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  • 1.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp Trust, Norway; Inland Norway Univ Appl Sci, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Still reduced cardiovascular mortality 12 years after supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years: A validation of previous 10-year follow-up results of a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial in elderly2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0193120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Selenium and coenzyme Q10 are both necessary for optimal cell function in the body. The intake of selenium is low in Europe, and the endogenous production of coenzyme Q10 decreases as age increases. Therefore, an intervention trial using selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years as a dietary supplement was performed. The main publication reported reduced cardiovascular mortality as a result of the intervention. In the present sub-study the objective was to determine whether reduced cardiovascular (CV) mortality persisted after 12 years, in the supplemented population or in subgroups with diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease or reduced functional capacity due to impaired cardiac function. Methods From a rural municipality in Sweden, four hundred forty-three healthy elderly individuals were included. All cardiovascular mortality was registered, and no participant was lost to the follow-up. Based on death certificates and autopsy results, mortality was registered. Findings After 12 years a significantly reduced CV mortality could be seen in those supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10, with a CV mortality of 28.1% in the active treatment group, and 38.7% in the placebo group. A multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated a reduced CV mortality risk in the active treatment group (HR: 0.59; 95% CI 0.42-0.81; P = 0.001). In those with ischemic heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and impaired functional capacity we demonstrated a significantly reduced CV mortality risk. Conclusions This is a 12-year follow-up of a group of healthy elderly participants that were supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years. Even after twelve years we observed a significantly reduced risk for CV mortality in this group, as well as in subgroups of patients with diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease or impaired functional capacity. The results thus validate the results obtained in the 10-year evaluation. The protective action was not confined to the intervention period, but persisted during the follow-up period. The mechanisms behind this effect remain to be fully elucidated, although various effects on cardiac function, oxidative stress, fibrosis and inflammation have previously been identified. Since this was a small study, the observations should be regarded as hypothesis-generating.

  • 2.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hosp, Norway; Hedmark Univ Coll, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Norway.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Less fibrosis in elderly subjects supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10A mechanism behind reduced cardiovascular mortality?2018In: Biofactors, ISSN 0951-6433, E-ISSN 1872-8081, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 137-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In an intervention study where 221 healthy elderly persons received selenium and coenzyme Q10 as a dietary supplement, and 222 received placebo for 4 years we observed improved cardiac function and reduced cardiovascular mortality. As fibrosis is central in the aging process, we investigated the effect of the intervention on biomarkers of fibrogenic activity in a subanalysis of this intervention study. Material and Methods: In the present subanalysis 122 actively treated individuals and 101 controls, the effect of the treatment on eight biomarkers of fibrogenic activity were assessed. These biomarkers were: Cathepsin S, Endostatin, Galectin 3, Growth Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF-15), Matrix Metalloproteinases 1 and 9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP 1) and Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 (ST-2). Blood concentrations of these biomarkers after 6 and 42 months were analyzed by the use of T-tests, repeated measures of variance, and factor analyses. Results: Compared with placebo, in those receiving supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, all biomarkers except ST2 showed significant decreased concentrations in blood. The changes in concentrations, that is, effects sizes as given by partial eta(2) caused by the intervention were considered small to medium. Conclusion: The significantly decreased biomarker concentrations in those on active treatment with selenium and coenzyme Q10 compared with those on placebo after 36 months of intervention presumably reflect less fibrogenic activity as a result of the intervention. These observations might indicate that reduced fibrosis precedes the reported improvement in cardiac function, thereby explaining some of the positive clinical effects caused by the intervention. (c) 2017 BioFactors, 44(2):137-147, 2018

  • 3.
    Bielsten, Therese
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lasrado, Reena
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Keady, John
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Living Life and Doing Things Together: Collaborative Research With Couples Where One Partner Has a Diagnosis of Dementia2018In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1719-1734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to identify relevant content for a self-management guide by using the outcomes of previous research in combination with knowledge and experiences from couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia. The study was carried out in three phases: (a) literature search of previous research related to well-being and couplehood in dementia; (b) interviews with couples with dementia based on the findings of the literature search; and (c) further authentication of the findings within expert groups of people with dementia and carers. For analysis of data, we used a hybrid approach of thematic analysis with combined deductive and inductive approaches. The findings of this study indicated that the four main themes Home and Neighborhood, Meaningful Activities and Relationships, Approach and Empowerment, and Couplehood with related subthemes could be appropriate targets for a self-management guide for couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia.

  • 4.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    Cty Hosp Ryhov, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Sjöblom, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ödeshög.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular systolic function as measured by left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain2018In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 17, article id 113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and heart failure but it is unclear to which extent it is related to left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The aim of the study was to explore the effects of overweight and obesity on left ventricular systolic function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and a control group of non-diabetic persons. Methods: We prospectively investigated 384 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 184 controls who participated in the CARDIPP and CAREFUL studies. The participants were grouped according to body mass index (normal weight amp;lt; 25 kg/m(2), overweight 25-29 kg/m(2), and obesity amp;gt;= 30 kg/m(2) ). Echocardiography was performed at the beginning of the study and after 4-years in the patient group. Results: Univariable and multivariable regression analysis revealed that variations in left ventricular ejection fraction, global longitudinal strain, left ventricular mass and diastolic function expressed as E/e (the ratio between early diastolic mitral flow and annular motion velocities) all are related to body mass index. The mean and standard deviation of left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain values were 57% (8%) vs. - 18.6% (2.3%) for normal weight patients, 53% (8%) vs. - 17.5% (2.3%) for overweight, and 49% (9%) vs. - 16.2% (3.0%) for obese (p amp;lt; 0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Corresponding results in the control group were 58% (6%) vs. -22.3% (3.0%), 55% (7%) vs. - 20.8% (3.1%) and 54% (8%) - 19.6% (4.0%) (p amp;lt;0.05 vs. p amp;lt;0.05). Patients who gained weight from baseline to follow-up changed left ventricular ejection fraction (median and interquartile range) by - 1.0 (9.0) % (n =187) and patients who lost weight changed left ventricular ejection fraction by 1.0 (10.0) % (n =179) (p amp;lt;0.05). Conclusion: Overweight and obesity impair left ventricular ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain in both patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-diabetic persons.

  • 5.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Tegelström, Valerie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekblad, Erik
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Usability of RemindMe – An Interactive Web-Based Mobile Reminder Calendar:: A Professional's Perspective2015In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics / [ed] Cecilia Sik-Lányi, Evert-Jan Hoogerwerf, Klaus Miesenberger, Peter Cudd, IOS Press, 2015, 217, Vol. 217, p. 1083p. 247-254Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the usability of an interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar (RemindMe) developed for supporting individuals in organizing, planning and executing activities in everyday life, from the perspectives of professionals.

    Methods and material: Eleven professionals working in community services evaluated the usability of RemindMe in their clinical practice. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analysed with inductive qualitative analysis.

    Results: The professionals perceived that RemindMe was useful, easy to use, and intuitive. There was a need among professionals for a web-based reminder calendar that requires the active acknowledgement of reminders. RemindMe's feedback system offering self-monitored information based on the user's interaction with the system supported the professionals in discussions, evaluation, and follow-up based on the needs of the persons with cognitive impairments.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that RemindMe may be potentially useful to professionals who provide support to individuals with cognitive impairments. However, further research is needed to evaluate experience of using RemindMe from the perspective of individuals with cognitive impairments.

  • 6.
    Dahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Region Östergötland.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Lund Hosp, Sweden; KI, Sweden.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Does comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in an outpatient care setting affect the causes of death and the quality of palliative care? A subanalysis of the age-FIT study2019In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 455-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Key summary pointsAimDoes comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) affect the causes of death and the quality of palliative care when patients receive care at the end of life when in an outpatient care setting compared to usual care?FindingsCGA does not affect the causes of death. CGA affects the frequency of referral to specialised palliative care teams, but CGA does not affect the quality of palliative care given to the patients. These effects are measured in outpatient care settings and in comparison with usual care.MessageFurther studies are needed to evaluate the CGA effects on causes of death and palliative care quality in outpatient care settings. AbstractPurposeThe purposes of this study were to retrospectively study whether comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) given to community-dwelling old patients with high health care usage has effects regarding: (1) the cause of death and (2) the quality of the provided palliative care when compared to patients without CGA-based care.MethodThis study includes secondary data from a randomised controlled trial (RCT) with 382 participants that took place in the periods 2011-2013. The present study examines all electronical medical records (EMR) from the deceased patients in the original study regarding cause of death [intervention group (IG) N=51/control group (CG) N=66] and quality of palliative care (IG N=33/CG N=41). Descriptive and comparative statistics were produced and the significance level was set at pamp;lt;0.05.ResultsThe causes of death in both groups were dominated by cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases with no statistical difference between the groups. Patients in the intervention group had a higher degree of support from specialised palliative care teams than had the control group (p=0.01).ConclusionThe present study in an outpatient context cannot prove any effects of CGA on causes of death. The study shows that CGA in outpatient care means a higher rate of specialised palliative care, but the study cannot show any effects on the palliative quality parameters measured. Further studies with statistical power are needed.

