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  • 1.
    Aardal-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Mobäck, Caroline
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Jakobsson, Sandra
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Germany.
    Hoffmann, Johannes J. M. L.
    Abbott GmbH and Co KG, Germany.
    Iron depletion in blood donors - Have extended erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters diagnostic utility?2015In: Transfusion and apheresis science, ISSN 1473-0502, E-ISSN 1878-1683, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Blood donation is associated with iron depletion, but donor iron status is not usually investigated, as such tests are cumbersome and costly. It would therefore be desirable to have simple, fast and inexpensive tests that give information on a donors risk of developing iron depletion. In a pilot study we investigated whether novel erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters can serve this goal. Methods: In regular blood donors extended red cell parameters were measured using the Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer and conventional biochemical tests of iron status. Donors were compared with a regionally matched group of non-donating controls. Results: In the controls, the reference ranges of extended RBC parameters were well comparable to published data. Donors had significantly more microcytic RBC than controls (median 0.9 vs 0.6%), lower serum ferritin concentration (median 43 vs 91 mg/L) and higher soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index (median 1.60 vs 1.27). Overall 18-28% of the donors were iron depleted. Moreover, 3.3% of donors had iron-restricted erythropoiesis. Microcytic RBC and reticulocyte mean cell hemoglobin content predicted iron depletion with 70% and 64% sensitivities and specificities of 72% and 78%, respectively. When combined these two parameters increased the sensitivity to 82%. Conclusions: Our results in Swedish blood donors confirm a high prevalence of iron depletion, despite iron supplementation used by about half of the donors. Microcytic RBC and MCHr appeared to be helpful in identifying iron-depleted donors, who might benefit from iron supplementation. We recommend larger prospective investigations in order to confirm and extend the findings of this pilot study. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Abelius, Martina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jedenfalk, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Pregnancy modulates the allergen-induced cytokine production differently in allergic and non-allergic women2017In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 818-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The immunological environment during pregnancy may differ between allergic and non-allergic women. This study investigates the effect of maternal allergy on the allergen-induced cytokine and chemokine levels and whether pregnancy modulates these immune responses differently in allergic and non-allergic women. Methods: The birch-, cat-, phytohemagglutinin- and tetanus toxoid-induced interferon-gamma(IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, the T-helper 1 (Th1)-associated chemokine CXCL10 and the Th2-associated chemokine CCL17 levels were quantified in 20 women with allergic symptoms (sensitized, n=13) and 36 women without allergic symptoms (non-sensitized, n=30) at gestational weeks 10-12, 15-16, 25, 35 and 2 and 12months post-partum. Results: Birch-, but not cat-induced, IL-5, IL-13 and CCL17 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the sensitized women with allergic symptoms. In contrast, cat-, but not birch-induced, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were increased during pregnancy as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Furthermore, IFN-gamma secretion was increased in the first and decreased in the second and third trimesters in response to birch and decreased in the third trimester in response to cat as compared to post-partum in the non-sensitized women without allergic symptoms. Increased allergen-induced IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels were associated with allergic symptoms and sensitization. Conclusions: Pregnancy had a clear effect on the allergen-induced IL-5, IL-13, CCL17, IFN-gamma and CXCL10 production, with distinct enhanced Th2-responses to birch in the allergic group and to cat in the non-allergic group.

  • 3.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Placental Immune Milieu is Characterized by a Th2- and Anti-Inflammatory Transcription Profile, Regardless of Maternal Allergy, and Associates with Neonatal Immunity2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 445-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: How maternal allergy affects the systemic and local immunological environment during pregnancy and the immune development of the offspring is unclear.

    METHOD OF STUDY: Expression of 40 genes was quantified by PCR arrays in placenta, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring.

    RESULTS: Placental gene expression was dominated by a Th2-/anti-inflammatory profile, irrespectively of maternal allergy, as compared to gene expression in PBMC. p35 expression in placenta correlated with fetal Tbx21 (ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001) and IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal galectin1 (ρ = 0.91, P < 0.001). Increased expression of Th2-associated CCL22 in CBMC preceded allergy development.

    CONCLUSIONS: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy was partly associated with the offspring's gene expression, possibly indicating that the immunological milieu is important for fetal immune development. Maternal allergy was not associated with an enhanced Th2 immunity in placenta or PBMC, while a marked prenatal Th2 skewing, shown as increased CCL22 mRNA expression, might contribute to postnatal allergy development.

  • 4.
    Abioye, Ajibola I.
    et al.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Park, Sangshin
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Ripp, Kelsey
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA.
    McDonald, Emily A.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Kurtis, Jonathan D.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Wu, Hannah
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Pond-Tor, Sunthorn
    Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Sharma, Surendra
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Women and Infants Hosp Rhode Isl, RI 02908 USA.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Baltazar, Palmera
    Res Inst Trop Med, Philippines; Remedios Trinidad Romualdez Hosp, Philippines.
    Acosta, Luz P.
    Res Inst Trop Med, Philippines.
    Olveda, Remigio M.
    Res Inst Trop Med, Philippines.
    Tallo, Veronica
    Res Inst Trop Med, Philippines.
    Friedman, Jennifer F.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA; Rhode Isl Hosp, RI USA.
    Anemia of Inflammation during Human Pregnancy Does Not Affect Newborn Iron Endowment2018In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 148, no 3, p. 427-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To our knowledge, no studies have addressed whether maternal anemia of inflammation (AI) affects newborn iron status, and few have addressed risk factors for specific etiologies of maternal anemia. Objectives: The study aims were to evaluate 1) the contribution of AI and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) to newborn iron endowment, 2) hepcidin as a biomarker to distinguish AI from IDA among pregnant women, and 3) risk factors for specific etiologies of maternal anemia. Methods: We measured hematologic biomarkers in maternal blood at 12 and 32 wk of gestation and in cord blood from a randomized trial of praziquantel in 358 pregnant women with Schistosoma japonicum in The Philippines. IDA was defined as anemia with serum ferritin amp;lt; 30 ng/mL and non-IDA (NIDA), largely due to AI, as anemia with ferritin amp;gt;= 30 ng/mL. We identified cutoffs for biomarkers to distinguish IDA from NIDA by using area under the curve (AUC) analyses and examined the impact of different causes of anemia on newborn iron status (primary outcome) by using multivariate regression modeling. Results: Of the 358 mothers, 38% (n = 136) had IDA and 9% (n = 32) had NIDA at 32 wk of gestation. At 32 wk of gestation, serum hepcidin performed better than soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) in identifying women with NIDA compared with the rest of the cohort (AUCs: 0.75 and 0.70, respectively) and in identifying women with NIDA among women with anemia (0.73 and 0.72, respectively). The cutoff that optimally distinguished women with NIDA from women with IDA in our cohort was 6.1 mu g/L. Maternal IDA, but not NIDA, was associated with significantly lower newborn ferritin (114.4 ng/mL compared with 148.4 mu g/L; P = 0.042). Conclusions: Hepcidin performed better than sTfR in identifying pregnant women with NIDA, but its cost may limit its use. Maternal IDA, but not NIDA, is associated with decreased newborn iron stores, emphasizing the need to identify this cause and provide iron therapy.

