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  • 1.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Validation of the burn intervention score in a National Burn Centre2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, no 5, p. 1159-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Linköping burn score has been used for two decades to calculate the cost to the hospital of each burned patient. Our aim was to validate the Burn Score in a dedicated Burn Centre by analysing the associations with burn-specific factors: percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA%), cause of injury, patients referred from other (non-specialist) centres, and survival, to find out which of these factors resulted in higher scores. Our second aim was to analyse the variation in scores of each category of care (surveillance, respiration, circulation, wound care, mobilisation, laboratory tests, infusions, and operation).

    We made a retrospective analysis of all burned patients admitted during the period 2000–15. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse predictive factors for an increased daily burn score, the cumulative burn score (the sum of the daily burn scores for each patient) and the total burn score (total sum of burn scores for the whole group throughout the study period) in addition to sub-analysis of the different categories of care that make up the burn score.

    We retrieved 22 301 daily recordings for inpatients. Mobilisation and care of the wound accounted for more than half of the total burn score during the study. Increased TBSA% and age over 45 years were associated with increased cumulative (model R2 0.43, p < 0.001) and daily (model R2 0.61, p < 0.001) burn scores. Patients who died had higher daily burn scores, while the cumulative burn score decreased with shorter duration of hospital stay (p < 0.001).

    To our knowledge this is the first long term analysis and validation of a system for scoring burn interventions in patients with burns that explores its association with the factors important for outcome. Calculations of costs are based on the score, and it provides an indicator of the nurses’ workload. It also gives important information about the different dimensions of the care provided from thorough investigation of the scores for each category.

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Division of overall duration of stay into operative stay and postoperative stay improves the overall estimate as a measure of quality of outcome in burn care.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and Methods: Surgically managed burn patients admitted between 2010-14 were included. Operative stay was defined as the time from admission until the last operation, postoperative stay as the time from the last operation until discharge. The difference in variation was analysed with F-test. A retrospective review of medical records was done to explore reasons for extended postoperative stay. Multivariable regression was used to assess factors associated with operative stay and postoperative stay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Operative stay/TBSA% showed less variation than total duration/TBSA% (F test = 2.38, pless than0.01). The size of the burn, and the number of operations, were the independent factors that influenced operative stay (R2 0.65). Except for the size of the burn other factors were associated with duration of postoperative stay: wound related, psychological and other medical causes, advanced medical support, and accommodation arrangements before discharge, of which the two last were the most important with an increase of (mean) 12 and 17 days (pless than0.001, R2 0.51).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Adjusted operative stay showed less variation than total hospital stay and thus can be considered a more accurate outcome measure for surgically managed burns. The size of burn and number of operations are the factors affecting this outcome measure.

  • 3.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. a Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Improvement in mortality at a National Burn Centre since 2000: Was it the result of increased resources?2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 25, article id e6727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The aim of this study was to find out whether the charging costs (calculated using interventional burn score) increased as mortality decreased. During the last 2 decades, mortality has declined significantly in the Linköping Burn Centre. The burn score that we use has been validated as a measure of workload and is used to calculate the charging costs of each burned patient. We compared the charging costs and mortality in 2 time periods (2000–2007 and 2008–2015). A total of 1363 admissions were included. We investigated the change in the burn score, as a surrogate for total costs per patient. Multivariable regression was used to analyze risk-adjusted mortality and burn score. The median total body surface area % (TBSA%) was 6.5% (10–90 centile 1.0–31.0), age 33 years (1.3–72.2), duration of stay/ TBSA% was 1.4 days (0.3–5.3), and 960 (70%) were males. Crude mortality declined from 7.5% in 2000–2007 to 3.4% in 2008–2015, whereas the cumulative burn score was not increased (P=.08). Regression analysis showed that risk-adjusted mortality decreased (odds ratio 0.42, P=.02), whereas the adjusted burn score did not change (P=.14, model R2 0.86). Mortality decreased but there was no increase in the daily use of resources as measured by the interventional burn score. The data suggest that the improvements in quality obtained have been achieved within present routines for care of patients (multidisciplinary/ orientated to patients’ safety).

    Abbreviation: TBSA% = total body surface area %.

  • 4.
    Abelius, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedenfalk, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pregnancy modulates the allergen-induced cytokine production differently in allergic and non-allergic women2017In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 818-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The immunological environment during pregnancy may differ between allergic and non-allergic women. This study investigates the effect of maternal allergy on the allergen-induced cytokine and chemokine levels and whether pregnancy modulates these immune responses differently in allergic and non-allergic women. Methods: The birch-, cat-, phytohemagglutinin- and tetanus toxoid-induced interferon-gamma(IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, the T-helper 1 (Th1)-associated chemokine CXCL10 and the Th2-associated chemokine CCL17 levels were quantified in 20 women with allergic symptoms (sensitized, n=13) and 36 women without allergic symptoms (non-sensitized, n=30) at gestational weeks 10-12, 15-16, 25, 35 and 2 and 12months post-partum. Results: Birch-, but not cat-induced, IL-5, IL-13 and CCL17 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the sensitized women with allergic symptoms. In contrast, cat-, but not birch-induced, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Furthermore, IFN-gamma secretion was increased in the first and decreased in the second and third trimesters in response to birch and decreased in the third trimester in response to cat as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Increased allergen-induced IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were associated with allergic symptoms and sensitization. Conclusions: Pregnancy had a clear effect on the allergen-induced IL-5, IL-13, CCL17, IFN-gamma and CXCL10 production, with distinct enhanced Th2-responses to birch in the allergic group and to cat in the non-allergic group.

  • 5.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Placental Immune Milieu is Characterized by a Th2- and Anti-Inflammatory Transcription Profile, Regardless of Maternal Allergy, and Associates with Neonatal Immunity2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 445-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: How maternal allergy affects the systemic and local immunological environment during pregnancy and the immune development of the offspring is unclear.

    METHOD OF STUDY: Expression of 40 genes was quantified by PCR arrays in placenta, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring.

    RESULTS: Placental gene expression was dominated by a Th2-/anti-inflammatory profile, irrespectively of maternal allergy, as compared to gene expression in PBMC. p35 expression in placenta correlated with fetal Tbx21 (ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001) and IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal galectin1 (ρ = 0.91, P < 0.001). Increased expression of Th2-associated CCL22 in CBMC preceded allergy development.

    CONCLUSIONS: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy was partly associated with the offspring's gene expression, possibly indicating that the immunological milieu is important for fetal immune development. Maternal allergy was not associated with an enhanced Th2 immunity in placenta or PBMC, while a marked prenatal Th2 skewing, shown as increased CCL22 mRNA expression, might contribute to postnatal allergy development.

  • 6.
    Abioye, Ajibola I.
    et al.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Park, Sangshin
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Ripp, Kelsey
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA.
    McDonald, Emily A.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Kurtis, Jonathan D.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Wu, Hannah
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Pond-Tor, Sunthorn
    Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Sharma, Surendra
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Women and Infants Hosp Rhode Isl, RI 02908 USA.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Baltazar, Palmera
    Res Inst Trop Med, Philippines; Remedios Trinidad Romualdez Hosp, Philippines.
    Acosta, Luz P.
    Res Inst Trop Med, Philippines.
    Olveda, Remigio M.
    Res Inst Trop Med, Philippines.
    Tallo, Veronica
    Res Inst Trop Med, Philippines.
    Friedman, Jennifer F.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Anemia of Inflammation during Human Pregnancy Does Not Affect Newborn Iron Endowment2018In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 148, no 3, p. 427-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To our knowledge, no studies have addressed whether maternal anemia of inflammation (AI) affects newborn iron status, and few have addressed risk factors for specific etiologies of maternal anemia. Objectives: The study aims were to evaluate 1) the contribution of AI and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) to newborn iron endowment, 2) hepcidin as a biomarker to distinguish AI from IDA among pregnant women, and 3) risk factors for specific etiologies of maternal anemia. Methods: We measured hematologic biomarkers in maternal blood at 12 and 32 wk of gestation and in cord blood from a randomized trial of praziquantel in 358 pregnant women with Schistosoma japonicum in The Philippines. IDA was defined as anemia with serum ferritin amp;lt; 30 ng/mL and non-IDA (NIDA), largely due to AI, as anemia with ferritin amp;gt;= 30 ng/mL. We identified cutoffs for biomarkers to distinguish IDA from NIDA by using area under the curve (AUC) analyses and examined the impact of different causes of anemia on newborn iron status (primary outcome) by using multivariate regression modeling. Results: Of the 358 mothers, 38% (n = 136) had IDA and 9% (n = 32) had NIDA at 32 wk of gestation. At 32 wk of gestation, serum hepcidin performed better than soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) in identifying women with NIDA compared with the rest of the cohort (AUCs: 0.75 and 0.70, respectively) and in identifying women with NIDA among women with anemia (0.73 and 0.72, respectively). The cutoff that optimally distinguished women with NIDA from women with IDA in our cohort was 6.1 mu g/L. Maternal IDA, but not NIDA, was associated with significantly lower newborn ferritin (114.4 ng/mL compared with 148.4 mu g/L; P = 0.042). Conclusions: Hepcidin performed better than sTfR in identifying pregnant women with NIDA, but its cost may limit its use. Maternal IDA, but not NIDA, is associated with decreased newborn iron stores, emphasizing the need to identify this cause and provide iron therapy.