  • 7.
    Danielsson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindvall, Björn
    University Hospital Örebro, Sweden.
    Hallert, Claes
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Increased prevalence of celiac disease in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies2017In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 7, no 10, article id e00803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesIdiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are often associated with other immune-mediated diseases or malignancy. Some studies have reported a high frequency of celiac disease in IIM. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of celiac disease, systemic inflammatory diseases, and malignancy in a cohort of IIM patients, and estimate the incidence of IIM in the county of ostergotland, Sweden. Material and MethodsWe reviewed medical records and analyzed sera from 106 patients, fulfilling pathological criteria of inflammatory myopathy, for the presence of IgA antibodies against endomysium and gliadin. Antibody-positive patients were offered further investigation with small bowel biopsy or investigation for the presence of antibodies against antitissue transglutaminase (t-TG). The patients were classified according to Bohan and Peter or Griggs criteria. The presence of celiac disease, systemic inflammatory, and malignant diseases was documented. ResultsFour of 88 patients classified as IIM (4.5%) had biopsy-confirmed celiac disease, which is higher than the prevalence in the general population, detected with a similar screening procedure (0.53%). Thirty-three patients (38%) had a systemic inflammatory disease and five (5.7%) a malignancy. The incidence of confirmed IIM in the county of ostergotland was 7.3 per million/year. ConclusionsThe results highlight the high frequency of associated inflammatory and malignant diseases and confirm an increased prevalence of celiac disease in IIM.

  • 8.
    Davidson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindelof, Ann
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Wallen, Torbjorn
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Vastervik Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly - A randomised controlled study2015In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 298-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to assess clinical effectiveness and costs of launching point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling frail elderly patients. A prospective multicentre controlled randomised study over 12 months comparing a point-of-care strategy with usual monitoring routines was carried out in primary healthcare centres and anticoagulation clinics in southeast Sweden. The subjects were community dwelling elderly across rural southeast Sweden on chronic warfarin treatment. Main outcome measures were time in therapeutic range (TTR), rate of treatment-related adverse events and costs. The study comprised 103 elderly people (61% women) mean age 86 yrs (range 75-98) treated with warfarin for median 9 yrs (range 1-18). Patients randomised to start point-of-care monitoring (n = 55) showed 75.9% in TTR before trial vs. 72.6% during trial (ns). The patients randomised to continue on usual monitoring routines (n = 48) showed 75.2% in TTR prior to trial vs. 72.9% during trial (ns). The point-of-care monitoring showed potential savings of SEK 624 per patient annually (based partly on effects that were not statistically significant). The study shows that point-of-care monitoring of warfarin treatment in community dwelling elderly in rural areas is as effective as usual monitoring routines and that it may offer savings to society.

  • 9.
    Drewes, Asbjørn M.
    et al.
    Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Munkholm, Pia
    NOH (Nordsjællands Hospital) Gastroenterology, Denmark.
    Simrén, Magnus
    Department of Internal Medicine & Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Breivik, Harald
    Department of Pain Management and Research, Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo, Norway.
    Kongsgaard, Ulf E.
    Department of Anaesthesiology, Division of Emergencies and Critical Care, Oslo University Hospital, Norway and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Hatlebakk, Jan G.
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Agreus, Lars
    Division of Family Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Christrup, Lona L.
    Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Definition, diagnosis and treatment strategies for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction—: Recommendations of the Nordic Working Group2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 11, p. 111-122Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) is an increasing problem due to the common use of opioids for pain worldwide. It manifests with different symptoms, such as dry mouth,gastro-oesophageal reflux, vomiting, bloating, abdominal pain, anorexia, hard stools, constipation and incomplete evacuation. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is one of its many symptoms and probably the most prevalent. The current review describes the pathophysiology, clinical implications, and treatment of OIBD.Methods: The Nordic Working Group was formed to provide input for Scandinavian specialists in multiple, relevant areas. Seven main topics with associated statements were defined. The working plan provided a structured format for systematic reviews and included instructions on how to evaluate the level of evidence according to the GRADE guidelines. The quality of evidence supporting the different statements was rated as high, moderate or low. At a second meeting, the group discussed and voted on each section with recommendations (weak and strong) for the statements.Results: The literature review supported the fact that opioid receptors are expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract. When blocked by exogenous opioids, there are changes in motility, secretion and absorption of fluids, and sphincter function that are reflected in clinical symptoms. The group supported a recent consensus statement for OIC, which takes into account the change in bowel habits for at least one week rather than focusing on the frequency of bowel movements. Many patients with pain received opioid therapy and concomitant constipation is associated with increased morbidity and utilization of healthcare resources. Opioid treatment for acute postoperative pain will prolong the postoperative ileus.

  • 10.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Karolinska Institute KI, Sweden.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

  • 11.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Finspång.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Elevated levels of CRP and IL-8 are related to reduce survival time: 1-year follow-up measurements of different analytes in frail elderly nursing home residents2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 79, no 5, p. 288-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are only few studies with specific focus on predictors of survival in nursing home residents (NHRs). The aim was to study whether 1-year changes in complete blood count (including hemoglobin, red blood cells, erythrocyte volume fraction, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, white blood cells count and platelet count), C-reactive protein and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, are associated with 8-year survival in elderly NHRs, aged amp;gt;= 80 years. Complete blood count, C-reactive protein and interleukins were measured at baseline, after 6 and 12 months from 167 NHRs aged 80-101 years, mean age 88 +/- 4.5 years, 75% of whom were women. Dates of death were collected from the National Death Register 8 years after baseline. Levels of hemoglobin, red blood cells and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were lower after 1-year, but higher for mean corpuscular volume and IL-1 beta, compared to baseline or 6 month follow-up. In the Cox regression model with a time-dependent covariate, raised levels of C-reactive protein and IL-8 were associated with reduced survival time. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein and IL-8 during 1-year follow-up were related to reduce lengths of survival in elderly NHRs.

  • 12.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Health care Center Finspång.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Sweden.
    Differences in levels of albumin, ALT, AST, gamma-GT and creatinine in frail, moderately healthy and healthy elderly individuals2018In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 471-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reference intervals are widely used as decision tools, providing the physician with information about whether the analyte values indicate ongoing disease process. Reference intervals are generally based on individuals without diagnosed diseases or use of medication, which often excludes elderly. The aim of the study was to assess levels of albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatinine and gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) in frail, moderately healthy and healthy elderly indivuduals. Methods: Blood samples were collected from individuals amp;gt; 80 years old, nursing home residents, in the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment and Nordic Reference Interval Project, a total of 569 individuals. They were divided into three cohorts: frail, moderately healthy and healthy, depending on cognitive and physical function. Albumin, ALT, AST, creatinine and gamma-GT were analyzed using routine methods. Results: Linear regression predicted factors for 34% of the variance in albumin were activities of daily living (ADL), gender, stroke and cancer. ADLs, gender and weight explained 15% of changes in ALT. For AST levels, ADLs, cancer and analgesics explained 5% of changes. Kidney disease, gender, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease explained 25% of the variation in creatinine levels and MMSE explained three per cent of gamma-GT variation. Conclusions: Because a group of people are at the same age, they should not be assessed the same way. To interpret results of laboratory tests in elderly is a complex task, where reference intervals are one part, but far from the only one, to take into consideration.

  • 13.
    Ekdahl, Anne W.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Mazya, Amelie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Wiklund, Rolf
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare the effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) as a complement to usual care in an outpatient setting with those of usual care alone. The assessment was performed 36 months after study inclusion. Design: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, single-center trial. Setting: A geriatric ambulatory unit in a municipality in the southeast of Sweden. Participants: Community-dwelling individuals aged >= 75 years who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion. Participants were randomized to the intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). Intervention: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care for 24 to 31 months at the geriatric ambulatory unit in addition to usual care. Outcome measures: Mortality, transfer to nursing home, days in hospital, and total costs of health and social care after 36 months. Results: Mean age (SD) of participants was 82.5 (4.9) years. Participants in the IG (n = 208) lived 69 days longer than did those in the CG (n = 174); 27.9% (n = 58) of participants in the IG and 38.5% (n = 67) in the CG died (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.12, P =.026). The mean number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (15.1 [SD 18.4]) than in the CG (21.0 [SD 25.0], P =.01). Mean overall costs during the 36-month period did not differ between the IG and CG (USD 71,905 [SD 85,560] and USD 65,626 [SD 66,338], P =.43). Conclusions: CGA-based care resulted in longer survival and fewer days in hospital, without significantly higher cost, at 3 years after baseline. These findings add to the evidence of CGAs superiority over usual care in outpatient settings. As CGA-based care leads to important positive outcomes, this method should be used more extensively in the treatment of older people to meet their needs. (c) 2016 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.