  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Capodanno, Alessandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Downregulation of tumor suppressive microRNAs in vivo in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 54, p. 92134-92142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with dense breast tissue on mammography are at higher risk of developing breast cancer but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. De-regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been associated with the onset of breast cancer. miRNAs in the extracellular space participate in the regulation of the local tissue microenvironment. Here, we recruited 39 healthy postmenopausal women attending their mammography-screen that were assessed having extreme dense or entirely fatty breasts (nondense). Microdialysis was performed in breast tissue and a reference catheter was inserted in abdominal subcutaneous fat for local sampling of extracellular compounds. Three miRNAs, associated with tumor suppression, miR-193b, miR-365a, and miR-452 were significantly down-regulated in dense breast tissue compared with nondense breast tissue. In addition, miR-452 exhibited significant negative correlations with several pro-inflammatory cytokines in vivo, which was confirmed in vitro by overexpression of miR-452 in breast cancer cells. No differences were found of miR-21, -29a, -30c, 146a, -148a, -203, or -451 in breast tissue and no miRs were different in plasma. Extracellular miRNAs may be among factors that should be included in studies of novel prevention strategies for breast cancer.

  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Equal Pro-inflammatory Profiles of CCLs, CXCLs, and Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Extracellular Microenvironment In Vivo in Human Dense Breast Tissue and Breast Cancer2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, article id 1994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inflammatory microenvironment affects breast cancer progression. Proteins that govern the inflammatory response are secreted into the extracellular space, but this compartment still needs to be characterized in human breast tissues in vivo. Dense breast tissue is a major risk factor for breast cancer by yet unknown mechanisms and no non-toxic prevention for these patients exists. Here, we used the minimal invasive technique of microdialysis for sampling of extracellular proteins in live tissues in situ in breast cancers of women before surgery and in healthy women having dense or non-dense breast tissue on mammography. Proteins were profiled using a proximity extension assay. Out of the 32 proteins assessed, 26 exhibited similar profiles in breast cancers and dense breast tissues; CCL-4, -7, -8, -11, -15, -16, -22, -23, and -25, CXCL-5, -8, -9, -16 as well as sIL-6R, IL-18, vascular endothelial growth factor, TGF-a, fibroblast growth factor 19, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -3, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator were all increased, whereas CCL-3, CX3CL1, hepatocyte growth factor, and MMP-9 were unaltered in the two tissues. CCL-19 and -24, CXCL-1 and -10, and IL-6 were increased in dense breast tissue only, whereas IL-18BP was increased in breast cancer only. Our results provide novel insights in the inflammatory microenvironment in human breast cancer in situ and define potential novel therapeutic targets. Additionally, we show previously unrecognized similarities of the pro-inflammatory microenvironment in dense breast tissue and breast cancer in vivo suggesting that anti-inflammatory breast cancer prevention trials for women with dense breast tissue may be feasible.

  • 7.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Increased nutrient availability in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women in vivo2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 42733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Nutrient availability in the tissue microenvironment determines cellular events and may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. High mammographic density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Whether nutrient availability differs in normal breast tissues with various densities is unknown. Therefore we investigated whether breast tissues with various densities exhibited differences in nutrient availability. Healthy postmenopausal women from the regular mammographic screening program who had either predominantly fatty breast tissue (nondense), n = 18, or extremely dense breast tissue (dense), n = 20, were included. Microdialysis was performed for the in vivo sampling of amino acids (AAs), analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectroscopy, glucose, lactate and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in breast tissues and, as a control, in abdominal subcutaneous (s.c.) fat. We found that dense breast tissue exhibited significantly increased levels of 20 proteinogenic AAs and that 18 of these AAs correlated significantly with VEGF. No differences were found in the s.c. fat, except for one AA, suggesting tissue-specific alterations in the breast. Glucose and lactate were unaltered. Our findings provide novel insights into the biology of dense breast tissue that may be explored for breast cancer prevention strategies.

  • 8.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment in vivo2016In: Oncoimmunology, ISSN 2162-4011, E-ISSN 2162-402X, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e1229723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation is one of the hallmarks of carcinogenesis. High mammographic density has been associated with increased risk of breast cancer but the mechanisms behind are poorly understood. We evaluated whether breasts with different mammographic densities exhibited differences in the inflammatory microenvironment.Postmenopausal women attending the mammography-screening program were assessed having extreme dense, n = 20, or entirely fatty breasts (nondense), n = 19, on their regular mammograms. Thereafter, the women were invited for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), microdialysis for the collection of extracellular molecules in situ and a core tissue biopsy for research purposes. On the MRI, lean tissue fraction (LTF) was calculated for a continuous measurement of breast density. LTF confirmed the selection from the mammograms and gave a continuous measurement of breast density. Microdialysis revealed significantly increased extracellular in vivo levels of IL-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, and CCL5 in dense breast tissue as compared with nondense breasts. Moreover, the ratio IL-1Ra/IL-1 was decreased in dense breasts. No differences were found in levels of IL-1, IL-1Ra, CCL2, leptin, adiponectin, or leptin:adiponectin ratio between the two breast tissue types. Significant positive correlations between LTF and the pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as between the cytokines were detected. Stainings of the core biopsies exhibited increased levels of immune cells in dense breast tissue.Our data show that dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment and, if confirmed in a larger cohort, suggests novel targets for prevention therapies for women with dense breast tissue.

  • 9.
    Adolfsson, Per I
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bloth, Björn
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Laboratory of Translational Neuropharmacology, Center of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Futurum Academy for Health and Care, Jönköping County Council, Sweden.
    Svensson, Samuel P S
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zinc Induces a Bell-shaped Proliferative Dose-response Effect in Cultured Smooth Muscle Cells From Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.2015In: Urology, ISSN 0090-4295, E-ISSN 1527-9995, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 704.e15-704.e19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of zinc (Zn(2+)) concentrations on cultured benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation.

    METHODS: The effects of Zn(2+) were studied in primary cultures of human BPH SMC, stimulated with either 10-μM lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) or LPA in combination with 100-nM testosterone. Deoxyribonucleic acid replication and protein synthesis using [(3)H]-thymidine and [(35)S]-methionine incorporation were measured. Furthermore, studies were performed to evaluate if Zn(2+) could potentiate the inhibitory effect of phosphodiesterase-5 blockers, on BPH SMC proliferation.

    RESULTS: Zn(2+) generated a bell-shaped concentration response, both regarding deoxyribonucleic acid replication and protein synthesis in cultured BPH SMC. Below a threshold value (approximately 200 μM), a significant mitogenic effect was seen, whereas higher concentrations inhibited SMC proliferation after stimulation with LPA. This effect was even more pronounced after stimulation of LPA in combination with testosterone. Moreover, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, that is, sildenafil blocked LPA-stimulated BPH SMC proliferation. This antiproliferative effect, was significantly potentiated by coincubation with Zn(2+) in an additative manner.

    CONCLUSION: The bell-shaped concentration response of Zn(2+) on cultured BPH SMC proliferation suggests that changes in prostate Zn(2+) concentrations, during aging, diet, or inflammatory conditions, may be of importance in the pathogenesis of BPH.

