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  • 1.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Effectiveness of implementing a best practice primary healthcare model for low back pain (BetterBack) compared with current routine care in the Swedish context: an internal pilot study informed protocol for an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e019906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem commonly requiring healthcare. In Sweden, there is a call from healthcare practitioners (HCPs) for the development, implementation and evaluation of a best practice primary healthcare model for LBP.

    Aims (1) To improve and understand the mechanisms underlying changes in HCP confidence, attitudes and beliefs for providing best practice coherent primary healthcare for patients with LBP; (2) to improve and understand the mechanisms underlying illness beliefs, self-care enablement, pain, disability and quality of life in patients with LBP; and (3) to evaluate a multifaceted and sustained implementation strategy and the cost-effectiveness of the BetterBack☺ model of care (MOC) for LBP from the perspective of the Swedish primary healthcare context.

    Methods This study is an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial testing the hypothesised superiority of the BetterBack☺ MOC compared with current routine care. The trial involves simultaneous testing of MOC effects at the HCP, patient and implementation process levels. This involves a prospective cohort study investigating implementation at the HCP level and a patient-blinded, pragmatic, cluster, randomised controlled trial with longitudinal follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months post baseline for effectiveness at the patient level. A parallel process and economic analysis from a healthcare sector perspective will also be performed. Patients will be allocated to routine care (control group) or the BetterBack☺ MOC (intervention group) according to a stepped cluster dogleg structure with two assessments in routine care. Experimental conditions will be compared and causal mediation analysis investigated. Qualitative HCP and patient experiences of the BetterBack☺ MOC will also be investigated.

    Dissemination The findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Further national dissemination and implementation in Sweden and associated national quality register data collection are potential future developments of the project.

  • 2.
    Agnew, Louise
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Johnston, Venerina
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Overmeer, Thomas
    Malardalen University, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gun
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Australia.
    FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH WORK ABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC WHIPLASH-ASSOCIATED DISORDER GRADE II-III: A CROSS-SECTIONAL ANALYSIS2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 546-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to self-perceived work ability in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder grades II-III. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Patients: A total of 166 working age patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder. Methods: A comprehensive survey collected data on work ability (using the Work Ability Index); demographic, psychosocial, personal, work- and condition-related factors. Forward, stepwise regression modelling was used to assess the factors related to work ability. Results: The proportion of patients in each work ability category were as follows: poor (12.7%); moderate (39.8%); good (38.5%); excellent (9%). Seven factors explained 65% (adjusted R-2 = 0.65, p less than 0.01) of the variance in work ability. In descending order of strength of association, these factors are: greater neck disability due to pain; reduced self-rated health status and health-related quality of life; increased frequency of concentration problems; poor workplace satisfaction; lower self-efficacy for performing daily tasks; and greater work-related stress. Conclusion: Condition-specific and psychosocial factors are associated with self-perceived work ability of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

  • 3.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Newcastle University, England.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Heinen, Maud
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Coulton, Simon
    University of Kent, England.
    Gual, Toni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Improving the delivery of brief interventions for heavy drinking in primary health care: outcome results of the Optimizing Delivery of Health Care Intervention (ODHIN) five-country cluster randomized factorial trial2016In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 111, no 11, p. 1935-1945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo test if training and support, financial reimbursement and option of referring screen-positive patients to an internet-based method of giving advice (eBI) can increase primary health-care providers delivery of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)-C-based screening and advice to heavy drinkers. DesignCluster randomized factorial trial with 12-week implementation and measurement period. SettingPrimary health-care units (PHCU) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. ParticipantsA total of 120 PHCU, 24 in each of Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. InterventionsPHCUs were randomized to one of eight groups: care as usual, training and support (TS), financial reimbursement (FR) and eBI; paired combinations of TS, FR and eBI, and all of FR, TS and eBI. MeasurementsThe primary outcome measure was the proportion of eligible adult (age 18+ years) patients screened during a 12-week implementation period. Secondary outcome measures were proportion of screen-positive patients advised; and proportion of consulting adult patients given an intervention (screening and advice to screen-positives) during the same 12-week implementation period. FindingsDuring a 4-week baseline measurement period, the proportion of consulting adult patients who were screened for their alcohol consumption was 0.059 per PHCU (95% CI 0.034 to 0.084). Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the logged proportion screened during the 12-week implementation period was 1.48 (95% CI=1.13-1.95) in PHCU that received TS versus PHCU that did not receive TS; for FR, the ratio was 2.00 (95% CI=1.56-2.56). The option of referral to eBI did not lead to a higher proportion of patients screened. The ratio for TS plus FR was 2.34 (95% CI=1.77-3.10), and the ratio for TS plus FR plus eBI was1.68 (95% CI=1.11-2.53). ConclusionsProviding primary health-care units with training, support and financial reimbursement for delivering Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-C-based screening and advice to heavy drinkers increases screening for alcohol consumption. Providing primary health-care units with the option of referring screen-positive patients to an internet-based method of giving advice does not appear to increase screening for alcohol consumption.

  • 4.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Coulton, Simon
    University of Kent, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Delivery of Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Care: Outcomes of the ODHIN 5-Country Cluster Randomized Trial2017In: Annals of family medicine (online), ISSN 1544-1709, E-ISSN 1544-1717, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 335-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE We aimed to test whether 3 strategies-training and support, financial reimbursement, and an option to direct screen-positive patients to an Internet-based method of giving brief advice-have a longer-term effect on primary care clinicians delivery of screening and advice to heavy drinkers operationalized with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) tool. METHODS We undertook a cluster randomized factorial trial with a 12-week implementation period in 120 primary health care units throughout Catalonia, England, Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Units were randomized to 8 groups: care as usual (control); training and support alone; financial reimbursement alone; electronic brief advice alone; paired combinations of these conditions; and all 3 combined. The primary outcome was the proportion of consulting adult patients (aged 18 years and older) receiving intervention-screening and, if screen-positive, advice-at 9 months. RESULTS Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the log of the proportion of patients given intervention at the 9-month follow-up was 1.39 (95% CI, 1.03-1.88) in units that received training and support as compared with units that did not. Neither financial reimbursement nor directing screen-positive patients to electronic brief advice led to a higher proportion of patients receiving intervention. CONCLUSIONS Training and support of primary health care units has a lasting, albeit small, impact on the proportion of adult patients given an alcohol intervention at 9 months.

  • 5.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Keurhorst, Myrna
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Laurant, Miranda
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Gual, Antoni
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Attitudes and Learning through Practice Are Key to Delivering Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Health Care: Analyses from the ODHIN Five Country Cluster Randomized Factorial Trial2017In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 2, article id 121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we test path models that study the interrelations between primary health care provider attitudes towards working with drinkers, their screening and brief advice activity, and their receipt of training and support and financial reimbursement. Study participants were 756 primary health care providers from 120 primary health care units (PHCUs) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, The Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Our interventions were training and support and financial reimbursement to providers. Our design was a randomized factorial trial with baseline measurement period, 12-week implementation period, and 9-month follow-up measurement period. Our outcome measures were: attitudes of individual providers in working with drinkers as measured by the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire; and the proportion of consulting adult patients (age 18+ years) who screened positive and were given advice to reduce their alcohol consumption (intervention activity). We found that more positive attitudes were associated with higher intervention activity, and higher intervention activity was then associated with more positive attitudes. Training and support was associated with both positive changes in attitudes and higher intervention activity. Financial reimbursement was associated with more positive attitudes through its impact on higher intervention activity. We conclude that improving primary health care providers screening and brief advice activity for heavy drinking requires a combination of training and support and on-the-job experience of actually delivering screening and brief advice activity.

  • 6.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Pelgrum-Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    King’s College London, London, UK.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Teesside Univ, England.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle Univ, England; State Agcy Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency for Prevention of Alcohol-Related Problems, Warsaw, Poland.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Gual, Antoni
    Neurosciences Institute, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
    Impact of practice, provider and patient characteristics on delivering screening and brief advice for heavy drinking in primary healthcare: Secondary analyses of data from the ODHIN five-country cluster randomized factorial trial2017In: European Journal of General Practice, ISSN 1381-4788, E-ISSN 1751-1402, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 241-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of primary healthcare-based screening and advice that is effective in reducing heavy drinking can be enhanced with training. Objectives: Undertaking secondary analysis of the five-country ODHIN study, we test: the extent to which practice, provider and patient characteristics affect the likelihood of patients being screened and advised; the extent to which such characteristics moderate the impact of training in increasing screening and advice; and the extent to which training mitigates any differences due to such characteristics found at baseline. Methods: A cluster randomized factorial trial involving 120 practices, 746 providers and 46 546 screened patients from Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Practices were randomized to receive training or not to receive training. The primary outcome measures were the proportion of adult patients screened, and the proportion of screen-positive patients advised. Results: Nurses tended to screen more patients than doctors (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.9, 4.9). Screenpositive patients were more likely to be advised by doctors than by nurses (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.1), and more liable to be advised the higher their risk status (OR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.7). Training increased screening and advice giving, with its impact largely unrelated to practice, provider or patient characteristics. Training diminished the differences between doctors and nurses and between patients with low or high-risk status. Conclusions: Training primary healthcare providers diminishes the negative impacts that some practice, provider and patient characteristics have on the likelihood of patients being screened and advised.