  • 14.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wirehn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine costs and effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) provided by an ambulatory geriatric care unit (AGU) in addition to usual care.

    DESIGN: Assessor-blinded, single-center randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: AGU in an acute hospital in southeastern Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion and randomized to the intervention group (IG; n = 208) or control group (CG; n = 174). Mean age (SD) was 82.5 (4.9) years.

    INTERVENTION: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care at the AGU in addition to usual care.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was number of hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were days in hospital and nursing home, mortality, cost of public health and social care, participant' sense of security in care, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The number of hospitalizations did not differ between the IG (2.1) and CG (2.4), but the number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (11.1 vs 15.2; P = .035). The IG showed trends of reduced mortality (hazard ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.988-2.310; P = .057) and an increased sense of security in care interaction. No difference in HRQoL was observed. Costs for the IG and CG were 33,371£ (39,947£) and 30,490£ (31,568£; P = .432).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study of CGA-based care was performed in an ambulatory care setting, in contrast to the greater part of studies of the effects of CGA, which have been conducted in hospital settings. This study confirms the superiority of this type of care to elderly people in terms of days in hospital and sense of security in care interaction and that a shift to more accessible care for older people with multimorbidity is possible without increasing costs. This study can aid the planning of future interventions for older people.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757.

  • 15.
    Erichsén, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Constipation in specialized palliative care: factors related to constipation when applying different definitions2016In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT:

    For patients in palliative care, constipation is primarily a result of opioid treatment. Impacts from other factors related to constipation in palliative care are rarely studied.

    OBJECTIVES:

    The aim was to identify factors related to constipation in patients in palliative care, and then to compare these factors between patients with different types of constipation and patients without constipation.

    METHODS:

    Cross-sectional data on constipation was collected with a 26-item questionnaire from 485 patients in 38 specialist palliative care units in Sweden. Three different constipation groups were used; MC ONLY, PC ONLY, and MC & PC. Logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios.

    RESULTS:

    Patients with <3 defecations/week, MC ONLY, (n = 36) had higher odds of being hospitalized, bed-restricted, in need of personal assistance for toilet visits, and of having a poor fluid intake. Patients with the perception of being constipated, PC ONLY, (n = 93) had higher odds of having poor appetite, hemorrhoids, hard stool, more opioid treatment, less laxative treatment and of being more dissatisfied with constipation information. Patients with both <3 defecations/week and a perception of being constipated, MC & PC, (n = 78) had higher odds of having cancer- disease.

    CONCLUSION:

    There were several significant factors related to constipation with higher odds than opioid- treatment, for patients in palliative care, such as; hard stool, cancer diagnosis, dissatisfaction with information, low fluid intake, hemorrhoids, bed restriction, hospitalization, and need of personal assistance for toilet visits.

  • 16.
    Erichsén, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Constipation in specialized palliative care: prevalence, definition and patient perceived symptom distress2015In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 585-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: The prevalence of constipation among patients in palliative care has varied in prior research, from 18-90 %, depending on different study factors.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and explore the prevalence and symptom distress of constipation, using different definitions of constipation, in patients admitted to specialized palliative care settings.

    Methods: Data was collected in a cross-sectional survey from 485 patients in 38 palliative care units in Sweden. Variables were analyzed using logistic regression and summarized as odds ratio (OR).

    Result: The prevalence of constipation varied between 7 – 43 %, depending on the definition used. Two constipation- groups were found: (i) Medical constipation- group (MCG; ≤ 3 defecations/week n=114; 23%); (ii) Perceived constipation- group (PCG; Patients with a perception of being constipated the last two weeks; n= 171; 35%). Three sub-groups emerged: patients with (a) only medical constipation (7 %), (b) only perceived constipation (19 %), and (c) with both medical and perceived constipation (16%). There were no differences in symptom severity between groups; 71% of all constipated patients had severe constipation.

    Conclusion: The prevalence of constipation may differ, depending on the definition used and how constipation is assessed. In this study we found two main groups and three sub-groups, analyzed from the definitions of frequency of bowel movements and experience of being constipated. To be able to identify constipation, the patients’ definition has to be further explored and assessed.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    End of Life Care for Patients Dying of Stroke: A Comparative Registry Study of Stroke and Cancer2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, p. e0147694-, article id 26845149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Although stroke is a significant public health challenge and the need for palliative care has been emphasized for these patients, there is limited data on end-of-life care for patients dying from stroke.

    Objective

    To study the end-of-life care during the last week of life for patients who had died of stroke in terms of registered symptom, symptom management, and communication, in comparison with patients who had died of cancer.

    Design

    This study is a retrospective, comparative registry study.

    Methods

    A retrospective comparative registry study was performed using data from a Swedish national quality register for end-of-life care based on WHO`s definition of Palliative care. Data from 1626 patients who had died of stroke were compared with data from 1626 patients who had died of cancer. Binary logistic analyses were used to calculate odds ratios, with 95% CI.

    Results

    Compared to patients who was dying of cancer, the patients who was dying of stroke had a significantly higher prevalence of having death rattles registered, but a significantly lower prevalence of, nausea, confusion, dyspnea, anxiety, and pain. In addition, the stroke group had significantly lower odds ratios for health care staff not to know whether all these six symptoms were present or not. Patients who was dying of stroke had significantly lower odds ratio of having informative communication from a physician about the transition to end-of-life care and of their family members being offered bereavement follow-up.

    Conclusions

    The results indicate on differences in end-of-life care between patients dying of stroke and those dying from cancer. To improve the end-of-life care in clinical practice and ensure it has consistent quality, irrespective of diagnosis, education and implementation of palliative care principles are necessary.

  • 18.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Hajradinovic, Yvonne
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Jakobsson, Maria
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Milberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Palliative care consultation team on acute wards-an intervention study with pre-post comparisons2017In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 371-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is little evidence regarding primary healthcare team members perceptions concerning palliative care consultation team (PCCT) and palliative care (PC) issues on their own wards. This study aimed to study whether a PCCT can influence and change primary healthcare team members perceptions regarding the palliative care at the end of life they are providing to patients in their own acute wards. The intervention was a PCCT visiting surgical and internal medicine wards in 1 year. We used a quasi-experimental design with pre-post-testing, measuring at baseline, and after 1 years intervention. A questionnaire was answered by all primary healthcare team members in three acute wards. A total of 252 team members (pre-post-intervention n = 132/n = 120) participated in the study. Overall, 11 of the 12 statements scored significantly higher after the intervention than before. Responses varied significantly between different professions and depending on the number of dying patients cared for during the last month. The five with the highest Wald values were as follows: the presence of a break point dialogue with a patient, where the changed aim and focus of care was discussed; early detection of impending death; adequate symptom relief and psychological and existential issues. It is possible to change perceptions about end-of-life care in primary healthcare team members on acute wards. Palliative care consultation teams should be a natural part wherever dying patients are cared for.

  • 19.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Astradsson, Eva
    Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Jakobsson, Maria
    Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Vrinnevi Hospital, Sweden .
    Does a Half-Day Course about Palliative Care Matter? A Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation among Health Care Practitioners2013In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 496-501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To date there has been a paucity of research examining whether a course in palliative care influences the clinical work. Therefore a half-day course was started for different professionals. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjectives: The aims of this study were to quantitatively and qualitatively explore professionals experience of the usefulness and importance of such a course. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: An evaluation study was used with two measurement points in the quantitative part; qualitative focus group interviews were conducted three times. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting and Subjects: Data was collected in Sweden through structured and open-ended questions (n = 355) and in focus group discussions (n = 40). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The majority of participants were allied professionals (86%). Course evaluation immediately after the intervention showed high scores. At three months, 78% of the 86 participants who had cared for a dying patient since the course claimed that the course had been useful in their work. In addition, there were improvements regarding symptom management (37%), support to family members (36%), more frequent break point conversations (31%), and improved cooperation in the teams (26%). The qualitative analysis showed that the course made participants start to compare their own working experiences with the new knowledge. When returning to work, the participants feel strengthened by the the newly acquired knowledge, but the will to improve the care also led to frustration, as some of the participants described that they wanted to change routines in the care of the dying, but felt hindered. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The course was appreciated and useful in the professionals work, but it also created problems.