  • 10.
    Ahle, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Necrotising Enterocolitis: epidemiology and imaging2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a potentially devastating intestinal inflammation of multifactorial aetiology in premature or otherwise vulnerable neonates. Because of the broad spectrum of presentations, diagnosis and timing of surgical intervention may be challenging, and imaging needs to be an integrated part of management.

    The first four studies included in this thesis used routinely collected, nationwide register data to describe the incidence of NEC in Sweden 1987‒2009, its variation with time, seasonality, space-time clustering, and associations with maternal, gestational, and perinatal factors, and the risk of intestinal failure in the aftermath of the disease.

    Early infant survival increased dramatically during the study period. The incidence rate of NEC was 0.34 per 1,000 live births, rising from 0.26 per 1,000 live births in the first six years of the study period to 0.57 in the last five. The incidence rates in the lowest birth weights were 100‒160 times those of the entire birth cohort. Seasonal variation was found, as well as space-time clustering in association with delivery hospitals but not with maternal residential municipalities.

    Comparing NEC cases with matched controls, some factors, positively associated with NEC, were isoimmunisation, fetal distress, caesarean section, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, and chromosomal abnormalities. Negative associations included maternal pre-eclampsia, maternal urinary infection, and premature rupture of the membranes. Intestinal failure occurred in 6% of NEC cases and 0.4% of controls, with the highest incidence towards the end of the study period.

    The last study investigated current practices and perceptions of imaging in the management of NEC, as reported by involved specialists. There was great consensus on most issues. Areas in need of further study seem mainly related to imaging routines, the use of ultrasound, and indications for surgery.

    Developing alongside the progress of neonatal care, NEC is a complex, multifactorial disease, with shifting patterns of predisposing and precipitating causes, and potentially serious long-term complications. The findings of seasonal variation, spacetime clustering, and negative associations with antenatal exposure to infectious agents, fit into the growing understanding of the central role of bacteria and immunological processes in normal maturation of the intestinal canal as well as in the pathogenesis of NEC. Imaging in the management of NEC may be developed through future studies combining multiple diagnostic parameters in relation to clinical outcome.

    List of papers
    1. Epidemiology and Trends of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Sweden: 1987-2009
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidemiology and Trends of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Sweden: 1987-2009
    2013 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 132, no 2, p. E443-E451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate temporal, seasonal, and geographic variations in the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and its relation to early infant survival in the Swedish population and in subgroups based on gestational age, birth weight, and gender. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: In the Swedish birth cohort of 1987 through 2009 all children with a diagnosis of NEC were identified in the National Patient Register, the Swedish Medical Birth Register, and the National Cause of Death Register. NEC incidence, early mortality, and seasonality were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Poisson regression, and auto regression. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The overall incidence of NEC was 3.4 in 10 000 live births, higher in boys than in girls (incidence rate ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.40, P = .005), with a peak in November and a trough in May, and increased with an average of similar to 5% a year during the study period. In most subgroups, except the most immature, an initial decrease was followed by a steady increase. Seven-day mortality decreased strongly in all subgroups over the entire study period (annual incidence rate ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.95-0.96, P andlt; .001). This was especially marked in the most premature and low birth weight infants. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: After an initial decrease, the incidence of NEC has increased in Sweden during the last decades. An association with the concurrent dramatically improved early survival seems likely.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Academy of Pediatrics, 2013
    Keywords
    necrotizing enterocolitis, premature infants, perinatal mortality, perinatal care, epidemiology, trends, seasonal variation
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98148 (URN)10.1542/peds.2012-3847 (DOI)000322957300017 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland||Futurum||Academy of Health Care||Jonkoping County Council, Jonkoping, Sweden||Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden||

    Available from: 2013-09-30 Created: 2013-09-30 Last updated: 2018-03-27
    2. Population-based study showed that necrotising enterocolitis occurred in space-time clusters with a decreasing secular trend in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population-based study showed that necrotising enterocolitis occurred in space-time clusters with a decreasing secular trend in Sweden
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 7, p. 1097-1102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study investigated space-time clustering of neonatal necrotising enterocolitis over three decades. Methods: Space-time clustering analyses objects that are grouped by a specific place and time. The Knox test and Kulldorffs scan statistic were used to analyse space-time clusters in 808 children diagnosed with necrotising enterocolitis in a national cohort of 2 389 681 children born between 1987 and 2009 in Sweden. The municipality the mother lived in and the delivery hospital defined closeness in space and the time between when the cases were born - seven, 14 and 21 days - defined closeness in time. Results: The Knox test showed no indication of space-time clustering at the residential level, but clear indications at the hospital level in all the time windows: seven days (p = 0.026), 14 days (p = 0.010) and 21 days (p = 0.004). Significant clustering at the hospital level was found during 1987-1997, but not during 1998-2009. Kulldorffs scan statistic found seven significant clusters at the hospital level. Conclusion: Space-time clustering was found at the hospital but not residential level, suggesting a contagious environmental effect after delivery, but not in the prenatal period. The decrease in clustering over time may reflect improved routines to minimise the risk of contagion between patients receiving neonatal care.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY, 2017
    Keywords
    Cluster analysis; Necrotising enterocolitis; Neonatal care; Precipitating contagion; Preterm infant
    National Category
    Pediatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139608 (URN)10.1111/apa.13851 (DOI)000405216700022 ()28349558 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish government; county councils

    Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2018-03-27
    3. Maternal, fetal and perinatal factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis in Sweden: A national case-control study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal, fetal and perinatal factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis in Sweden: A national case-control study
    2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0194352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To analyze associations of maternal, fetal, gestational, and perinatal factors with necrotizing enterocolitis in a matched case-control study based on routinely collected, nationwide register data.

    Study design

    All infants born in 1987 through 2009 with a diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis in any of the Swedish national health care registers were identified. For each case up to 6 controls, matched for birth year and gestational age, were selected. The resulting study population consisted of 720 cases and 3,567 controls. Information on socioeconomic data about the mother, maternal morbidity, pregnancy related diagnoses, perinatal diagnoses of the infant, and procedures in the perinatal period, was obtained for all cases and controls and analyzed with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions for the whole study population as well as for subgroups according to gestational age.

    Results

    In the study population as a whole, we found independent positive associations with necrotizing enterocolitis for isoimmunization, fetal distress, cesarean section, neonatal bacterial infection including sepsis, erythrocyte transfusion, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac malformation, gastrointestinal malformation, and chromosomal abnormality. Negative associations were found for maternal weight, preeclampsia, maternal urinary infection, premature rupture of the membranes, and birthweight. Different patterns of associations were seen in the subgroups of different gestational age.

    Conclusion

    With some interesting exceptions, especially in negative associations, the results of this large, population based study, are in keeping with earlier studies. Although restrained by the limitations of register data, the findings mirror conceivable pathophysiological processes and underline that NEC is a multifactorial disease.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    San Francisco, United States: Public Library of Science, 2018
    National Category
    Pediatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146093 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0194352 (DOI)000428168400016 ()29570713 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044427061 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Region Ostergotland, Sweden [LiO-107641]; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-77481]; Futurum - the Academy of Health Care, Jonkoping County Council, Jonkoping, Sweden; Region Ostergotland [LIO-130291, LIO-204581, LIO-280451, LIO-361481, L

    Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
    4. The role of imaging in the management of necrotising enterocolitis: a multispecialist survey and a review of the literature
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of imaging in the management of necrotising enterocolitis: a multispecialist survey and a review of the literature
    2018 (English)In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 3621-3631Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To investigate current practices and perceptions of imaging in necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) according to involved specialists, put them in the context of current literature, and identify needs for further investigation.