  • 7.
    Andersson, E Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effectiveness of a Text Messaging-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 6, no 6, article id e146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Excessive drinking among university students is a global challenge, leading to significant health risks. However, heavy drinking among students is widely accepted and socially normalized. Mobile phone interventions have attempted to reach students who engage in excessive drinking. A growing number of studies suggest that text message-based interventions could potentially reach many students and, if effective, such an intervention might help reduce heavy drinking in the student community. Objective: The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of a behavior change theory-based 6-week text message intervention among university students. Methods: This study was a two-arm, randomized controlled trial with an intervention group receiving a 6-week text message intervention and a control group that was referred to treatment as usual at the local student health care center. Outcome measures were collected at baseline and at 3 months after the initial invitation to participate in the intervention. The primary outcome was total weekly alcohol consumption. Secondary outcomes were frequency of heavy episodic drinking, highest estimated blood alcohol concentration, and number of negative consequences attributable to excessive drinking. Results: A total of 896 students were randomized to either the intervention or control group. The primary outcome analysis included 92.0% of the participants in the intervention group and 90.1% of the control group. At follow-up, total weekly alcohol consumption decreased in both groups, but no significant between-group difference was seen. Data on the secondary outcomes included 49.1% of the participants in the intervention group and 41.3% of the control group. No significant between-group difference was seen for any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusions: The present study was under-powered, which could partly explain the lack of significance. However, the intervention, although theory-based, needs to be re-assessed and refined to better support the target group. Apart from establishing which content forms an effective intervention, the optimal length of an alcohol intervention targeting students also needs to be addressed in future studies.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Implementing healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: a quasi-experimental cross-sectional study evaluating a team initiative2015In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 15, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Non-communicable diseases are a leading cause of death and can largely be prevented by healthy lifestyles. Health care organizations are encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. This study evaluates the impact of a team initiative on healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care.

    Methods: A quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design compared three intervention centres that had implemented lifestyle teams with three control centres that used a traditional model of care. Outcomes were defined using the RE-AIM framework: reach, the proportion of patients receiving lifestyle promotion; effectiveness, self-reported attitudes and competency among staff; adoption, proportion of staff reporting regular practice of lifestyle promotion; implementation, fidelity to the original lifestyle team protocol. Data collection methods included a patient questionnaire (n = 888), a staff questionnaire (n = 120) and structured interviews with all practice managers and, where applicable, team managers (n = 8). The chi square test and problem-driven content analysis was used to analyse the questionnaire and interview data, respectively.

    Results:Reach: patients at control centres (48%, n = 211) received lifestyle promotion significantly more often compared with patients at intervention centres (41%, n = 169). Effectiveness: intervention staff was significantly more positive towards the effectiveness of lifestyle promotion, shared competency and how lifestyle promotion was prioritized at their centre. Adoption: 47% of staff at intervention centres and 58% at control centres reported that they asked patients about their lifestyle on a daily basis. Implementation: all intervention centres had implemented multi-professional teams and team managers and held regular meetings but struggled to implement in-house referral structures for lifestyle promotion, which was used consistently among staff.

    Conclusions:Intervention centres did not show higher rates than control centres on reach of patients or adoption among staff at this stage. All intervention centres struggled to implement working referral structures for lifestyle promotion. Intervention centres were more positive on effectiveness outcomes, attitudes and competency among staff, however. Thus, lifestyle teams may facilitate lifestyle promotion practice in terms of increased responsiveness among staff, illustrated by positive attitudes and perceptions of shared competency. More research is needed on lifestyle promotion referral structures in primary care regarding their configuration and implementation.

  • 9.
    Anskär, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Mantorp.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. 1177 Med Advisory Serv, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Time utilization and perceived psychosocial work environment among staff in Swedish primary care settings2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, article id 166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the past decades, reorganizations and structural changes in Swedish primary care have affected time utilization among health care professionals. Consequently, increases in administrative tasks have substantially reduced the time available for face-to-face consultations. This study examined how work-time was utilized and the association between work time utilization and the perceived psychosocial work environment in Swedish primary care settings. Methods: This descriptive, multicentre, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014-2015. Data collection began with questionnaire. In the first section, respondents were asked to estimate how their workload was distributed between patients (direct and indirect patient work) and other work tasks. The questionnaire also comprised the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, which assessed the psychosocial work environment. Next a time study was conducted where the participants reported their work-time based on three main categories: direct patient-related work, indirect patient-related work, and other work tasks. Each main category had a number of subcategories. The participants recorded the time spent (minutes) on each work task per hour, every day, for two separate weeks. Eleven primary care centres located in southeast Sweden participated. All professionals were asked to participate (n = 441), including registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants, and allied professionals. Response rates were 75% and 79% for the questionnaires and the time study, respectively. Results: All health professionals allocated between 30.9% - 37.2% of their work-time to each main category: direct patient work, indirect patient work, and other work. All professionals estimated a higher proportion of time spent in direct patient work than they reported in the time study. Physicians scored highest on the psychosocial scales of quantitative demands, stress, and role conflicts. Among allied professionals, the proportion of work-time spent on administrative tasks was associated with more role conflicts. Younger staff perceived more adverse working conditions than older staff. Conclusions: This study indicated that Swedish primary care staff spent a limited proportion of their work time directly with patients. PCPs seemed to perceive their work environment in negative terms to a greater extent than other staff members. This study showed that work task allocations influenced the perceived psychosocial work environment.

  • 10.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Satisfaction With the Outcome of Physical Therapist-Prescribed Exercise in Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2016In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 640-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial. BACKGROUND: Patient perception of the benefits gained from treatment is important, yet satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) has not been investigated. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic WAD changed over time, and whether there were group differences. METHODS: Two hundred sixteen people with chronic WAD (66% women; mean age, 40.4 years) participated in a 3-month program of physical therapist-led neck-specific exercises with or without a behavioral approach, or received a prescription of general physical activity. The main outcome was satisfaction with the outcome of treatment, assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months later. Additional outcomes were enablement and expectation fulfillment. RESULTS: Satisfaction improved over time in the 3 groups (odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.20; P amp;lt; .001). There was a significant group-by-time interaction (P amp;lt; 001), with increased odds of being satisfied in the groups receiving neck-specific exercises compared to general physical activity. Enablement increased after completion of the intervention in all groups (P amp;lt; .001). People who received neck-specific exercises reported greater enablement and expectation fulfillment than people prescribed general physical activity (P amp;lt; .01). CONCLUSION: Exercise interventions for chronic WAD led to increased satisfaction for 12 months following treatment that was unrelated to the type of exercise intervention received.

  • 11.
    Bell, Katy J. L.
    et al.
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Azizi, Lamiae
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hayen, Andrew
    UTS, Australia.
    Irwig, Les
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Sundrom, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Prognostic impact of systolic blood pressure variability in people with diabetes2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0194084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Blood pressure variability (BPV) has been associated with risk of cardiovascular events in observational studies, independently of mean BP levels. In states with higher autonomic imbalance, such as in diabetes, the importance of BP variability may theoretically be even greater. We aimed to investigate the incremental value of BPV for prediction of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We identified 9,855 patients without pre-existing cardiovascular disease who did not change BP-lowering treatment during the observation period from a Swedish primary health care cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. BPV was summarized as the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CV), or variation independent of mean (VIM). Patients were followed for a median of 4 years and associations with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were investigated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results BPV was not associated with cardiovascular specific or all-cause mortality in the total sample. In patients who were not on BP-lowering drugs during the observation period (n = 2,949), variability measures were associated with all-cause mortality: hazard ratios were 1.05, 1.04 and 1.05 for 50% increases in SD, CV and VIM, respectively, adjusted for Framingham risk score risk factors, including mean BP. However, the addition of the variability measures in this subgroup only led to very minimal improvement in discrimination, indicating they may have limited clinical usefulness (change in C-statistic ranged from 0.000-0.003 in all models). Conclusions Although BPV was independently associated with all-cause mortality in diabetes patients in primary care who did not have pre-existing cardiovascular disease or BP-lowering drugs, it may be of minimal clinical usefulness above and beyond that of other routinely measured predictors, including mean BP.

  • 12.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland; University of Michigan, MI 48109 USA.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Newcastle University, England.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brzozka, Krzysztof
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Palacio, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Slodownik, Luiza
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Professionals Attitudes Do Not Influence Screening and Brief Interventions Rates for Hazardous and Harmful Drinkers: Results from ODHIN Study2015In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 430-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the relation between existing levels of alcohol screening and brief intervention rates in five European jurisdictions and role security and therapeutic commitment by the participating primary healthcare professionals. Health care professionals consisting of, 409 GPs, 282 nurses and 55 other staff including psychologists, social workers and nurse aids from 120 primary health care centres participated in a cross-sectional 4-week survey. The participants registered all screening and brief intervention activities as part of their normal routine. The participants also completed the Shortened Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (SAAPPQ), which measure role security and therapeutic commitment. The only significant but small relationship was found between role security and screening rate in a multilevel logistic regression analysis adjusted for occupation of the provider, number of eligible patients and the random effects of jurisdictions and primary health care units (PHCU). No significant relationship was found between role security and brief intervention rate nor between therapeutic commitment and screening rate/brief intervention rate. The proportion of patients screened varied across jurisdictions between 2 and 10%. The findings show that the studied factors (role security and therapeutic commitment) are not of great importance for alcohol screening and BI rates. Given the fact that screening and brief intervention implementation rate has not changed much in the last decade in spite of increased policy emphasis, training initiatives and more research being published, this raises a question about what else is needed to enhance implementation.