  • 7.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. University of Toronto, Canada.
    You Wu, Richard
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gut microbiota and allergy: the importance of the pregnancy period2015In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 214-219Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limited microbial exposure is suggested to underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent countries, and bacterial diversity seems to be more important than specific bacteria taxa. Prospective studies indicate that the gut microbiota composition during the first months of life influences allergy development, and support the theory that factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system might be important for subsequent allergic disease. However, recent research indicates that microbial exposure during pregnancy may be even more important for the preventative effects against allergic disease. This review gives a background of the epidemiology, immunology, and microbiology literature in this field. It focuses on possible underlying mechanisms such as immune-regulated epigenetic imprinting and bacterial translocation during pregnancy, potentially providing the offspring with a pioneer microbiome. We suggest that a possible reason for the initial exposure of bacterial molecular patterns to the fetus in utero is to prime the immune system and/or the epithelium to respond appropriately to pathogens and commensals after birth.

  • 8.
    Ackerley, R
    et al.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / SDS Clinic, ESRS accredited Sleep Research Laboratory, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Badre, G
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / SDS Clinic, ESRS accredited Sleep Research Laboratory, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden / SDS Clinic, ESRS accredited Sleep Research Laboratory, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Positive Effects of a Weighted Blanket on Insomnia2015In: Journal of Sleep Medicine & Disorders, ISSN 2379-0822, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insomnia is a common occurrence and can have a negative impact on physiological, psychological and social well-being. There is a need for simple, effective solutions to increase sleep quality. It has been suggested that weighted blankets and vests can provide a beneficial calming effect, especially in clinical disorders. Hence, we aimed to investigate the effects of a chain weighted blanket on insomnia, using objective and subjective measures. Objectively, we found that sleep bout time increased, as well as a decrease in movements of the participants, during weighted blanket use. Subjectively, the participants liked sleeping with the blanket, found it easier to settle down to sleep and had an improved sleep, where they felt more refreshed in the morning. Overall, we found that when the participants used the weighted blanket, they had a calmer night’s sleep. A weighted blanket may aid in reducing insomnia through altered tactile inputs, thus may provide an innovative, non-pharmacological approach and complementary tool to improve sleep quality.

  • 9.
    Agebratt, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, p. e0147149-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern.

    Objectives

    To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans.

    Methods

    Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers.

    Results

    Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group.

    Conclusions

    Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including measurement of HFC by MRI.

  • 10.
    Agnafors, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Västra Götalandsregionen, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken.
    A Biopsychosocial and Long Term Perspective on Child Behavioral Problems: Impact of Risk and Resilience2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health has become a prominent issue in society. Yet, much remains unknown about the etiology of psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present thesis was to investigate the association between biological, psychological and social factors of risk and resilience and behavioral problems in a birth cohort of Swedish children. 1723 mothers and their children were followed from birth to the age of 12 as part of the South East Sweden Birth Cohort Study (the SESBiC study). Information was gathered through register data, standardized questionnaires and DNA samples.

    In study I, stability of maternal symptoms of depression and the impact on child behavior at age 12 were investigated. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was found to be 12.0 % postpartum. Symptoms of postpartum depression significantly increased the risk for subsequent depressive symptoms 12 years later in women. Children whose mothers reported concurrent symptoms of depression and anxiety had an increased risk for both internalizing and externalizing problems at age 12, but no long term effect on child behavior was seen for postpartum depressive symptoms. The greatest risk was seen for children whose mothers reported symptoms of depression on both occasions. In study II, the impact of gene-environment interaction of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met and experience of life events together with symptoms of maternal depression and anxiety on child behavior at age 12 was studied. A main effect of 5-HTTLPR was noticed, but no geneenvironment effects were shown. Similarly to study I, concurrent symptoms of maternal depression and anxiety were an important predictor of child behavioral problems. A high degree of psychosocial stress around childbirth was found to have long lasting detrimental effects on child behavior, increasing the risk for internalizing problems at age 12. Study III investigated the impact of geneenvironment interactions of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met and life events together with symptoms of maternal depression and birth characteristics on behavioral problems at age 3. Symptoms of postpartum depression were found to predict internalizing as well as externalizing problems in children three years later. Child experience of life events was a stable predictor of behavioral problems across the scales similar to sociodemographic factors such as parental immigration status and unemployment. No gene-environment interaction effects of 5-HTTLPR or BDNF Val66Met were shown. Study IV used the risk factors identified in studies I-III to investigate factors of resilience to behavioral problems at age 12. The l/l genotype of 5-HTTLPR was associated with a lower risk for behavioral problems at age 12, especially for children facing low adversity. Good social functioning was found to be a general resource factor, independent of the level of risk, while an easy temperament was associated with resilience for children with a high degree of adversity. However, effect sizes were small.

    In summary, the results from the present thesis emphasize the importance of maternal mental health and sociodemographic factors for child mental health at ages 3 and 12, which must be taken into account in clinical settings. Moreover, it adds to the null-findings of the gene-environment effect of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met on behavioral problems in children, but indicates a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms at age 12.

    List of papers
    1. Symptoms of Depression Postpartum and 12 years Later-Associations to Child Mental Health at 12 years of Age
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptoms of Depression Postpartum and 12 years Later-Associations to Child Mental Health at 12 years of Age
    2013 (English)In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, ISSN 1092-7875, E-ISSN 1573-6628, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Children of depressed mothers have been shown to express behaviour problems to a greater extent than children of non-depressed mothers. The purpose of this study was to examine the persistence of depressive symptoms in mothers and to evaluate the relative importance of symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) and concurrent maternal symptoms of depression, on child behaviour at age 12. A birth cohort of 1,707 children and their mothers was followed from 3 months after birth to 12 years after birth. Self-reported symptoms of depression in mothers were assessed at baseline and 12-year follow-up where 893 mothers (52.3 %) and their children participated. The mothers reports on the behaviour of their children at age 12 were used. Multivariate analysis was used to assess factors that increased the risk of child behaviour problems. At baseline, 10.4 % scored above the cutoff for symptoms of postpartum depression. At follow up, 18.2 % scored above the cutoff for depressive symptoms. Multivariate analysis showed that ongoing maternal symptoms of depression, as distinct from PPD-symptoms, was the strongest predictor of child behaviour problems at age 12. The gender of the child and socio-demographic factors at baseline were additional factors that affected the risk of behaviour problems in the 12 year old children. Children of mothers who reported symptoms of depression, both postpartum and at follow-up, were at a greater risk of behaviour problems compared to children of women with no depressive symptoms on either occasion. Our findings indicate that recurrent and ongoing maternal depressive symptoms significantly increase the risk of child behaviour problems as reported by mothers, while symptoms of PPD do not seem to result in an increased risk of behaviour problems in 12 year olds. High maternal socio-demographic life stress at childbirth constitutes an important risk factor for later child behaviour problems.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer Verlag (Germany), 2013
    Keywords
    CBCL, Children, Mental health, Postpartum depression, SESBiC-study
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90750 (URN)10.1007/s10995-012-0985-z (DOI)000316021200003 ()
    Available from: 2013-04-05 Created: 2013-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems - a longitudinal study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of gene, environment and maternal depressive symptoms on pre-adolescence behavior problems - a longitudinal study.
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, ISSN 1753-2000, E-ISSN 1753-2000, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 10-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common and disabling condition with a high relapse frequency. Maternal mental health problems and experience of traumatic life events are known to increase the risk of behavior problems in children. Recently, genetic factors, in particular gene-by-environment interaction models, have been implicated to explain depressive etiology. However, results are inconclusive.

    METHODS: Study participants were members of the SESBiC-study. A total of 889 mothers and their children were followed during the child's age of 3 months to 12 years. Information on maternal depressive symptoms was gathered postpartum and at a 12 year follow-up. Mothers reported on child behavior and traumatic life events experienced by the child at age 12. Saliva samples were obtained from children for analysis of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms.

    RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed a significant association between maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety, and internalizing problems in 12-year-old children (OR 5.72, 95% CI 3.30-9.91). Furthermore, carriers of two short alleles (s/s) of the 5-HTTLPR showed a more than 4-fold increased risk of internalizing problems at age 12 compared to l/l carriers (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.14-10.48). No gene-by-environment interaction was found and neither depressive symptoms postpartum or traumatic experiences during childhood stayed significant in the final model.

    CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent maternal symptoms of depression and anxiety are significant risk factors for behavior problems in children, which need to be taken into account in clinical practice. Furthermore, we found a main effect of 5-HTTLPR on internalizing symptoms in 12-year-old children, a finding that needs to be confirmed in future studies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2013
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104869 (URN)10.1186/1753-2000-7-10 (DOI)23518193 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-02-28 Created: 2014-02-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    3. Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The early environment is important for child development and wellbeing. Gene-by-environment studies investigating the impact of the serotonin transporter genelinked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms by life events on mental health and behaviour problems have been inconclusive. Methodological differences regarding sample sizes, study population, definitions of adversities and measures of mental health problems obstacle their comparability. Furthermore, very few studies included children. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between a broad range of risk factors covering pregnancy and birth, genetic polymorphism, experience of multiple life events and psychosocial environment, and child behaviour at age three, using a comparably large, representative, population-based sample.

    Methods: A total of 1,106 children, and their mothers, were followed from pregnancy to age three. Information on pregnancy and birth-related factors was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Questionnaires on depressive symptoms, child behaviour and child experiences of life events were filled in by the mothers. Child saliva samples were used for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between psychological scales and genetic polymorphisms.

    Results: Symptoms of postpartum depression increased the risk of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Experience of multiple life events was also a predictor of behavioural problems across the scales. No gene-by-environment or gene-bygene-by-environment interactions were found. Children of immigrants had an increased risk of internalizing problems and parental unemployment was significantly associated with both internalizing and externalizing type of problems.

    Conclusion: This study shows the importance of the psychosocial environment for psychosocial health in preschool children, and adds to  the literature of null-findings of gene-by-environment effects of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF in children

    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124207 (URN)10.1186/s12887-016-0614-x (DOI)000377535800002 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies:Funding was obtained from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (FAS), the Swedish Research Council (VR), the Clas Groschinsky Memorial Foundation, Stockholm, Samariten Foundation, Stockholm, the Hallsten Research Foundation and ALF, County Council of Ostergotland.