    Methods

    Two hundred two neonatologists, paediatric surgeons, and radiologists answered a web-based questionnaire about imaging in NEC at their hospitals. The results were descriptively analysed, using proportion estimates with 95% confidence intervals.

    Results

    There was over 90% agreement on the value of imaging for confirmation of the diagnosis, surveillance, and guidance in decisions on surgery as well as on abdominal radiography as the first-choice modality and the most important radiographic signs. More variation was observed regarding some indications for surgery and the use of some ultrasonographic signs. Fifty-eight per cent stated that ultrasound was used for NEC at their hospital. Examination frequency, often once daily or more but with considerable variations, and projections used in AR were usually decided individually rather than according to fixed schedules. Predicting the need of surgery was regarded more important than formal staging.

    Conclusion

    Despite great agreement on the purposes of imaging in NEC and the most important radiographic signs of the disease, there was considerable diversity in routines, especially regarding examination frequency and the use of ultrasound. Apart from continuing validation of ultrasound, important objectives for future studies include definition of the supplementary roles of both imaging modalities in relation to other diagnostic parameters and evaluation of various imaging routines in relation to timing of surgery, complications, and mortality rate.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2018
    Keywords
    Enterocolitis, necrotising, Abdominal radiography, Ultrasonography, Surveys and questionnaires, Professional practice
    National Category
    Pediatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146094 (URN)10.1007/s00330-018-5362-x (DOI)000440984300006 ()
    Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-08-24
  • 11.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Drott, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Maternal, fetal and perinatal factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis in Sweden: A national case-control study2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0194352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To analyze associations of maternal, fetal, gestational, and perinatal factors with necrotizing enterocolitis in a matched case-control study based on routinely collected, nationwide register data.

    Study design

    All infants born in 1987 through 2009 with a diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis in any of the Swedish national health care registers were identified. For each case up to 6 controls, matched for birth year and gestational age, were selected. The resulting study population consisted of 720 cases and 3,567 controls. Information on socioeconomic data about the mother, maternal morbidity, pregnancy related diagnoses, perinatal diagnoses of the infant, and procedures in the perinatal period, was obtained for all cases and controls and analyzed with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions for the whole study population as well as for subgroups according to gestational age.

    Results

    In the study population as a whole, we found independent positive associations with necrotizing enterocolitis for isoimmunization, fetal distress, cesarean section, neonatal bacterial infection including sepsis, erythrocyte transfusion, persistent ductus arteriosus, cardiac malformation, gastrointestinal malformation, and chromosomal abnormality. Negative associations were found for maternal weight, preeclampsia, maternal urinary infection, premature rupture of the membranes, and birthweight. Different patterns of associations were seen in the subgroups of different gestational age.

    Conclusion

    With some interesting exceptions, especially in negative associations, the results of this large, population based study, are in keeping with earlier studies. Although restrained by the limitations of register data, the findings mirror conceivable pathophysiological processes and underline that NEC is a multifactorial disease.

  • 12.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Magnusson, Amanda
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Elfvin, Anders
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Roland
    Department of Surgery, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Space-time clustering of necrotizing enterocolitis supports the existence of transmissible causes.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem Statement: Despite great efforts to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) the incidence may in fact be increasing, and changes in the patient population over time seem to lead to changes in clinical presentation and risk factor spectrum as well. The presence of bacteria is an important prerequisite in the pathogenesis, but, rather than being caused by specific pathogens, inflammation and bacterial invasion are thought to be mediated through erroneous interaction between microbiota and innate immunity during colonization of the gut. There are, however, reports of episodic outbreaks of NEC, seasonal variation in incident rates, and clustering, suggesting a role for transmissible infectious agents or other environmental factors around the pregnant mother or newborn infant. In order to investigate evidence for such factors we have analyzed the occurrence of space-time clusters in Sweden over 23 years. Methods: A national register-based cohort of all children born between 1987 and 2009 in Sweden, diagnosed with NEC, was identified. The Knox test and Kulldorff’s scan method were used to analyze signs of space-time clusters at two geographical levels; the mother’s residential address and the delivery hospital. Time windows of seven, 14 and 21 days were used for closeness in time. Results: The Knox test showed clustering on hospital level in all studied temporal windows; seven days (p=0.022) 14 days (p=0.011) and 21 days (p=0.006), and Kulldorff’s scan method found seven significant clusters. On residential level, there was no indication of space-time interaction. When comparing two time periods, significant clustering on hospital level was found during 1987-1997, but not during 1998-2009. Conclusion: Space-time clustering was found on hospital level, but not on community level, suggesting a contagious environmental effect at and after delivery but not in the materno-fetal environment outside the hospital before birth. The decrease in clustering over time suggests that improved routines in neonatal care have minimized the risk of NEC precipitating contagions spreading between patients in the neonatal intensive care unit. The importance of such routines should not be forgotten while our efforts to bring down NEC incidence are directed towards other challenges.

  • 13.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ringertz, Hans G.
    Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, USA; Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rubesova, Erika
    Department of Radiology, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, USA.
    The role of imaging in the management of necrotising enterocolitis: a multispecialist survey and a review of the literature2018In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 3621-3631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To investigate current practices and perceptions of imaging in necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) according to involved specialists, put them in the context of current literature, and identify needs for further investigation.

    Methods

    Two hundred two neonatologists, paediatric surgeons, and radiologists answered a web-based questionnaire about imaging in NEC at their hospitals. The results were descriptively analysed, using proportion estimates with 95% confidence intervals.

    Results

    There was over 90% agreement on the value of imaging for confirmation of the diagnosis, surveillance, and guidance in decisions on surgery as well as on abdominal radiography as the first-choice modality and the most important radiographic signs. More variation was observed regarding some indications for surgery and the use of some ultrasonographic signs. Fifty-eight per cent stated that ultrasound was used for NEC at their hospital. Examination frequency, often once daily or more but with considerable variations, and projections used in AR were usually decided individually rather than according to fixed schedules. Predicting the need of surgery was regarded more important than formal staging.

    Conclusion

    Despite great agreement on the purposes of imaging in NEC and the most important radiographic signs of the disease, there was considerable diversity in routines, especially regarding examination frequency and the use of ultrasound. Apart from continuing validation of ultrasound, important objectives for future studies include definition of the supplementary roles of both imaging modalities in relation to other diagnostic parameters and evaluation of various imaging routines in relation to timing of surgery, complications, and mortality rate.