  • 13.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of York, England.
    Online Alcohol Assessment and Feedback for Hazardous and Harmful Drinkers: Findings From the AMADEUS-2 Randomized Controlled Trial of Routine Practice in Swedish Universities2015In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 17, no 7, p. e170-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research on the effectiveness of online alcohol interventions for college students has shown mixed results. Small benefits have been found in some studies and because online interventions are inexpensive and possible to implement on a large scale, there is a need for further study. Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of national provision of a brief online alcohol intervention for students in Sweden. Methods: Risky drinkers at 9 colleges and universities in Sweden were invited by mail and identified using a single screening question. These students (N=1605) gave consent and were randomized into a 2-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial consisting of immediate or delayed access to a fully automated online assessment and intervention with personalized feedback. Results: After 2 months, there was no strong evidence of effectiveness with no statistically significant differences in the planned analyses, although there were some indication of possible benefit in sensitivity analyses suggesting an intervention effect of a 10% reduction (95% CI -30% to 10%) in total weekly alcohol consumption. Also, differences in effect sizes between universities were seen with participants from a major university (n=365) reducing their weekly alcohol consumption by 14% (95% CI -23% to -4%). However, lower recruitment than planned and differential attrition in the intervention and control group (49% vs 68%) complicated interpretation of the outcome data. Conclusions: Any effects of current national provision are likely to be small and further research and development work is

  • 14.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lopez-Pelayo, Hugo
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Gual, Antoni
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Implementing referral to an electronic alcohol brief advice website in primary healthcare: results from the ODHIN implementation trial2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 6, article id e010271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The objective of the present study was to explore whether the possibility of offering facilitated access to an alcohol electronic brief intervention (eBI) instead of delivering brief face-to-face advice increased the proportion of consulting adults who were screened and given brief advice. Design The study was a 12-week implementation study. Sixty primary healthcare units (PHCUs) in 5 jurisdictions (Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden) were asked to screen adults who attended the PHCU for risky drinking. Setting A total of 120 primary healthcare centres from 5 jurisdictions in Europe. Participants 746 individual providers (general practitioners, nurses or other professionals) participated in the study. Primary outcome Change in the proportion of patients screened and referred to eBI comparing a baseline 4-week preimplementation period with a 12-week implementation period. Results The possibility of referring patients to the eBI was not found to be associated with any increase in the proportion of patients screened. However, it was associated with an increase in the proportion of screen-positive patients receiving brief advice from 70% to 80% for the screen-positive sample as a whole (pamp;lt;0.05), mainly driven by a significant increase in brief intervention rates in England from 87% to 96% (pamp;lt;0.01). The study indicated that staff displayed a low level of engagement in this new technology. Staff continued to offer face-to-face advice to a larger proportion of patients (54%) than referral to eBI (38%). In addition, low engagement was seen among the referred patients; on average, 18% of the patients logged on to the website with a mean log-on rate across the different countries between 0.58% and 36.95%. Conclusions Referral to eBI takes nearly as much time as brief oral advice and might require more introduction and training before staff are comfortable with referring to eBI.

  • 15.
    Berman, Anne H.
    et al.
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Kolaas, Karoline
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Gustavsberg Primary Care Clin, Sweden.
    Petersen, Elisabeth
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Hedman, Erik
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Gustavsberg Primary Care Clin, Sweden.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sinadinovic, Kristina
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Spak, Fredrik
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thurang, Anna
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Clinician experiences of healthy lifestyle promotion and perceptions of digital interventions as complementary tools for lifestyle behavior change in primary care2018In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 19, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence-based practice for healthy lifestyle promotion in primary health care is supported internationally by national policies and guidelines but implementation in routine primary health care has been slow. Referral to digital interventions could lead to a larger proportion of patients accessing structured interventions for healthy lifestyle promotion, but such referral might have unknown implications for clinicians with patients accessing such interventions. This qualitative study aimed to explore the perceptions of clinicians in primary care on healthy lifestyle promotion with or without digital screening and intervention. Methods: Focus group interviews were conducted at 10 primary care clinics in Sweden with clinicians from different health professions. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using content analysis, with inspiration from a phenomenological-hermeneutic method involving naive understanding, structural analysis and comprehensive understanding. Results: Two major themes captured clinicians perceptions on healthy lifestyle promotion: 1) the need for structured professional practice and 2) deficient professional practice as a hinder for implementation. Sub-themes in theme 1 were striving towards professionalism, which for participants meant working in a standardized fashion, with replicable routines regardless of clinic, as well as being able to monitor statistics on individual patient and group levels; and embracing the future with critical optimism, meaning expecting to develop professionally but also being concerned about the consequences of integrating digital tools into primary care, particularly regarding the importance of personal interaction between patient and provider. For theme 2, sub-themes were being in an unmanageable situation, meaning not being able to do what is perceived as best for the patient due to lack of time and resources; and following ones perception, meaning working from a gut feeling, which for our participants also meant deviating from clinical routines. Conclusions: In efforts to increase evidence-based practice and lighten the burden of clinicians in primary care, decision-and policy-makers planning the introduction of digital tools for healthy lifestyle promotion will need to explicitly define their role as complements to face-to-face encounters. Our overriding hope is that this study will contribute to maintaining meaningfulness in the patient-clinician encounter, when digital tools are added to facilitate patient behavior change of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors.

  • 16.
    Bernhoff, Gabriella
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bertilson, Bo Christer
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Elf, Madeleine
    Kista Rygg and Idrottsklin, Sweden.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The pain drawing as an instrument for identifying cervical spine nerve involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders2016In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 9, p. 397-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a standardized assessment of pain drawing with regard to clinical signs of cervical spine nerve root involvement. Design: This cross-sectional study included data collected in a randomized controlled study. Patients: Two hundred and sixteen patients with chronic (amp;gt;= 6 months) whiplash-associated disorders, grade 2 or 3, were included in this study. Methods: The validity, sensitivity, and specificity of a standardized pain drawing assessment for determining nerve root involvement were analyzed, compared to the clinical assessment. In addition, we analyzed the interrater reliability with 50 pain drawings. Results: Agreement was poor between the standardized pain drawing assessment and the clinical assessment (kappa = 0.11, 95% CI: -0.03 to 0.20). Sensitivity was high (93%), but specificity was low (19%). Interrater reliability was good (kappa = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.53 to 0.76). Conclusion: The standardized pain drawing assessment of nerve root involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders was not in agreement with the clinical assessment. Further research is warranted to optimize the utilization of a pain/discomfort drawing as a supportive instrument for identifying nerve involvement in cervical spinal injuries.

  • 17.
    Biermann, Olivia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Eckhardt, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Emergency Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Forsberg, Birger C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Collaboration between non-governmental organizations and public services in health - a qualitative case study from rural Ecuador2016In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 32237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have a key role in improving health in low-and middle-income countries. Their work needs to be synergistic, complementary to public services, and rooted in community mobilization and collective action. The study explores how an NGO and its health services are perceived by the population that it serves, and how it can contribute to reducing barriers to care. Design: A qualitative exploratory study was conducted in remote Ecuador, characterized by its widespread poverty and lack of official governance. An international NGO collaborated closely with the public services to deliver preventative and curative health services. Data were collected using focus group discussions and semistructured interviews with purposively sampled community members, healthcare personnel, and community health workers based on their links to the health services. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used, focusing on manifest content. Results: Emerging themes relate to the public private partnership (PPP), the NGO and its services, and community participation. The population perceives the NGO positively, linking it to healthcare improvements. Their priority is to get services, irrespective of the providers structure. The presence of an NGO in the operation may contribute to unrealistic expectations of health services, affecting perceptions of the latter negatively. Conclusions: To avoid unrealistic expectations and dissatisfaction, and to increase and sustain the populations trust in the organization, an NGO should operate in a manner that is as integrated as possible within the existing structure. The NGO should work close to the population it serves, with services anchored in the community. PPP parties should develop a common platform with joint messages to the target population on the providers structure, and regarding partners roles and responsibilities. Interaction between the population and the providers on service content and their expectations is key to positive outcomes of PPP operations.

  • 18.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöblom, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular systolic function as measured by left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain2018In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 17, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and heart failure but it is unclear to which extent it is related to left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The aim of the study was to explore the effects of overweight and obesity on left ventricular systolic function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and a control group of non-diabetic persons. Methods: We prospectively investigated 384 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 184 controls who participated in the CARDIPP and CAREFUL studies. The participants were grouped according to body mass index (normal weight amp;lt; 25 kg/m(2), overweight 25-29 kg/m(2), and obesity amp;gt;= 30 kg/m(2) ). Echocardiography was performed at the beginning of the study and after 4-years in the patient group. Results: Univariable and multivariable regression analysis revealed that variations in left ventricular ejection fraction, global longitudinal strain, left ventricular mass and diastolic function expressed as E/e (the ratio between early diastolic mitral flow and annular motion velocities) all are related to body mass index. The mean and standard deviation of left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain values were 57% (8%) vs. - 18.6% (2.3%) for normal weight patients, 53% (8%) vs. - 17.5% (2.3%) for overweight, and 49% (9%) vs. - 16.2% (3.0%) for obese (p amp;lt; 0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Corresponding results in the control group were 58% (6%) vs. -22.3% (3.0%), 55% (7%) vs. - 20.8% (3.1%) and 54% (8%) - 19.6% (4.0%) (p amp;lt;0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Patients who gained weight from baseline to follow-up changed left ventricular ejection fraction (median and interquartile range) by - 1.0 (9.0) % (n =187) and patients who lost weight changed left ventricular ejection fraction by 1.0 (10.0) % (n =179) (p amp;lt;0.05). Conclusion: Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain in both patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-diabetic persons.

