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  • 1.
    Abelius, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedenfalk, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pregnancy modulates the allergen-induced cytokine production differently in allergic and non-allergic women2017In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 818-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The immunological environment during pregnancy may differ between allergic and non-allergic women. This study investigates the effect of maternal allergy on the allergen-induced cytokine and chemokine levels and whether pregnancy modulates these immune responses differently in allergic and non-allergic women. Methods: The birch-, cat-, phytohemagglutinin- and tetanus toxoid-induced interferon-gamma(IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, the T-helper 1 (Th1)-associated chemokine CXCL10 and the Th2-associated chemokine CCL17 levels were quantified in 20 women with allergic symptoms (sensitized, n=13) and 36 women without allergic symptoms (non-sensitized, n=30) at gestational weeks 10-12, 15-16, 25, 35 and 2 and 12months post-partum. Results: Birch-, but not cat-induced, IL-5, IL-13 and CCL17 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the sensitized women with allergic symptoms. In contrast, cat-, but not birch-induced, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Furthermore, IFN-gamma secretion was increased in the first and decreased in the second and third trimesters in response to birch and decreased in the third trimester in response to cat as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Increased allergen-induced IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were associated with allergic symptoms and sensitization. Conclusions: Pregnancy had a clear effect on the allergen-induced IL-5, IL-13, CCL17, IFN-gamma and CXCL10 production, with distinct enhanced Th2-responses to birch in the allergic group and to cat in the non-allergic group.

  • 2.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Placental Immune Milieu is Characterized by a Th2- and Anti-Inflammatory Transcription Profile, Regardless of Maternal Allergy, and Associates with Neonatal Immunity2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 445-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: How maternal allergy affects the systemic and local immunological environment during pregnancy and the immune development of the offspring is unclear.

    METHOD OF STUDY: Expression of 40 genes was quantified by PCR arrays in placenta, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring.

    RESULTS: Placental gene expression was dominated by a Th2-/anti-inflammatory profile, irrespectively of maternal allergy, as compared to gene expression in PBMC. p35 expression in placenta correlated with fetal Tbx21 (ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001) and IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal galectin1 (ρ = 0.91, P < 0.001). Increased expression of Th2-associated CCL22 in CBMC preceded allergy development.

    CONCLUSIONS: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy was partly associated with the offspring's gene expression, possibly indicating that the immunological milieu is important for fetal immune development. Maternal allergy was not associated with an enhanced Th2 immunity in placenta or PBMC, while a marked prenatal Th2 skewing, shown as increased CCL22 mRNA expression, might contribute to postnatal allergy development.

  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: Not all probiotic strains prevent necrotising enterocolitis in premature infants in LANCET, vol 387, issue 10019, pp 624-6252016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10019, p. 624-625Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Using probiotics to prevent necrotising enterocolitis2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 11, p. 1718-1719Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wu, Richard Y.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Sherman, Philip M.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Microbiota in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Infancy: Implications for Management2017In: INTESTINAL MICROBIOME: FUNCTIONAL ASPECTS IN HEALTH AND DISEASE, KARGER , 2017, Vol. 88, p. 107-115Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex and diverse intestinal microbiome is recognized as important in promoting human health. An altered gut microflora, referred to as dysbiosis, is increasingly recognized as having an etiologic role in a variety of conditions, including functional gastrointestinal disorders: colic in infants and irritable bowel syndrome in older children. Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, if ingested in sufficient amounts, restore microbial homeostasis and have a benefit on health. Randomized controlled trials indicate that probiotics can be effective in a variety of intestinal conditions, including colic and irritable bowel syndrome. Probiotics may promote gut microbial diversity, but timing of the intervention appears crucial. Strain-specific effects on colonization resistance, epithelial barrier integrity, modulation of signal transduction, impacts on innate and adaptive immune responses, and effects on visceral hyperalgesia likely explain the observed variability in various probiotic strains. In the future, probiotics are likely to be chosen for use in a defined clinical setting based on underlying mechanism(s) of action. The precise component of the probiotic agent mediating observed effects is the subject of current research. Unresolved issues relate to optimal dosages, timing of ingestion, single versus combination formulations, maintenance of viability in storage, and the merits of employing probiotic- derived products. (C) 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. University of Toronto, Canada.
    You Wu, Richard
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gut microbiota and allergy: the importance of the pregnancy period2015In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 214-219Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limited microbial exposure is suggested to underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent countries, and bacterial diversity seems to be more important than specific bacteria taxa. Prospective studies indicate that the gut microbiota composition during the first months of life influences allergy development, and support the theory that factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system might be important for subsequent allergic disease. However, recent research indicates that microbial exposure during pregnancy may be even more important for the preventative effects against allergic disease. This review gives a background of the epidemiology, immunology, and microbiology literature in this field. It focuses on possible underlying mechanisms such as immune-regulated epigenetic imprinting and bacterial translocation during pregnancy, potentially providing the offspring with a pioneer microbiome. We suggest that a possible reason for the initial exposure of bacterial molecular patterns to the fetus in utero is to prime the immune system and/or the epithelium to respond appropriately to pathogens and commensals after birth.

  • 7.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Mental health in young mothers, single mothers and their children2019In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 19, article id 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Parenthood is a life transition that can be especially demanding for vulnerable individuals. Young maternal age and maternal single status have been reported to increase the risk for adverse outcomes for both mother and child. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of young maternal age and maternal single status on maternal and child mental health and child development at age 3. Methods: A birth-cohort of 1723 mothers and their children were followed from birth to age 3. Sixty-one mothers (3.5%) were age 20 or younger, and 65 (4.0%) reported single status at childbirth. The mothers filled out standardized instruments and medical information was retrieved from the standardized clinical assessment of the children at Child Welfare Centers, (CWC). Results: Young maternal age was associated with symptoms of postpartum depression whereas single status was not. Young mothers were more prone to report internalizing and externalizing problems in their children, while there was no association between single status and child behavioral problems. No differences were seen on child development (CWC scores). School drop-out was, however, a more influential factor on depressive symptoms postpartum than maternal age. Conclusion: Young mothers are at increased risk for symptoms of postpartum depression which indicates the need for attention in pre- and postnatal health care programs. Single mothers and their children were not found to be at increased risk for adverse outcomes. The importance of schooling was demonstrated, indicating the need for societal support to encourage adolescents to remain in school.

  • 8.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Barnafrid. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A Biopsychosocial Approach to Risk and Resilience on Behavior in Children Followed from Birth to Age 122017In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 584-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on preadolescence behavior. Data from 889 children and mothers from a birth cohort were used. An adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and childrens experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament, social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. The l/ l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region was associated with lower internalizing scores, but not mainly related to the level of adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilience for children exposed to high adversity. Social functioning was found to be promotive independent of the risk level. The results support a multiple-level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors.

  • 9.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A biopsychosocial approach to risk and resilience on behavior in children followed from birth to age twelve2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing prevalence of mental health problems calls for more knowledge into factors associated with resilience in the context of child behavior. Biological factors are seldom considered in psychosocial models of resilience. The present study used multiple statistical methodologies to examine a biopsychosocial model of risk and resilience on behavior at preadolescence. Data from 889 children and their mothers were used. A cumulative adversity score was created by combining maternal symptoms of depression, psychosocial risk and children’s experiences of life events. The proposed resilience factors investigated were candidate genetic polymorphisms, child temperament and social functioning, and maternal sense of coherence. Results show that the l/l genotype of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was associated with lower internalizing scores, especially for children exposed to low adversity. An easy temperament was associated with resilient outcomes for children exposed to high adversity. Child social functioning was found to be more of a general resource variable buffering risk in both high and low adversity groups. The results support a multiple level model of resilience indicating effects, though small, of both biological and psychosocial factors. The present findings call for both preventive actions and further studies on biopsychosocial models in resilience research.

  • 10.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Comasco, Erika
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Oreland, Lars
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Early predictors of behavioural problems in pre-schoolers: a longitudinal study of constitutional and environmental main and interaction effects2016In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The early environment is important for child development and wellbeing. Gene-by-environment studies investigating the impact of the serotonin transporter genelinked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms by life events on mental health and behaviour problems have been inconclusive. Methodological differences regarding sample sizes, study population, definitions of adversities and measures of mental health problems obstacle their comparability. Furthermore, very few studies included children. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between a broad range of risk factors covering pregnancy and birth, genetic polymorphism, experience of multiple life events and psychosocial environment, and child behaviour at age three, using a comparably large, representative, population-based sample.

    Methods: A total of 1,106 children, and their mothers, were followed from pregnancy to age three. Information on pregnancy and birth-related factors was retrieved from the Medical Birth Register. Questionnaires on depressive symptoms, child behaviour and child experiences of life events were filled in by the mothers. Child saliva samples were used for genotyping the 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the association between psychological scales and genetic polymorphisms.

    Results: Symptoms of postpartum depression increased the risk of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Experience of multiple life events was also a predictor of behavioural problems across the scales. No gene-by-environment or gene-bygene-by-environment interactions were found. Children of immigrants had an increased risk of internalizing problems and parental unemployment was significantly associated with both internalizing and externalizing type of problems.