  • 14.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Rubesova, Erika
    Stanford university, US.
    Ringertz, Hans
    Stanford university, US.
    The significance of radiographic and ultrasonographic findings in the management of necrotising enterocolitis - results from a survey2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Necrotising Enterocolitis (NEC) remains a potentially devastating emergency in neonates, predominantly the premature. Ever since it was first described in the 60's, imaging has played a great role in definition, staging, and monitoring of the disease. The radiographic image can change before the clinical condition, but typical signs are often transient and may be missing even in severe NEC [1-4]. These circumstances have led to the recommendation of frequent imaging and to the insight that the clinical decisions cannot rely solely on radiological signs [5-7]. Ultrasound (US) as a possibility to enhance sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy was first described in the mid 80's [8, 9] and was included in a diagnostic algorithm suggested by in 1994 [6], but despite great effort to develop and validate the method, its role in the management of NEC has not yet been established [7, 10, 11].

    Meanwhile, in order to improve interobserver agreement and diagnostic accuracy of AR, the radiographic signs of NEC have also been systematized into the DAAS scale [12]. Imaging, as an adjunct to clinical assessment [11], is crucial in the diagnosis and management of NEC. The purpose of this survey was to investigate current views and routines, as described by involved specialists, and identify areas in need of further study and discussion.

  • 15.
    Ahle, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Rubesova, Erika
    Stanford university, US.
    Ringertz, Hans
    Stanford university, US.
    The use of imaging in necrotising enterocolitis - results from a survey2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Aizawa, Naoki
    et al.
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Gandaglia, Giorgio
    IRCCS, Italy; Lund University, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Fujimura, Tetsuya
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Fukuhara, Hiroshi
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Montorsi, Francesco
    IRCCS, Italy.
    Homma, Yukio
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Igawa, Yasuhiko
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    URB937, a peripherally restricted inhibitor for fatty acid amide hydrolase, reduces prostaglandin E-2-induced bladder overactivity and hyperactivity of bladder mechano-afferent nerve fibres in rats2016In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 117, no 5, p. 821-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To determine if inhibition of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) can counteract the changes in urodynamic variables and bladder afferent activities induced by intravesical prostaglandin E-2 (PGE(2)) instillation in rats. Materials and methods In female Sprague-Dawley rats we studied the effects of URB937, a peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitor, on single-unit afferent activity (SAA) during PGE(2)-induced bladder overactivity (BO). SAA measurements were made in urethane-anaesthetised rats and Ad-and C-fibres were identified by electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve and by bladder distention. Cystometry (CMG) in conscious animals and during SAA measurements was performed during intravesical instillation of PGE(2) (50 or 100 mu M) after intravenous administration of URB937 (0.1 and 1 mg/kg) or vehicle. In separate experiments, the comparative expressions of FAAH and cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, in microsurgically removed L6 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were studied by immunofluorescence. Results During CMG, 1 mg/kg URB937, but not vehicle or 0.1 mg/kg URB937, counteracted the PGE(2)-induced changes in urodynamic variables. PGE(2) increased the SAAs of C-fibres, but not Ad-fibres. URB937 (1 mg/kg) depressed Ad-fibre SAA and abolished the facilitated C-fibre SAA induced by PGE(2). The DRG nerve cells showed strong staining for FAAH, CB1 and CB2, with a mean (SEM) of 77 (2)% and 87 (3)% of FAAH-positive nerve cell bodies co-expressing CB1 or CB2 immunofluorescence, respectively. Conclusion The present results show that URB937, a peripherally restricted FAAH inhibitor, reduces BO and C-fibre hyperactivity in the rat bladder provoked by PGE(2), suggesting an important role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in BO and hypersensitivity.

  • 17.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Svensson, Erland
    Swedish Def Research Agency, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Levels of sP-selectin and hs-CRP Decrease with Dietary Intervention with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Combined: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, p. e0137680-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Objectives Inflammation and oxidative stress are central in many disease states. The major anti-oxidative enzymes contain selenium. The selenium intake in Europe is low, and supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q(10) , important anti-oxidants, was evaluated in a previous study. The aim of this study was to evaluate response on the inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein, and sP-selectin, and their possible impact on cardiovascular mortality. Subjects/Methods 437 elderly individuals were included in the study. Clinical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood samples were drawn. The intervention time was 48 months, and median follow-up was 5.2 years. The effects on inflammation/atherosclerosis were evaluated through analyses of CRP and sP-selectin. Evaluations of the effect of the intervention was performed using repeated measures of variance. All mortality was registered, and endpoints of mortality were assessed by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results The placebo group showed a CRP level of 4.8 ng/mL at the start, and 5.1 ng/mL at the study end. The active supplementation group showed a CRP level of 4.1 ng/mL at the start, and 2.1 ng/mL at the study end. SP-selectin exhibited a level of 56.6mg/mL at the start in the placebo group and 72.3 mg/mL at the study end, and in the active group the corresponding figures were 55.9 mg/mL and 58.0 mg/mL. A significantly smaller increase was demonstrated through repeated measurements of the two biomarkers in those on active supplementation. Active supplementation showed an effect on the CRP and sP-selectin levels, irrespective of the biomarker levels. Reduced cardiovascular mortality was demonstrated in both those with high and low levels of CRP and sP-selectin in the active supplementation group. Conclusion CRP and sP-selectin showed significant changes reflecting effects on inflammation and atherosclerosis in those given selenium and coenzyme Q(10) combined. A reduced cardiovascular mortality could be demonstrated in the active group, irrespective of biomarker level. This result should be regarded as hypothesis-generating, and it is hoped it will stimulate more research in the area.

  • 18.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Individual long-term variation of platelet reactivity in patients with dual antiplatelet therapy after myocardial infarction.2018In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment, and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in those with high residual platelet reactivity (HPR). Less is known about individual variation over time. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate intra-individual variation in platelet reactivity. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was assessed in 77 patients, at 3 days, 8 days and 6 months after admission for acute myocardial infarction and loading dose of clopidogrel. All patients were treated with aspirin and clopidogrel through 6-month follow-up. We found a significant increase in median ADP-stimulated aggregation from third to eighth day (195 vs. 250 AU*min, p-value = 0.001) but not from day 8 to 6 months (250 vs. 223 AU*min, p-value = 0.666). There was no significant change in the overall rate of HPR (15.6% vs 20.8%, p-value 0.503) or low platelet reactivity (LPR) (37.7% vs 33.8%, p-value = 0.609) from day 8 to 6-month follow-up. In contrast, more than one in four changed HPR status, 15.6% from non-HPR to HPR and 10.4% HPR to non-HPR. A shift in LPR status appeared even more frequent, occurring in about one of three patients. In spite of similar median aggregation and rate of HPR during 6-month follow-up, about one in four of the patients changed HPR status and one in three changed LPR status. This may be important information for a concept of risk stratification based on a single aggregation value early after an acute coronary syndromes.