  • 19.
    Bolin, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berggren, F.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Berling, P.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Morberg, S.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Gauffin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Patterns of antiepileptic drug prescription in Sweden: A register-based approach2017In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 521-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine drug utilization pathways from the incident healthcare visit due to epilepsy and three years onward. Material and methods: Anti-epileptic drug utilization was calculated using individual information on inpatient- and outpatient care utilization and drug sales. Throughout, we used national register information pertaining to pharmaceutical sales linked to diagnosis-related healthcare utilization. Information on pharmaceutical sales was collected for the 2007-2013 period. Results: For the entire studied period, a majority of new patients with epilepsy were initiated on anti-epileptic drug treatment with a monotherapy (98%); most of these patients remained on that first treatment (64%). The three most frequently prescribed drugs accounted for 72% of the initiated AED treatments. Patients with epilepsy (ICD-10: G40/41) were most commonly prescribed carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. The most common second-line monotherapy was levetiracetam. About 12% of new patients with epilepsy who were initiated on AED treatment during the period eventually switched to an add-on therapy. The proportion of patients who were initiated on treatment with carbamazepine or valproate decreased, and the proportion of patients who remained on their initial monotherapy increased between 2007 and 2013. Conclusions: A limited number of anti-epileptic drugs accounted for the treatment of a majority of new patients with epilepsy (carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate accounted for more than 70%). Add-on therapies showed the same pattern, as the most frequently prescribed add-on regimens were the same ones that accounted for most of the monotherapies. There was a tendency towards fewer patients being initiated on AED treatment with either carbamazepine or valproate.

  • 20.
    Bragde, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Jansson, Ulf
    Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Söderman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Celiac disease biomarkers identified by transcriptome analysis of small intestinal biopsies2018In: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences (CMLS), ISSN 1420-682X, E-ISSN 1420-9071, Vol. 75, no 23, p. 4385-4401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Establishing a celiac disease (CD) diagnosis can be difficult, such as when CD-specific antibody levels are just above cutoff or when small intestinal biopsies show low-grade injuries. To investigate the biological pathways involved in CD and select potential biomarkers to aid in CD diagnosis, RNA sequencing of duodenal biopsies from subjects with either confirmed Active CD (n=20) or without any signs of CD (n=20) was performed. Gene enrichment and pathway analysis highlighted contexts, such as immune response, microbial infection, phagocytosis, intestinal barrier function, metabolism, and transportation. Twenty-nine potential CD biomarkers were selected based on differential expression and biological context. The biomarkers were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction of eight RNA sequencing study subjects, and further investigated using an independent study group (n=43) consisting of subjects not affected by CD, with a clear diagnosis of CD on either a gluten-containing or a gluten-free diet, or with low-grade intestinal injury. Selected biomarkers were able to classify subjects with clear CD/non-CD status, and a subset of the biomarkers (CXCL10, GBP5, IFI27, IFNG, and UBD) showed differential expression in biopsies from subjects with no or low-grade intestinal injury that received a CD diagnosis based on biopsies taken at a later time point. A large number of pathways are involved in CD pathogenesis, and gene expression is affected in CD mucosa already in low-grade intestinal injuries. RNA sequencing of low-grade intestinal injuries might discover pathways and biomarkers involved in early stages of CD pathogenesis.

  • 21.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jennersjö, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Dalarna University,Falun Sweden.
    Association of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 with nephropathy, cardiovascular events, and total mortality in type 2 diabetes2016In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 40-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) contribute to experimental diabetic kidney disease, a condition with substantially increased cardiovascular risk when present in patients. Therefore, we aimed to explore the levels of sTNFRs, and their association with prevalent kidney disease, incident cardiovascular disease, and risk of mortality independently of baseline kidney function and microalbuminuria in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. In pre-defined secondary analyses we also investigated whether the sTNFRs predict adverse outcome in the absence of diabetic kidney disease. Methods: The CARDIPP study, a cohort study of 607 diabetes patients [mean age 61 years, 44 % women, 45 cardiovascular events (fatal/non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke) and 44 deaths during follow-up (mean 7.6 years)] was used. Results: Higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were associated with higher odds of prevalent kidney disease [odd ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) increase 1.60, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.32-1.93, p < 0.001 and OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.21-1.97, p = 0.001, respectively]. In Cox regression models adjusting for age, sex, glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 predicted incident cardiovascular events [hazard ratio (HR) per SD increase, 1.66, 95 % CI 1.29-2.174, p < 0.001 and HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.13-1.91, p = 0.004, respectively]. Results were similar in separate models with adjustments for inflammatory markers, HbA1c, or established cardiovascular risk factors, or when participants with diabetic kidney disease at baseline were excluded (p < 0.01 for all). Both sTNFRs were associated with mortality. Conclusions/Interpretations: Higher circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with diabetic kidney disease, and predicts incident cardiovascular disease and mortality independently of microalbuminuria and kidney function, even in those without kidney disease. Our findings support the clinical utility of sTNFRs as prognostic markers in type 2 diabetes.

  • 22.
    Carlsson, Axel Carl
    et al.
    Division of Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    The association between endostatin and kidney disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes2016In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Circulating endostatin, a biologically active derivate of collagen XVIII, is considered to be a marker of kidney disease and a risk factor for its related mortality. However, less is known of the role of endostatin in diabetes and the development of diabetic nephropathy. For this reason, our study investigated the associations between circulating endostatin and the prevalence and progression of kidney disease, and its mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

    METHODS: This was a cohort study of 607 patients with T2D (mean age: 61 years, 44% women). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine equation, was used to assess the patients' kidney function decline and mortality.

    RESULTS: Of the total study cohort, 20 patients declined by ≥20% in eGFR over 4 years, and 44 died during the follow-up (mean duration: 6.7 years). At baseline, participants with diabetic nephropathy (defined as eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2)) and/or microalbuminuria [defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR)>3g/mol] had higher median levels of endostatin than those without nephropathy (62.7μg/L vs 57.4μg/L, respectively; P=0.031). In longitudinal analyses adjusted for age, gender, baseline eGFR and ACR, higher endostatin levels were associated with a higher risk of decline (≥20% in eGFR, OR per 1 SD increase: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.13-2.65) and a higher risk of mortality (HR per 1 SD increase: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.19-2.07).

    CONCLUSION: In patients with T2D, circulating endostatin levels can predict the progression of kidney disease and mortality independently of established kidney disease markers. The clinical usefulness of endostatin as a risk marker in such patients merits further studies.

  • 23.
    Carlsson, Noomi
    et al.
    Reg Execut Off, Sweden.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ida-Klara
    Reg Execut Off, Sweden.
    Bergman, Paula
    Reg Execut Off, Sweden.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Exploring experiences among adopters during the diffusion of a novel dance intervention in Sweden2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1438697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a demand for interventions aimed at adolescent girls with psychosomatic problems. In 2013, positive results were reported from a dance intervention programme addressing girls with internalizing problems. The research team behind the intervention immediately received requests from municipalities and county councils interested in using the intervention. From an implementation point of view it is unclear what made the intervention spread without an active plan. The aim of this study was to explore adopters experiences about the diffusion and initiation of a public health intervention targeting adolescent girls with internalizing problems. Interviews were conducted with 12 people who were engaged in initiating the intervention in different settings. Data were analysed using conventional content analysis, yielding three categories: perceived appeal and trustworthiness, convenient information, and contextual factors. The results reflected that the participants found that there was a need for an intervention and found the dance intervention to be evidence based and not too complex to perform. Further, there was available information on the project which could easily be distributed to decision makers and others. When initiating the intervention, factors related to economy, possibility for collaboration and recruitment were of importance.

  • 24.
    Chow, Clara K.
    et al.
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hosp, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Thiagalingam, Aravinda
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hosp, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Santo, Karla
    Univ Sydney, Australia.
    Kok, Cindy
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Thakkar, Jay
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hosp, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Stepien, Sandrine
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Billot, Laurent
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Jan, Stephen
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Joshi, Rohina
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Hillis, Graham S.
    Univ Western Australia, Australia.
    Brieger, David
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Concord Repatriat Gen Hosp, Australia.
    Chew, Derek P.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Australia.
    Rådholm, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Atherton, John J.
    Royal Brisbane and Womens Hosp, Australia; Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Bhindi, Ravinay
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Australia.
    Collins, Nicholas
    John Hunter Hosp, Australia.
    Coverdale, Steven
    Sunshine Coast Univ Hosp, Australia.
    Hamilton-Craig, Christian
    Prince Charles Hosp, Australia; Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Kangaharan, Nadarajah
    Royal Darwin Hosp, Australia; Alice Springs Hosp, Australia.
    Maiorana, Andrew
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Fiona Stanley Hosp, Australia.
    McGrady, Michelle
    Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Australia.
    Shetty, Pratap
    Wollongong Hosp, Australia.
    Thompson, Peter
    Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Australia.
    Rogers, Anthony
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    Redfern, Julie
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hosp, Australia; Univ New South Wales, Australia.
    TEXT messages to improve MEDication adherence and Secondary prevention (TEXTMEDS) after acute coronary syndrome: a randomised clinical trial protocol2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 1, article id e019463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Identifying simple, low-cost and scalable means of supporting lifestyle change and medication adherence for patients following a cardiovascular (CV) event is important. Objective The TEXTMEDS (TEXT messages to improve MEDiGation adherence and Secondary prevention) study aims to investigate whether a cardiac education and support programme sent via mobile phone text message improves medication adherence and risk factor levels in patients following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Study design A single-blind, multicentre, randomised clinical trial of 1400 patients after an ACS with 12 months follow-up. The intervention group will receive multiple weekly text messages that provide information, motivation, support to adhere to medications, quit smoking (if relevant) and recommendations for healthy diet and exercise. The primary endpoint is the percentage of patients who are adherent to cardioprotective medications and the key secondary outcomes are mean systolic blood pressure (BP) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Secondary outcomes will also include total cholesterol, mean diastolic BP, the percentage of participants who are adherent to each cardioprotective medication class, the percentage of participants who achieve target levels of CV risk factors, major vascular events, hospital readmissions and all-cause mortality. The study will be augmented by formal economic and proGess evaluations to assess acceptability, utility and Gost-effectiveness. Summary The study will provide multicentre randomised trial evidence of the effects of a text message-based programme on cardioprotective medication adherence and levels of CV risk factors. Ethics and dissemination Primary ethics approval was received from Western Sydney Local Health District Human Research EthiGs Committee (HREC2012/12/4.1 (3648) AU RED HREC/13ANMEAD/15). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and presentations at international conferences.