    Conclusion: This study shows the importance of the psychosocial environment for psychosocial health in preschool children, and adds to  the literature of null-findings of gene-by-environment effects of 5-HTTLPR and BDNF in children

  • 11.
    Aho, Nikolas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gren Landell, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey2016In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 620-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying the extent to which children are exposed to victimizing events is important to fully understand the effect of such exposure in shaping them as adults. The aim of this study was to use self-report by adolescents to measure the prevalence of victimizing events and of poly-victimization. A representative sample of 5,960 students (aged 17) from high schools in Sweden was given the self-administrated version of the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) along with questions concerning gender, birthplace, parents birthplace and employment, residence, educational program, and municipality size. The results show that 84.1% (83.0% young men and 85.2% young women) of the students had experienced victimization during their lifetime, and 10.3% were categorized as poly-victims (8.1% young men and 12.5% young women; OR = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.35, 1.94]). Adolescents living with both parents were at lower risk of any form of victimization for both genders, while females were at higher risk of maltreatment, peer victimization, and, most significantly, sexual victimization. In conclusion, the vast majority of young people have been victimized during their lifetime. A greater awareness of the impact of these victimizing events on children and adolescents is important as a basis for providing a safer milieu and establishing better interventions, especially for those that have been victimized on multiple occasions. The high-exposure group was determined by using 10 events as a cutoff. Findings on this group corresponded with findings in other international studies regarding distribution, elevated risk for females, and the possibility of limiting the effects of victimization by modifying living conditions.

  • 12.
    Akesson, Karin
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden; Jonköping County Council, Sweden; University of Jonköping, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    The influence of age, gender, insulin dose, BMI, and blood pressure on metabolic control in young patients with type 1 diabetes2015In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 581-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo explore the relationship between certain clinical variables and metabolic HbA1c at diagnosis correlated to HbA1c at follow-up (p less than 0.001). There was a clear gender difference regarding HbA1c. Girls had higher values both at diagnosis and at follow-up (p less than 0.001). Girls also had lower BMI and pH at diagnosis than boys (p less than 0.001). In contrast, girls with the highest body mass index (BMI) at follow-up had higher mean HbA1c at follow-up in 2010 (p less than 0.001). Having a mother and/or a father with high BMI implied higher HbA1c at diagnosis (p less than 0.003). ConclusionsHbA1c at diagnosis seems to predict metabolic control years later. There is a gender difference at diagnosis as female patients have higher HbA1c than males at diagnosis as well as at follow up. As metabolic control is very much correlated to complications there is a need to early identify patients at risk of poor metabolic control. Even though we do not know whether a high HbA1c level is mainly due to severity of the disease or to behavioral patterns, new ways to treat and support these children, especially girls, are needed.

  • 13.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Halili, Shefqet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hildebrand, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Vesico-Uterine Fistula after TURB in pregnancy, a rare cause of genitourinary fistula2018In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 162-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 14.
    Anderzen, Johan
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Akesson, Karin
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden; Futurum, Australia; Jonköping Academic Improvement Health and Welf, Germany.
    Teenagers with poor metabolic control already have a higher risk of microvascular complications as young adults2016In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 533-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate how HbA1c in adolescents with type 1 diabetes affects microvascular complications in young adults. Methods: All individuals registered in the Swedish paediatric diabetes quality registry (SWEDIABKIDS) 13-18 years of age, and as adults registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Registry (NDR) in both the years 2011 and 2012 were included, in total 4250 individuals. Results: Of the individuals with mean HbA1c &gt;78 mmol/mol in SWEDIABKIDS 83.4% had retinopathy, 15.8% had microalbuminuria and 4.9% had macroalbuminuria in NDR. The logistic regression analysis showed that the OR to develop macroalbuminuria as a young adult was significantly higher in the group with mean HbA1c &gt;78 mmol/mol in SWEDIABKIDS (p &lt; 0.05). Among the patients with mean HbA1c above 78 mmol/mol in both registries there was a significantly higher proportion that had retinopathy, microalbuminuria (p &lt; 0.001) and/or macroalbuminuria (p &lt; 0.01) compared to the group with HbA1c below 57 mmol/mol in both registries. Only 6.5% of the persons in this study were over 30 years of age. Conclusions: Paediatric diabetes teams working with teenagers must be aware of the impact of good metabolic control during adolescence, and should intensify the care during this vulnerable period of life to reduce the risk of microvascular complications in young adults.

  • 15.
    Andolf, Ellika G.
    et al.
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sharma, Surendra
    Brown University, RI 02908 USA.
    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and later dementia: a Swedish National Register Study2017In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 464-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Our aim was to investigate the rate of vascular dementia and dementia in women with previous hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, since white matter lesions of the brain and cardiovascular disease are linked both to dementia and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Material and methods. Prospective population-based registry study on all women giving birth in Sweden between 1973 and 1975 (284 598). Women with and without hypertensive disorders in pregnancy were identified by means of the Swedish Medical Birth Register and linked to the National Patient Register, where data on somatic disease later in life were obtained. International classification of disease was used. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios for both groups and adjusted for possible confounders. Main outcome measures were in-hospital diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia and dementia. Results. No increased risks were seen for vascular dementia or dementia after any hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. If broken down in specific diagnoses for hypertensive disease in pregnancy, adjusted risks for vascular dementia after hypertension and proteinuria during pregnancy the hazard ratio was 6.27 (95% CI 1.65-27.44). Higher risks for cardiovascular disease were confirmed. Conclusions. Because of the very low absolute risk, the wide confidence interval and risk of misclassification, our results on vascular dementia could be questioned. Considering the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, the findings of brain lesions and the increased risk for cardiovascular disease, the possibly increased risk for all kinds of dementia must be investigated in larger and more well-defined cohorts.

  • 16.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Askenteg, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Wikner, Ulrica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    "To Cope with Everyday Life, I Need to Sleep" - A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Sleep Loss in Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis.2018In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 43, p. E59-E65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The whole family is affected when a child has atopic dermatitis (AD), and parents experience sleep disruption related to the child's condition leading to physical and mental exhaustion, mood swings, loss of concentration and lower job performance. This study aimed to explore and describe perceptions of sleep in parents of children <2 years old with AD, consequences of parental sleep loss, and what strategies the parents used to manage sleep loss and to improve sleep.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: This qualitative interview study had an inductive and descriptive design. Twelve parents (eleven mothers and one father) participated in the study. Data analysis was performed using a phenomenographic approach.

    RESULTS: Three categories of description were found: Acceptance and normalization of parental sleep loss; Changed routines and behavior to compensate for sleep loss; and Support is needed to gain sleep and manage daily life.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sleep loss due to the child's AD affected the parents' emotional state, mood, well-being, cognitive function, ability to concentrate and take initiative, and sensitivity to stress and sound negatively. The parents managed their sleep loss mainly by changing their behavior and creating new routines, by taking me-time and through support from partners.

    PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Pediatric nurses should acknowledge sleep loss in parents of small children with AD in time to prevent negative consequences, which affect the well-being of the entire family. Advice on how to improve sleep should be given early to increase the parents' understanding, make them feel safer and strengthen them in their parenthood.

  • 17.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Morelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    The cortisol response in parents staying with a sick child at hospital2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 620-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To study the cortisol response in parents staying with their child in paediatric wards, to compare the parents’ cortisol levels between the paediatric ward and at home 4 weeks after discharge and to compare the parents’ cortisol levels with data of an adult reference population, reported by Wust et al., as there are few studies investigating parental cortisol.

    Design

    This study has a descriptive and prospective comparative design.

    Method

    Thirty‐one parents participated. Saliva samples were collected in the paediatric ward and 4 weeks later at home.

    Results

    The parents had lower morning awakening cortisol levels in the paediatric ward than at home after discharge. There were no statistically significant differences in postawakening cortisol or cortisol awakening response (CAR). The child's age, diagnosis or previously diagnosed chronic condition did not affect the parents’ cortisol levels. The morning and postawakening cortisol levels were lower than those of the reference population.

    Conclusion

    The hospital stay with a sick child affects parents’ cortisol levels. Parental stress needs more attention to find interventions to prevent the risk of stress‐related complications that subsequently can affect the care of the child.

  • 18.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. e544-e550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family‐centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers’ and fathers’ sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents’ sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily‐life home setting after discharge.

    Background

    Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents’ sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child.

    Methods

    This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty‐two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood.

    Results

    The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood.

    Conclusion

    Parents’ sleep quality in family‐centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice

    The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents’ sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well‐being in the family.