  • 19.
    Ali Abdi, Abshir
    et al.
    East Africa University, Somalia.
    Osman, Abdimajid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Prevalence of common hereditary risk factors for thrombophilia in Somalia and identification of a novel Gln544Arg mutation in coagulation factor V2017In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 536-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thrombophilia, commonly manifested as venous thromboembolism (VTE), is a worldwide concern but little is known on its genetic epidemiology in many parts of the globe particularly in the developing countries. Here we employed TaqMan genotyping and pyrosequencing to evaluate the prevalence of known common nucleotide polymorphisms associated with thrombophilia in a Somali population in the Puntland region of Somalia. We also employed next generation sequencing (NGS) to investigate other genetic variants in a Somali patient with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). As expected, we found no existence of factor V Leiden (rs6025) and prothrombin G20210A (rs1799963) in the Somali population. The G allele of ABO [261G/delG] polymorphism (rs8176719) was found at a frequency of 29%, similar to that observed in other African populations. We found the lowest so far reported frequency of MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) polymorphism in the Somali population (T allele frequency 1.5%). A novel and deleterious single nucleotide variation in exon 11 of coagulation factor V (c.1631A amp;gt; G) causing Gln544Arg exchange in factor V was identified in a 29 years old Somali female with DVT. The same patient was heterozygous to VKORC1 Asp36Tyr polymorphism (rs61742245) that predisposes to warfarin resistance. In conclusion, this study shows that common hereditary factors for thromboembolism found in Caucasians are either less frequent or absent in the Somali population-similar to the situation in other Africans. NGS is possibly a better choice to detect genetic risk variants for thrombosis in this ethnic group.

  • 20.
    Ali, Zaheer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Islam, Anik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sherrell, Peter
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Le-Moine, Mark
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lolas, Georgios
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Syrigos, Konstantinos
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Adjustable delivery of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 by alginate: collagen microspheres2018In: BIOLOGY OPEN, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 7, no 3, article id UNSP bio027060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapeutic induction of blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) in ischemic tissues holds great potential for treatment of myocardial infarction and stroke. Achieving sustained angiogenesis and vascular maturation has, however, been highly challenging. Here, we demonstrate that alginate: collagen hydrogels containing therapeutic, pro-angiogenic FGF-2, and formulated as microspheres, is a promising and clinically relevant vehicle for therapeutic angiogenesis. By titrating the amount of readily dissolvable and degradable collagen with more slowly degradable alginate in the hydrogel mixture, the degradation rates of the biomaterial controlling the release kinetics of embedded proangiogenic FGF-2 can be adjusted. Furthermore, we elaborate a microsphere synthesis protocol allowing accurate control over sphere size, also a critical determinant of degradation/release rate. As expected, alginate: collagen microspheres were completely biocompatible and did not cause any adverse reactions when injected in mice. Importantly, the amount of pro-angiogenic FGF-2 released from such microspheres led to robust induction of angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos similar to that achieved by injecting FGF-2-releasing cells. These findings highlight the use of microspheres constructed from alginate: collagen hydrogels as a promising and clinically relevant delivery system for pro-angiogenic therapy.

  • 21.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Skoog, Susann
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.2015In: BMC urology, ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

    METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

    RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

    CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

  • 22.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    M2-macrophage infiltration and macrophage traits of tumor cells in urinary bladder cancer2018In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 4, article id 159.e19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) constitute a subset of nonneoplastic cells in tumor stroma and influence cancer progression in solid tumors. The clinical significance of TAMs in urinary bladder cancer(UBC) is controversial.

    Methods

    We prospectively studied 103 patients with stage pT1–T4 UBC treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Tumor sections were immunostained with M2-specific macrophage marker CD163 and proliferation marker Ki-67. The expression of these markers in cancer cells as well as macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma was analyzed in relation to clinical data and outcome.

    Results

    The mean rate of CD163 and Ki-67 expressed by cancer cells were 35% and 78%, respectively. With borderline significance, MI was associated with lower rate of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.06). CD163 expression in cancer cells was proportional to MI (P<0.014). Patients with CD163-positive tumors and strong MI had significantly longer cancer-specific survival (CSS) (76 months), compared to patient with CD163-positive tumors and weak MI (28 months) (P = 0.02).

    Conclusions

    M2-specific MI tends to be inversely correlated with LN metastasis and improved CSS in UBC. MI might have protective impact in CD163-positive tumors. Expression of CD163 in cancer cells is significantly correlated with MI and might have a tumor promoting impact.

  • 23.
    Aljabery, Firas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland.
    Shabo, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Endocrine and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna Stockholm, Sweden .
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical pathology.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Urology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Radio-guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer: a prospective clinical study.2017In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the possibility of detecting sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) in patients with urinary bladder cancer (BCa) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified SNs reflected that of the lymphatic field.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 103 patients with BCa pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq and blue dye were injected into the bladder wall around the primary tumour before surgery. SNs were detected ex vivo during the operation with a handheld Geiger probe (Gamma Detection System; Neoprobe Corp., Dublin, OH, USA). All LNs were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. An experienced uropathologist evaluated the slides.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean (range) number of 31 (7-68) nodes per patient were examined, totalling 3 253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 patients (40%). SNs were detected in 83 of the 103 patients (80%). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SN biopsy (SNB) varied between LN stations, with average values of 67% and 90%, respectively. LN metastatic density (LNMD) had a significant prognostic impact; a value of ≥8% was significantly related to shorter survival. Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) occurred in 65% of patients (n = 67) and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that SNB is not a reliable technique for peri-operative localization of LN metastases during cystectomy for BCa; however, LNMD has a significant prognostic value in BCa and may be useful in the clinical context and in BCa oncological and surgical research. LVI was also found to be a prognostic factor.

  • 24.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ekstrand, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jawad, Aksa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice2016In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 124, no 7, p. 920-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Following human mercury (Hg) exposure, the metal accumulates in considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Although the toxicokinetics of Hg have been studied extensively, factors responsible for interindividual variation in humans are largely unknown. Differences in accumulation of renal Hg between inbred mouse strains suggest a genetic interstrain variation regulating retention or/and excretion of Hg. A. SW, DBA/2 and BALB/C mouse strains accumulate higher amounts of Hg than B10.S.

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to find candidate genes associated with regulation of renal Hg concentrations.

    METHODS: A. SW, B10.S and their F1 and F2 offspring were exposed for 6 weeks to 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water. Genotyping with microsatellites was conducted on 84 F2 mice for genome-wide scanning with ion pair reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP RP HPLC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were established. Denaturing HPLC was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for haplotyping and fine mapping in 184 and 32 F2 mice, respectively. Candidate genes (Pprc1, Btrc and Nfkb2) verified by fine mapping and QTL were further investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genes enhanced by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) were included for gene expression analysis.

    RESULTS: Renal Hg concentrations differed significantly between A. SW and B10. S mice and between males and females within each strain. QTL analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio score 5.78 on chromosome 19 (p = 0.002). Haplotype and fine mapping associated the Hg accumulation with Pprc1, which encodes PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), a coactivator for proteins involved in detoxification. Pprc1 and two genes coactivated by Pprc1 (Nrf1 and Nrf2) had significantly lower gene expression in the A. SW strain than in the B10. S strain.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study supports Pprc1 as a key regulator for renal Hg excretion.