  • 25.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Törnvall, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Education to Increase Skills in Research Methods among Clinicians in Health Care2017In: Journal of Health & Medical Informatics, ISSN 2157-7420, Vol. 8, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The aim of this study was to evaluate participants’ and managers’ experience of the design and content of an education programme. The Knowledge to Action (KTA) framework was applied to identify the steps of knowledge creation and action in the education programme.

    Methods

    Data were collected from 18 participants representing two groups: participants in the intervention and supervisors and managers. Two focus groups took place: two with participants in the intervention (4 and 3 in each) and one with eleven managers.

    Results

    All steps in the KTA framework were identified and discussed from several aspects. The importance of selecting projects that were relevant and added value in their clinics was mentioned by all participants. The participants also mentioned that after the education, they had further understanding and increased skills in how to be active and perform continuous improvement projects. The step in the KTA process regarding how to adapt knowledge to local context was not discussed explicitly by the participants or managers.

    Discussion

    Education in research methods and performing improvement projects to develop the clinic creates a more positive attitude to working with continuous improvement. The participant’s self-esteem and knowledge increased regarding how to work with improvements. It is important to have the manager’s support to perform a project. Emphasis was on knowledge inquiry and synthesis and presenting the results with or without possible solutions. The participants and managers talked about barriers and knowledge use more generally and at an organizational level. This means that the participants did not gain the last bit of nowledge needed to put the action into practice. This implies that the problem regarding lack of implementation skills in health care might remain.

  • 26.
    Detert, H.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Hedlund, S.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Rodvall, Y.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Whiteman, D. C.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Validation of sun exposure and protection index (SEPI) for estimation of sun habits2015In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 986-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In both Sweden and Australia high incidence rates of skin cancer have become a major health problem. In prevention and risk communication, it is important to have reliable ways for identifying people with risky sun habits. In this study the validity and reliability of the questionnaire Sun Exposure Protection Index (SEPI), developed to assess individuals sun habits and their propensity to increase sun protection during routine, often brief, clinical encounters, has been evaluated. The aim of our study was to evaluate validity and reliability of the proposed SEPI scoring instrument, in two countries with markedly different ultraviolet radiation environments (Sweden and Australia). Method: Two subpopulations in Sweden and Australia respectively were asked to fill out the SEPI together with the previously evaluated Readiness to Alter Sun Protective Behaviour questionnaire (RASP-B) and the associated Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire. To test reliability, the SEPI was again filled out by the subjects one month later. Results: Comparison between SEPI and the questions in the Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire, analyzed with Spearmans Rho, showed good correlations regarding sun habits. Comparison between SEPI and RASP-B regarding propensity to increase sun protection showed concurrently lower SEPI mean scores for action stage, but no difference between precontemplation and contemplation stages. The SEPI test-retest analysis indicated stability over time. Internal consistency of the SEPI, assessed with Cronbachs alpha estimation showed values marginally lower than the desired &gt;0.70 coefficient value generally recommended, and was somewhat negatively affected by the question on sunscreen use, likely related to the classic "sunscreen paradox". There were some differences in the performance of the SEPI between the Swedish and Australian samples, possibly due to the influence of "available" sunlight and differing attitudes to behaviour and protection "at home" and on vacation. Conclusions: SEPI appears to be a stable instrument with an overall acceptable validity and reliability, applicable for use in populations exposed to different UVR environments, in order to evaluate individual sun exposure and protection. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 27.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Rättsmedicinalverket, Linköping, Sweden.
    Clinical use of conventional reference intervals in the frail elderly2015In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectives

    Reference intervals provided by the laboratory are commonly established by measuring samples from apparently healthy subjects in the ages 18–65 years, excluding elderly individuals with chronic diseases and medication. The aim of our study was to establish whether current reference intervals for immune parameters and chemical biomarkers are valid for older individuals including those with chronic diseases, so-called frail elderly.

    Methods

    Data from our cohort of 138 non-infected nursing home residents (NHR), mean age 86.8 years, range 80–98, were compared with raw data, as basis for the development of reference intervals, obtained from reference populations, like blood donors (IgA, IgG, IgM, C3 and C4) and from the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP) (alanine aminotransferase, albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transferase, lactate dehydrogenase, phosphate, sodium and urea). Immune parameters were measured by nephelometry and in NORIP the measurements were performed by means of different routine methods, in more than 100 laboratories.

    Results

    Only nine individuals (7%) of NHR were found to be free from chronic disease. C3, C4 (P < 0.001) and IgG levels (P < 0.05) were higher, while IgM levels (P < 0.001) were lower in NHR compared with reference blood donors. Levels of alanine aminotransferase, phosphate (P < 0.001), albumin (P < 0.05) and sodium (P < 0.01) were lower while creatinine and urea levels were higher (P < 0.001) in NHR compared with NORIP subjects.

    Conclusion

    Comparing laboratory results from elderly people with conventional reference intervals can be misleading or even dangerous, as normal conditions may appear pathological, or vice versa and thus lead to unnecessary or even harmful treatment.

  • 28.
    Ekdahl, Anne W.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Mazya, Amelie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Wiklund, Rolf
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare the effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) as a complement to usual care in an outpatient setting with those of usual care alone. The assessment was performed 36 months after study inclusion. Design: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, single-center trial. Setting: A geriatric ambulatory unit in a municipality in the southeast of Sweden. Participants: Community-dwelling individuals aged &gt;= 75 years who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion. Participants were randomized to the intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). Intervention: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care for 24 to 31 months at the geriatric ambulatory unit in addition to usual care. Outcome measures: Mortality, transfer to nursing home, days in hospital, and total costs of health and social care after 36 months. Results: Mean age (SD) of participants was 82.5 (4.9) years. Participants in the IG (n = 208) lived 69 days longer than did those in the CG (n = 174); 27.9% (n = 58) of participants in the IG and 38.5% (n = 67) in the CG died (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.12, P =.026). The mean number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (15.1 [SD 18.4]) than in the CG (21.0 [SD 25.0], P =.01). Mean overall costs during the 36-month period did not differ between the IG and CG (USD 71,905 [SD 85,560] and USD 65,626 [SD 66,338], P =.43). Conclusions: CGA-based care resulted in longer survival and fewer days in hospital, without significantly higher cost, at 3 years after baseline. These findings add to the evidence of CGAs superiority over usual care in outpatient settings. As CGA-based care leads to important positive outcomes, this method should be used more extensively in the treatment of older people to meet their needs. (c) 2016 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.

  • 29.
    Enthoven, Paul
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Do pain characteristics guide selection for multimodal pain rehabilitation?2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine whether self-reported painmeasures are associated with selection for multimodalor multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MMR) andwhether this selection is influenced by sex.Design: Cross-sectional cohort study.Subjects: A total of 1,226 women and 464 men withchronic pain conditions from 2 university hospitals.Methods: Drawing from the Swedish Quality Registryfor Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP), data on pain, psychologicalsymptoms, function, health, and activity/participation were collected. Multiple logistic regressionwas used to investigate association of painmeasures with selection for MMR (no/yes) aftermultidisciplinary assessment. Covariates were: age,educational level, anxiety, depression, working status,and several pain measures.Results: High pain intensity in the previous week(odds ratio (OR) 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI)0.86–0.99) and high pain severity (MultidimensionalPain Inventory) (OR 0.83; 95% CI 0.74–0.95)were negatively associated with selection for MMR,whereas higher number of pain quadrants was positivelyassociated with selection for MMR. Similarresults were obtained for women, but none of themeasures was predictive for men.Conclusion: This practice-based study showed thathigher scores on self-reported pain were not associatedwith selection for MMR, and in women therewas a negative association for higher pain intensityand pain severity. Thus, other factors than pain determinewhether patients are selected for MMR.

  • 30.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    et al.
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, and Deptartment of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Andersson, Therese M-L
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The proportion cured of patients diagnosed with Stage III-IV cutaneous malignant melanoma in Sweden 1990-2007: A population-based study.2016In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 138, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The survival in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is highly dependent on the stage of the disease. Stage III-IV CMM patients are at high risk of relapse with a heterogeneous outcome, but not all experience excess mortality due to their disease. This group is referred to as the cure proportion representing the proportion of patients who experience the same mortality rate as the general population. The aim of this study was to estimate the cure proportion of patients diagnosed with Stage III-IV CMM in Sweden. From the population-based Swedish Melanoma Register, we included 856 patients diagnosed with primary Stage III-IV CMM, 1990-2007, followed-up through 2013. We used flexible parametric cure models to estimate cure proportions and median survival times (MSTs) of uncured by sex, age, tumor site, ulceration status (in Stage III patients) and disease stage. The standardized (over sex, age and site) cure proportion was lower in Stage IV CMMs (0.15, 95% CI 0.09-0.22) than non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs (0.48, 95% CI 0.41-0.55) with a statistically significant difference of 0.33 (95% CI = 0.24-0.41). Ulcerated Stage III CMMs had a cure proportion of 0.27 (95% CI 0.21-0.32) with a statistically significant difference compared to non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs (difference 0.21; 95% CI = 0.13-0.30). The standardized MST of uncured was approximately 9-10 months longer for non-ulcerated versus ulcerated Stage III CMMs. We could demonstrate a significantly better outcome in patients diagnosed with non-ulcerated Stage III CMMs compared to ulcerated Stage III CMMs and Stage IV disease after adjusting for age, sex and tumor site.