    Vid tiden för publicering förelåg publikationen endast som manuskript

    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    4. A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve
    Show others...
    2016 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience in the context of child behavior. Biological factors are seldom considered in psychosocial models of resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on behavior at preadolescence. Data from 889 children and their mothers were used. A cumulative adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and children’s experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament and social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. Results show that the l/l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was associated with lower internalizing scores, especially for children exposed to low adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilient outcomes for children exposed to high adversity. Child social functioning was found to be more of a general resource variable buffering risk in both high and low adversity groups. The results support a multiple level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors. The present findings call for both preventive actions and further studies on biopsychosocial models in resilience research.

    Keywords
    Child, genotype, longitudinal, mental health, resilience
    National Category
    Psychiatry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124208 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2016-01-22Bibliographically approved
  • 11.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience in the context of child behavior. Biological factors are seldom considered in psychosocial models of resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on behavior at preadolescence. Data from 889 children and their mothers were used. A cumulative adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and children’s experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament and social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. Results show that the l/l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was associated with lower internalizing scores, especially for children exposed to low adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilient outcomes for children exposed to high adversity. Child social functioning was found to be more of a general resource variable buffering risk in both high and low adversity groups. The results support a multiple level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors. The present findings call for both preventive actions and further studies on biopsychosocial models in resilience research.

  • 12.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects2016In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The early environment is important for child development and wellbeing. Gene-by-environment studies investigating the impact of the serotonin transporter genelinked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms by life events on mental health and behaviour problems have been inconclusive. Methodological differences regarding sample sizes, study population, definitions of adversities and measures of mental health problems obstacle their comparability. Furthermore, very few studies included children. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between a broad range of risk factors covering pregnancy and birth, genetic polymorphism, experience of multiple life events and psychosocial environment, and child behaviour at age three, using a comparably large, representative, population-based sample.

    Methods: A total of 1,106 children, and their mothers, were followed from pregnancy to age three. Information on pregnancy and birth-related factors was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Questionnaires on depressive symptoms, child behaviour and child experiences of life events were filled in by the mothers. Child saliva samples were used for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between psychological scales and genetic polymorphisms.

    Results: Symptoms of postpartum depression increased the risk of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Experience of multiple life events was also a predictor of behavioural problems across the scales. No gene-by-environment or gene-bygene-by-environment interactions were found. Children of immigrants had an increased risk of internalizing problems and parental unemployment was significantly associated with both internalizing and externalizing type of problems.

    Conclusion: This study shows the importance of the psychosocial environment for psychosocial health in preschool children, and adds to  the literature of null-findings of gene-by-environment effects of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF in children

  • 13.
    Ahlbeck, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Ahlberg, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyström Kronander, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Björkander, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Intralymphatic allergen immunotherapy against pollen allergy. A 3-year open follow-up study of 10 patients2018In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 626-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only treatment that affects the long-term development of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and induces clinical tolerance primarily by stimulating regulatory T (Treg) cells, attenuating T helper 2 (Th2) responses and synthesis of blocking antibodies1. Conventional AIT with subcutaneous injections, sublingual tablets or drops is effective, but consumes time and resources 2.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-09-13 10:35
  • 14.
    Ahlstrand, I.
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Pain and activity limitations in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared to 10 years ago: the Swedish TIRA project2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 259-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study differences regarding pain and activity limitations during the 3 years following diagnosis in women and men with contemporary treated early RA compared with their counterparts who were diagnosed 10 years earlier. Method: This study was based on patients recruited to the Early Intervention in RA (TIRA) project. In the first cohort (TIRA-1) 320 patients were included in time for diagnosis during 1996-1998 and 463 patients were included in the second cohort (TIRA-2) during 2006-2009. Disease activity, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), bodily pain (BP) in the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), activity limitations (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and medication were reported at inclusion and at follow-up after 1, 2, and 3 years. Results: Disease activity, pain, and activity limitations were pronounced at inclusion across both genders and in both cohorts, with some improvement observed during the first year after diagnosis. Disease activity did not differ between cohorts at inclusion but was significantly lower at the follow-ups in the TIRA-2 cohort, in which the patients were prescribed traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents more frequently. In TIRA-2, patients reported significantly lower pain and activity limitations at all follow-ups, with men reporting lower pain than women. Women reported significantly higher activity limitations at all time points in TIRA-2. Conclusions: Pain and activity limitations were still pronounced in the contemporary treated early RA cohort compared with their counterparts diagnosed 10 years earlier and both of these factors need to be addressed in clinical settings.

  • 15.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Pain and difficulties performing valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2015In: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 0770-3198, E-ISSN 1434-9949, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 1353-1362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to examine the difficulties with performing valued life activities in relation to pain intensity in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In total, 737 persons with RA (73 % women) from three rheumatology units in Sweden responded to a questionnaire measuring performance of 33 valued life activities and self-rated pain. The relationships between performance of valued life activities (VLAs) and pain (measured by visual analogue scale (VAS)) were analysed based on gender. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted with the total VLA score as dependent variable. Women reported more pain and difficulties in performing valued life activities than men. Across genders, 85 % reported at least one valued life activity affected by RA. Significantly more women than men encountered difficulties in performing some activities such as cooking, gardening and meeting new people. Women reported higher pain intensity (35 mm) than men (31 mm). Almost all 33 difficulty ratings for valued life activities were higher among persons with high pain (greater than 40 mm) than persons with lower pain. Difficulty ratings for valued life activities correlated positively with pain in persons with lower pain, but not among those with high pain. The results highlight the importance of addressing pain, especially among women with RA, as they reported pain to impact on their valued life activities. Interestingly, this was evident also in women with lower levels of pain.

  • 16.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Vaz, Sharmila
    School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, CHIRI, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Self-efficacy and pain acceptance as mediators of the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in women and men with rheumatoid arthritis2017In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 824-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether personal factors (self-efficacy and pain acceptance) mediate the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis.

    METHODS: Persons with rheumatoid arthritis for at least four years (n = 737; 73% women) answered a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy, pain acceptance, performance of valued life activities, and self-rated pain. Relationships among these constructs were explored using univariate and multivariate analyses. Structural equation modelling was then used to examine the mediational role of personal factors on the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities.

    RESULTS: A direct negative association between pain and performance of valued life activities was identified (Beta = .34, P < .001). This suggests that people with rheumatoid arthritis who had higher levels of pain has increased difficulties in performing valued life activities. Self-efficacy and activity engagement component of pain acceptance mediated the relationship between pain and performance of valued life activities, however the pain willingness component of pain acceptance did not influence participation in valued life activities.

    CONCLUSION: These findings highlight the importance of considering personal factors, such as pain acceptance and self-efficacy, in facilitating participation in valued life activities.

  • 17.
    Ahn, Song-Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpiläinen, Sanna
    University of Gothenburg.
    Theodorsson, Annette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning in Technology-Enhanced Medical Simulation:Locations and Knowings2015In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study focuses on how knowings and learning take place in full-scale simulation training of medical and nursing students, by drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT). ANT situates materiality as a part of the social practic-es. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the relation between material assemblages and human actors being performed into being in particular locations. Data consists of observations of simulations performed by ten groups of students. The analysis focuses on the emerging knowings in the socio-material—arrangements of three locations involved in the simulation—the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room. The findings indicate that medical knowing, affective knowing and communicative knowing are produced in different ways in the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle.

  • 18.
    Aho, Nikolas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Victimization, Prevalence, Health and Peritraumatic Reactions in Swedish Adolescents2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to expand the knowledge of victimization in children and youth in Sweden. Victimization, prevalence, health and peritraumatic reactions were explored in a cross sectional, representative sample of 5,960 second grade high school students in Sweden. A computerized survey was developed and administered in class room setting.

    Lifetime victimization was found in 84.1% of the sample (m=83.0%, f=85.2%), and, in relation to the five domains, 66.4% had experienced conventional crime, 24% child maltreatment, 54.4% peer and sibling victimization, 21.8% sexual victimization, and 54% had experienced witness victimization. Females experienced significantly more child maltreatment, peer and sibling victimization, sexual victimization, and witnessed victimization, males more conventional crime (p<0.001). Using logistic regression risk factors for victimization were confirmed by a significant increase OR regarding gender, environment and lack of both parents.

    Symptoms (TSCC), were clearly associated with both victimizations per se and the number of victimizations. The results indicated a relatively linear increase in symptoms with an increase in number of events experienced. Mental health of the polyvictimized group was significantly worse than that of the non-polyvictimized group, with significantly elevated TSCC scores (t<0.001). Hierarchical regression analysis resulted in beta value reduction when polyvictimization was introduced supporting the independent effect on symptoms. Social anxiety was found in 10.2 % (n = 605) of the total group (n = 5,960). A significant gender difference emerged, with more females than males reporting social anxiety. Elevated PTSS was found in 14.8 % (n=883). Binary logistic regression revealed the highest OR for having had contact with child and adolescent psychiatry was found for the combined group with social anxiety and elevated PTSS (OR = 4.88, 95 % CI = 3.53–6.73, p<001). Significant associations were also found between use of child and adolescent psychiatry and female gender (OR = 2.05, 95 % CI = 1.70–2.45), Swedish birth origin (OR = 1.68, 95 % CI = 1.16–2.42) and living in a small municipality (OR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.02–1.73).