  • 25.
    Alkaissi, Hammoudi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Jesper Bo
    Univ Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Bank1 and NF-kappaB as key regulators in anti-nucleolar antibody development2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0199979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune rheumatic disorders (SARD) represent important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans. The mechanisms triggering autoimmune responses are complex and involve a network of genetic factors. Mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) in mice is an established model to study the mechanisms of the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which is a hallmark in the diagnosis of SARD. A.SW mice with HgIA show a significantly higher titer of antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) than the B10.S mice, although both share the same MHC class II (H-2). We applied a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to their Hg-exposed F2 offspring to investigate the non-MHC genes involved in the development of ANoA. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed a peak logarithm of odds ratio (LOD) score of 3.05 on chromosome 3. Microsatellites were used for haplotyping, and fine mapping was conducted with next generation sequencing. The candidate genes Bank1 (B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) and Nfkbl (nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1) were identified by additional QTL analysis. Expression of the Bank1 and Nfkb1 genes and their downstream target genes involved in the intracellular pathway (Tlr9,II6, Tnf) was investigated in mercury-exposed A.SW and B10.S mice by real-time PCR. Bank1 showed significantly lower gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, whereas the B10.S strain showed no significant difference. Nfkb1, Tlr9, II6 and Tnf had significantly higher gene expression in the A.SW strain after Hg-exposure, while the B10.S strain showed no difference. This study supports the roles of Bank1 (produced mainly in B-cells) and Nfkbl (produced in most immune cells) as key regulators of ANoA development in HgIA.

  • 26.
    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda
    et al.
    Nordic University, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olays Hospital, Norway.
    Lydersen, Stian
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Schjott, Jan
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Damkier, Per
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Rolighed Christensen, Hanne
    Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Peter Kampmann, Jens
    Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg University Hospital, Denmark.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Spigset, Olav
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olays Hospital, Norway.
    Relationship Between Time Consumption and Quality of Responses to Drug-related Queries: A Study From Seven Drug Information Centers in Scandinavia2016In: Clinical Therapeutics, ISSN 0149-2918, E-ISSN 1879-114X, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1738-1749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to assess the quality of responses produced by drug information centers (DICs) in Scandinavia, and to study the association between time consumption processing queries and the quality of the responses. Methods: We posed six identical drug-related queries to seven DICs in Scandinavia, and the time consumption required for processing them was estimated. Clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and general practitioners (external experts) reviewed responses individually. We used mixed model linear regression analyses to study the associations between time consumption on one hand and the summarized quality scores and the overall impression of the responses on the other hand. Findings: Both expert groups generally assessed the quality of the responses as "satisfactory" to "good." A few responses were criticized for being poorly synthesized and less relevant, of which none were quality-assured using co-signatures. For external experts, an increase in time consumption was statistically significantly associated with a decrease in common quality score (change in score, -0.20 per hour of work; 95% CI, -0.33 to -0.06; P = 0.004), and overall impression (change in score, -0.05 per hour of work; 95% CI, -0.08 to -0.01; P = 0.005). No such associations were found for the internal experts assessment. Implications: To our knowledge, this is the first study of the association between time consumption and quality of responses to drug-related queries in DICs. The quality of responses were in general good, but time consumption and quality were only weakly associated in this setting. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier HS Journals, Inc.

  • 27.
    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda
    et al.
    Nordic University, Norway; Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olavs Hospital, Norway.
    Spigset, Olav
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; St Olavs Hospital, Norway.
    Kampmann, Jens Peter
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Damkier, Per
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Rolighed Christensen, Hanne
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Schjott, Jan
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Quality assessment of structure and language elements of written responses given by seven Scandinavian drug information centres2017In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 623-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify structure and language elements affecting the quality of responses from Scandinavian drug information centres (DICs). Six different fictitious drug-related queries were sent to each of seven Scandinavian DICs. The centres were blinded for which queries were part of the study. The responses were assessed qualitatively by six clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and six general practitioners (GPs, external experts). In addition, linguistic aspects of the responses were evaluated by a plain language expert. The quality of responses was generally judged as satisfactory to good. Presenting specific advice and conclusions were considered to improve the quality of the responses. However, small nuances in language formulations could affect the individual judgments of the experts, e.g. on whether or not advice was given. Some experts preferred the use of primary sources to the use of secondary and tertiary sources. Both internal and external experts criticised the use of abbreviations, professional terminology and study findings that was left unexplained. The plain language expert emphasised the importance of defining and explaining pharmacological terms to ensure that enquirers understand the response as intended. In addition, more use of active voice and less compressed text structure would be desirable. This evaluation of responses to DIC queries may give some indications on how to improve written responses on drug-related queries with respect to language and text structure. Giving specific advice and precise conclusions and avoiding too compressed language and non-standard abbreviations may aid to reach this goal.

  • 28.
    Andelin, M.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden..
    Kropff, J.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Matuleviciene, V.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Joseph, J.I.
    Department of Anaesthesiology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA..
    Attvall, S.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hirsch, I.B.
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Imberg, H.
    Statistiska Konsultgruppen, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Dahlqvist, S.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Klonoff, D.
    Diabetes Research Institute, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, San Mateo, CA, USA..
    Haraldsson, B.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    DeVries, J.H.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Lind, M.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden lind.marcus@telia.com..
    Assessing the Accuracy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Calibrated With Capillary Values Using Capillary or Venous Glucose Levels as a Reference.2016In: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, E-ISSN 1932-2968, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 876-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Using the standard venous reference for the evaluation of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems could possibly negatively affect measured CGM accuracy since CGM are generally calibrated with capillary glucose and venous and capillary glucose concentrations differ. We therefore aimed to quantify the effect of using capillary versus venous glucose reference samples on estimated accuracy in capillary calibrated CGM.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: We evaluated 41 individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) using the Dexcom G4 CGM system over 6 days. Patients calibrated their CGM devices with capillary glucose by means of the HemoCue system. During 2 visits, capillary and venous samples were simultaneously measured by HemoCue and compared to concomitantly obtained CGM readings. The mean absolute relative difference (MARD) was calculated using capillary and venous reference samples.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Venous glucose values were 0.83 mmol/L (15.0 mg/dl) lower than capillary values over all glycemic ranges, P less than .0001. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl), the difference was 1.25 mmol/l (22.5 mg/dl), P = .0001, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl), 0.67 mmol/l (12.0 mg/dl), P less than .0001 and above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl), 0.95 mmol/l (17.1 mg/dl), P less than .0001. MARD was 11.7% using capillary values as reference compared to 13.7% using venous samples, P = .037. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl) MARD was 16.6% and 31.8%, P = .048, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl) 12.1% and 12.6%, P = .32, above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl) 8.7% and 9.2%, P = .82.less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Using capillary glucose concentrations as reference to evaluate the accuracy of CGM calibrated with capillary samples is associated with a lower MARD than using venous glucose as the reference. Capillary glucose concentrations were significantly higher than venous in all glycemic ranges.less thanbr /greater than (© 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.)

  • 29.
    Anders Eriksson, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Lieden, Agne
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Bremer, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics. Division of Clinical Genetics, University Hospital, Link.
    Wincent, Josephine
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sahlin, Ellika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Anderlid, Britt-Marie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rare copy number variants are common in young children with autism spectrum disorder2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 6, p. 610-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimSeveral studies have suggested that rare copy number variants (CNVs) are an important genetic contributor to autism spectrum disorders. The aims of the study were to use chromosomal microarray to investigate the presence of rare copy number variants in a population-based cohort of well-characterised young children with autism spectrum disorders and to relate the genetic results to neurodevelopmental profiles and medical conditions. MethodsWe performed chromosomal microarray on samples from 162 children who had been referred to the Stockholm Autism Centre for Young Children in Sweden after being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder between 20 and 54months of age. ResultsPathogenic aberrations were detected in 8.6% of the children and variants of uncertain significance were present in another 8.6%. CNVs were more frequent in children with congenital malformations or dysmorphic features as well as in the subgroup with intellectual disability. ConclusionOur results support the use of chromosomal microarray methods for the first tier genetic analysis of autism spectrum disorder. However, it is likely in the near future that chromosomal microarray methods will probably be replaced by whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies in clinical genetic testing.