  • 19.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Sjolie, Hege
    Oslo Metropolitan Univ, Norway.
    Moerelius, Evalotte
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Perth Childrens Hosp, Australia.
    Loyland, Borghild
    Oslo Metropolitan Univ, Norway.
    Like Walking in a Fog2019In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, article id UNSP e12945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disruption of parental sleep in hospital, with frequent awakenings and poor sleep quality, limits the parents resources to meet the childs needs and maintain parental wellbeing. The aim of the study was to explore and describe how parents perceive their sleep when staying overnight with their sick child in hospital. A further aim was to explore and describe parents perception of what circumstances influence their sleep in the hospital. Twenty-two parents who were accommodated with their sick child (0-17 years) in paediatric wards in Norway and Sweden participated. Interviews were conducted during the hospital stay to elicit their perspectives. Phenomenography was used to analyse data. Two descriptive categories were found: (a) "Perceptions of sleep", with two sub-categories: "Sleep in the paediatric ward" and "Consequences of sleep loss"; and (b) "Circumstances influencing sleep in the paediatric ward" with three sub-categories: "The importance of the family", "Information and routines at the paediatric ward", and "Accommodation facilities". Parents sleep and needs must be acknowledged in paediatric wards. An individual plan of care for the upcoming night could be a valuable tool for both the parents and nurses. The childs medical needs must be met with respect to the parents willingness to take part in the childs care during the night, and the need for rest and sleep for both parent and child.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-11-13 14:20
  • 20.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sahlén Helmer, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Olsson, Emma
    Department of Pediatrics and Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Shorey, Shefaly
    Alice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Effect of skin-to-skin contact on parents sleep quality, mood, parent-infant interaction and cortisol concentrations in neonatal care units: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 7, article id e021606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Separation after preterm birth is a major stressor for infants and parents. Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is a method of care suitable to use in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimise separation between parents and infants. Less separation leads to increased possibilities for parent-infant interaction, provided that the parents’ sleep quality is satisfactory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous SSC on sleep quality and mood in parents of preterm infants born <33 weeks of gestation as well as the quality of parent-infant interaction and salivary cortisol concentrations at the time of discharge.

    Methods and analysis A randomised intervention study with two arms—intervention versus standard care. Data will be collected from 50 families. Eligible families will be randomly allocated to intervention or standard care when transferred from the intensive care room to the family-room in the NICU. The intervention consists of continuous SSC for four consecutive days and nights in the family-room. Data will be collected every day during the intervention and again at the time of discharge from the hospital. Outcome measures comprise activity tracker (Actigraph); validated self-rated questionnaires concerning sleep, mood and bonding; observed scorings of parental sensitivity and emotional availability and salivary cortisol. Data will be analysed with pairwise, repeated measures, Mann Whitney U-test will be used to compare groups and analysis of variance will be used to adjust for different hospitals and parents’ gender.

    Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Regional Research Ethics Board at an appropriate university (2016/89–31). The results will be published in scientific journals. We will also use conferences and social media to disseminate our findings.

  • 21.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog-Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Correction: Reproductive Patterns Among Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Survivors in Sweden: A Population-Based Matched-Cohort Study (vol 35, pg 1577, 2018)2018In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 36, no 20Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 22.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lampic, C.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Skoog-Svanberg, A.
    Uppsala University of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wanggren, K.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Survey shows that Swedish healthcare professionals have a positive attitude towards surrogacy but the health of the child is a concern2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 1, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimIn February 2016, Sweden upheld its ban on surrogacy following a Government enquiry. This survey investigated attitudes towards surrogacy among primary health professionals working with children and their experiences of working with families following surrogacy abroad. MethodsFrom April to November 2016, nurses, physicians and psychologist working in primary child health care in four counties in Sweden were invited to participate in a cross-sectional online survey about surrogacy. ResultsThe mean age of the 208 participants was 49.2years (range 27-68) and nearly 91% were women. Approximately 60% supported legalised surrogacy. Wanting a conscience clause to be introduced in Sweden was associated with not supporting surrogacy for any groups, while personal experiences of infertility and clinical experiences with families following surrogacy were associated with positive attitudes towards surrogacy for heterosexual couples. The majority (64%) disagreed that surrogate children were as healthy as other children, and many believed that they risked worse mental health (21%) and social stigmatisation (21%). ConclusionWe found that 60% supported legalised surrogacy, but many expressed concerns about the childrens health and greater knowledge about the medical and psychosocial consequences of surrogacy is needed.

  • 23.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Adverse obstetric outcomes among female childhood and adolescent cancer survivors in Sweden: A population-based matched cohort study2019In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 12, p. 1603-1611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Cancer treatment during childhood may lead to late adverse effects, such as reduced musculoskeletal development or vascular, endocrine and pulmonary dysfunction, which in turn may have an adverse effect on later pregnancy and childbirth. The aim of the present study was to investigate pregnancy and obstetric outcomes as well as the offsprings health among childhood and adolescent female cancer survivors. Material and methods This register-based study included all women born between 1973 and 1977 diagnosed with cancer in childhood or adolescence (age amp;lt;21), as well as an age-matched comparison group. A total of 278 female cancer survivors with their first childbirth were included in the study, together with 829 age-matched individuals from the general population. Logistic regression and analysis of variance were used to investigate associations between having been treated for cancer and the outcome variables, adjusting for maternal age, nicotine use and comorbidity. Results Survivors were more likely to have preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.58 to 7.56), undergo induction of labor (aOR 1.66, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.62), suffer labor dystocia (primary labor dystocia aOR 3.54, 95% CI 1.51 to 8.34 and secondary labor dystocia aOR 2.43, 95% CI 1.37 to 4.31), malpresentation of fetus (aOR 2.02, 95% CI 1.12 to 3.65) and imminent fetal asphyxia (aOR 2.55, 95% CI 1.49 to 4.39). In addition, deliveries among survivors were more likely to end with vacuum extraction (aOR 2.53, 95% CI 1.44 to 4.47), with higher risk of clitoral lacerations (aOR 2.18, 95% CI 1.47 to 3.23) and anal sphincter injury (aOR 2.76, 95% CI 1.14 to 6.70) and emergency cesarean section (aOR 2.34 95% CI 1.39 to 3.95). Survivors used pain-reliving methods to a higher extent compared with the comparison group. There was no increased risk of neonate diagnoses and malformations. The results showed that survivors who had been diagnosed with cancer when they were younger than 14 had an increased risk of adverse obstetric outcomes. Conclusions The study demonstrates increased risk of pregnancy and childbirth complications among childhood and adolescent cancer survivors. There is a need to optimize perinatal care, especially among survivors who were younger than 14 at time of diagnosis.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-07-22 13:49
  • 24.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skoog-Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproductive Patterns Among Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Survivors in Sweden: A Population-Based Matched-Cohort Study.2017In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 35, no 14, p. 1577-1583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To compare the probability of a first live birth, age at time of birth, and time between diagnosis/referent date and birth between childhood and adolescent cancer survivors and an age-matched comparison group. Materials and Methods A total of 1,206 survivors was included in the study, together with 2,412 age-matched individuals from the general population. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to investigate first live birth after diagnosis/referent date. Data were stratified by sex, age at diagnosis, and diagnostic era (ie, diagnosis before 1988 v in 1988 or later). Results Overall, the probability of having a first live birth (hazard ratio [HR]) was significantly lower; men had lower HRs than women (HR, 0.65 v 0.79). There were no significant differences in the probability of having a first live birth among women diagnosed during adolescence (HR, 0.89), but the HR was lower among women with childhood cancers (HR, 0.47). Among male survivors, the situation was the opposite; men diagnosed during adolescence had lower HRs than survivors of childhood cancer (HR, 0.56 v 0.70). Examination of the data from the two diagnostic eras (before 1988 and 1988 or later) shows that the HR increased among female survivors after 1988 (HR, 0.71 v 0.90) and decreased among male survivors (HR, 0.72 v 0.59). A shorter time had elapsed between diagnosis/referent date and the birth of a first child among both male and female survivors compared with controls. In addition, female survivors were younger at time of birth. Conclusion The study demonstrates reduced probability of having a first live birth among cancer survivors diagnosed during childhood or adolescence; men were particularly vulnerable.

  • 25.
    Armuand, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Attitudes towards embryo donation among healthcare professionals working in child healthcare: a survey study2019In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 19, article id 209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate attitudes towards embryo donation and embryo donation families among professionals working in primary child healthcare, and their experiences of these families.MethodsA cross-sectional online survey was conducted in Sweden between April and November 2016. A total of 712 primary healthcare physicians, registered nurses and psychologists were approached to participate in this study. The study-specific questionnaire measured attitudes and experiences in the following four domains: legalisation and financing, the family and the childs health, clinical experience of meeting families following embryo donation, and knowledge of embryo donation.ResultsOf the 189 women and 18 men who completed the questionnaire (response rate 29%), relatively few (13%) had clinical experience of caring for families following embryo donation. Overall, 69% supported legalisation of embryo donation for infertile couples, and 54% agreed it should be publicly funded. The majority (88%) agreed the child should have the right to know the donors identity. Respondents did not believe that children conceived through embryo donation are as healthy as other children (50%), citing the risks of poor mental health (17%) and social stigmatization (18%). Approximately half reported low confidence in their own knowledge of embryo donation (47%) and wanted to know more (58%).ConclusionsThese results indicate relatively large support among healthcare professionals in Sweden for the legalisation of embryo donation. In order to provide adequate healthcare to families following embryo donation, there is a need to develop educational resources to increase knowledge about the medical and psychosocial consequences of embryo donation among healthcare professionals working in primary healthcare.