    Mediation models used peritraumatic reactions (PT): total, physiological arousal (PA), peritraumatic dissociation (PD), and intervention thoughts (IT) and JVQ and TSCC. Of the n=5,332 cases, a total of n=4,483 (84.1%) reported at least one victimizing event (m = 83.0%, f = 85.2%). Of these, 74.9% (n=3,360) also experienced a PT reaction of some kind. The effect mediated by PT tot was b= 0.479, BCa CI [0.342 – 0.640], representing a relatively small effect of 7.6%, κ2=0.076, 95% BCa CI [0.054- 0.101]. The mediating effect of JVQ on TSCC was mediated by PD more for males (b=0.394 BCa CI [0.170-0.636]) than for females (b=0.247, BCa CI [0.021-0.469]). The indirect effect of the JVQ on the TSCC tot mediated by the different PT reactions was significant for PD (b=0.355, BCa CI [0.199- 0.523]. In males a mediating effect of PD could be seen in the different models, while females had a more mixed result. IT did not show any indirect effect in males, but had a mixed effect for females.

    The empirical findings in this thesis lead to the conclusion that victimization is highly prevalent in children and youth and is related to health issues. The association of victimization on symptoms was mediated by peritraumatic reactions. Using a comprehensive instrument such as the JVQ provides the researcher or clinician the opportunity to acquire more complete measurement and also makes it possible to identify polyvictimization, a high-level category of events with severe impact on health.  

    List of papers
    1. The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 620-651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the extent to which children are exposed to victimizing events is important to fully understand the effect of such exposure in shaping them as adults. The aim of this study was to use self-report by adolescents to measure the prevalence of victimizing events and of poly-victimization. A representative sample of 5,960 students (aged 17) from high schools in Sweden was given the self-administrated version of the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) along with questions concerning gender, birthplace, parents birthplace and employment, residence, educational program, and municipality size. The results show that 84.1% (83.0% young men and 85.2% young women) of the students had experienced victimization during their lifetime, and 10.3% were categorized as poly-victims (8.1% young men and 12.5% young women; OR = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.35, 1.94]). Adolescents living with both parents were at lower risk of any form of victimization for both genders, while females were at higher risk of maltreatment, peer victimization, and, most significantly, sexual victimization. In conclusion, the vast majority of young people have been victimized during their lifetime. A greater awareness of the impact of these victimizing events on children and adolescents is important as a basis for providing a safer milieu and establishing better interventions, especially for those that have been victimized on multiple occasions. The high-exposure group was determined by using 10 events as a cutoff. Findings on this group corresponded with findings in other international studies regarding distribution, elevated risk for females, and the possibility of limiting the effects of victimization by modifying living conditions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2016
    Keywords
    JVQ; victim; youth; poly-victimization; sociodemographics
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124456 (URN)10.1177/0886260514556105 (DOI)000367838200004 ()25392393 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority in Sweden; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2018-02-21
    2. Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents
    2016 (English)In: Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, ISSN 1179-318X, Vol. 7, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this article was to study the relationship between the different areas of victimization (eg, sexual victimization) and psychological symptoms, taking into account the full range of victimization domains. The final aim was to contribute further evidence regarding the bias that studies that focus on just one area of victimization may be introduced into our psychological knowledge. The sample included 5,960 second-year high school students in Sweden with a mean age of 17.3 years (range =16–20 years, standard deviation =0.652), of which 49.6% were females and 50.4% males. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children were used to assess victimization and psychological problems separately. The results show that a majority of adolescents have been victimized, females reported more total events and more sexual victimization and childhood maltreatment, and males were more often victims of conventional crime. The majority of victimization domains as well as the sheer number of events (polyvictimization [PV]) proved to be harmful to adolescent health, affecting females more than males. PV explained part of the health effect and had an impact on its own and in relation to each domain. This suggests the possibility that PV to a large degree explains trauma symptoms. In order to understand the psychological effects of trauma, clinicians and researchers should take into account the whole range of possible types of victimization.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dovepress, 2016
    Keywords
    victimization, childhood trauma, psychological symptoms, JVQ, TSCC
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132626 (URN)10.2147/AHMT.S109587 (DOI)27616895 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
    3. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recent findings from studies on adults show similarities between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and posttraumatic stress in the form of recurrent memories and intrusive and distressing images of earlier aversive events. Further, treatment models for SAD in adults have been successfully developed by using transdiagnostic knowledge on posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Studies on adolescents are though missing. The present study aimed at exploring the association between PTSS and SAD in Swedish adolescents. A second aim was to study mental health services utilization in relation to these conditions. A total of 5,960 high-school students participated and reported on SAD, life time victimization, PTSS and mental health service utilization. Socially anxious adolescents reported significantly higher levels of PTSS than adolescents not reporting SAD and this difference was seen in victimized as well as non-victimized subjects. Contact with a school counselor was the most common mental health service utilization in subjects with SAD and those with elevated PTSS. In the prediction of contact with a CAP-clinic, significant odds ratios were found for a condition of SAD and elevated PTSS (OR = 4.88, 95 % CI = 3.53–6.73) but not for SAD only. Screening of PTSS in adolescents with SAD is recommended. The service of school counselors is important in detecting and helping young people with SAD and elevated PTSS. Clinical studies on SAD and PTSS in adolescents could aid in modifying treatment models for SAD.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2013
    Keywords
    Social anxiety disorder, victimization, mental health service utilization, adolescents
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89939 (URN)10.1007/s00787-012-0336-z (DOI)000315736200005 ()
    Available from: 2013-03-11 Created: 2013-03-11 Last updated: 2018-02-21
  • 19.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gren Landell, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey2016In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 620-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the extent to which children are exposed to victimizing events is important to fully understand the effect of such exposure in shaping them as adults. The aim of this study was to use self-report by adolescents to measure the prevalence of victimizing events and of poly-victimization. A representative sample of 5,960 students (aged 17) from high schools in Sweden was given the self-administrated version of the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) along with questions concerning gender, birthplace, parents birthplace and employment, residence, educational program, and municipality size. The results show that 84.1% (83.0% young men and 85.2% young women) of the students had experienced victimization during their lifetime, and 10.3% were categorized as poly-victims (8.1% young men and 12.5% young women; OR = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.35, 1.94]). Adolescents living with both parents were at lower risk of any form of victimization for both genders, while females were at higher risk of maltreatment, peer victimization, and, most significantly, sexual victimization. In conclusion, the vast majority of young people have been victimized during their lifetime. A greater awareness of the impact of these victimizing events on children and adolescents is important as a basis for providing a safer milieu and establishing better interventions, especially for those that have been victimized on multiple occasions. The high-exposure group was determined by using 10 events as a cutoff. Findings on this group corresponded with findings in other international studies regarding distribution, elevated risk for females, and the possibility of limiting the effects of victimization by modifying living conditions.

  • 20.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Victimization, polyvictimization , and health in Swedish adolescents2016In: Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, ISSN 1179-318X, Vol. 7, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this article was to study the relationship between the different areas of victimization (eg, sexual victimization) and psychological symptoms, taking into account the full range of victimization domains. The final aim was to contribute further evidence regarding the bias that studies that focus on just one area of victimization may be introduced into our psychological knowledge. The sample included 5,960 second-year high school students in Sweden with a mean age of 17.3 years (range =16–20 years, standard deviation =0.652), of which 49.6% were females and 50.4% males. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children were used to assess victimization and psychological problems separately. The results show that a majority of adolescents have been victimized, females reported more total events and more sexual victimization and childhood maltreatment, and males were more often victims of conventional crime. The majority of victimization domains as well as the sheer number of events (polyvictimization [PV]) proved to be harmful to adolescent health, affecting females more than males. PV explained part of the health effect and had an impact on its own and in relation to each domain. This suggests the possibility that PV to a large degree explains trauma symptoms. In order to understand the psychological effects of trauma, clinicians and researchers should take into account the whole range of possible types of victimization.

  • 21.
    Akeroyd, Michael A.
    et al.
    MRC, England.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bentler, Ruth A.
    University of Iowa, IA 52242 USA.
    Boothroyd, Arthur
    San Diego State University, CA 92182 USA.
    Dillier, Norbert
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Dreschler, Wouter A.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Gagne, Jean-Pierre
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, England.
    Wouters, Jan
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Wong, Lena
    University of Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Kollmeier, Birger
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany; Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany; HorTechnical gGmbH, Germany.
    International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA) recommendations for the construction of multilingual speech tests ICRA Working Group on Multilingual Speech Tests2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, p. 17-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To provide guidelines for the development of two types of closed-set speech-perception tests that can be applied and interpreted in the same way across languages. The guidelines cover the digit triplet and the matrix sentence tests that are most commonly used to test speech recognition in noise. They were developed by a working group on Multilingual Speech Tests of the International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA). Design: The recommendations are based on reviews of existing evaluations of the digit triplet and matrix tests as well as on the research experience of members of the ICRA Working Group. They represent the results of a consensus process. Results: The resulting recommendations deal with: Test design and word selection; Talker characteristics; Audio recording and stimulus preparation; Masking noise; Test administration; and Test validation. Conclusions: By following these guidelines for the development of any new test of this kind, clinicians and researchers working in any language will be able to perform tests whose results can be compared and combined in cross-language studies.