  • 20.
    Fällman, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Lundgren, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Normative data for the oldest old: Trail Making Test A, Symbol Digit Modalities Test, Victoria Stroop Test and Parallel Serial Mental Operations2019In: Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, ISSN 1382-5585, E-ISSN 1744-4128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normative data for evaluating cognitive function in the oldest old, aged 85 years and above, are currently sparse. The normative values used in clinical practice are often derived from younger old persons, from small sample sizes or from broad age spans (e.g. amp;gt;75 years) resulting in a risk of misjudgment in assessments of cognitive decline. This longitudinal study presents normative values for the Trail Making Test A (TMT-A), the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), the Victoria Stroop Test (VST) and the Parallel Serial Mental Operations (PaSMO) from cognitively intact Swedes aged 85 years and above. 207 participants, born in 1922, were tested at 85, 90 (n = 68) and 93 (n = 35) years of age with a cognitive screening test battery. The participants were originally recruited for participation in the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment. Normative values are presented as mean values and standard deviations, with and without adjustment for education. There were no clinically important differences between genders, but education had a significant effect on test results for the 85-year-olds. Age effects emerged in analyses of those participants who completed the entire study and were evident for TMT-A, SDMT, VST1 and PaSMO. When comparisons can be made, our results are in accordance with previous data for TMT-A, SDMT and VST, and we present new normative values for PaSMO.

  • 21.
    Gidhagen, Ylva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Dependency in Norrköping.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Philips, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Attachment style among outpatients with substance use disorders in psychological treatment2018In: Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, ISSN 1476-0835, E-ISSN 2044-8341, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 490-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To explore the associations between self-rated attachment style, psychological distress and substance use among substance use disorder (SUD) outpatients in psychological treatment.

    Design and Methods

    In this practice-based study, 108 outpatients were asked to fill in the Experiences in Close Relationships – Short form, the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) at treatment start and end. Patients were given psychological treatments with a directive, reflective or supportive orientation.

    Results

    An insecure attachment style was more common among the SUD outpatients, compared to non-clinical groups. Patients with a fearful attachment style scored higher on psychological distress than patients with a secure attachment style. The associations between the attachment dimensions and psychological distress were stronger than those between attachment and SUD. Significantly more patients had a secure attachment style at treatment end.

    Conclusions

    This study shows significant relations between patients’ attachment style and their initial psychological distress. The causal relationship between attachment style and psychological distress is, however, not clear and can likely go in both directions. The psychological treatment of patients with SUD contributed significantly to changes from insecure to secure attachment style.

    Practitioner Points

    We found among patients with SUD a strong relation between patients’ attachment style and their psychological distress. Knowledge of the patient’s attachment style may help the therapist to tailor the treatment to the patient’s needs. A change from insecure to secure attachment style can be an important goal for a SUD treatment, as it may prevent the patient from using defence strategies involving substance use for regulating emotions and interpersonal relationships.

  • 22.
    Gidhagen, Ylva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Dependency in Norrköping.
    Philips, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Outcome of psychological treatment of patients with substance use disorders in routine care2017In: Journal of Substance Use, ISSN 1465-9891, E-ISSN 1475-9942, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 343-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: More knowledge is needed about outcome of treatments in routine care for patients with substance use disorders (SUDs). These patients often suffer from psychological distress in addition to SUDs. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of community-based psychological treatment on SUD patients’ psychosocial problems, as well as on their substance use. Design: All patients who were referred or self-referred for psychological treatment to a social worker or a psychotherapist at three outpatient treatment centers for SUD patients were asked to participate in the study. Methods: Ratings at treatment start and end were obtained on Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure (CORE-OM, n = 100), Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test - Consumption (AUDIT-C, n = 49), and Drug Use Disorders Identification Test - Consumption (DUDIT-C, n = 27). Results: CORE-OM mean scores were significantly improved. In total 14% of the patients were recovered, 10% improved, and 5% deteriorated. Both AUDIT-C and DUDIT-C mean scores were significantly improved for patients with alcohol use and patients using illicit drugs, respectively. Conclusions: Routine psychological treatment had positive effects on psychological distress as well as on reduction of substance use. A substantial number of patients remained however unchanged, particularly regarding psychological distress. More studies with larger patient groups are needed to develop treatment for SUD patients in routine care.

  • 23.
    Gonon, Adrian
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Richter, Arina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cederholm, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Khan, Jehangir
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Novak, Jacek
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Janerot-Sjoberg, Birgitta
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Effects of thoracic epidural analgesia on exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia in refractory angina pectoris2019In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 515-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEDA) was offered to patients with refractory angina pectoris. Our primary objectives were to evaluate TEDAs influence on quality of life (QoL, base for power analysis), and hypothesising that TEDA with bupivacaine during 1 month counteracts exercise-induced myocardial hypoperfusion and increase physical performance. Methods Patients with refractory angina and exercise inducible hypoperfusion, as demonstrated by myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), were randomised to 1-month treatment with TEDA with bupivacaine (B-group, n = 9) or saline (P-group, n = 10) in a double-blind fashion. MPI and bicycle ergometry were performed before TEDA and after 1 month while subjective QoL on a visual analogue scale (VAS) reported by the patients was checked weekly. Results During this month VAS (mean [95%CI]) increased similarly in both groups (B-group from 33 [18-50] to 54 [30-78] P P amp;lt; 0.05). The B-group reduced their exertional-induced myocardial hypoperfusion (from 32% [12-52] to 21% [3-39]; n = 9; P amp;lt; 0.05), while the P-group showed no significant change (before 21% [6-35]; at 1 month 23% [6-40]; n = 10). MPI at rest did not change and no improvement in physical performance was detected in neither of the groups. Conclusions In refractory angina, TEDA with bupivacaine inhibits myocardial ischaemia in contrast to TEDA with saline. Regardless of whether bupivacaine or saline is applied intermittently every day, TEDA during 1 month improves the quality of life and reduces angina, even when physical performance remains low. A significant placebo effect has to be considered.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-10-30 11:44
  • 24.
    Hajradinovic, Yvonne
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Sophiahemmet Univ, Sweden.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Vasterbottens Cty Council VLL, Sweden; Stockholms Country Council SLL, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Olav
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Goliath, Ida
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ersta Hosp, Sweden.
    Family members experiences of the end-of-life care environments in acute care settings - a photo-elicitation study2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1511767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article explores experiences of the acute-care environment as a setting for end-of-life (EoL) care from the perspective of family members of a dying person. Method: We used participant-produced photographs in conjunction with follow-up interviews with nine family members to persons at the EoL, cared for in two acute-care settings. Results: The interpretive description analysis process resulted in three constructed themes-Aesthetic and unaesthetic impressions, Space for privacy and social relationships, and Need for guidance in crucial times. Aspects of importance in the physical setting related to aesthetics, particularly in regard to sensory experience, and to a need for enough privacy to facilitate the maintenance of social relationships. Interactions between the world of family members and that of professionals were described as intrinsically related to guidance about both the material and immaterial environment at crucial times. Conclusion: The care environment, already recognized to have an impact in relation to patients, is concluded to also affect the participating family members in this study in a variety of ways.

  • 25.
    Harding, Andrew J. E.
    et al.
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Morbey, Hazel
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Ahmed, Faraz
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Opdebeeck, Carol
    Manchester Metropolitan Univ, England.
    Wang, Ying-Ying
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Williamson, Paula
    Univ Liverpool, England.
    Swarbrick, Caroline
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Leroi, Iracema
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Challis, David
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Davies, Linda
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Reeves, David
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Holland, Fiona
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Hann, Mark
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Burns, Alistair
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Keady, John
    Univ Manchester, England; Greater Manchester Mental Hlth NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Reilly, Siobhan
    Univ Lancaster, England.
    Developing a core outcome set for people living with dementia at home in their neighbourhoods and communities: study protocol for use in the evaluation of non-pharmacological community-based health and social care interventions2018In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 19, article id 247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The key aim of the study is to establish an agreed standardised core outcome set (COS) for use when evaluating non-pharmacological health and social care interventions for people living at home with dementia. Methods/design: Drawing on the guidance and approaches of the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET), this study uses a four-phase mixed-methods design: 1 Focus groups and interviews with key stakeholder groups (people living with dementia, care partners, relevant health and social care professionals, researchers and policymakers) and a review of the literature will be undertaken to build a long list of outcomes. 2 Two rounds of Delphi surveys will be used with key stakeholder groups. Statements for the Delphi surveys and participation processes will be developed and informed through substantial member involvement with people living with dementia and care partners. A consensus meeting will be convened with key participant groups to discuss the key findings and finalise the COS. 3 A systematic literature review will be undertaken to assess the properties of tools and instruments to assess components of the COS. Measurement properties, validity and reliability will be assessed using the Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement (COSMIN) and COMET guidance. 4 A stated preference survey will elicit the preferences of key stakeholders for the outcomes identified as important to measure in the COS. Discussion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to use a modified Delphi process to involve people living with dementia as a participant group. Though the study is confined to collecting data in the United Kingdom, use of the COS by researchers will enhance the comparability of studies evaluating non-pharmacological and community-based interventions.