  • 26.
    Asklöf, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Bioelectrical impedance analysis; a new method to evaluate lymphoedema, fluid status, and tissue damage after gynaecological surgery - A systematic review2018In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 228, p. 111-119Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this descriptive review is to summarise the current knowledge of non-invasive bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) used with gynaecological surgical patients in regard to postoperative development of lymphoedema and determination of perioperative fluid balance, and as a prognostic factor in cancer mortality and a predictor of postoperative complications. The databases PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and reference lists of selected articles were searched for relevant articles published during the period January 2008-April 2018. Only papers published in English were retrieved. Thirty-seven articles were evaluated. Where gynaecological studies were lacking, studies with a study population from neighbouring clinical fields were used instead. Studies on the clinical use of BIA with gynaecological surgical patients were divided into three categories: the postoperative development of lower limb lymphoedema (n = 7), perioperative hydration measuring (n = 3), and the BIA parameter phase angle as a prognostic factor in cancer survival and as predictive for postoperative complications (n = 6). Of these 16 studies only three used a pure gynaecological study population. Three different methods of BIA were used in these articles: single frequency-BIA, multifrequency-BIA and bioimpedance spectroscopy. BIA was found to detect lymphoedema with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 84%. Studies indicated that BIA was able to detect lower limb lymphoedema at an early stage even before it became clinically detectable. During postoperative hydration measurements, an increase in extracellular fluid volume and extracellular fluid volume in relation to total body fluid volume, as well as a decrease in phase angle, were associated with higher frequencies of postoperative complications. Moreover, low values for the phase angle have been associated with increased mortality in cancer patients. However, the number of studies in this field was limited. From our review, BIA seems to be a useful tool for use in the clinical setting of the gynaecological surgical patient. The theoretical approach of using bioelectrical impedance values to measure the fluid distribution in the body compartments offers wide opportunities in the clinical setting. However, so far, all studies have set up cut-off limits within the study population, and reference values for a general population need to be defined. There are also rather few studies on a gynaecological study population. Hence, there is a need for further studies within gynaecological surgery focusing on early detection of lower limb lymphoedema, perioperative fluid balance, and postoperative complications in order to establish the value of BIA in clinical praxis. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Axelsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Maternal obesity, obstetric interventions and post-partum anaemia increase the risk of post-partum sepsis: a population-based cohort study based on Swedish medical health registers2017In: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, Vol. 49, no 10, p. 765-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The objective was to estimate whether maternal obesity and/or obstetric interventions are associated with diagnosed maternal post-partum sepsis. Methods: A retrospective observational cohort study including all deliveries in Sweden between 1997 and 2012 (N=1,558,752). Cases of sepsis (n=376) were identified by International Classification of Diseases, (ICD-10) codes A40, A41 and O 85 in the Medical Birth Register and the National Patient Register. The reference population was non-infected, and therefore, women with any other infection diagnosis and/or with dispensed antibiotics within eight weeks post-partum were excluded. Information on dispensed drugs was available in the prescribed drug Register. Women with sepsis were compared with non-infected women concerning maternal characteristics and obstetric interventions. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were determined using the Mantel-Haenszel technique. Adjustments were made for maternal age, parity and smoking. Results: Obese women (body mass index 30) had a doubled risk of sepsis (3.6/10,000) compared with normal weight women (2.0/10,000) (aOR 1.85 (95%CI: 1.37-2.48)). Induction of labour (aOR 1.44 (95%CI: 1.09-1.91)), caesarean section overall (aOR 3.06 (95%CI: 2.49-3.77)) and elective caesarean section (aOR 2.41 (95%CI: 1.68-3.45)) increased the risk of sepsis compared with normal vaginal delivery. Post-partum anaemia due to acute blood loss was associated with maternal sepsis (aOR 3.40 (95%CI: 2.59-4.47)). Conclusions: Maternal obesity, obstetric interventions and post-partum anaemia due to acute blood loss increased the risk of diagnosed post-partum sepsis indicating that interventions in obstetric care should be considered carefully and anaemia should be treated if resources are available.

  • 28.
    Axelsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Postpartum infection in relation to maternal characteristics, obstetric interventions and complications2018In: Journal of Perinatal Medicine, ISSN 0300-5577, E-ISSN 1619-3997, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to evaluate the association between maternal characteristics, obstetrical interventions/complications and postpartum wound infections (WI), urinary tract infection (UTI) and endometritis. Furthermore, this study aimed to determine the time from delivery to onset of infections after discharge from the hospital. Three large Swedish Medical Health Registers were scrutinized for the period 2005-2012. A total of 582,576 women had 795,072 deliveries. Women with diagnosis codes for WIs, UTIs or endometritis, from delivery to 8 weeks postpartum, were compared to non-infected women. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Increasing age and body mass index (BMI) were both associated with increasing prevalence of postpartum infections. WIs were most strongly associated with cesarean section (CS) (OR 17.2; 95% CI 16.1-18.3), 3rd and 4th degree tears (OR 10.7%; 95% CI 9.80-11.9) and episiotomy (OR 10.2; 95% CI 8.94-11.5). Endometritis was associated with anemia (OR 3.16; 95% CI 3.01-3.31) and manual placental removal (OR 2.72; 95% CI 2.51-2.95). UTI was associated with emergency CS (OR 3.46; 95% CI 3.07-3.89) and instrumental delivery (OR 3.70; 95% CI 3.29-4.16). For women discharged from the delivery hospital the peak occurrence of UTI was 6 days postpartum, while for WIs and endometritis it was 7 days postpartum.

  • 29.
    Axelsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics.
    Vitamin D deficiency at the time of delivery - Prevalence and risk of postpartum infections.2019In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 12, article id e0226673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum infections are a common cause of morbidity after childbirth. Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to increase the risk for several infections in a non-pregnant population. Vitamin D deficiency has been described as common in pregnant women.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women in labor was associated with an increased risk of overall postpartum infectious morbidity within eight weeks of delivery. A secondary aim was to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among pregnant women in Linköping, Sweden at the time of delivery.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Serum vitamin D levels in labor were analyzed for 1397 women. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as serum levels <50 nmol/L. All ICD-10 codes given to the women eight weeks postpartum were reviewed and postpartum infections were defined as the presence of an ICD-10 code suggestive of infection. The prevalence of postpartum infections among women with sufficient vitamin D levels was compared with women with vitamin D deficiency. Adjusted Odds Ratios and 95% confidence intervals for postpartum infections were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis.

    RESULTS: Fifty eight per cent of the women had serum vitamin D levels <50 nmol/L. The proportion of women with vitamin D deficiency varied, as expected, with season. No association between vitamin D deficiency and postpartum infections was found. For vitamin D 25-50 nmol/L the adjusted Odds Ratio was 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.56-1.29) and for vitamin D <25 nmol/L the adjusted Odds Ratio was 1.15 (95% confidence interval 0.66-2.03). Women who smoked or who had a cesarean section had an increased risk of postpartum infections.

    CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency was more common than previously reported in Swedish pregnant women. No association between vitamin D deficiency and postpartum infections was found. Other well-known risk factors for postpartum infection were identified.

  • 30.
    Aydemir, Ozkan
    et al.
    Univ Massachusetts, MA USA.
    Noble, Janelle A.
    Childrens Hosp Oakland, CA 94609 USA.
    Bailey, Jeffrey A.
    Univ Massachusetts, MA USA.
    Lernmark, Ake
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Marsh, Patrick
    Univ Massachusetts, MA USA.
    Svard, Agnes Andersson
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bearoff, Frank
    Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA.
    Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.
    Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA.
    Mordes, John P.
    Univ Massachusetts, MA 01655 USA.
    Persson, Martina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Larsson, Helena Elding
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Forsander, Gun
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Sten-Anders
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Marcus, Claude
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Genetic Variation Within the HLA-DRA1 Gene Modulates Susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes in HLA-DR3 Homozygotes2019In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 68, no 7, p. 1523-1527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) involves the interaction of multiple gene variants, environmental factors, and immunoregulatory dysfunction. Major T1D genetic risk loci encode HLA-DR and -DQ. Genetic heterogeneity and linkage disequilibrium in the highly polymorphic HLA region confound attempts to identify additional T1D susceptibility loci. To minimize HLA heterogeneity, T1D patients (N = 365) and control subjects (N = 668) homozygous for the HLA-DR3 high-risk haplotype were selected from multiple large T1D studies and examined to identify new T1D susceptibility loci using molecular inversion probe sequencing technology. We report that risk for T1D in HLA-DR3 homozygotes is increased significantly by a previously unreported haplotype of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the first intron of HLA-DRA1. The homozygous risk haplotype has an odds ratio of 4.65 relative to the protective homozygous haplotype in our sample. Individually, these SNPs reportedly function as "expression quantitative trait loci," modulating HLA-DR and -DQ expression. From our analysis of available data, we conclude that the tri-SNP haplotype within HLA-DRA1 may modulate class II expression, suggesting that increased T1D risk could be attributable to regulated expression of class II genes. These findings could help clarify the role of HLA in T1D susceptibility and improve diabetes risk assessment, particularly in high-risk HLA-DR3 homozygous individuals.