  • 22.
    Albrecht, Inka
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wick, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Asa
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Tjarnlund, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nagaraju, Kanneboyina
    Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Andrade, Felipe
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA.
    Thompson, Kathryn
    Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Coley, William
    Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Phadke, Aditi
    Childrens National Medical Centre, DC 20010 USA.
    Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bottai, Matteo
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nennesmo, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Chemin, Karine
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Herrath, Jessica
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johansson, Karin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wikberg, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jimmy Ytterberg, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Zubarev, Roman A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Krystufkova, Olga
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Vencovsky, Jiri
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Landegren, Nils
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Padyukov, Leonid
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kampe, Olle
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Ingrid E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Development of autoantibodies against muscle-specific FHL1 in severe inflammatory myopathies2015In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 125, no 12, p. 4612-4624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations of the gene encoding four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) are the causative factor of several X-linked hereditary myopathies that are collectively termed FHL1-related myopathies. These disorders are characterized by severe muscle dysfunction and damage. Here, we have shown that patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) develop autoimmunity to FHL1, which is a muscle-specific protein. Anti-FHL1 autoantibodies were detected in 25% of IIM patients, while patients with other autoimmune diseases or muscular dystrophies were largely anti-FHL1 negative. Anti-FHL1 reactivity was predictive for muscle atrophy, dysphagia, pronounced muscle fiber damage, and vasculitis. FHL1 showed an altered expression pattern, with focal accumulation in the muscle fibers of autoantibody-positive patients compared with a homogeneous expression in anti-FHL1-negative patients and healthy controls. We determined that FHL1 is a target of the cytotoxic protease granzyme B, indicating that the generation of FHL1 fragments may initiate FHL1 autoimmunity. Moreover, immunization of myositis-prone mice with FHL1 aggravated muscle weakness and increased mortality, suggesting a direct link between anti-FHL1 responses and muscle damage. Together, our findings provide evidence that FHL1 may be involved in the pathogenesis not only of genetic FHL1-related myopathies but also of autoimmune IIM. Importantly, these results indicate that anti-FHL1 autoantibodies in peripheral blood have promising potential as a biomarker to identify a subset of severe IIM.

  • 23.
    Al-Chalabi, Ammar
    et al.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Chandran, Siddharthan
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Chio, Adriano
    University of Torino, Italy.
    Corcia, Philippe
    CHU Tours, France.
    Couratier, Philippe
    CHU Limoges, France.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    de Carvalho, Mamede
    University of Lisbon, Portugal; H Santa Maria CHLN, Portugal.
    Desnuelle, Claude
    CHU Nice, France.
    Grehl, Torsten
    Alfried Krupp Hospital, Germany.
    Grosskreutz, Julian
    Jena University Hospital, Germany.
    Holmoy, Trygve
    Kershus University of Lorenskog, Norway.
    Ingre, Caroline
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karlsborg, Merete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Kleveland, Grethe
    Sykehuset Innlandet, Norway.
    Christoph Koch, Jan
    University of Medical Gottingen, Germany.
    Koritnik, Blaz
    University of Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    KuzmaKozakiewicz, Magdalena
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Laaksovirta, Hannu
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ludolph, Albert
    University of Ulm, Germany.
    McDermott, Christopher
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Meyer, Thomas
    University of Medical Berlin, Germany.
    Mitre Ropero, Bernardo
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Mora Pardina, Jesus
    Hospital San Rafael, Spain.
    Nygren, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Petri, Susanne
    Hannover Medical Sch, Germany.
    Povedano Panades, Monica
    University of Bellvitge, Spain.
    Salachas, Francois
    Hop Salptriere, France.
    Shaw, Pamela
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Silani, Vincenzo
    University of Milan, Italy; University of Milan, Italy.
    Staaf, Gert
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Svenstrup, Kirsten
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Talbot, Kevin
    University of Oxford, England.
    Tysnes, Ole-Bjorn
    Haukeland University of Sjukehus, Norway.
    Van Damme, Philip
    University of Leuven, Belgium; VIB Centre Brain and Disease Research, Belgium; University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.
    van der Kooi, Anneke
    University of Amsterdam Centre, Netherlands.
    Weber, Markus
    Kantonssp St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Weydt, Patrick
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Wolf, Joachim
    Diakonissen Hospital, Germany.
    Hardiman, Orla
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    van den Berg, Leonard H.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    July 2017 ENCALS statement on edaravone2017In: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration, ISSN 2167-8421, E-ISSN 2167-9223, Vol. 18, no 7-8, p. 471-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 24.
    Ali, Neserin
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ljunggren, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wierzbicka, Aneta
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Pagels, Joakim
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Isaxon, Christina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Jorn
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lindh, Christian H.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Karedal, Monica
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Comprehensive proteome analysis of nasal lavage samples after controlled exposure to welding nanoparticles shows an induced acute phase and a nuclear receptor, LXR/RXR, activation that influence the status of the extracellular matrix2018In: Clinical Proteomics, ISSN 1542-6416, E-ISSN 1559-0275, Vol. 15, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological studies have shown that many welders experience respiratory symptoms. During the welding process a large number of airborne nanosized particles are generated, which might be inhaled and deposited in the respiratory tract. Knowledge of the underlying mechanisms behind observed symptoms is still partly lacking, although inflammation is suggested to play a central role. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of welding fume particle exposure on the proteome expression level in welders suffering from respiratory symptoms, and changes in protein mediators in nasal lavage samples were analyzed. Such mediators will be helpful to clarify the pathomechanisms behind welding fume particle-induced effects. Methods: In an exposure chamber, 11 welders with work-related symptoms in the lower airways during the last month were exposed to mild-steel welding fume particles (1 mg/m(3)) and to filtered air, respectively, in a double-blind manner. Nasal lavage samples were collected before, immediately after, and the day after exposure. The proteins in the nasal lavage were analyzed with two different mass spectrometry approaches, label-free discovery shotgun LC-MS/MS and a targeted selected reaction monitoring LC-MS/MS analyzing 130 proteins and four in vivo peptide degradation products. Results: The analysis revealed 30 significantly changed proteins that were associated with two main pathways; activation of acute phase response signaling and activation of LXR/RXR, which is a nuclear receptor family involved in lipid signaling. Connective tissue proteins and proteins controlling the degradation of such tissues, including two different matrix metalloprotease proteins, MMP8 and MMP9, were among the significantly changed enzymes and were identified as important key players in the pathways. Conclusion: Exposure to mild-steel welding fume particles causes measurable changes on the proteome level in nasal lavage matrix in exposed welders, although no clinical symptoms were manifested. The results suggested that the exposure causes an immediate effect on the proteome level involving acute phase proteins and mediators regulating lipid signaling Proteases involved in maintaining the balance between the formation and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins are important key proteins in the induced effects.

  • 25.
    Ali, Neserin
    et al.
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Karin
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rissler, Jenny
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen Marg
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Svensson, Christian R
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Anders
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomic and Aerosol Technology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindh, Christian H
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Bo A G
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Cedervall, Tommy
    Center for Molecular Protein Science, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kåredal, Monica
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Analysis of nanoparticle-protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins.2016In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welding fumes include agglomerated particles built up of primary nanoparticles. Particles inhaled through the nose will to some extent be deposited in the protein-rich nasal mucosa, and a protein corona will be formed around the particles. The aim was to identify the protein corona formed between nasal lavage proteins and four types of particles with different parameters. Two of the particles were formed and collected during welding and two were manufactured iron oxides. When nasal lavage proteins were added to the particles, differences were observed in the sizes of the aggregates that were formed. Measurements showed that the amount of protein bound to particles correlated with the relative size increase of the aggregates, suggesting that the surface area was associated with the binding capacity. However, differences in aggregate sizes were detected when nasal proteins were added to UFWF and Fe2O3 particles (having similar agglomerated size) suggesting that yet parameters other than size determine the binding. Relative quantitative mass spectrometric and gel-based analyses showed differences in the protein content of the coronas. High-affinity proteins were further assessed for network interactions. Additional experiments showed that the inhibitory function of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, a highly abundant nasal protein, was influenced by particle binding suggesting that an understanding of protein function following particle binding is necessary to properly evaluate pathophysiological events. Our results underscore the importance of including particles collected from real working environments when studying the toxic effects of particles because these effects might be mediated by the protein corona.

  • 26.
    Alickovic, Emina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, 20 Rortangvej, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Gustafsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Automatic Control. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A System Identification Approach to Determining Listening Attention from EEG Signals2016In: 2016 24TH EUROPEAN SIGNAL PROCESSING CONFERENCE (EUSIPCO), IEEE , 2016, p. 31-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We still have very little knowledge about how ourbrains decouple different sound sources, which is known assolving the cocktail party problem. Several approaches; includingERP, time-frequency analysis and, more recently, regression andstimulus reconstruction approaches; have been suggested forsolving this problem. In this work, we study the problem ofcorrelating of EEG signals to different sets of sound sources withthe goal of identifying the single source to which the listener isattending. Here, we propose a method for finding the number ofparameters needed in a regression model to avoid overlearning,which is necessary for determining the attended sound sourcewith high confidence in order to solve the cocktail party problem.

  • 27.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Skoog, Susann
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.2015In: BMC urology, ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

    METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

    RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

  • 28.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    M2-macrophage infiltration and macrophage traits of tumor cells in urinary bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 4, article id 159.e19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) constitute a subset of nonneoplastic cells in tumor stroma and influence cancer progression in solid tumors. The clinical significance of TAMs in urinary bladder cancer(UBC) is controversial.

    Methods

    We prospectively studied 103 patients with stage pT1–T4 UBC treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Tumor sections were immunostained with M2-specific macrophage marker CD163 and proliferation marker Ki-67. The expression of these markers in cancer cells as well as macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma was analyzed in relation to clinical data and outcome.

    Results

    The mean rate of CD163 and Ki-67 expressed by cancer cells were 35% and 78%, respectively. With borderline significance, MI was associated with lower rate of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.06). CD163 expression in cancer cells was proportional to MI (P<0.014). Patients with CD163-positive tumors and strong MI had significantly longer cancer-specific survival (CSS) (76 months), compared to patient with CD163-positive tumors and weak MI (28 months) (P = 0.02).

    Conclusions

    M2-specific MI tends to be inversely correlated with LN metastasis and improved CSS in UBC. MI might have protective impact in CD163-positive tumors. Expression of CD163 in cancer cells is significantly correlated with MI and might have a tumor promoting impact.