  • 31.
    Falk, Lars
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skov Jensen, Jorgen
    Microbiology and Infection Control, Sexually Transmitted Infections, Research and Development, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Successful outcome of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis after spectinomycin treatment: a case report2017In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 624-625Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hagesund, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    CBT-based group intervention for insomnia – a non-randomized trial in primary care2016In: Journal of Sleep Disorders and Therapy, ISSN 0972-5792, E-ISSN 2327-4123, Vol. 5, no 230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Insomnia is a major health problem, commonly leading to pharmacological treatment. During recent years, behavioural therapies have gained stronger therapeutic position, not least cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). The aim was to investigate the effect of a CBT-based group intervention for insomnia in primary care, by means of self-reported sleep quality and duration. In addition, cortisol in saliva, as a biological marker of stress was tested. Methods: Fifty participants with primary insomnia, attending primary care, were enrolled, 35 receiving the intervention, and 15 serving as control. The intervention group was recruited during the first two study years, and controls during a following third year, without randomization. The intervention included eight CBT-based group sessions, each two-hour long and led by a psychologist, with 4-6 participants in each group. Controls were handled in accordance with ordinary clinical routine, including pharmacological intervention. Sleep onset time, duration and quality were assessed before and after the intervention, by patients filling-out the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Insomnia severity was assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Also, cortisol in saliva levels were monitored. Results: In the intervention group, significant shortening of mean sleep onset time, from 60-27 min (p<0.05) was observed, and a prolongation of mean sleep duration time, from 298-358 min (p<0.05), in neither case seen in the control group, although between-group difference was not statistically significant. Both PSQI and ISI means scores were significantly improved in the intervention group, from 12.1 to 7.9 (p<0.05) and from 19.4 to 12.5 (p<0.01), respectively, in the latter case significantly more so than in the control group (p<0.05). No effect on cortisol levels was detected, in either group. In conclusion, the tested eight-session CBT-based group intervention for insomnia appears to reduce severity and duration of insomnia, and to shorten time before falling asleep, when provided in primary care.

  • 33.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Lagerfelt, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ahlström, Ulla
    Vårdcentralen Kungsgatan Linköping, Sweden Region Östergötland, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Modifierad brittisk modell kortade ledtid till datortomografi av kolon2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British national Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has presented guidelines based on signs and symptoms which should raise a suspicion of colorectal cancer. A slightly modified version of these guidelines, adapted to Swedish conditions, named Swedish NICE (sNICE) criteria, was implemented at eight primary care centres. By following the sNICE criteria, cases with higher degree of suspicion of colorectal cancer were advised for computer tomography (CT) of the colon, whereas cases of low degree of suspicion were advised for the considerably less time and patient demanding CT of the abdomen. For patients with isolated anal symptoms without presence of sNICE criteria, active expectancy for six weeks was recommended, followed by renewed consideration. Results showed that the ratio between CT colon and CT abdomen was reduced from 2.2 to 1.1 after introduction of the sNICE criteria. Also, the proportion of patients undergoing CT colon within two weeks from admittance was increased from 3 to 25 %. We conclude that the sNICE criteria may be a useful supportive tool for the primary care physician.

  • 34.
    Falla, D.
    et al.
    University Hospital Gottingen, Germany; University of Birmingham, England.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Soldini, E.
    University of Appl Science and Arts Southern Switzerland SUPSI, Switzerland.
    Schneebeli, A.
    University of Appl Science and Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Barbero, M.
    University of Appl Science and Arts Southern Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Perceived pain extent is associated with disability, depression and self-efficacy in individuals with whiplash-associated disorders2016In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1490-1501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundCompletion of a pain drawing is a familiar task in those presenting with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Some people report pain almost over their entire body. Yet the reasons for larger pain extent have not been fully explored. MethodsA novel method was applied to quantify pain extent from the pain drawings of 205 individuals with chronic WAD. Pain extent was evaluated in relation to sex, age, educational level, insurance status and financial status. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to verify whether pain extent was associated with other health indicators including perceived pain and disability, health-related quality of life, pain catastrophizing, anxiety, depression and self-efficacy. ResultsPain extent was influenced by sex ((2):10.392, pamp;lt;0.001) with larger pain extent in women compared to men (7.887.66% vs. 5.406.44%). People with unsettled insurance claims ((2): 7.500, pamp;lt;0.05) and those with a worse financial situation ((2):12.223, pamp;lt;0.01) also had larger pain extent. Multiple linear regression models revealed that, when accounting for age, sex, education, insurance status, financial status and neck pain intensity, pain extent remained associated with perceived disability (pamp;lt;0.01), depression (pamp;lt;0.05) and self-efficacy (pamp;lt;0.001). ConclusionBy utilizing a novel method for pain extent quantification, this study shows that widespread pain is associated with a number of factors including perceived disability, depression and self-efficacy in individuals with chronic WAD. Widespread pain should alert the clinician to consider more specific psychological screening, particularly for depression and self-efficacy, in patients with WAD. What does this study add?Women with chronic WAD, those with unsettled insurance claims and those with poorer financial status perceive more widespread pain. When controlling for these factors, larger pain areas remain associated with perceived pain and disability, depression and self-efficacy. The pain drawing is useful to support psychological screening in people with chronic WAD.

  • 35.
    Gabrielsson-Järhult, Felicia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Economou, Konstantin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society and Media Production - KSM. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Co-operative Care Planning in Theory and Practice2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Garvin, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Levels Predict First-Time Coronary Heart Disease: An 8-Year Follow-Up of a Community-Based Middle Aged Population2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, p. e0138290-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The enzyme in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 has been suggested to be an important determinant of plaque degradation. While several studies have shown elevated levels in patients with coronary heart disease, results in prospective population based studies evaluating MMP-9 in relation to first time coronary events have been inconclusive. As of today, there are four published studies which have measured MMP-9 in serum and none using plasma. Measures of MMP-9 in serum have been suggested to have more flaws than measures in plasma. Aim To investigate the independent association between plasma levels of MMP-9 and first-time incidence of coronary events in an 8-year follow-up. Material and Methods 428 men and 438 women, aged 45-69 years, free of previous coronary events and stroke at baseline, were followed-up. Adjustments were made for sex, age, socioeconomic position, behavioral and cardiovascular risk factors, chronic disease at baseline, depressive symptoms, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein. Results 53 events were identified during a risk-time of 6 607 person years. Hazard ratio (HR) for MMP-9 after adjustment for all covariates were HR = 1.44 (1.03 to 2.02, p = 0.033). Overall, the effect of adjustments for other cardiovascular risk factors was low. Conclusion Levels of plasma MMP-9 are independently associated with risk of first-time CHD events, regardless of adjustments. These results are in contrast to previous prospective population-based studies based on MMP-9 in serum. It is essential that more studies look at MMP-9 levels in plasma to further evaluate the association with first coronary events.

  • 37.
    Garvin, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Evalill
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The joint subclinical elevation of CRP and IL-6 is associated with lower health-related quality of life in comparison with no elevation or elevation of only one of the biomarkers2016In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 213-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQoL), like the Short Form (SF)-36, have been suggested to correlate with inflammatory biomarkers. It is, however, unclear whether a joint measure of two inflammatory biomarkers would bring additional information in comparison with evaluation of one inflammatory biomarker. To evaluate associations between SF-36 and low-grade inflammation in a Swedish population, with emphasis on a combined measure of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a proxy for low-grade inflammation. In a randomly selected sample of a middle-aged Swedish general population (n = 905; aged 45-69 years, 50 % women), relations between SF-36 parameters and the biomarkers were tested. Regression and correlation analyses were adjusted for sex, age, presence of disease, lifestyle, and psychological factors. After adjustment for sex and age, HRQoL was significantly lower in the group with a joint elevation of CRP and IL-6 in comparison with either the group with no elevation or the groups showing elevation of one of the two biomarkers. Also after full adjustments, the combined measure of elevated CRP and IL-6, with few exceptions, was associated with significantly lower HRQoL in comparison with elevations in one of them, difference ranging from 4 (Mental Health scale) to 18 scale steps (Role-Physical scale). This study confirms that there is a relationship between HRQoL and low-grade inflammation. In particular, SF-36 scores are significantly lower in a group with joint elevation of IL-6 and CRP, in comparison with elevation of either one of them.

  • 38.
    Gerdle, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Stenberg, Gunilla
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. 5 Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Weak outcome predictors of multimodal rehabilitation at one-year follow-up in patients with chronic pain-a practice based evidence study from two SQRP centres.2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic pain, the heterogeneity of clinical presentations makes it difficult to identify patients who would benefit from multimodal rehabilitation programs (MMRP). Yet, there is limited knowledge regarding the predictors of MMRP's outcomes. This study identifies predictors of outcome of MMRPs at a 12-month follow-up (FU-12) based on data from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP).

    METHODS: Patients with chronic pain from two clinical departments in Sweden completed the SQRP questionnaires-background, pain characteristics, psychological symptoms, function, activity/participation, health and quality of life-on three occasions: 1) during their first visit; 2) immediately after the completion of their MMRP; and 3) 12 months after completing the MMRP (n = 227). During the FU-12, the patients also retrospectively reported their global impressions of any changes in their perception of pain and their ability to handle their life situation in general.