  • 31.
    Baldvinsdottir, Tinna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Improved clinical management but not patient outcome in women with postpartum haemorrhage-An observational study of practical obstetric team training2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e0203806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is the most common obstetric emergency. A well-established postpartum haemorrhage protocol in the labour ward is crucial for effective treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate if practical obstetric team training improves the patient outcome and clinical management of PPH. Setting The practical obstetric team training (PROBE) at Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden, with approximate 3000 deliveries annually, was studied between the years of 2004-2011. Each team consisted of one or two midwives, one obstetrician or one junior doctor and one nurse assistant. Emergency obstetrics cases were trained in a simulation setting. PROBE was scheduled during work hours at an interval of 1.5 years. Population Pre-PROBE women (N = 419 were defined as all women with vaginal birth between the years of 2004-2007 with an estimated blood loss of amp;gt;= 1000 ml within the first 24 hours of delivery. Post-PROBE women (N = 483) were defined as all women with vaginal birth between the years of 2008-2011 with an estimated blood loss of amp;gt;= 1000 ml within the first 24 hours of delivery. The two groups were compared regarding blood loss parameters and management variables using retrospective data from medical records. Results No difference was observed in estimated blood loss, haemoglobin level, blood transfusions or the incidence of postpartum haemorrhage between the two groups. Post-PROBE women had more often secured venous access (pamp;lt;0.001), monitoring of vital signs (pamp;lt;0.001) and received fluid resuscitation (pamp;lt;0.001) compared to pre-PROBE women. The use of uterine massage was also more common among the post-PROBE women compared with the pre-PROBE women (pamp;lt;0.001). Conclusion PROBE improved clinical management but not patient outcome in women with postpartum haemorrhage in the labour ward. These new findings may have clinical implications since they confirm that training was effective concerning the management of postpartum haemorrhage. However, there is still no clear evidence that simulation training improve patient outcome in women with PPH.

  • 32.
    Barcenilla, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Pihl, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mass Cytometry Identifies Distinct Subsets of Regulatory T Cells and Natural Killer Cells Associated With High Risk for Type 1 Diabetes2019In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 10, article id 982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by autoimmune destruction of insulin producing beta-cells. The time from onset of islet autoimmunity to manifest clinical disease can vary widely in length, and it is fairly uncharacterized both clinically and immunologically. In the current study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from autoantibody-positive children with high risk for T1D, and from age-matched healthy individuals, were analyzed by mass cytometry using a panel of 32 antibodies. Surface markers were chosen to identify multiple cell types including T, B, NK, monocytes, and DC, and antibodies specific for identification of differentiation, activation and functional markers were also included in the panel. By applying dimensional reduction and computational unsupervised clustering approaches, we delineated in an unbiased fashion 132 phenotypically distinct subsets within the major immune cell populations. We were able to identify an effector memory Treg subset expressing HLA-DR, CCR4, CCR6, CXCR3, and GATA3 that was increased in the high-risk group. In addition, two subsets of NK cells defined by CD16(+) CD8(+) CXCR3(+) and CD16(+) CD8(+) CXCR3(+) CD11c(+) were also higher in the same subjects. High-risk individuals did not show impaired glucose tolerance at the time of sampling, suggesting that the changes observed were not the result of metabolic imbalance, and might be potential biomarkers predictive of T1D.

  • 33.
    Beam, Craig A.
    et al.
    Western Michigan University, MI 49008 USA.
    MacCallum, Colleen
    Western Michigan University, MI 49008 USA.
    Herold, Kevan C.
    Yale University, CT USA; Yale University, CT USA.
    Wherrett, Diane K.
    Hospital Sick Children, Canada; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Palmer, Jerry
    University of Washington, WA 98195 USA; VA Puget Sound Health Care Syst, WA USA.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    GAD vaccine reduces insulin loss in recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes: findings from a Bayesian meta-analysis2017In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 43-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GAD is a major target of the autoimmune response that occurs in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Randomised controlled clinical trials of a GAD + alum vaccine in human participants have so far given conflicting results. In this study, we sought to see whether a clearer answer to the question of whether GAD65 has an effect on C-peptide could be reached by combining individual-level data from the randomised controlled trials using Bayesian meta-analysis to estimate the probability of a positive biological effect (a reduction in C-peptide loss compared with placebo approximately 1 year after the GAD vaccine). We estimate that there is a 98% probability that 20 mu g GAD with alum administered twice yields a positive biological effect. The effect is probably a 15-20% reduction in the loss of C-peptide at approximately 1 year after treatment. This translates to an annual expected loss of between -0.250 and -0.235 pmol/ml in treated patients compared with an expected 2 h AUC loss of -0.294 pmol/ml at 1 year for untreated newly diagnosed patients. The biological effect of this vaccination should be developed further in order to reach clinically desirable reductions in insulin loss in patients recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

  • 34.
    Bengtsdotter, Hanna
    et al.
    Örebro Univ, Sweden.
    Lundin, Cecilia
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Gemzell Danielsson, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bixo, Marie
    Umeå Univ, Sweden.
    Baumgart, Juliane
    Örebro Univ, Sweden.
    Marions, Lena
    Karolinska Inst Södersjukhuset, Sweden.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Malmborg, Agota
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh, Ingela
    Gothenburg Univ, Sweden.
    Poromaa, Inger Sundstrom
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ongoing or previous mental disorders predispose to adverse mood reporting during combined oral contraceptive use2018In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Previous studies have emphasised that women with pre-existing mood disorders are more inclined to discontinue hormonal contraceptive use. However, few studies have examined the effects of combined oral contraceptives (COC) on mood in women with previous or ongoing mental disorders. Materials and methods: This is a supplementary analysis of an investigator-initiated, double-blinded, randomised clinical trial during which 202 women were treated with either a COC (1.5mg estradiol and 2.5mg nomegestrolacetate) or placebo during three treatment cycles. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to collect information on previous or ongoing mental disorders. The primary outcome measure was the total change score in five mood symptoms on the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP) scale in the intermenstrual phase of the treatment cycle. Results: Women with ongoing or previous mood, anxiety or eating disorders allocated to COC had higher total DRSP -scores during the intermenstrual phase of the treatment cycle in comparison with corresponding women randomised to placebo, mean difference 1.3 (95% CI 0.3-2.3). In contrast, among women without mental health problems, no difference in total DRSP -scores between COC- and placebo users was noted. Women with a risk use of alcohol who were randomised to the COC had higher total DRSP -scores than women randomised to placebo, mean difference 2.1 (CI 95% 1.0-3.2). Conclusions: Women with ongoing or previous mental disorders or risk use of alcohol have greater risk of COC-induced mood symptoms. This may be worth noting during family planning and contraceptive counselling.

  • 35.
    Berin, Emilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Primary Health Care Center Nygatan, Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz Holm, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Resistance training for hot flushes in postmenopausal women: A randomised controlled trial2019In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 126, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of 15 weeks of resistance training on the frequency of moderate to severe hot flushes in postmenopausal women. Study design: Postmenopausal women with at least 4 moderate or severe hot flushes or night sweats per day day were randomized to a 15-week resistance training intervention or unchanged physical activity. Participants did not exercise regularly at baseline and had not used any therapy for hot flushes two months prior to study entry. The resistance training was performed three times per week and the program contained 8 exercises performed with 8-12 repetitions in 2 sets. Loads were set individually from eight-repetition maximum-strength tests and increased progressively. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was change in mean moderate or severe hot flushes per day from baseline to week 15, assessed with symptom diaries. Secondary outcomes included change in hot flush score and time spent on physical activity. Results: Between November 19, 2013, and October 26, 2016, 65 women were enrolled; 58 completed the trial and were included in the analyses. The mean age was 55 and the mean number of moderate or severe hot flushes per day at baseline was 7.1; there were no baseline differences between groups. The frequency of hot flushes decreased more in the intervention group than in the control group (mean difference -2.7, 95% CI -4.2 to -1.3). The mean percentage change was -43.6% (-56.0 to -31.3) in the intervention group and -2.0% (16.4-12.4) in the control group. Conclusion: A 15-week resistance-training program decreased the frequency of moderate and severe hot flushes among postmenopausal women and could be an effective and safe treatment option to alleviate vasomotor symptoms.

  • 36.
    Berin, Emilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spetz, Anna-Clara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Resistance training for hot flushes in postmenopausal women: Randomized controlled trial protocol2016In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 85, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Hot flushes and night sweats affect 75% of all women after menopause and is a common reason for decreased quality of life in mid-aged women. Hormone therapy is effective in ameliorating symptoms but cannot be used by all women due to contraindications and side effects. Engagement in regular exercise is associated with fewer hot flushes in observational studies, but aerobic exercise has not proven effective in randomized controlled trials. It remains to be determined whether resistance training is effective in reducing hot flushes and improves quality of life in symptomatic postmenopausal women. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of standardized resistance training on hot flushes and other health parameters in postmenopausal women. Study design: This is an open, parallel-group, randomized controlled intervention study conducted in Linkoping, Sweden. Sixty symptomatic and sedentary postmenopausal women with a mean of at least four moderate to severe hot flushes per day or 28 per week will be randomized to an exercise intervention or unchanged physical activity (control group). The intervention consists of 15 weeks of standardized resistance training performed three times a week under supervision of a physiotherapist. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome is hot flush frequency assessed by self-reported hot flush diaries, and the difference in change from baseline to week 15 will be compared between the intervention group and the control group. Conclusion: The intention is that this trial will contribute to the evidence base regarding effective treatment for hot flushes. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Berlin, Gösta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Tapper, Linus
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tynngård, Nahreen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Hematopoiesis and Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Effects of age, gender and menstrual cycle on platelet function assessed by impedance aggregometry2019In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 473-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platelets are needed to prevent or arrest bleeding and aggregate at the site of injury upon vascular damage. Platelets express receptors for estrogens which might affect the function of the platelets and their hemostatic ability. The aim was to identify possible differences in platelet function related to age, gender, and phases of the menstrual cycle by use of impedance aggregometry with Multiplate. In the first part of the study, platelet function was assessed in 60 healthy individuals (30 men and 30 women) in each of three age groups (20-25, 40-45, and 60-65 years). In the second part of the study, the platelet function was analyzed on four occasions during the menstrual cycle in women without oral contraceptives (OCs) (n = 17) and compared to 19 women on OCs and 18 men of similar age (20-40 years). For the women on OCs, aggregation was analyzed once during the tablet-free week and once late during the period with OCs. The men were sampled once. Women of younger age (amp;lt;45 years) had significantly higher agonist-induced aggregation response than both men and post-menopausal women (60-65 years). The agonist-induced aggregation response did not differ between phases of the menstrual cycle or OC use. The results suggest that estradiol and/or progesterone affect spontaneous aggregation since it was found to be lowest in the mid-luteal phase. Spontaneous aggregation was significantly lower in women on OCs than in both men and women without OCs. Our findings indicate that fertile age is associated with higher aggregation response capacity of the platelets, possibly to prevent excessive bleeding during menstruation, but this response capacity is not altered during the menstrual cycle or by use of OCs.