  • 29.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna Stockholm, Sweden .
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.2017In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the possibility of detecting sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) in patients with urinary bladder cancer (BCa) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified SNs reflected that of the lymphatic field.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 103 patients with BCa pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq and blue dye were injected into the bladder wall around the primary tumour before surgery. SNs were detected ex vivo during the operation with a handheld Geiger probe (Gamma Detection System; Neoprobe Corp., Dublin, OH, USA). All LNs were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. An experienced uropathologist evaluated the slides.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean (range) number of 31 (7-68) nodes per patient were examined, totalling 3 253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 patients (40%). SNs were detected in 83 of the 103 patients (80%). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SN biopsy (SNB) varied between LN stations, with average values of 67% and 90%, respectively. LN metastatic density (LNMD) had a significant prognostic impact; a value of ≥8% was significantly related to shorter survival. Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) occurred in 65% of patients (n = 67) and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that SNB is not a reliable technique for peri-operative localization of LN metastases during cystectomy for BCa; however, LNMD has a significant prognostic value in BCa and may be useful in the clinical context and in BCa oncological and surgical research. LVI was also found to be a prognostic factor.

  • 30.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Identification of candidate genes involved in Mercury Toxicokinetics and Mercury Induced Autoimmunity2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Autoimmune diseases require the involvement and activation of immune cells and occur when the body builds up an immune response against its own tissues. This process takes place due to the inability to distinguish self-antigen from foreign antigen. Systemic autoimmunity represents an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. The mechanisms triggering autoimmune responses are complex and involve a network of genetic factors. Genome wide association study (GWAS) is a powerful method, used to identify genetic risk factors in numerous diseases, such as systemic autoimmune diseases. The goal of GWAS is to identify these genetic risk factors in order to make predictions about who is at risk and investigate the biological process of disease susceptibility. There are several valuable mouse models to investigate the underlying mechanisms causing systemic autoimmune diseases in which mercury induced autoimmunity (HgIA) is a well- established and relevant model. HgIA in mice includes development of autoantibodies, immune complex glomerulonephritis, lymphocyte proliferation, hypergammaglobulinemia and polyclonal B cell activation. In humans, mercury exposure accumulates with considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Toxicokinetics of Hg has been studied extensively but the key for inter-individual variation in humans are largely unclear. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic inter-strain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg.

    OBJECTIVES: To find loci and candidate genes associated with phenotypes involved in the development of autoimmunity and find candidate genes involved in the regulation of renal Hg excretion.

    METHODS: MHC II (H-2s) mice were paired (A.SW x B10.S) to obtain F2 offspring exposed to 2.0 or 4.0 mg Hg in drinking water for 6 weeks. Mercury induced autoimmune phenotypes were studied with immunofluorescence (anti-nucleolar antibodies (ANoA)), ELISA anti-DNP/anti-ssDNA (polyclonal B cell activation), anti-chromatin antibodies (ACA) (4.0 mg Hg), and serum IgG1 concentrations. Mercury accumulation in kidney was performed previously and data was included as phenotype. F2 mice exposed to 2.0 mg Hg were genotyped with microsatellites for genome-wide scan with Ion Pair Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (IP RP HPLC). F2 mice exposed to 4.0 mg Hg were genotyped with single nucleotide polymorphisms for genomewide scan with SNP&SEQ technology platform. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) was established with R/QTL. Denaturing HPLC, next generation sequencing, conserved region analysis and genetic mouse strain comparison were used for haplotyping and fine mapping on QTLs associated with Hg concentration in kidney, development of ANoA and serum IgG1 hypergammaglobulinemia. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Bank1 and Nfkb1) verified by additional QTL were further investigated by real time polymerase chain reaction. Genes involved in the intracellular signaling together with candidate genes were included for gene expression analysis.

    RESULTS: F2 mice exposed to 2.0 mg Hg had low or no development of autoantibodies and showed no significant difference in polyclonal B cell activation in the B10.S and F2 strains. F2 mice exposed to 4.0 mg Hg developed autoantibodies and significantly increased IgG1 concentration and polyclonal B cell activation (anti-DNP). QTL analysis showed a logarithm of odds ratio (LOD) score between 2.9 – 4.36 on all serological phenotypes exposed to 4.0 mg Hg, and a LOD score of 5.78 on renal Hg concentration. Haplotyping and fine mapping associated the development of ANoA with Bank1 (B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) and Nfkb1 (nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1). The serum IgG1 concentration was associated with a locus on chromosome 3, in which Rxfp4 (Relaxin Family Peptide/INSL5 Receptor 4) is a potential candidate gene. The renal Hg concentration was associated with Pprc1 (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma, Co-activator-Related). Gene expression analysis revealed that the more susceptible A.SW strain expresses significantly higher levels of Nfkb1, Il6 and Tnf than the less susceptible B10.S strain. The A.SW strain expresses significantly lower levels of Pprc1 and cascade proteins than the B10.S strain. Development of ACA was associated with chromosomes 3, 6, 7 and 16 (LOD 3.1, 3.2, 3.4 and 6.8 respectively). Polyclonal B cell activation was associated with chromosome 2 with a LOD score of 2.9.

    CONCLUSIONS: By implementing a GWAS on HgIA in mice, several QTLs were discovered to be associated with the development of autoantibodies, polyclonal B cell activation and hypergammaglobulinemia. This thesis plausibly supports Bank1 and Nfkb1 as key regulators for ANoA development and HgIA seems to be initiated by B cells rather than T cells. GWAS on renal mercury excretion plausibly supports Pprc1 as key regulator and it seems that this gene has a protective role against Hg.

    List of papers
    1. Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 124, no 7, p. 920-926Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Following human mercury (Hg) exposure, the metal accumulates in considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Although the toxicokinetics of Hg have been studied extensively, factors responsible for interindividual variation in humans are largely unknown. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic interstrain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg. A. SW, DBA/2 and BALB/C mouse strains accumulate higher amounts of Hg than B10.S.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to find candidate genes associated with regulation of renal Hg concentrations.

    METHODS: A. SW, B10.S and their F1 and F2 offspring were exposed for 6 weeks to 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water. Genotyping with microsatellites was conducted on 84 F2 mice for genome-wide scanning with ion pair reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP RP HPLC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were established. Denaturing HPLC was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for haplotyping and fine mapping in 184 and 32 F2 mice, respectively. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Btrc and Nfkb2) verified by fine mapping and QTL were further investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genes enhanced by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) were included for gene expression analysis.

    RESULTS: Renal Hg concentrations differed significantly between A. SW and B10. S mice and between males and females within each strain. QTL analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio score 5.78 on chromosome 19 (p = 0.002). Haplotype and fine mapping associated the Hg accumulation with Pprc1, which encodes PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), a coactivator for proteins involved in detoxification. Pprc1 and two genes coactivated by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) had significantly lower gene expression in the A. SW strain than in the B10. S strain.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study supports Pprc1 as a key regulator for renal Hg excretion.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services * National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 2016
    National Category
    Other Biological Topics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131584 (URN)10.1289/ehp.1409284 (DOI)000380749300012 ()26942574 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council Branch of Medicine; County Council of Ostergotland; Linkoping University

    Available from: 2016-09-27 Created: 2016-09-27 Last updated: 2018-10-24Bibliographically approved
    2. Bank1 and NF-kappaB as key regulators in anti-nucleolar antibody development
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bank1 and NF-kappaB as key regulators in anti-nucleolar antibody development
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0199979Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune rheumatic disorders (SARD) represent important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans. The mechanisms triggering autoimmune responses are complex and involve a network of genetic factors. Mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) in mice is an established model to study the mechanisms of the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which is a hallmark in the diagnosis of SARD. A.SW mice with HgIA show a significantly higher titer of antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) than the B10.S mice, although both share the same MHC class II (H-2). We applied a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to their Hg-exposed F2 offspring to investigate the non-MHC genes involved in the development of ANoA. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio (LOD) score of 3.05 on chromosome 3. Microsatellites were used for haplotyping, and fine mapping was conducted with next generation sequencing. The candidate genes Bank1 (B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) and Nfkbl (nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1) were identified by additional QTL analysis. Expression of the Bank1 and Nfkb1 genes and their downstream target genes involved in the intracellular pathway (Tlr9,II6, Tnf) was investigated in mercury-exposed A.SW and B10.S mice by real-time PCR. Bank1 showed significantly lower gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, whereas the B10.S strain showed no significant difference. Nfkb1, Tlr9, II6 and Tnf had significantly higher gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, while the B10.S strain showed no difference. This study supports the roles of Bank1 (produced mainly in B-cells) and Nfkbl (produced in most immune cells) as key regulators of ANoA development in HgIA.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
    National Category
    Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150265 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0199979 (DOI)000438866600014 ()30016332 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council Branch of Medicine; County Council of Ostergotland; Linkoping University

    Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-10-24
  • 31.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ekstrand, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jawad, Aksa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice2016In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 124, no 7, p. 920-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Following human mercury (Hg) exposure, the metal accumulates in considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Although the toxicokinetics of Hg have been studied extensively, factors responsible for interindividual variation in humans are largely unknown. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic interstrain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg. A. SW, DBA/2 and BALB/C mouse strains accumulate higher amounts of Hg than B10.S.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to find candidate genes associated with regulation of renal Hg concentrations.

    METHODS: A. SW, B10.S and their F1 and F2 offspring were exposed for 6 weeks to 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water. Genotyping with microsatellites was conducted on 84 F2 mice for genome-wide scanning with ion pair reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP RP HPLC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were established. Denaturing HPLC was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for haplotyping and fine mapping in 184 and 32 F2 mice, respectively. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Btrc and Nfkb2) verified by fine mapping and QTL were further investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genes enhanced by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) were included for gene expression analysis.