  • 26.
    Hedman, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland. Ersta Sköndal Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ersta Sköndal Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Sweden; Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Sense of Self in Alzheimers Research Participants2018In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 191-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sense of self is vulnerable in people with Alzheimers disease (AD), and might be positively and negatively influenced by research participation. The purpose of this study was to describe how people with AD express their experience of being a research participant with respect to their sense of self. Interviews and support group conversations involving 13 people with mild and moderate AD were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes were constructed: contributing to an important cause, gaining from participating, and experiencing risks and drawbacks. Participants described contributing to research as being in line with their lifelong values and lifestyles. They expressed contentment and pride about being research participants, emphasized their positive relationships with the researchers, and described participation as a meaningful activity. When research procedures threatened their sense of self, they were able to reason about risks and decline participation.

  • 27.
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Åstradsson, E.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Blomquist, K.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Palliation of Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Adverse Events are Common after Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 107, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aim: Endoscopic stents in the common bile duct is the first treatment choice to alleviate symptoms of biliary obstruction due to malignant disease. When endoscopic stenting fails in palliative patients, one option is to use a percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, but it is not clear whether and how it can reduce the symptom load. The aim of this study was to evaluate benefits and disadvantages of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in palliative care. Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria were malignant disease and bilirubin 26 mu mol/L in plasma. A structured protocol for obtaining data from the medical records was used. Data were collected from the time of last computed tomography scan before the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was placed and during 14days afterward. Results and Conclusion: Inclusion criteria were fulfilled in 140 patients. Median age was 70years (33-91years). Some 126 patients had a remaining external percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Jaundice was the initial symptom in 62 patients (44%). Within the first week after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, the bilirubin decreased from 237 mu mol/L (31-634) to 180 mu mol/L (17-545). Only 25% reached a level below the double upper reference value. Pruritus occurred in 27% before the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, but the bilirubin value did not differ from patients without pruritus. However, the pruritus was relieved in 56% with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Antibiotic prophylaxis protected to some extent from infectious complications. Adverse events were common and early mortality was high (16% within 14days). Jaundice should not by itself be an indication for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for palliation except when the aim is to prepare the patient for chemotherapy. It is mandatory that the patients are informed carefully about what can be expected regarding the positive effects and the risks of adverse events.

  • 28.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linneaus Univ, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    I was told that I would not die from heart failure2018In: Applied Nursing Research, ISSN 0897-1897, E-ISSN 1532-8201, Vol. 41, p. 41-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives: To describe patients experiences of communication about their heart failure prognosis and explore how these experiences affected their preferences for future communication about the prognosis. Background: Professionals need to discuss about the heart failure prognosis with patients in order to improve their understanding of their illness and address palliative care needs. Methods: An inductive and exploratory design was used. A total of 24 patients (75% men, 52-87 years of age) in New York Heart Association class I-III from primary outpatient care participated in focus group-, or individual semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to identify and interpret patterns in the data. Findings: Two overarching themes, "The message sent" and "Hoping for the best or preparing for the worst", each with three sub-themes, were discovered during the thematic analysis. Many patients described that professionals had not provided them with any prognosis information at all. Other patients described professional information about prognosis that was given in an either very optimistic or very negative way. However, patients also described situations where professionals had given information in a way that they thought was perfect for them to handle, and in accordance with their preferences. Conclusion: This study shows that patients have different experiences and preferences for communication about prognosis and uses different approaches in order to cope living with a chronic illness such as heart failure.

  • 29.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Using co-design to develop an intervention to improve communication about the heart failure trajectory and end-of-life care2018In: BMC Palliative Care, ISSN 1472-684X, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 17, article id 85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this paper was to describe the development of an intervention that is developed to improve communication about the heart failure (HF) trajectory and end-of-life care. We also present data that provides a first insight in specific areas of feasibility of the intervention. Methods: Co-design was used and patients, family members and health care professionals were constructive participants in the design process of the intervention. Feasibility of the intervention was tested in two areas; acceptability and limited efficacy. Results: Two communication tools were designed and evaluated; 1) a Question Prompt List (QPL) for patients and family members and 2) a communication course for professionals which was web -based with one face-to-face training day with simulation. Data on feasibility was collected with questionnaires that were developed for this study, from the 13 participants who completed the course (all nurses). They reported improved knowledge, confidence and skills to discuss the HF trajectory and end-of-life care. The QPL was evaluated to be a useful tool in communication with patients and family members. Conclusions: In a co-design process, future users identified the need for a QPL and a communication course. These communication tools can be used as a dual intervention to improve communication about the HF trajectory and end-of-life care. The QPL can help patients and families to ask questions about the HF trajectory and end-of-life care. The communication course can prepare the professionals to be knowledgeable, confident and skilled to discuss the questions in the QPL. Before the tools are ready for implementation in clinical practice, further studies testing the feasibility of the intervention are needed, including also patients and their families.

  • 30.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patient-Nurse Communication about Prognosis and End-of-Life Care2015In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 18, no 10, p. 865-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although several studies advise that discussions about prognosis and end-of-life care should be held throughout the whole heart failure (HF) trajectory, data is lacking on the prevalence and practice of such discussions in HF care. Objective: The study objective was to explore how often and why HF nurses in outpatient clinics discuss prognosis and end-of-life care in the context of patient education. Methods: This was a descriptive and comparative study. Participants were HF nurses from Swedish and Dutch HF outpatient clinics. Measurements were taken via a survey for both quantitative and qualitative data. Additional data was collected via open-ended questions and analyzed with content analysis. Results: Two hundred seventy-nine nurses registered 1809 patient conversations using a checklist. Prognosis and end-of-life care were among the least frequently discussed topics, whereas symptoms of HF was discussed most often. Prognosis was discussed with 687 patients (38%), and end-of-life care was discussed with 179 patients (10%). Prognosis and end-of-life care were discussed more frequently in The Netherlands than in Sweden (41% versus 34%, pless than0.001, 13% versus 4%, pless than0.001). The nurses did not always recognize prognosis and end-of-life care discussions as a part of their professional role. Conclusions: Currently, patient-nurse communication about prognosis and end-of-life care does not seem to be routine in patient education in HF clinics, and these discussions could be included more often. The reasons for nurses to discuss these topics were related to clinical routines, the patients situation, and professional responsibilities. To improve future care, communication with patients needs to be further developed.

  • 31.
    Jennersjö, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Björne, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A prospective observational study of all-cause mortality in relation to serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 and parathyroid hormone levels in patients with type 2 diabetes2015In: Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome, ISSN 1758-5996, E-ISSN 1758-5996, Vol. 7, no 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low levels of vitamin D have been related to increased mortality and morbidity in several non-diabetic studies. We aimed to prospectively study relationships between serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 (vitamin D) and of serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) to total mortality in type 2 diabetes. We also aimed to compare the levels of these potential risk-factors in patients with and without diabetes. Methods: The main study design was prospective and observational. We used baseline data from 472 men and 245 women who participated in the "Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care" study. Patients were 55-66 years old at recruitment, and an age-matched non-diabetic sample of 129 individuals constituted controls for the baseline data. Carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation-tonometry and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) with ultrasound. Patients with diabetes were followed for all-cause mortality using the national Swedish Cause of Death Registry. Results: Levels of vitamin D were lower in patients with diabetes than in controls, also after correction for age and obesity, while PTH levels did not differ. Nine women and 24 men died during 6 years of median follow up of the final cohort (n = 698). Vitamin D levels were negatively related to all-cause mortality in men independently of age, PTH, HbA1c, waist circumference, 24-h systolic ambulatory-blood pressure (ABP) and serum-apoB (p = 0.049). This finding was also statistically significant when PWV and IMT were added to the analyses (p = 0.028) and was not affected statistically when medications were also included in the regression-analysis (p = 0.01). In the women with type 2 diabetes, levels of PTH were positively related with all-cause mortality in the corresponding calculations (p = 0.016 without PWV and IMT, p = 0.006 with PWV and IMT, p = 0.045 when also adding medications to the analysis), while levels of vitamin D was without statistical significance (p greater than 0.9). Conclusions: Serum vitamin D in men and serum PTH in women give prognostic information in terms of total-mortality that are independent of regular risk factors in addition to levels of ABP, IMT and PWV.

  • 32.
    Järemo, Petter
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson-Franzen, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Platelets, gender and acute cerebral infarction2015In: Journal of Translational Medicine, ISSN 1479-5876, E-ISSN 1479-5876, ISSN ISSN 1479-5876, Vol. 13, no 267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Platelets may well be significant in the pathogenesis of cerebral infarction. Platelets vary substantially according to gender. The scope of our current work is to establish if female and male stroke sufferers differ regarding platelet reactivity.