  • 38.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grundström, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    The double-edged experience of healthcare encounters among women with endometriosis: a qualitative study2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe the experience of healthcare encounters among women with endometriosis.

    Background

    Endometriosis is a “hidden” chronic gynaecological disease appearing in every 10th woman of fertile age. Different manifestations of pain are the main symptoms, often leading to impaired physical and mental health, and lower quality of life. Previous research on healthcare experiences among women with endometriosis has focused on diagnostic delay and experiences of encountering general practitioners.

    Design

    A qualitative, interpretive, phenomenological approach was used.

    Methods

    We interviewed nine women aged 23–55, with a laparoscopy-confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed following the steps of the interpretive phenomenological approach.

    Results

    Two themes were identified in the interview transcripts: being treated with ignorance and being acknowledged. The essence: “the double-edged experience of healthcare encounters” emerged from the themes. The women's experience was double-edged as it involved contradictory feelings: the encounters were experienced as both destructive or constructive. On the one hand, the destructive side was characterised by ignorance, exposure and disbelief. On the other hand, the constructive side made the women feel acknowledged and confirmed, boosting their self-esteem.

    Conclusions

    The new and important aspects of the findings are that the experience of healthcare encounters is for the first time expressed as double-edged: both destructive and constructive. The experience was of specific importance as it affected the women's perceptions of themselves and of their bodies.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    The information about the constructive side of the experience is of clinical valuable for all healthcare professionals (nurses, midwives and doctors) encountering these women, as it provides a new level of understanding of the experiences. The findings demonstrate both psychological and practical aspects that can help professionals to improve the encounters.

  • 39.
    Besser, Rachel E. J.
    et al.
    UCL, England; Oxford Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England; Churchill Hosp, England.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Hindmarsh, Peter C.
    UCL, England.
    Cole, Tim J.
    UCL, England.
    Exploring C-peptide loss in type 1 diabetes using growth curve analysis2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0199635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives C-peptide (CP) loss in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is highly variable, and factors influencing it are poorly understood. We modelled CP values in T1D patients from diagnosis for up to 6 years, treating the serial data as growth curves plotted against time since diagnosis. The aims were to summarise the pattern of CP loss (i.e. growth curve shape) in individual patients in simple terms, and to identify baseline characteristics that predict this pattern in individuals. Materials and methods Between 1976 and 2011, 442 T1D patients initially aged amp;lt; 18y underwent 120-minute mixed meal tolerance tests (MMTT) to calculate area under the curve (AUC) CP, at 3, 9,18, 30, 48 and 72 months after diagnosis (n = 1537). The data were analysed using the novel SITAR mixed effects growth curve model (Superlmposition by Translation And Rotation). It fits a mean AUC growth curve, but also allows the curves mean level and rate of fall to vary between individuals so as to best fit the individual patient curves. These curve adjustments define individual curve shape. Results The square root (root) AUC scale provided the best fit. The mean levels and rates of fall for individuals were normally distributed and uncorrelated with each other. Age at diagnosis and root AUC at 3 months strongly predicted the patient-specific mean levels, while younger age at diagnosis (p amp;lt; 0.0001) and the 120-minute CP value of the 3-month MMTT (p = 0.002) predicted the patient-specific rates of fall. Conclusions SITAR growth curve analysis is a useful tool to assess CP loss in type 1 diabetes, explaining patient differences in terms of their mean level and rate of fall. A definition of rapid CP loss could be based on a quantile of the rate of fall distribution, allowing better understanding of factors determining CP loss and stratification of patients into targeted therapies.

  • 40.
    Bird, Philippa K
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, North Yorkshire, UK // Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK.
    Pickett, Kate E
    Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, North Yorkshire, UK.
    Graham, Hilary
    Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, North Yorkshire, UK.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaddoe, Vincent W V
    Generation R Study Group, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands // Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Raat, Hein
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Seguin, Louise
    Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Québec, Canada.
    Wijtzes, Anne I
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    McGrath, Jennifer J
    Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, Québec, Canada.
    Income inequality and social gradients in children's height: a comparison of cohort studies from five high-income countries.2019In: BMJ paediatrics open, ISSN 2399-9772, Vol. 3, no 1, article id e000568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health and well-being are better, on average, in countries that are more equal, but less is known about how this benefit is distributed across society. Height is a widely used, objective indicator of child health and predictor of lifelong well-being. We compared the level and slope of social gradients in children's height in high-income countries with different levels of income inequality, in order to investigate whether children growing up in all socioeconomic circumstances are healthier in more equal countries.

    Methods: We conducted a coordinated analysis of data from five cohort studies from countries selected to represent different levels of income inequality (the USA, UK, Australia, the Netherlands and Sweden). We used standardised methods to compare social gradients in children's height at age 4-6 years, by parent education status and household income. We used linear regression models and predicted height for children with the same age, sex and socioeconomic circumstances in each cohort.

    Results: The total analytic sample was 37 063 children aged 4-6 years. Gradients by parent education and household income varied between cohorts and outcomes. After adjusting for differences in age and sex, children in more equal countries (Sweden, the Netherlands) were taller at all levels of parent education and household income than children in less equal countries (USA, UK and Australia), with the greatest between-country differences among children with less educated parents and lowest household incomes.

    Conclusions: The study provides preliminary evidence that children across society do better in more equal countries, with greatest benefit among children from the most disadvantaged socioeconomic groups.

  • 41.
    Birkebaek, N. H.
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Drivvoll, A K
    Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry, Division of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Aakeson, K.
    Department of Pediatrics, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Bjarnason, R.
    Medical Center, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Pediatrics, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Johansen, A.
    Department of Growth and Reproduction, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Skrivarhaug, T.
    Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry, Division of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Thorsson, A. V.
    Medical Center, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Pediatrics, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Svensson, J.
    Copenhagen Diabetes Research Center (CPH-DIRECT), Department of Children and Adolescents, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    Incidence of severe hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes in the Nordic countries in the period 2008-2012: association with hemoglobin A 1c and treatment modality2017In: BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, ISSN 2052-4897, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e000377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment of type 1 diabetes has been intensified aiming at normalizing blood glucose, which may increase the risk of severe hypoglycemia (SH). We aimed to compare the incidence of SH events in the four Nordic countries Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and to assess the influence of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and treatment modalities on the frequency of SH; particularly, to explore if a HbA1c target =6.7% (50 mmol/mol) is feasible.

  • 42.
    Birkebaek, N. H.
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ, Denmark.
    Kahlert, J.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Denmark.
    Bjarnason, R.
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland; Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Drivvoll, A. K.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Johansen, A.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Konradsdottir, E.
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Iceland; Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Pundziute-Lycka, A.
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hosp, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Skrivarhaug, T.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway.
    Svensson, J.
    Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Body mass index standard deviation score and obesity in children with type 1 diabetes in the Nordic countries. HbA(1c) and other predictors of increasing BMISDS2018In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 1198-1205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intensified insulin therapy may increase body weight and cause obesity. This study compared body mass index standard deviation score (BMISDS) and obesity rate in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and uncovered predictors for increasing BMISDS. Methods: Data registered in the Nordic national childhood diabetes databases during the period 2008-2012 on children below 15 years with T1D for more than 3 months were compiled, including information on gender, age, diabetes duration, hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), insulin dose, severe hypoglycemia (SH), treatment modality, height and weight. The Swedish reference chart for BMI was used for calculating BMISDS. Results: Totally, 11025 children (48% females) (30994 registrations) were included. Medians by the last recorded examination were: age, 13.5 years; diabetes duration, 4.3 years; HbA(1c), 7.9% (63 mmol/mol); insulin dose, 0.8 IU/kg/d and BMISDS, 0.70. Obesity rate was 18.5%. Adjusted mean BMISDS (BMISDS adj) was inversely related to HbA(1c) and directly to diabetes duration. Higher BMISDS adj was found in those with an insulin dose above 0.6 IU/kg/d, and in girls above 10 years. Pump users had higher BMISDS adj than pen users, and patients with registered SH had higher BMISDS adj than patients without SH (both P amp;lt; .001). Conclusion: Obesity rate in children with T1D in the Nordic countries is high, however, with country differences. Low HbA(1c), long diabetes duration, higher insulin dose, pump treatment and experiencing a SH predicted higher BMISDS. Diabetes caregivers should balance the risk of obesity and the benefit of a very low HbA(1c).