    RESULTS: Significant improvements were found for pain, psychological symptoms, activity/participation, health, and quality of life aspects with low/medium strong effects. A general pattern was observed from the analyses of the changes from baseline to FU-12; the largest improvements in outcomes were significantly associated with poor situations according to their respective baseline scores. Although significant regressors of the investigated outcomes were found, the significant predictors were weak and explained a minor part of the variation in outcomes (15-25%). At the FU-12, 53.6% of the patients reported that their pain had decreased and 80.1% reported that their life situation in general had improved. These improvements were associated with high education, low pain intensity, high health level, and work importance (only pain perception). The explained variations were low (9-11%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Representing patients in real-world clinical settings, this study confirmed systematic reviews that outcomes of MMRP are associated with broad positive effects. A mix of background and baseline variables influenced the outcomes investigated, but the explained variations in outcomes were low. There is still a need to develop standardized and relatively simple outcomes that can be used to evaluate MMRP in trials, in clinical evaluations at group level, and for individual patients.

  • 39.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Osteoporosis School in Primary Health Care-A Pilot Study2017In: HSOA Journal of Orthopedic Research & Physiotherapy, ISSN 2381-2052, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An osteoporosis school was introduced as a pilot study in a Swedish primary health care center. Women aged 50 years and over with healed fragility fractures were asked to participate. The aim was to increase awareness amongst the participants and to advise them about life-style and fall prevention strategies to prevent a secondary fragility fracture. The osteoporosis school was scheduled to once a week for eight weeks and included theory and exercise training sessions. Eleven women with mean age 74 years participated. Clinical tests such as back straightening test and balance tests were performed, pain was estimated by the visual analogue scale, and health-related quality of life was measured by the SF-36 questionnaire. Straightening of the back improved 0.6 cm (p<0.05), worst estimated pain decreased from 5.8 to 4.0 (p<0.05), and the SF-36 bodily pain domain improved (p<0.05). The participants completed an average of 7 out of 8 sessions. The exercise training sessions were the most appreciated part of the program.

  • 40.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Would the first fragility fracture be tha last one: a physiotherapeutic perspective2017In: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 2398-3353, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala.
    Salminen, Helena
    Division of Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Long-term effects of a ten-year osteoporosis intervention program in a Swedish population-A cross-sectional study.2017In: Preventive medicine reports, ISSN 2211-3355, Vol. 5, p. 295-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to explore long-term effects seven years after the completion of a ten-year community-based osteoporosis intervention program in Vadstena, Sweden. The association between calcaneal bone mineral density and several life style factors, and the impact of risk factors for sustaining a fracture after the age of 50 were also studied. Previous participants in the intervention group, and matched subjects were invited to calcaneal bone mass measurement by a portable device including the dual X-ray and laser (DXL) technology by Calscan, and to complete a questionnaire in 2006. A total of 417 persons (63% of those invited) in the intervention (I) group, and 120 persons (47% of those invited) in the control (C) group participated. Mean age was 63 years (37-94 years). There was somewhat more knowledge of osteoporosis in the I-group (M = 18) than in the C-group (M = 17) (p < 0.05), and more use of shoe/cane spikes in elderly women in the I-group (67%) than in the C-group (40.5%). The fully adjusted model of logistic regression showed that participants with an osteoporotic DXL T-score (≤- 2.5) had a 3-fold increased risk (95%CI 1.48-6.89) of having a history of a self-reported fracture after the age of fifty compared to women with a calcaneal T-score >- 2.5. The long-term effects of a ten-year, community-based, osteoporosis intervention program on knowledge and behavior were modest seven years after its completion.

  • 42.
    Granström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Molarius, Anu
    Vastmanland County Council, Sweden.
    Garvin, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elo, Sirkka
    Örebro County Council, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala County Council, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Exploring trends in and determinants of educational inequalities in self-rated health2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 677-686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Educational inequalities in self-rated health (SRH) in European welfare countries are documented, but recent trends in these inequalities are less well understood. We examined educational inequalities in SRH in different age groups, and the contribution of selected material, behavioural and psychosocial determinants from 2000 to 2008. Methods: Data were derived from cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2000, 2004 and 2008 including 37,478, 34,876 and 32,982 respondents, respectively, aged 25-75 in mid-Sweden. Inequalities were analysed by age-standardized and age-stratified rate ratios of poor SRH and age-standardized prevalence of determinants, and contribution of determinants by age-adjusted logistic regression. Results: Relative educational inequalities in SRH increased among women from 2000 (rate ratio (RR) 1.70, 95% CI 1.55-1.85) to 2008 (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.90-2.26), but were unchanged among men (RR 1.91-2.01). The increase among women was mainly due to growing inequalities in the age group 25-34 years. In 2008, significant age differences emerged with larger inequalities in the youngest compared with the oldest age group in both genders. All determinants were more prevalent in low educational groups; the most prominent were lack of a financial buffer, smoking and low optimism. Educational differences were unchanged over the years for most determinants. In all three surveys, examined determinants together explained a substantial part of the educational inequalities in SRH. Conclusions: Increased relative educational health inequalities among women, and persisting inequalities among men, were paralleled by unchanged, large differences in material/structural, behavioural and psychosocial factors. Interventions to reduce these inequalities need to focus on early mid-life.

  • 43.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Viktorsson, Lisa
    Carlsson, Ann-Kristin
    Jones, Michael P.
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Olsen Faresjö, Ashild
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    More negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among patients diagnosed with IBS compared with patients without IBS - a case-control study in primary care2015In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, relapsing gastrointestinal disorder,that affects approximately 10% of the general population and the majority are diagnosed  in primary care. IBS has been reported to be associated with altered psychological and cognitive functioning such as mood disturbances, somatization, catastrophizing or altered visceral interoception by negative emotions and stress. The aim was to  investigate the psychosocial constructs of self-esteem and sense of coherence among IBS patients compared to non-IBS patients in primary care.     

    Methods

    A case–control study in primary care setting among IBS patients meeting the ROME III         criteria (n = 140) compared to controls i.e. non-IBS patients (n = 213) without any         present or previous gastrointestinal complaints. The data were collected through self-reportedquestionnaires of psychosocial factors.     

    Results

    IBS-patients reported significantly more negative self-esteem (p < 0.001), lower scores         for positive self-esteem (p < 0.001), and lower sense of coherence (p < 0.001) than the controls. The IBS-cases were also less likely to report ‘good’ health status (p < 0.001) and less likely to report a positive belief in the future (p < 0.001). After controlling for relevant confounding factors in multiple regressions, the elevation  in negative self-esteem among IBS patients remained statistically significant (p =0.02), as did the lower scores for sense of coherence among IBS cases (p = 0.04).     

    Conclusions

    The more frequently reported negative self-esteem and inferior coping strategies among         IBS patients found in this study suggest the possibility that psychological therapies         might be helpful for these patients. However these data do not indicate the causal         direction of the observed associations. More research is therefore warranted to determine whether these psychosocial constructs are more frequent in IBS patients.

  • 44.
    Hallgren Elfgren, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Törnvall, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    The Swedish National Diabetes Register in clinical practice and evaluation in primary health care2016In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 549-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this project is to describe the use of the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) in clinical practice in a Swedish county and to specifically monitor the diabetes care routines at two separate primary health-care centres (PHCC) with a special focus on older patients. Background: According to Swedish law, all health-care units have to maintain a system for quality evaluation and improvement. As the NDR holds the most important quality indicators, implementation of the NDR in primary care was carried out by an implementation project in 2002-2005. Methods: Initially, a digital questionnaire about NDR routines was sent to all PHCC. Statistics about hemoglobin adult 1c (HbA1c) and blood pressure (BP) was presented for the diabetes teams at two centres who were also interviewed. The responses became the basis for a focus group interview with both teams together, with data subject to content analysis. Findings: The study showed that reporting to the NDR has become a compulsory routine in primary care. The diabetes nurse specialist was responsible for the practical management of the register and used the NDR for continuous monitoring of the patients. Most centres used the NDRs statistics for evaluation and analyses annually. The diabetes nurse adapted the visits to the patients wishes and general condition. Only in terms of target values for HbA1c and BP did they accept slightly higher values for the older patients. Since the NDR was implemented, the registration rate has remained at 75% and has not increased. The reason given was that patients with diabetes living in nursing homes are checked up by the municipal nurse who does not use the NDR. However, the risk of omitting older patients in the NDR could be considerably decreased if data could be transferred from the electronic patient record.

  • 45.
    Hasselgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Malago, Massimo
    UCL, England.
    Vyas, Soumil
    UCL, England.
    Robles Campos, Ricardo
    Vizgen De La Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Brusadin, Roberto
    Vizgen De La Arrixaca University Hospital, Spain.
    Linecker, Michael
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Petrowsky, Henrik
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Clavien, Pierre Alain
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Machado, Marcel Autran
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto
    University of Rochester, NY USA.
    Wanis, Kerollos
    Western University, Canada.
    Walter, Lars
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not affect future liver remnant growth and outcomes of associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy2017In: Surgery, ISSN 0039-6060, E-ISSN 1532-7361, Vol. 161, no 5, p. 1255-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The only potentially curative treatment for patients with colorectal liver metastases is hepatectomy. Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy has emerged as a method of treatment for patients with inadequate future liver remnant. One concern about associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy is that preoperative chemotherapy may negatively affect the volume increase of the future liver remnant and outcomes. Methods. This study from the International Associating Liver Partition and Portal Vein Ligation for Staged Hepatectomy Registry (NCT01924741) includes 442 patients with colorectal liver metastases registered from 2012-2016. Future liver remnant hypertrophy (absolute increase, percent increase, and kinetic growth rate) and clinical outcome were analyzed retrospectively in relation to type and amount of chemotherapy. The analyzed groups included patients with no chemotherapy, 1 regimen of chemotherapy, amp;gt; 1 regimen, and a group that received monoclonal antibodies in addition to chemotherapy. Results. Ninety percent of the patients received neoadjuvant oncologic therapy including 42% with 1 regimen of chemotherapy, 44% with monoclonal antibodies, and 4% with amp;gt; 1 regimen. Future liver remnant increased between 74-92% with the largest increase in the group with 1 regimen of chemotherapy. The increase in milliliters was between 241 mL (amp;gt; 1 regimen) and 306 mL (1 regimen). Kinetic growth rate was between 14-18% per week and was greatest for the group with 1 regimen of chemotherapy. No statistical significance was found between the groups with any of the measurements of future liver remnant hypertrophy. Conclusion. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, including monoclonal antibodies, does not negatively affect future liver remnant growth. Patients with colorectal liver metastases who might be potential candidates for associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy should be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (Surgery 2017;161:1255-65.)