    Patients and methods

    73 Consecutive individuals stricken by acute ischemic cerebral infarction (31 females, 42 males) participated. All stroke subtypes were included. Platelet counts was determined electronically. Platelet reactivity i.e. the presence of surface-bound fibrinogen following provocation was analyzed with a flow cytometer. ADP (1.7 μmol/L) and a thrombin receptor agonist (TRAP-6) (57 μmol/L) were the agonists used.

    Results

    Female stroke sufferers had higher platelet counts (p = 0.013) but their platelets were less reactive. The p values were (p = 0.038) and (p = 0.016) for ADP and TRAP-6, respectively.

    Conclusion

    The current study demonstrates that women suffering acute cerebral infarction have less reactive platelets. It is concluded that gender affects platelets. Our study indicates that it may be beneficial to individualize platelet inhibition of stroke sufferers according to gender.

  • 33.
    Järemo, Petter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Eriksson-Franzen, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Oweling, Magnus
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Platelets and inflammatory parameters do not affect long-term survival after acute stroke. Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases,2016In: Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1052-3057, E-ISSN 1532-8511, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 1936-1938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale

    According to literature, the inflammatory response and platelets are associated with coronary heart disease mortality. In this study, we examine if similar relationships exist after acute cerebral infarctions.

    Design

    Between 2005 and 2007, individuals (n = 61) hospitalized with acute stroke were investigated 2.1 ± .3 (SD) days after hospital admission. After 9.3 ± .7 (SD) years, 29 patients (age 79 ± 8 [SD]; 12 women) had died. They were compared with survivors (age 69 ± 9 [SD]; 9 women) with respect to inflammatory parameters and platelet features such as activity and reactivity.

    Results and conclusion

    Inflammation and platelets at the acute event do not forecast long-term survival of stroke sufferers

  • 34.
    Kastbom, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ljungsbro.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Karlsson, Marit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    A good death from the perspective of palliative cancer patients2017In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 933-939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous research has indicated some recurrent themes and similarities between what patients from different cultures regard as a good death, the concept is complex and there is lack of studies from the Nordic countries. The aim of this study was to explore the perception of a good death in dying cancer patients in Sweden. Interviews were conducted with 66 adult patients with cancer in the palliative phase who were recruited from home care and hospital care. Interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Participants viewed death as a process. A good death was associated with living with the prospect of imminent death, preparing for death and dying comfortably, e.g., dying quickly, with independence, with minimised suffering and with social relations intact. Some were comforted by their belief that death is predetermined. Others felt uneasy as they considered death an end to existence. Past experiences of the death of others influenced participants views of a good death. Healthcare staff caring for palliative patients should consider asking them to describe what they consider a good death in order to identify goals for care. Exploring patients personal experience of death and dying can help address their fears as death approaches.

  • 35.
    Kastbom, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Ljungsbro.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Karlsson, Marit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    We have no crystal ball-advance care planning at nursing homes from the perspective of nurses and physicians2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate clinicians perspectives on the factors that shape the process of advance care planning in a nursing home context. Design: Interviews. Latent qualitative content analysis. Setting: Nine nursing homes in Sweden. Subjects: 14 physicians and 11 nurses working at nursing homes. Main outcome measures: Participants views on advance care planning (ACP) at nursing homes. Results: The analysis of the interviews resulted in four manifest categories: Exploration of preferences and views, e.g. exploring patient wishes regarding end-of-life issues and restrictions in care at an early stage, and sensitivity to patients readiness to discuss end-of-life issues; Integration of preferences and views, e.g. integration of patients preferences and staffs and family members views; Decision amp; documentation of the ACP, e.g. clear documentation in patients medical records that are up-to-date and available for staff caring for the patient, and Implementation amp; re-evaluation of the ACP, e.g. nurse following up after ACP-appointment to confirm the content of the documented ACP. The latent theme, Establishing beneficence - defending oneself against tacit accusations of maleficence, emerged as a deeper meaning of all the four (manifest) parts of the ACP-process Conclusion: This study stresses the importance of involving patients, family members, and the team in the work with advance care planning in nursing homes. In addition, clear medical record documentation and proficiency in end-of-life communication related to advance care planning for physicians as well as nurses may also be factors that significantly shape advance care planning in a nursing home context.

  • 36.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekdahl, Anne W.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Factors related to health-related quality of life in older people with multimorbidity and high health care consumption over a two-year period2019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe prevalence of multimorbidity is increasing worldwide, and older people with multimorbidity are frequent users of health care services. Since multimorbidity has a significant negative impact on Health-related Quality of Life (HrQoL) and is more common in older age it would be expected that factors related to HrQoL in this group might have been thoroughly researched, but this is not the case. Furthermore, it is important to look at old people living at home, considering the shift from residential to home-based care. Therefore, we aim to investigate factors that are related to HrQoL in older people with multimorbidity and high health care consumption, living at home.MethodsThis is a secondary analysis of a RCT study conducted in a municipality in south-eastern Sweden. The study had a longitudinal design with a two-year follow-up period assessing HrQoL, symptom burden, activities of daily living, physical activity and depression.ResultsIn total, 238 older people with multimorbidity and high health care consumption, living at home were included (mean age 82, 52% female). A multiple linear regression model including symptom burden, activities of daily living and depression as independent variables explained 64% of the HrQoL. Higher symptom burden, lower ability in activities of daily living and a higher degree of depression were negatively related to HrQoL. Depression at baseline and a change in symptom burden over a two-year period explained 28% of the change in HrQoL over a two-year period variability. A higher degree of depression at baseline and negative change in higher symptom burden were related to a decrease in HrQoL over a two-year period.ConclusionIn order to facilitate better delivery of appropriate health care to older people with high health care consumption living at home it is important to assess HrQoL, and HrQoL over time. Symptom burden, activities of daily living, depression and change in symptom burden over time are important indicators for HrQoL.Trial registrationClinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757, the trial was registered prospectively with the date of trial registration October 5(th), 2011.

  • 37.
    Krevers, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    The sense of security in care-relatives' evaluation instrument: its development and presentation.2015In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 586-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: Relatives' sense of security in their family members' palliative home care is important, and a valid and reliable instrument is needed to measure this.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this article is to report the development, structure, and psychometric properties of a new instrument, the Sense of Security in Care-Relatives' Evaluation (SEC-R), in palliative home care.

    METHODS: Instrument development was based on a previous study and review of the literature; 213 relatives (55% women) of patients in palliative home care were recruited (response rate 73%) and participated in a structured interview based on a questionnaire. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify subscales. The construction was tested in correlation with other scales and questions representing concepts expected to be related to sense of security in care.

    RESULTS: The PCA resulted in three subscales, namely care interaction, mastery and patient situation, which had an explained variance of 53%. Internal consistency of the subscales ranged from 0.76 to 0.78. The final instrument comprises 17 items. The scales were associated with the quality-of-care process and the relatives' situation, perceived health, quality of life, stress, general sense of security, and general sense of security in care.

    CONCLUSION: The SEC-R provides a three-component assessment of palliative home care settings using valid and reliable scales associated with other concepts. The SEC-R is a manageable means of assessment that may contribute to quality-of-care measures and to further research on relatives' sense of security in care.

  • 38.
    Lasrado, Reena
    et al.
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Bielsten, Therese
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hann, Mark
    Division of Population Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Davies, Linda
    Division of Population Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Schumm, James
    IT Services, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Reilly, Siobhan
    Division of Health Research, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Swarbrick, Caroline
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Keady, John
    Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland. Department of Health Care Science, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Designing and Implementing a Home-Based Couple Management Guide for Couples Where One Partner has Dementia (DemPower): Protocol for a Nonrandomized Feasibility Trial2018In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing rate of dementia and high health and social care costs call for effective measures to improve public health and enhance the wellbeing of people living with dementia and their relational networks. Most postdiagnostic services focus on the condition and the person with dementia with limited attention to the caring spouse or partner. The key focus of the study is to develop a guide for couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia. This couple management guide is delivered in the form of an app, DemPower.

  • 39.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study2018In: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, ISSN 1064-7481, E-ISSN 1545-7214, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This study aimed to compare, over a 5-year period, the prospective direct healthcare costs and service utilization of persons with subsyndromal depression (SSD) and non-depressive persons (ND), in a population of very old persons. A second aim was to develop a model that predicts direct healthcare costs in very old persons with SSD.

    Design and Setting

    A prospective population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden.

    Measurements

    Depressiveness was screened with the Geriatric Depression Scale at baseline and at 1-year follow-up, and the results were classified into ND, SSD, and syndromal depression. Data on individual healthcare costs and service use from a 5-year period were derived from national database registers. Direct costs were compared between categories using Mann-Whitney U tests, and a prediction model was identified with linear regression.