    RESULTS: Renal Hg concentrations differed significantly between A. SW and B10. S mice and between males and females within each strain. QTL analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio score 5.78 on chromosome 19 (p = 0.002). Haplotype and fine mapping associated the Hg accumulation with Pprc1, which encodes PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), a coactivator for proteins involved in detoxification. Pprc1 and two genes coactivated by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) had significantly lower gene expression in the A. SW strain than in the B10. S strain.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study supports Pprc1 as a key regulator for renal Hg excretion.

  • 32.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Bank1 and NF-kappaB as key regulators in anti-nucleolar antibody development2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0199979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune rheumatic disorders (SARD) represent important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans. The mechanisms triggering autoimmune responses are complex and involve a network of genetic factors. Mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) in mice is an established model to study the mechanisms of the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which is a hallmark in the diagnosis of SARD. A.SW mice with HgIA show a significantly higher titer of antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) than the B10.S mice, although both share the same MHC class II (H-2). We applied a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to their Hg-exposed F2 offspring to investigate the non-MHC genes involved in the development of ANoA. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio (LOD) score of 3.05 on chromosome 3. Microsatellites were used for haplotyping, and fine mapping was conducted with next generation sequencing. The candidate genes Bank1 (B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) and Nfkbl (nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1) were identified by additional QTL analysis. Expression of the Bank1 and Nfkb1 genes and their downstream target genes involved in the intracellular pathway (Tlr9,II6, Tnf) was investigated in mercury-exposed A.SW and B10.S mice by real-time PCR. Bank1 showed significantly lower gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, whereas the B10.S strain showed no significant difference. Nfkb1, Tlr9, II6 and Tnf had significantly higher gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, while the B10.S strain showed no difference. This study supports the roles of Bank1 (produced mainly in B-cells) and Nfkbl (produced in most immune cells) as key regulators of ANoA development in HgIA.

  • 33.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Latorre, Malcolm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Göransson, Nathanael
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Investigation into Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Designs: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study2016In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode designs offer operation in voltage and current mode and capability to steer the electric field (EF). The aim of the study was to compare the EF distributions of four DBS leads at equivalent amplitudes (3 V and 3.4 mA). Finite element method (FEM) simulations (n = 38) around cylindrical contacts (leads 3389, 6148) or equivalent contact configurations (leads 6180, SureStim1) were performed using homogeneous and patient-specific (heterogeneous) brain tissue models. Steering effects of 6180 and SureStim1 were compared with symmetric stimulation fields. To make relative comparisons between simulations, an EF isolevel of 0.2 V/mm was chosen based on neuron model simulations (n = 832) applied before EF visualization and comparisons. The simulations show that the EF distribution is largely influenced by the heterogeneity of the tissue, and the operating mode. Equivalent contact configurations result in similar EF distributions. In steering configurations, larger EF volumes were achieved in current mode using equivalent amplitudes. The methodology was demonstrated in a patient-specific simulation around the zona incerta and a “virtual” ventral intermediate nucleus target. In conclusion, lead design differences are enhanced when using patient-specific tissue models and current stimulation mode.

  • 34.
    Alonso, Fabiola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Latorre, Malcolm
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Brain Stimulation Steering of the Electric Field: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Alstad, V.
    et al.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abtahi, Jahan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Surgical removal of keratocystic odontogenic tumours via a Le Fort I osteotomy approach: a retrospective study of the recurrence rate2017In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 6p. 434-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) is one of the most aggressive odontogenic cysts and has a high recurrence rate. The treatment of these tumours is the subject of debate. A KCOT in the posterior maxilla with sinus involvement is rare. Few reports have been published in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recurrence rate after surgical removal of maxillary KCOTs via a Le Fort I osteotomy. A search was performed to identify patients with a follow-up time of at least 5 years. Nine patients were included in the study. The following clinical variables were analyzed: age at surgery, sex, symptoms, site and size of the tumour, surgical approach, and recurrence rate. The surgical approaches were curettage (n=6) and enucleation (n=3). Recurrence was seen in three patients (33%); all had multilocular tumours. No recurrence was seen in patients with unilocular tumours. The Le Fort I osteotomy approach allows direct visualization and ensures wide excision, minimizing the risk of recurrence. In this series, cases with a multilocular KCOT showed a higher risk of recurrence due to the difficulty of removing the tumour in total. All recurrences took place within 2 years of the intervention; a 5-year follow-up is recommended.

  • 36.
    Anagnostopoulos, Dimitris C.
    et al.
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Heberbrand, Johannes
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Eliez, Stephan
    University of Geneva, Switzerland.
    Doyle, Maeve B.
    St Davnets Hospital, Ireland.
    Klasen, Henrikje
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Crommen, Sofie
    Flemish Assoc Child and Adolescent Psychiat, Belgium.
    Cetin Cuhadaroglu, Fusun
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica
    University of Belgrade, Serbia.
    Herreros, Oscar
    Hospital University of Virgen de las Nieves, Spain.
    Minderaa, Ruud
    European Soc Child and Adolescent Psychiat, Belgium.
    Karwautz, Andreas
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Raynaud, Jean Philippe
    Centre Hospital University of Toulouse, France.
    Editorial Material: European Society of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: position statement on mental health of child and adolescent refugees in EUROPEAN CHILD and ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY, vol 25, issue 7, pp 673-6762016In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 673-676Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 37.
    Andersson, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jagervall, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Ctr Med Image Sci and Visualizat CMIV, Linkoping, Sweden; Linkoping Univ, Dept Radiol, Linkoping, Sweden; Linkoping Univ, Dept Med and Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Wang, Chunliang
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    How to measure renal artery stenosis - a retrospective comparison of morphological measurement approaches in relation to hemodynamic significance2015In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 15, no 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although it is well known that renal artery stenosis may cause renovascular hypertension, it is unclear how the degree of stenosis should best be measured in morphological images. The aim of this study was to determine which morphological measures from Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) and Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) are best in predicting whether a renal artery stenosis is hemodynamically significant or not. Methods: Forty-seven patients with hypertension and a clinical suspicion of renovascular hypertension were examined with CTA, MRA, captopril-enhanced renography (CER) and captopril test (Ctest). CTA and MRA images of the renal arteries were analyzed by two readers using interactive vessel segmentation software. The measures included minimum diameter, minimum area, diameter reduction and area reduction. In addition, two radiologists visually judged the diameter reduction without automated segmentation. The results were then compared using limits of agreement and intra-class correlation, and correlated with the results from CER combined with Ctest (which were used as standard of reference) using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Results: A total of 68 kidneys had all three investigations (CTA, MRA and CER + Ctest), where 11 kidneys (16.2 %) got a positive result on the CER + Ctest. The greatest area under ROC curve (AUROC) was found for the area reduction on MRA, with a value of 0.91 (95 % confidence interval 0.82-0.99), excluding accessory renal arteries. As comparison, the AUROC for the radiologists visual assessments on CTA and MRA were 0.90 (0.82-0.98) and 0.91 (0.83-0.99) respectively. None of the differences were statistically significant. Conclusions: No significant differences were found between the morphological measures in their ability to predict hemodynamically significant stenosis, but a tendency of MRA having higher AUROC than CTA. There was no significant difference between measurements made by the radiologists and measurements made with fuzzy connectedness segmentation. Further studies are required to definitely identify the optimal measurement approach.

  • 38.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction in water–fat MRI2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the water-signal performance of the consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction (CIIC) method to correct for intensity inhomogeneities METHODS: Water-fat volumes were acquired using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T symmetrically sampled 2-point Dixon three-dimensional MRI. Two datasets: (i) 10 muscle tissue regions of interest (ROIs) from 10 subjects acquired with both 1.5T and 3.0T whole-body MRI. (ii) Seven liver tissue ROIs from 36 patients imaged using 1.5T MRI at six time points after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The performance of CIIC was evaluated quantitatively by analyzing its impact on the dispersion and bias of the water image ROI intensities, and qualitatively using side-by-side image comparisons.

    RESULTS:

    CIIC significantly ( P1.5T≤2.3×10-4,P3.0T≤1.0×10-6) decreased the nonphysiological intensity variance while preserving the average intensity levels. The side-by-side comparisons showed improved intensity consistency ( Pint⁡≤10-6) while not introducing artifacts ( Part=0.024) nor changed appearances ( Papp≤10-6).

    CONCLUSION:

    CIIC improves the spatiotemporal intensity consistency in regions of a homogenous tissue type. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2014.

  • 39.
    Ansell, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedlinski, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Epidermal growth factor is a biomarker for poor cetuximab response in tongue cancer cells2016In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 9-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target for treatment in tongue cancer. Here, EGFR ligands were evaluated for their potential uses as predictive biomarkers of cetuximab treatment response.

    Methods: In three tongue cancer cell lines the influences of epidermal growth factor (EGF), amphiregulin (AR), and epiregulin (EPR) on tumour cell proliferation and cetuximab response were evaluated by the addition of recombinant human (rh) proteins or the siRNA-mediated downregulation of endogenous ligand production.

    Results: EGF or AR downregulation suppressed the proliferation of all investigated cell lines. Furthermore, all cell lines displayed increased cetuximab resistance upon the addition of rhEGF, whereas EGF silencing resulted in an improved cetuximab response in one cell line.

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that EGF and AR are critical components of the EGFR signalling network required for full proliferative potential. Moreover, EGF is a potential predictive biomarker of poor cetuximab response and a possible treatment target.