  • 43.
    Bjurberg, Maria
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Erik
    Reg Canc Ctr West, Sweden; Sahlgrens Acad, Sweden.
    Borgfeldt, Christer
    Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Floter-Radestad, Angelique
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Dahm-Kahler, Pernilla
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Elisabet
    Visby Hosp, Sweden.
    Hogberg, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Marcickiewicz, Janusz
    Reg Canc Ctr West, Sweden; Halland Hosp, Sweden.
    Rosenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stalberg, Karin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Tholander, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Hellman, Kristina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Primary treatment patterns and survival of cervical cancer in Sweden: A population-based Swedish Gynecologic Cancer Group Study2019In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, E-ISSN 1095-6859, Vol. 155, no 2, p. 229-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Survival in cervical cancer has improved little over the last decades. We aimed to elucidate primary treatment patterns and survival. Methods: Population-based study of patients included in the Swedish Quality Registry for Gynecologic Cancer diagnosed 2011-2015. Main outcome was 5-year relative survival (RS). Age-standardised RS (AS-RS) was estimated for the total cohort and for the pooled study population of squamous, adenosquamous-, adenocarcinoma. Results: Median follow-up time was 4.6 years. The study population consisted of 2141 patients; 97% of the 2212 patients in the total cohort and the 5-year AS-RS was 71% and 70%, respectively. RS stage IB1: surgery alone 95% vs. 72% for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CT-RT) (p amp;lt; 0.001). In stage IIA1 74% had CTRL, and 47% of operated patients received adjuvant (CT)-RT. RS stage IB2: surgically treated 81% (69% received adjuvant (CT)-RT) vs. 76% for (CT)-RT (p = 0.73). RS stage IIB: 77% for CT-RT + brachytherapy BT), 37% for RT + BT (p = 0.045) and 27% for RT-BT (p amp;lt; 0.001). Stages III-IVA; amp;lt;40% received CT-RT + BT, RS 45% vs. 18% for RT-BT (RR 4.1, p amp;lt; 0.001). RS stage IVB 7%. Conclusion: Primary treatment of cervical cancer in Sweden adhered to evidence-based standard of care. Areas of improvement include optimising treatment for stages III-IVA, and avoiding combining surgery and radiotherapy. (C) 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 44.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Borrebaeck, Carl
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Elander, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gasslander, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gawel, Danuta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jornsten, Rebecka
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Jung Lee, Eun Jung
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Yonsei Univ, South Korea.
    Li, Xinxiu
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lilja, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Martinez, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Matussek, Andreas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Dept Lab Med, Sweden.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Schäfer, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Futurum Acad Hlth and Care, Sweden; Inst Clin Sci, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sysoev, Oleg
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, The Division of Statistics and Machine Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zhang, Huan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus Linköping/Motala.
    Digital twins to personalize medicine2019In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personalized medicine requires the integration and processing of vast amounts of data. Here, we propose a solution to this challenge that is based on constructing Digital Twins. These are high-resolution models of individual patients that are computationally treated with thousands of drugs to find the drug that is optimal for the patient.

  • 45. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Birth Characteristics’ Impacton Future Reproduction and Morbidity Among Twins an dSingletons2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally, in both developed and developing countries, the twinning rates have increased since the early 70’s. A large proportion of twins are born preterm and/or small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and/or with a low birth weight. Several studies have been performed on the long-term effect of these non-optimal birth characteristics on future reproductive performance and morbidity. Yet, most studies exclude twins or higher order pregnancies and thus the findings are based on singleton pregnancies only.

    The aim of the present thesis was therefore to investigate the impact of non-optimal birth characteristics in terms of preterm birth, small-for-gestational age, and low birth weight, on the reproductive pattern and morbidity among twins and singletons Furthermore, the present thesis attempted to establish whether twins and singletons were affected in the same manner.

    The studies included in this thesis are prospective population-based register studies, including all men and women, alive and living in Sweden at age 13, who were born between 1973 and 1983 (1,000,037 singletons and 16,561 twins) for the first three studies with follow-up till the end of 2006 and 2009. The last study included all men and women, alive and living in Sweden at age 13, who were born between 1973 and 1993 (2,051,479 singletons and 39,726 twins) with follow-up till the end of 2012.

    In general, twins were found less likely to reproduce between 13 and 33 years of age compared with singletons. Stratifying data by different birth characteristics, it was found that twins had a lower likelihood of reproducing on several different birth characteristics (appropriate-for-gestational-age, normal birth weight, low birth weight, term birth, preterm birth). However, twins born very preterm had an increased likelihood of reproducing compared with singletons born very preterm.

    Not taking birth characteristics into account, twinning was associated with a higher degree of hospitalization. However, accounting for the diverging birth characteristics this difference diminished and for some diagnoses the relationship was reversed such that twins were actually less likely to be hospitalized compared with singletons.

    In terms of the heritability of non-optimal birth characteristics singleton mothers born preterm were more predisposed to give birth to a child that was preterm while singleton mothers born SGA more often gave birth to a child either born preterm or SGA. Among twins this heritability was not as evident. The only difference observed was among twin mothers born SGA who were more likely to give birth to a child born SGA.

    In the extended cohort comprising those born between 1973 and 1993, male and female twins were found to be less likely to become parents compared with singletons. No difference was found among women in terms of having a second child, while male twins were more likely to have a second child compared with male singletons. It was also found that the likelihood of becoming a first-time parent and second-time parent was positively associated with the number of siblings.

    List of papers
    1. Reproductive patterns among twins: a Swedish register study of men and women born 1973-1983
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reproductive patterns among twins: a Swedish register study of men and women born 1973-1983
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    2013 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the last decades there has been a steady increase of twin births. A combination of improved medical treatment of preterm and small-for-gestational age children has contributed to a higher number of surviving twins. Prematurity is known to affect reproduction in a negative way. Few studies have focused on the potential effect twinning may have on future reproduction. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of being born a twin compared to being born a singleton have on future reproduction.

    Methods

    In a national population-based register study, all individuals born between 1973–1983 who were alive and living in Sweden at 13 years of age (n = 1 016 908) constituted the sample. Data on each study subject’s own birth as well as the birth of their first offspring, and parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios and corresponding 95% CI was calculated using Cox proportional hazards model.

    Results

    Twins, both men and women, had a reduced likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86-0.93; men: HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.97). This difference in birth rates can only partly be explained by diverging birth characteristics. Amongst men and women born very preterm, twins had an increased likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.02-1.62; men: HR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.01-1.78).

    Conclusions

    Twins have lower reproduction rates compared to singletons, which only to a certain degree can be explained by diverging birth characteristics.

    Keywords
    Twin, Singleton, Reproduction rate, Birth characteristics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89750 (URN)10.1186/1471-2393-13-6 (DOI)000314290200001 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden||

    Available from: 2013-03-05 Created: 2013-03-05 Last updated: 2019-06-28
    2. Hospitalization in Adolescence and Young Adulthood Among Twins and Singletons: A Swedish Cohort Study of Subjects Born Between 1973 and 1983
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hospitalization in Adolescence and Young Adulthood Among Twins and Singletons: A Swedish Cohort Study of Subjects Born Between 1973 and 1983
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    2013 (English)In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 707-715Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Children born with non-optimal birth characteristics — that is, are small for gestational age and/or preterm — have an increased risk for several long-term effects such as neurological sequelae and chronic disease. The purpose of this study was to examine whether twins exhibited a different outcome, compared with singletons, in terms of hospitalization during adolescence and early adulthood, and to what extent differences remain when considering the divergence in birth characteristics between singletons and twins. Persons born between 1973 and 1983 in Sweden and surviving until age 13 were included and followed until the end of 2006. Data on birth characteristics, parental socio-demographic factors, and hospitalizations were collected from national registers. Adjusting for parental socio-demographic factors, twins had a higher risk of being hospitalized than singletons (odds ratio, OR = 1.17, 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.10–1.25) and more often due to ‘Congenital anomalies’ (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.06–1.28), ‘Infections’ (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.08–1.20), ‘External causes of illness’ (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.06–1.15), and ‘Diseases of the nervous system’ (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.10–1.26). Stratifying for birth characteristics, this difference diminishes, and for some diagnoses non-optimal twins seem to do slightly better than non-optimal singletons. Thus, twins with non-optimal birth characteristics had a lower risk of hospitalization than non-optimal singletons on, for example, ‘Congenital anomalies’ and ‘Diseases of the nervous system’ (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77–0.96; OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81–0.97, respectively) and Total (any) hospitalization (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.83–0.92). Among those with optimal birth characteristics, twins had an increased hospitalization due to ‘External causes of illness’ (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.02–1.13) compared with optimal singletons. Twins have higher hospitalization rates than singletons. In stratifying for birth characteristics, this difference diminishes, and for some diagnoses, non-optimal twins seem to do less poorly than non-optimal singletons.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2013
    Keywords
    twin, singleton, morbidity, SGA, preterm, low birthweight
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-94317 (URN)10.1017/thg.2013.27 (DOI)000319127400007 ()
    Available from: 2013-06-24 Created: 2013-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-28
    3. Intergenerational cohort study of preterm and small-for-gestational-age birth in twins and singletons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intergenerational cohort study of preterm and small-for-gestational-age birth in twins and singletons
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 581-590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    To date several studies have investigated the intergenerational effect of preterm and small-for-gestational-age births. However, most studies excluded both twin mothers and twin offspring from the analyses. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the intergenerational effect of preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA) among twins and singletons.