    Results

    For persons with SSD, the direct healthcare costs per month of survival exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio 1.45 (€634 versus €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity. The final regression model consisted of five independent variables predicting direct healthcare costs: male sex, activities of daily living functions, loneliness, presence of SSD, and somatic multimorbidity.

    Conclusions

    SSD among very old persons is associated with increased direct healthcare costs independently of somatic multimorbidity. The associations between SSD, somatic multimorbidity, and healthcare costs in the very old need to be analyzed further in order to better guide allocation of resources in health policy.

  • 40.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.2016In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 619-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors associated with subsyndromal depression (SSD) in very old persons, and to develop a model for prediction of SSD among very old persons.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden. Data were collected from a postal questionnaire, assessments in the participants' homes and at reception visits. Depressiveness was screened with GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale), and the results were classified into three outcome categories: non-depression (ND), SSD and syndromal depression. Data were analysed with binary logistic, ordinal logistic and linear regression.

    RESULTS: With univariate logistic regression 20 factors associated with SSD were identified in very old persons, and the four hypothesized domains-sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors and existential factors-significantly related to SSD. The multivariate logistic model included seven independent factors that increase the likelihood of SSD instead of ND (lower self-perceived health, life not meaningful, problems with self-care, use of tranquilizing medication, no contact with neighbours, history of affective disorder and history of stroke). The ordinal logistic and the linear regression models resulted in seven partly different factors for predicting SSD and depressiveness, in the very old.

    CONCLUSIONS: The identified markers may help clinicians with the detection, prevention and treatment of SSD in very old persons. The findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive functional approach to diagnosing and treating depressiveness in this population, and the findings might be interpreted as offering support for the coexistence of a dimensional and a categorical view on depressive disorders.

  • 41.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Normal Aging or Depression? A Qualitative Study on the Differences Between Subsyndromal Depression and Depression in Very Old People.2015In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 760-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study was to make a qualitative comparison of experiences of being in very old people with subsyndromal depression (SSD), in relation to the experiences of very old people with syndromal depression or nondepression. Through investigation and deeper understanding of the interface between depressive disease and normal aging, clinicians might give more accurate prevention or treatment to those very old persons who need such help.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted for 27 individuals of 87-88 years of age, who were categorized in the 3 strata of nondepressive, SSD, and syndromal depression. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis within each stratum and later with a comparison between the strata.

    RESULTS: The content analysis resulted in 4 themes in people with SSD, as defined by a self-report depression screening instrument, giving a comprehensive picture of SSD in very old people, and also showed qualitative differences between the SSD, syndromal depression, and nondepressive groups. A main finding was that SSD differs qualitatively from syndromal depression but not clearly from nondepression.

    IMPLICATIONS: The results might indicate that SSD in very old people is not related to pathology but to normal aging, even though the condition correlates with negative health parameters. Overlooking certain psychosocial aspects of living in the very old may pose a risk of both underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis in the spectrum of depressive disorders.

  • 42.
    Lundgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australian Catholic Univ, Australia.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kärner Köhler, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patient Experiences of Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Heart Failure and Depression: Qualitative Study2018In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 20, no 9, article id e10302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (wCBT) has been proposed as a possible treatment for patients with heart failure and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms are common in patients with heart failure and such symptoms are known to significantly worsen their health. Although there are promising results on the effect of wCBT, there is a knowledge gap regarding how persons with chronic heart failure and depressive symptoms experience wCBT. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of participating and receiving health care through a wCBT intervention among persons with heart failure and depressive symptoms. Methods: In this qualitative, inductive, exploratory, and descriptive study, participants with experiences of a wCBT program were interviewed. The participants were included through purposeful sampling among participants previously included in a quantitative study on wCBT. Overall, 13 participants consented to take part in this study and were interviewed via telephone using an interview guide. Verbatim transcripts from the interviews were qualitatively analyzed following the recommendations discussed by Patton in Qualitative Research amp; Evaluation Methods: Integrating Theory and Practice. After coding each interview, codes were formed into categories. Results: Overall, six categories were identified during the analysis process. They were as follows: "Something other than usual health care," "Relevance and recognition," "Flexible, understandable, and safe," "Technical problems," "Improvements by real-time contact," and "Managing my life better." One central and common pattern in the findings was that participants experienced the wCBT program as something they did themselves and many participants described the program as a form of self-care. Conclusions: Persons with heart failure and depressive symptoms described wCBT as challenging. This was due to participants balancing the urge for real-time contact with perceived anonymity and not postponing the work with the program. wCBT appears to be a valuable tool for managing depressive symptoms.

  • 43.
    Lundgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Westas, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology.
    Mourad, G
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    The trajectory of depression and physical activity in patients with heart disease during nurse led internet based cognitive behavioural therapy2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Few studies have investigated the trajectory of depression and level of physical activity, in patients with heart disease during a psychosocial intervention such as internet based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT). For health care professionals in cardiac care it is important to know when an improvement in depression can be expected during iCBT and if this improvement can be associated with physical activity. The aim of this study therefore is, 1) to investigate the trajectory of depression and physical activity during participation in an iCBT program compared to a moderated online discussion forum (ODF). 2) to investigate the association between improvements in depression and physical activity.

    Method

    A sub-analysis of data collected in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) that evaluated the effect on depression of a nine-week iCBT program guided by nurse. In the RCT, 144 cardiac patients with at least mild depression were randomised to iCBT or ODF. The iCBT program consisted of seven modules where feedback was provided by nurses. The ODF consisted of nine discussion topics moderated by a nurse.

    Data for the present analysis was collected at baseline, once weekly during the intervention period, and the follow-up. Depression was measured by Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale – self rating (MADRS-S). Two modified items from the Physical Activity Questionnaire measured frequency and length of physical activity. Frequency was scored between “none of the days” (0) to “often, 5-7 days” (3). Length was scored from 0 (0 minutes) to 4 (more than 60 minutes). A combined physical activity factor was calculated by multiplying frequency and length scores.

    Results

    Figure 1a illustrates the trajectory of depression from baseline assessment until the follow up. There was a significant time and group interaction (F=9.98, p<.001, η2=.106) favouring iCBT. The significant difference in depression between iCBT and ODF started at week six and remained to the follow-up. Figures 1b to 1d illustrates the trajectories of physical activity. We found a significant interaction of time and group favouring iCBT for the combined physical factor (F=2.36, p=0.019, η2=.028). The interaction effects for time and group for frequency (F=1.95, p=0.056) and length in physical activity (F=1.26, p=0.272) was not statistically significant. Pearson correlational analyses showed a positive association between improvement in depression and increase of physical activity (r=.256, p=.004). For the iCBT-group this association was stronger (r= .312, p=.011), whereas there was no significant correlation in the ODF group (r= -.006, p= .965)

     

    Conclusion

    Both depression and physical activity improved during the course of the nine week iCBT program. However, improvement occur more clearly after half the duration of iCBT program. Early in the program, a temporary worsening of depression was seen. This indicates that patients need support and encouragement to complete the iCBT program, which gives them greater opportunities to improve in depression and physical activity.

  • 44.
    Lundin, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Language interpretation conditions and boundaries in multilingual and multicultural emergency healthcare2018In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, ISSN 1472-698X, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 18, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: With an increasing migrant population globally the need to organize interpreting service arises in emergency healthcare to deliver equitable high-quality care. The aims of this study were to describe interpretation practices in multilingual emergency health service institutions and to explore the impact of the organizational and institutional context and possible consequences of different approaches to interpretation. No previous studies on these issues in multilingual emergency care have been found. Methods: A qualitative descriptive study was used. Forty-six healthcare professionals were purposively recruited from different organizational levels in ambulance service and psychiatric and somatic emergency care units. Data were collected between December 2014 and April 2015 through focus-group and individual interviews, and analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Organization of interpreters was based on patients health status, context of emergency care, and access to interpreter service. Differences existed between workplaces regarding the use of interpreters: in somatic emergency care bilingual healthcare staff and family members were used to a limited extent; in psychiatric emergency care the norm was to use professional interpreters on the spot; and in ambulance service persons available at the time, e.g. family and friends were used. Similarities were found in: procuring a professional interpreter, mainly based on informal workplace routines, sometimes on formal guidelines and national laws, but knowledge of existing laws was limited; the ideal was a linguistically competent interpreter with a professional attitude, and organizational aspects such as appropriate time, technical and social environment; and wishes for development of better procedures for prompt access to professional interpreters at the workplace, regardless of organizational context, and education of interpreters and users. Conclusion: Use of interpreters was determined by health professionals, based on the patients health status, striving to deliver as fast and individualized care as possible based on humanistic values. Defects in organizational routines need to be rectified and transcultural awareness is needed to achieve the aim of person-centered and equal healthcare. Clear formal guidelines for the use of interpreters in emergency healthcare need to be developed and it is important to fulfill health professionals wishes for future development of prompt access to interpreters and education of interpreters and users.

