) Self-Assembled Monolayers2012In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 22, p. 12008-12016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two series of oligo (ethylene glycol) (OEG) thiol compounds HS-(CH2CH2O)nR with R = CH3, H and n = 5, 6, 7, have been synthesized and used to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold. The data from null ellipsometry, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and ab initio calculations of this type of OH- and CH3-terminated OEG SAMs are used to examine the rarely addressed in-SAM orientation of oligo (ethylene glycols) and to provide detailed assignments of infrared bands in the fingerprint and CH-stretching regions. Based on these results, a new spectral band has been observed at 2947 cm-1 and identified by the firstprinciple calculations as localized vibrations that are specific for hydrogen-terminated OEG thiolate SAMs. This band can be used as an indicator of a high crystalline like ordering. It is further more stressed that theory agrees with the experimentally obtained CH-stretching spectra remarkably well if, and only if, the OEG helix axis within studied SAMs is tilted by about 20o with respect to the surface normal.

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