  • 46.
    Holtedahl, Knut
    et al.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway.
    Hjertholm, Peter
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Donker, Ge A.
    NIVEL Primary Care Database, Netherlands.
    Buntinx, Frank
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Weller, David
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Braaten, Tonje
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway.
    Mansson, Jorgen
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Eva Lena
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Campbell, Christine
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Korevaar, Joke C.
    NIVEL Primary Care Database, Netherlands.
    Parajuli, Ranjan
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Norway.
    Abdominal symptoms and cancer in the abdomen: prospective cohort study in European primary care2018In: British Journal of General Practice, ISSN 0960-1643, E-ISSN 1478-5242, Vol. 68, no 670, p. E301-E310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Different abdominal symptoms may signal cancer, but their role is unclear. Aim To examine associations between abdominal symptoms and subsequent cancer diagnosed in the abdominal region. Design and setting Prospective cohort study comprising 493 GPs from surgeries in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Method Over a 10-day period, the GPs recorded consecutive consultations and noted: patients who presented with abdominal symptoms prespecified on the registration form; additional data on non-specific symptoms; and features of the consultation. Eight months later, data on all cancer diagnoses among all study patients in the participating general practices were requested from the GPs. Results Consultations with 61 802 patients were recorded and abdominal symptoms were documented in 6264 (10.1%) patients. Malignancy, both abdominal and non-abdominal, was subsequently diagnosed in 511 patients (0.8%). Among patients with a new cancer in the abdomen (n = 251), 175 (69.7%) were diagnosed within 180 days after consultation. In a multivariate model, the highest sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was for the single symptom of rectal bleeding (HR 19.1, 95% confidence interval = 8.7 to 41.7). Positive predictive values of amp;gt; 3% were found for macroscopic haematuria, rectal bleeding, and involuntary weight loss, with variations according to age and sex. The three symptoms relating to irregular bleeding had particularly high specificity in terms of colorectal, uterine, and bladder cancer. Conclusions A patient with undiagnosed cancer may present with symptoms or no symptoms. Irregular bleeding must always be explained. Abdominal pain occurs with all types of abdominal cancer and several symptoms may signal colorectal cancer. The findings are important as they influence how GPs think and act, and how they can contribute to an earlier diagnosis of cancer.

  • 47.
    Holtedahl, Knut
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Vedsted, Peter
    Aarhus University, Research Unit for General Practice, Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care, Denmark.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Donker, Gé A.
    NIVEL Primary Care Database, Sentinel Practices, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Buntinx, Frank
    Dept of General Practice, KULeuven, Belgium, and Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Weller, David
    Usher Institute for Population Health Sciences and Medical Informatics, The University of Edinburgh, Doorway 1, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    Braaten, Tonje
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Hjertholm, Peter
    Aarhus University, Research Unit for General Practice, Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care, Denmark.
    Månsson, Jörgen
    Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strandberg, Eva Lena
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Family Medicine/General Practice, Sweden.
    Campbell, Christine
    Usher Institute for Population Health Sciences and Medical Informatics, The University of Edinburgh, Doorway 1, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG, Scotland, UK.
    Ellegaard, Lisbeth
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Parajuli, Ranjan
    Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Abdominal symptoms in general practice: Frequency, cancer suspicions raised, and actions taken by GPs in six European countries. Cohort study with prospective registration of cancer2017In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 3, no 6, article id e00328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abdominal symptoms are diagnostically challenging to general practitioners (GPs): although common, they may indicate cancer. In a prospective cohort of patients, we examined abdominal symptom frequency, initial diagnostic suspicion, and actions of GPs in response to abdominal symptoms.

  • 48.
    Horner, Patrick J
    et al.
    School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK.
    Karla, Blee
    Bristol Sexual Health Centre, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, UK.
    Falk, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    van der Meijden, W
    Department of Dermatology, New Cross Hospital, UK..
    Moi, H.
    Olafia Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Institute of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
    2016 European Guideline on the management of non-gonococcal urethritis2016In: International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), ISSN 0956-4624, E-ISSN 1758-1052, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 928-937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the updated International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections guideline for the management of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. This guideline recommends confirmation of urethritis in symptomatic men before starting treatment. It does not recommend testing asymptomatic men for the presence of urethritis. All men with urethritis should be tested for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and ideally M. genitalium using a NAAT as this is highly likely to improve clinical outcomes. If a NAAT is positive for gonorrhoea, a culture should be performed before treatment. In view of the increasing evidence that azithromycin 1 g may result in the development of antimicrobial resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium azithromycin 1 g is no longer recommended as first line therapy, which should be doxycycline 100 mg bd for 7 days. If azithromycin is to be prescribed an extended of 500 mg, then 250 mg daily for 4 days is to be preferred over 1 g stat. In men with persistent NGU, M. genitalium NAAT testing is recommended if not previously undertaken, as is Trichomonas vaginalis NAAT testing in populations where T. vaginalis is detectable in >2% of symptomatic women.

  • 49.
    Hägerlind, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Löfstedt, Tommy
    Computational Solutions, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindholm-Sethson, Britta
    Computational Solutions, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bodén, Ida
    Ivida AB, Umeå.
    Near infrared and skin impedance spectroscopy - a possible support in the diagnostic process of skin tumours in primary health care.2015In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 493-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: The global incidence of skin cancer has increased drastically in recent decades, especially in Australia and Northern Europe. Early detection is crucial for good prognosis and high survival rates. In general, primary care physicians have considerably lower sensitivity and specificity rates for detection of skin cancer, compared to dermatologists. A probable main reason for this is that current diagnostic tools are subjective in nature, and therefore diagnostic skills highly depend on experience. Illustratively, in Sweden, approximately 155 500 benign skin lesions are excised unnecessarily every year. An objective instrument, added to the clinical examination, might improve the diagnostic accuracy, and thus promote earlier detection of malignant skin tumours, as well as reduce medical costs associated with unnecessary biopsies and excisions. The general aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of the combination of near infrared (NIR) and skin impedance spectroscopy as a supportive tool in the diagnosis and evaluation of skin tumours in primary health care.

    METHODS: Near infrared and skin impedance data were collected by performing measurements on suspect malignant, premalignant and benign tumours in the skin of patients seeking primary health care for skin tumour evaluation. The obtained data were analysed using multivariate analysis and compared with the diagnosis received by the conventional diagnostic process.

    RESULTS: The observed sensitivity and specificity rates were both 100%, when discriminating malignant and premalignant skin tumours from benign skin tumours, and the observed sensitivity and specificity for separating malignant skin tumours from premalignant and benign skin tumours were also 100%, respectively.

    CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that the NIR and skin impedance spectroscopy may be a useful supportive tool for the general practitioner in the diagnosis and evaluation of skin tumours in primary health care, as a complement to the visual assessment.

  • 50.
    Ingves, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vilhelmsson, Nathalie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A randomized cross-over study of the effects of macronutrient composition and meal frequency on GLP-1, ghrelin and energy expenditure in humans2017In: Peptides, ISSN 0196-9781, E-ISSN 1873-5169, Vol. 93, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Little is known about human postprandial increase of energy expenditure and satiety-associated hormones in relation to both meal frequency and macronutrient composition. Design: Randomized cross-over study with four conditions for each participant. Methods: Seven men and seven women (mean age 23 +/- 1.5 years) were randomly assigned to the order of intake of a 750 kcal drink with the same protein content while having either 20 energy-percent (E%) or 55 E% from carbohydrates and the remaining energy from fat. Participants were also randomized to consume the drinks as one large beverage or as five 150 kcal portions every 30 min, starting in the fasting state in the morning. Energy expenditure (EE) was determined every 30 min by indirect calorimetry. Hormonal responses and suppression of hunger (by visual-analogue scales) were also studied. A p amp;lt; 0.013 was considered statistically significant following Bonferroni-correction. Results: The area under the curve (AUC) for EE was higher during the 2.5 h after the high-carbohydrate drinks (p = 0.005 by Wilcoxon) and also after ingesting one drink compared with five (p = 0.004). AUC for serum active GLP-1 was higher after single drinks compared with five beverages (p = 0.002). Although GLP-1 levels remained particularly high at the end of the test during the low-carbohydrate meals, the AUC did not differ compared with the high-carbohydrate occasions (low-carbohydrate: 58.9 +/- 18 pg/ml/h, high-carbohydrate: 45.2 +/- 16 pg/ml/h, p = 0.028). Hunger sensations were suppressed more after single beverages compared with five small drinks (p = 0.009). Conclusions: We found higher EE during 2.5 h following one large drink compared with five smaller beverages. Since hunger was also suppressed more efficiently, and serum GLP-1 levels were higher after one compared with five smaller drinks, our findings do not support nibbling to avoid hunger or to keep up EE from morning to noon.

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