  • 45.
    Milberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Attachment figures when death is approaching: a study applying attachment theory to adult patients' and family members' experiences during palliative home care2017In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 2267-2274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Attachment theory is currently receiving much attention in relation to how adults cope with severe illness. The study aims were using the experiences of patients and family members to explore attachment figures (a central concept within the theory) during palliative home care.

    Methods

    Twelve patients and 14 family members were interviewed during ongoing palliative home care. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results

    Four types of attachment figures were identified: (i) family and friends, (ii) health care practitioners, (iii) pets and (iv) God. Both non-physical and physical contact with the attachment figures facilitated a sense of security. In addition, the patient/family members and their attachment figures were described by some as a “we”, and when one part of the “we” felt insecure, this made the other also feel insecure. The patients’ unstable and progressing illnesses constituted a threat to the patients’ and family members’ sense of security. The availability of the attachment figures made them feel secure, and they could then divert their attention from the patients’ illnesses to other things in everyday life, e.g. socialising with family and friends. Some family members also had to cope with the loss of their own attachment figure, when the patient, who had previously been a source of security for them, was no longer able to offer protection and comfort due to the progression of the illness.

    Conclusion

    Important aspects of attachment figures in the end-of-life context were identified, and their clinical implications will be discussed.

  • 46.
    Milberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Liljeroos, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Malarsjukhuset Hosp, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Can a single question about family members sense of security during palliative care predict their well-being during bereavement? A longitudinal study during ongoing care and one year after the patients death2019In: BMC Palliative Care, ISSN 1472-684X, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 18, article id 63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundIt has been recognised that more evidence about important aspects of family members sense of security during palliative care is needed. The objectives of the study was: i) to discover what variables are associated with family members feeling secure during palliative care; ii) to develop a model of family members sense of security during palliative care, and iii) to evaluate if family members sense of security during ongoing palliative care predicts well-being during bereavement.MethodsBetween September 2009 and October 2010, 227 family members (of patients admitted to six Swedish palliative home care units) participated in the study (participation rate 75%) during ongoing care and 158 participated also 1 year after the patients death (70%). They answered a single question regarding the family members sense of security during the palliative care period. The question was constructed and validated by the researchers. Data were also collected using other questions and validated instruments and analysed stepwise with Generalized Linear Models (ordinal multinomial distribution and logit link).ResultsSixteen variables were positively related to family members sense of security during ongoing palliative care. The five variables with the highest importance were selected into the model (listed in decreasing importance): Family members mastery; nervousness and stress; self-efficacy; patient having gynaecological cancer; family members perceived quality of life. Moreover, the family members sense of security during ongoing palliative care predicted ten variables indicating their well-being 1 year after the patients death, e.g. psychological well-being, complicated grief symptoms, health related quality of life.ConclusionsThe findings reveal possibilities to identify family members at risk of negative adjustment to bereavement in clinical practice and may help to develop interventions to support family members during ongoing palliative care.

  • 47.
    Milberg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ågård, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Health Care Professionals Understandings of Cross- Cultural Interaction in End- of- Life Care: A Focus Group Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e0165452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The academic debate on cross-cultural interaction within the context of end-of-life care takes for granted that this interaction is challenging. However, few empirical studies have actually focused on what health care professionals think about this interaction. This study aimed to explore health care professionals understandings of cross-cultural interaction during end-of-life care. Methods Sixty end-of-life care professionals were recruited from eleven care units in Sweden to take part in focus group interviews. These interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The health care professionals interviewed talked about cross-cultural interaction in end-oflife care as interaction that brings about uncertainty, stress and frustration even though they had limited experience of this type of interaction. The focus group discussions brought attention to four specific challenges that they expected to meet when they care for patients with migrant backgrounds since they took for granted that they would have an ethno-cultural background that is different to their own. These challenges had to do with communication barriers, `unusual emotional and pain expressions, the expectation that these patients families would be `different and the anticipation that these patients and their families lack knowledge. At the core of the challenges in question is the idea that cross-cultural interaction means meeting "the unknown". In addition, the end-of-life care professionals interviewed talked about patients whose backgrounds they did not share in homogenizing terms. It is against this backdrop that they worried about their ability to provide end-of-life care that is individualized enough to meet the needs of these patients. Conclusions The study suggests that end-of-life care professionals who regard cross-cultural interaction in this manner could face actual challenges when caring for patients whose backgrounds they regard as "the unknown" since they anticipate a variety of challenges and do not seem confident enough that they can provide good quality care when cross-cultural interaction is at stake.

  • 48.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Harakka, PI
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Post, C.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gerlde, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    High in vivo platelet activity in female fibromyalgia patients2016In: Journal of Biomedical Sciences, ISSN 2254-609X, Vol. 5, no 3:21, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FMS) is a pain syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain and hyperalgesia/allodynia. Many affected are women and risk factors are unidentified. Today, a certain number of set criteria of disease signs and symptoms must be met for the diagnosis to be made. These criteria are used because of the lack of reliable biomarkers or other medical examination. The current study examines if in vivo platelet activity varies between FMS and controls without FMS.

    Material and Methods: The study involves 24 females (age 38 + 9 (SD) years) with diagnosed FMS. 25 healthy females (age 50 + 12 (SD) years) without FMS served as controls. After sampling the whole platelet population was separated according to density with a linear Percoll™, into 17 density fractions. Platelet counts was carried out in all fractions using a routine cell counter. In addition, a flow cytometer was used to measure platelet bound fibrinogen without platelet agonist, reflecting in vivo platelet activity.

    Results: The study groups did not differ with respect to the distribution of platelets in the gradient. FMS sufferers demonstrated a significant higher platelet bound fibrinogen in most of the platelet density fractions. In particular, significant differences (p < 0.05) were obtained in fractions numbers 2-14 and 16. In difference, fractions numbers 1, 15 and 17 did not show any significant variance.

    Discussion: This is the first study to examine in vivo platelet activity in FMS. The results indicate that FMS is associated with elevated in vivo platelet activity compared to individuals without FMS. The clinical significance and the biochemical mechanisms regarding platelet heterogeneity are still uncertain. The results stimulate further research to elucidate the importance of platelet diversity in FMS

  • 49.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Norrköping.
    Pirjo, Harakka
    Department of Neurobiology, Society and Caring Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Augmented serotonin content in density separated platelets of fibromyalgia patients2016In: Clinical and Diagnostic Pathology, ISSN 2399-5297Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Milovanovic, Micha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Vikbolandet.
    Winblad, B
    NVS, Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Karolinska University Hospital, Geriatrics, Huddinge.
    Jelic, V
    NVS, Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Karolinska University Hospital, Geriatrics, Huddinge.
    Behbahani, H
    NVS, Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Shahnaz, T
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. NVS, Neurogeriatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge .
    Oweling, M
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Järemo, Petter
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Inverse relationship between erythrocyte size and platelet reactivity in elderly.2017In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 182-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous work indicates that erythrocytes (RBCs) accumulate β-amyloid X-40 (Aβ40) in individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD) and to a lesser extent in healthy elderly. The toxin damages RBCs and increases their mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Furthermore, AD platelets demonstrate lower reactivity. This study investigated interactions between RBCs and platelets. Older individuals with moderate hypertension (n = 57) were classified into two groups, depending on MCV in whole blood: The MCV(high) group comprised individuals with higher MCV (n = 27; 97 ± 3(SD) fl) and MCV(low) group had relatively lower MCV (n = 30; 90 ± 3(SD) fl). Flow cytometry was used to determine platelet reactivity, i.e., the surface binding of fibrinogen after provocation. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and a thrombin receptor-activating protein (TRAP-6) were used as agonists. Subsequently, blood cells were divided according to density into 17 subfractions. Intra-RBC Aβ40 content was analyzed and in all platelet populations surface-bound fibrinogen was determined to estimate platelet in vivo activity. We found Aβ40 inside RBCs of approximately 50% of participants, but the toxin did not affect MCV and platelet reactivity. In contrast, MCV associated inversely with platelet reactivity as judged from surface-attached fibrinogen after ADP (1.7 μmol/L) (p < 0.05) and TRAP-6 provocation (57 μmol/L (p = 0.01) and 74 μmol/L (p < 0.05)). In several density fractions (nos. 3, 4, 8, 11-13 (p < 0.05) and nos. 5-7 (p < 0.01)) MCV linked inversely with platelet-attached fibrinogen. In our community-dwelling sample, enhanced MCV associated with decreased platelet reactivity and lower in vivo platelet activity. It resembles RBCs and platelet behavior in AD-type dementia.

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