  • 40.
    Appelgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Marginal-Zone B-Cells Are Main Producers of IgM in Humans, and Are Reduced in Patients With Autoimmune Vasculitis2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 2242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mice, B1 and marginal zone (MZ) B-cells play an important role in prevention of autoimmunity through production of regulatory cytokines and natural antibodies. There is limited knowledge about the human counterparts of these cells. We therefore investigated functions of MZ-like B-cells and the frequency of circulating MZ-like and Bl-like B-cells in healthy controls (HC), as well as in patients with autoimmune vasculitis to learn more about the role of these cells in autoimmune disease. After stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) of class B in vitro, MZ-like B-cells were the main producers of IgM whereas switched memory B-cells primarily produced IgG and IgA. TNF and IL-10 were produced by both MZ-like and switched memory B-cells. Neither antibody nor TNF/IL-10 production by the B-cell subsets differed between patients and HC. Patients with autoimmune vasculitis, irrespective of disease activity, had lower percentage and absolute numbers of circulating MZ-like B-cells, and lower absolute numbers of B1-like B-cells. The percentage of B1-like B-cells was reduced during active disease. These findings remained significant when the analysis was confined to active treatment-naive patients (disease onset).Our results suggest that human innate-like B-cells might have a physiological role in prevention of autoimmunity.

  • 41.
    Archer, Brent
    et al.
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette, PO Box 43170, Lafayette, LA 70504-3170, USA.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Penn, Claire
    University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 1 Jan Smuts Avenue, Braamfontein, Gauteng 2000, South Africa.
    Facilitation effects of cueing techniques in two Sesotho speakers with anomia2016In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 140-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aphasiologists developing treatments for anomia should closely align therapy methods with the typological and morphological characteristics of the language in question. The lead author initiated this study to develop more defensible interventions for speakers of Sesotho, a South African language. Prefix-based cueing (our alternative name for initial phoneme cueing that describes these cues in Sesotho-oriented terms) was compared to a novel technique, root-based cueing (RBC). While prefix-based cues are described in the literature, we hypothesized root-based cues would be more appropriate in this context since they were thought to be more consonant with the linguistic parameters of Sesotho. Two speakers with aphasia, who demonstrated significant anomic symptoms, served as participants. We used a multiple-baseline, single case study design. Two 144-item word lists were developed with every item represented by a photograph. Each of the two word lists was associated with one of the two cueing techniques investigated. After baseline measurements were obtained, each participant attended eight facilitation sessions for each cueing condition, resulting in eight data points per condition and participant. For both participants, RBC resulted in greater naming performance than cueing by means of initial phonemes. Our explanation of these results is based on the Interactive Lexical Network model of lexical access; root-based cues may be more effective because they more efficiently constrain the number of lemmas activated after a cue is provided. We argue that a confluence of factors (word-retrieval processes and the character of Sesotho morphosyntax) gave rise to the noted differences in naming facilitation.

  • 42.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    1Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Jönsen, Andreas
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund.
    Rönnblom, Lars
    Department of Medical Sciences, Science for Life Laboratories, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Simard, Julia F
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Case definitions in Swedish register data to identify systemic lupus erythematosus2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and investigate the utility of several different case definitions for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) using national register data in Sweden.

    METHODS: The reference standard consisted of clinically confirmed SLE cases pooled from four major clinical centres in Sweden (n=929), and a sample of non-SLE comparators randomly selected from the National Population Register (n=24 267). Demographics, comorbidities, prescriptions and autoimmune disease family history were obtained from multiple registers and linked to the reference standard. We first used previously published SLE definitions to create algorithms for SLE. We also used modern data mining techniques (penalised least absolute shrinkage and selection operator logistic regression, elastic net regression and classification trees) to objectively create data-driven case definitions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for the case definitions identified.

    RESULTS: Defining SLE by using only hospitalisation data resulted in the lowest sensitivity (0.79). When SLE codes from the outpatient register were included, sensitivity and PPV increased (PPV between 0.97 and 0.98, sensitivity between 0.97 and 0.99). Addition of medication information did not greatly improve the algorithm's performance. The application of data mining methods did not yield different case definitions.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of SLE International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes in outpatient clinics increased the accuracy for identifying individuals with SLE using Swedish registry data. This study implies that it is possible to use ICD codes from national registers to create a cohort of individuals with SLE.

  • 43.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Palmsten, Kristin
    University of California, San Diego, USA.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salmon, Jane E
    Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York.
    Simard, Julia F
    Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA ;Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What to Expect When Expecting With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Population-Based Study of Maternal and Fetal Outcomes in SLE and Pre-SLE.2016In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 68, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess maternal and fetal outcomes associated with subclinical (pre-systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE] and SLE presenting up to 5 years postpartum) and prevalent maternal SLE during pregnancy compared with the general population.

    METHODS: This prospective cohort study used population-based Swedish registers to identify 13,598 women with first singleton pregnancies registered in the Medical Birth Register (551 prevalent SLE, 65 pre-SLE within 0-2 years, 133 pre-SLE within 2-5 years, and 12,847 general population). SLE was defined as ≥2 SLE-coded discharge diagnoses in the patient register with ≥1 diagnosis from a specialist. Unadjusted risks of adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes were calculated by SLE status, and Cochran-Armitage tests evaluated trend across exposure groups.

    RESULTS: Maternal outcomes such as preeclampsia, hypothyroidism, stroke, and infection were more common among women with SLE. Sixteen percent of prevalent-SLE pregnancies were diagnosed with preeclampsia compared with 5% of those from the general population. Among the pre-SLE women, preeclampsia was found in 26% of those with SLE within 2 years postpartum and 13% in those with SLE within 2-5 years postpartum. Similarly, infant outcomes, such as preterm birth, infection, and mortality, were worse among those born to mothers with prevalent SLE and pre-SLE during pregnancy. The test for trend was significant for most outcomes.

    CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that adverse maternal and fetal outcomes are more common in SLE pregnancies. Furthermore, these unfavorable outcomes are observed in pregnancies occurring prior to the diagnosis of SLE. Thus, the underlying immunologic profile of SLE and alterations preceding clinical SLE may contribute to these pregnancy complications.

  • 44.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V
    et al.
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Rossides, Marios
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Von Euler, Mia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Simard, Julia F
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
    Response to 'Increased stroke incidence in systemic lupus erythematosus patients"2018In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 77, no 10, article id UNSP e72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Arkema, Elizabeth V.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Von Euler, Mia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Simard, Julia F.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stanford School Med, CA USA; Stanford School Med, CA USA.
    Stroke in systemic lupus erythematosus: a Swedish population-based cohort study2017In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 76, no 9, p. 1544-1549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To study the occurrence of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with the general population by age, sex and time since SLE diagnosis Methods Adults with incident SLE were identified from the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR, n=3390) and general population comparators from the Total Population Register were matched on age, sex and county (n=16730). Individuals were followed prospectively until first of death, December 2013, emigration or incident stroke (identified from the NPR, Cause of Death Register and the Stroke Register). Incidence rates, rate differences and HR were estimated comparing SLE with non-SLE. Estimates were stratified by sex, age and time since diagnosis. Results We observed 126 strokes in SLE and 304 in the general population. Individuals with SLE had a twofold increased rate of ischaemic stroke compared with the general population (HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.7 to 2.8). The HR for intracerebral haemorrhage was 1.4 (95% CI 0.7 to 2.8). There was effect modification by sex and age, with the highest HRs for females and individuals amp;lt;50 years old. The HR for ischaemic stroke was highest in the first year of follow-up (3.7; 95% CI 2.1 to 6.5). Conclusions The relative risk of ischaemic stroke in SLE was more than doubled compared with the general population, and importantly, the highest relative risks were observed within the first year after SLE diagnosis. Thus, the first encounter with patients presents an opportunity for rheumatologists to screen for risk factors and intervene.

  • 46.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids: Data From a Large Swedish Quality Register Database2017In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 443-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze a database of completed International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) questionnaires obtained from over 100,000 clients fitted with new hearing aids in Sweden during the period of 2012-2016. Mean IOI-HA total scores were correlated with degree of hearing loss, unilateral versus bilateral fitting, first-time versus return clients, gender, and variation among dispensing clinics. The correlations with expectations, service quality, and technical functioning of the hearing aids were also analyzed. Method: Questionnaires containing the 7 IOI-HA items as well as questions concerning some additional issues were mailed to clients 3-6 months after fitting of new hearing aids. The questionnaires were returned to and analyzed by an independent research institute. Results: More than 100 dispensing clinics nationwide take part in this project. A response rate of 52.6% resulted in 106,631 data sets after excluding incomplete questionnaires. Forty-six percent of the responders were women, and 54% were men. The largest difference in mean score (0.66) was found for the IOI-HA item "use" between return clients and first-time users. Women reported significantly higher (better) scores for the item "impact on others" compared with men. The bilaterally fitted subgroup reported significantly higher scores for all 7 items compared with the unilaterally fitted subgroup. Experienced users produced higher scores on benefit and satisfaction items, whereas first-time users gave higher scores for residual problems. No correlation was found between mean IOI-HA total score and average hearing threshold level (pure-tone average [ PTA]). Mean IOI-HA total scores were found to correlate significantly with perceived service quality of the dispensing center and with the technical functionality of the hearing aids. Conclusions: When comparing mean IOI-HA total scores from different studies or between groups, differences with regard to hearing aid experience, gender, and unilateral versus bilateral fitting have to be considered. No correlation was found between mean IOI-HA total score and degree of hearing loss in terms of PTA. Thus, PTA is not a reliable predictor of benefit and satisfaction of hearing aid provision as represented by the IOI-HA items. Identification of a specific lower fence in PTA for hearing aid candidacy is therefore to be avoided. Large differences were found in mean IOI-HA total scores related to different dispensing centers.

  • 47.
    Asp, Filip
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Eskilsson, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.