    A prospective population based register study of mother-first-born offspring pairs recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Register was performed. The study included 4073 twins and 264,794 singletons born in 1973-1983 and their firstborns born in 1986-2009. Preterm birth was defined as birth <37 weeks of gestation and SGA as < 2 standard deviations of the Swedish standard. Logistic regressions were performed to estimate the intergenerational effect of each birth characteristic. Adjustments were made for maternal grandmothers and mother’s socio-demographic factors in addition to maternal birth- characteristics.

    Among mothers born as singletons, being born preterm was associated with an increased risk for delivering a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.29-1.50) while being born SGA increased the likelihood of a SGA child (adjusted OR 3.04, 95% CI 2.80-3.30) as well as a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.20-1.40). In twin mothers, the corresponding ORs tended to be lower and the only statistically significant association was between a SGA mother and a SGA child (adjusted OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.40-3.31). A statistically significant interaction between twinning and mother’s size for gestational was identified in a multivariate linear regression analysis indicating that singleton mothers born SGA were associated with a lower birth weight compared to mothers not born SGA.

    Preterm birth and SGA appear to be transferred from one generation to the next, although not always reaching statistical significance. These effects seem to be less evident in mothers born as twins compared with those born as singletons.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press, 2015
    National Category
    Pediatrics Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121275 (URN)10.1017/thg.2015.60 (DOI)000361660800010 ()
    Note

    Funding: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

    Available from: 2015-09-11 Created: 2015-09-11 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
    4. Reproductive pattern among twins and singletons in relation to number of siblings: a Swedish cohort study of individuals born between 1973 and 1993
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reproductive pattern among twins and singletons in relation to number of siblings: a Swedish cohort study of individuals born between 1973 and 1993
    Show others...
    2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Twinning has been shown to be associated with a reduced reproductive rate compared to singletons. This can partly be explained by the birth-characteristics pertaining to twinning as many twins are born preterm, with low birth weight or small for gestational age. However, the intergenerational reproductive rate may also be due to familial factors such as number of siblings.

    Methods This is a register-based study of all men and women born in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 who were living in Sweden at 13 years of age. Data on the study objects’ own births as well as their offspring, parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios for the likelihood of becoming a parent were estimated using Cox’s proportion hazard models. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic and birth characteristics.

    Results Adjusting for number of siblings, socio-demographic factors and birth characteristics, twinning was associated with a decreased likelihood of becoming a first-time parent, compared with singletons both for females (HR (95% CI)=0.90 (0.88-0.93) and males (HR (95% CI)=0.96 (0.93-0.99). Having 3 or more siblings increased the chance of becoming a first-time parent among both male twins (HR (95% CI)=1.17 (1.08-1.27)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.16 (1.15-1.18)) compared to having fewer than 3 siblings. This increased likelihood of becoming a parent was also present among female twins (HR (95% CI)=1.18 (1.10-1.26)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.22 (1.21-1.24)).

    Conclusions Twins have a decreased likelihood of becoming a parent compared to singletons even when adjusting for number of siblings.

    Keywords
    Twinning, reproduction, siblings, prematurity, size for gestational age, birth weight
    National Category
    Pediatrics Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121276 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-09-11 Created: 2015-09-11 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
  • 46.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Intergenerational cohort study of preterm and small-for-gestational-age birth in twins and singletons2015In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 581-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date several studies have investigated the intergenerational effect of preterm and small-for-gestational-age births. However, most studies excluded both twin mothers and twin offspring from the analyses. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the intergenerational effect of preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA) among twins and singletons.

    A prospective population based register study of mother-first-born offspring pairs recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Register was performed. The study included 4073 twins and 264,794 singletons born in 1973-1983 and their firstborns born in 1986-2009. Preterm birth was defined as birth <37 weeks of gestation and SGA as < 2 standard deviations of the Swedish standard. Logistic regressions were performed to estimate the intergenerational effect of each birth characteristic. Adjustments were made for maternal grandmothers and mother’s socio-demographic factors in addition to maternal birth- characteristics.

    Among mothers born as singletons, being born preterm was associated with an increased risk for delivering a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.29-1.50) while being born SGA increased the likelihood of a SGA child (adjusted OR 3.04, 95% CI 2.80-3.30) as well as a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.20-1.40). In twin mothers, the corresponding ORs tended to be lower and the only statistically significant association was between a SGA mother and a SGA child (adjusted OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.40-3.31). A statistically significant interaction between twinning and mother’s size for gestational was identified in a multivariate linear regression analysis indicating that singleton mothers born SGA were associated with a lower birth weight compared to mothers not born SGA.

    Preterm birth and SGA appear to be transferred from one generation to the next, although not always reaching statistical significance. These effects seem to be less evident in mothers born as twins compared with those born as singletons.

  • 47.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproductive pattern among twins and singletons in relation to number of siblings: a Swedish cohort study of individuals born between 1973 and 19932015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Twinning has been shown to be associated with a reduced reproductive rate compared to singletons. This can partly be explained by the birth-characteristics pertaining to twinning as many twins are born preterm, with low birth weight or small for gestational age. However, the intergenerational reproductive rate may also be due to familial factors such as number of siblings.

    Methods This is a register-based study of all men and women born in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 who were living in Sweden at 13 years of age. Data on the study objects’ own births as well as their offspring, parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios for the likelihood of becoming a parent were estimated using Cox’s proportion hazard models. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic and birth characteristics.

    Results Adjusting for number of siblings, socio-demographic factors and birth characteristics, twinning was associated with a decreased likelihood of becoming a first-time parent, compared with singletons both for females (HR (95% CI)=0.90 (0.88-0.93) and males (HR (95% CI)=0.96 (0.93-0.99). Having 3 or more siblings increased the chance of becoming a first-time parent among both male twins (HR (95% CI)=1.17 (1.08-1.27)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.16 (1.15-1.18)) compared to having fewer than 3 siblings. This increased likelihood of becoming a parent was also present among female twins (HR (95% CI)=1.18 (1.10-1.26)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.22 (1.21-1.24)).

    Conclusions Twins have a decreased likelihood of becoming a parent compared to singletons even when adjusting for number of siblings.

  • 48.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Avoiding the first cesarean section-results of structured organizational and cultural changes2016In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 580-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionIn 2006 the overall rates of instrumental deliveries (10%) and cesarean sections (CS) (20%) were high in our unit. We decided to improve quality of care by offering more women a safe and attractive normal vaginal delivery. The target group was primarily nulliparous women at term with spontaneous onset of labor and cephalic presentation. Material and methodsImplementation of a nine-item list of structured organizational and cultural change in Linkoping 2006-15. The nine items include monitoring of obstetric results, recruitment of a midwife coordinator, risk classification of women, introduction of three different midwife competence levels, improved teamwork, obstetrical morning round, fetal monitoring skills, obstetrical skills training, and public promotion of the strategy. ResultsThe CS rate in nulliparous women at term with spontaneous onset of labor decreased from 10% in 2006 to 3% in 2015. During the same period the overall CS rate dropped from 20% to 11%. The prevalence of children born at the unit with umbilical cord pH &lt;7 and Apgar score &lt;4 at 5 min were the same over the years studied. At present, 95.2% of women delivering at our unit are satisfied with their delivery experience. ConclusionsThe CS rates have declined after implementing the nine items of organizational and cultural changes. It seems that a specific and persistent multidisciplinary activity with a focus on the Robson group 1 can reduce CS rates without increased risk of neonatal complications.

  • 49.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Fetma under graviditet ökar risken för både kvinna och barn: Kompetent omhändertagande kan minska riskökningen2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112, no 48, p. 2156-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Fetma hos en gravid kvinna innebär ökad risk för missbildning hos fostret. Vid screeningultraljud upptäcks färre missbildningar än hos barn till normalviktiga kvinnor, men KUB-metoden för att upptäcka Downs syndrom är lika effektiv i alla BMI-grupper. Fetma hos kvinnan innebär ökad risk för gestationsdiabetes, preeklampsi, prematur förlossning och intrauterin fosterdöd. Öppningsskedet under förlossningen är förlängt hos kvinnor med BMI >30, men krystskedet är snabbt. Det finns ökad risk för atonisk postpartumblödning, vilket kan indicera profylaktisk behandling med uterotonika. Fetma hos kvinnan medför fler allvarliga komplikationer hos barnet under första levnadsveckan oavsett förlossningssätt.

  • 50.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Team-led hospital-based care reduced the number of obstetric interventions in ACTA OBSTETRICIA ET GYNECOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA2016In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 95, no 11, p. 1320-1320Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

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