  • 30.
    Andersson, B.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swolin-Eide, D.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kristroem, B.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Gelander, L.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Angered Hospital, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Albertsson-Wikland, K.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Seasonal variations in vitamin D in relation to growth in short prepubertal children before and during first year growth hormone treatment2015In: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, ISSN 0391-4097, E-ISSN 1720-8386, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 1309-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between seasonal variations in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) levels and growth in prepubertal children during both the pretreatment year and the first year of GH treatment. Methods The study included 249 short prepubertal children with a broad range of GH secretion, GH(max) during a 24 h profile median 23; range 1-127 mU/L, 191 boys (mean age +/- SD, 8.6 +/- 2.6 years), 58 girls (7.5 +/- 1.9 years) receiving GH treatment (mean 43 mu g/kg/day; range 17-99 mu g/kg/day). Serum 25(OH) D was measured using an automated IDS-iSYS immunoassay. Results 25(OH) D levels showed seasonal variation, and decreased significantly during GH treatment. 25(OH) D levels at start and first year reduction in 25(OH) D, correlated (-) with the first year growth response during treatment. The degree of GH secretion capacity within our study population of mainly non-GH deficient children and 25(OH) D sufficient (67 +/- 29 nmol/L) had no influence on 25(OH) D levels. Growth during GH treatment were independent of seasonal variations in 25(OH) D. Multiple regression analysis showed that 25(OH) D levels at treatment start, together with auxological data and IGF-binding protein-3(SDS), explained 61 % of the variation in first year gain in height(SDS). Conclusion 25(OH) D levels were associated with first year growth response to GH and may be a useful contribution to future growth prediction models.

  • 31.
    Andersson, Bjorn
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swolin-Eide, Diana
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Short-term changes in bone formation markers following growth hormone (GH) treatment in short prepubertal children with a broad range of GH secretion2015In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectivesGrowth hormone (GH) promotes longitudinal growth and bone modelling/remodelling. This study investigated the relationship between levels of bone formation markers and growth during GH treatment in prepubertal children with widely ranging GH secretion levels. MethodsThe study group comprised 113 short prepubertal children (mean ageSD, 937213years; 99 boys) on GH treatment (330 +/- 006g/kg/day) for 1year. Blood samples were taken at baseline and 1 and 2weeks, 1 and 3months, and 1year after treatment start. Intact amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) and osteocalcin were measured using an automated IDS-iSYS immunoassay system. ResultsIntact amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP), BALP and osteocalcin, increased in the short-term during GH treatment. PINP after 1week (P=000077), and BALP and osteocalcin after 1month (Pless than00001 and P=00043, respectively). PINP levels at 1 and 3months correlated positively, and osteocalcin levels at 1week and percentage change after 1month correlated negatively, with first year growth response. No significant correlations were found between BALP and first year growth. Multiple regression analysis showed that bone marker levels together with auxological data and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 explained the variation in first year growth response to 36% at start, 32% after 2weeks and 48% at 3months. ConclusionShort-term increases in levels of the bone formation markers PINP, BALP and osteocalcin showed different temporal patterns, but all correlated with first year growth response during GH treatment. These markers may be a useful addition to existing prediction models for growth response.

  • 32.
    Andersson, Björn
    et al.
    Institution of Clinical Sciences/Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Swolin-Eide, Diana
    Göteborg Pediatric Growth Research Center (GP-GRC), Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Albertsson-Wikland, Kerstin
    Department of Physiology/Division of Endocrinology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Vitamin D status in children over three decades – do children get enough vitamin D?2016In: Bone Reports, ISSN 2352-1872, Vol. 5, p. 150-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vitamin D is a key player in the endocrine regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism and plays a pivotal role in the acquisition of bone mass during childhood. This study investigated long-term data of vitamin D levels in children and adolescents between 1 and 18 years of age. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was analyzed between 1982 and 2013 in 2048 Swedish Caucasian children (mean age ± SD, 8.59 ± 3.68 years; 1197 boys). Overall, 704 (34%) children had below recommended levels of 50 nmol/L; however, only 63 (3%) had levels below 25 nmol/L, i.e., vitamin D deficiency. No trend for decreased vitamin D levels over time was found in this population, with median 25(OH)D levels of 58.4 nmol/L, minimum–maximum 5.0–159.3 nmol/L. Younger children, independent of gender, had significantly higher levels 25(OH)D.

  • 33.
    Andersson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Physiology in Norrköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lindström, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Phase-contrast MRI volume flow - a comparison of breath held and navigator based acquisitions2016In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 16, no 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) 2D phase-contrast flow measurement has been regarded as the gold standard in blood flow measurements and can be performed with free breathing or breath held techniques. We hypothesized that the accuracy of flow measurements obtained with segmented phase-contrast during breath holding, and in particular higher number of k-space segments, would be non-inferior compared to navigator phase-contrast. Volumes obtained from anatomic segmentation of cine MRI and Doppler echocardiography were used for additional reference. Methods: Forty patients, five women and 35 men, mean age 65 years (range 53-80), were randomly selected and consented to the study. All underwent EKG-gated cardiac MRI including breath hold cine, navigator based free-breathing phase-contrast MRI and breath hold phase-contrast MRI using k-space segmentation factors 3 and 5, as well as transthoracic echocardiography within 2 days. Results: In navigator based free-breathing phase-contrast flow, mean stroke volume and cardiac output were 79.7 +/- 17.1 ml and 5071 +/- 1192 ml/min, respectively. The duration of the acquisition was 50 +/- 6 s. With k-space segmentation factor 3, the corresponding values were 77.7 ml +/- 17.5 ml and 4979 +/- 1211 ml/min (p = 0.15 vs navigator). The duration of the breath hold was 17 +/- 2 s. K-space segmentation factor 5 gave mean stroke volume 77.9 +/- 16.4 ml, cardiac output 5142 +/- 1197 ml/min (p = 0.33 vs navigator), and breath hold time 11 +/- 1 s. Anatomical segmentation of cine gave mean stroke volume and cardiac output 91.2 +/- 20.8 ml and 5963 +/- 1452 ml/min, respectively. Echocardiography was reliable in 20 of the 40 patients. The mean diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract was 20.7 +/- 1.5 mm, stroke volume 78.3 ml +/- 15.2 ml and cardiac output 5164 +/- 1249 ml/min. Conclusions: In forty consecutive patients with coronary heart disease, breath holding and segmented k-space sampling techniques for phase-contrast flow produced stroke volumes and cardiac outputs similar to those obtained with free-breathing navigator based phase-contrast MRI, using less time. The values obtained agreed fairly well with Doppler echocardiography while there was a larger difference when compared with anatomical volume determinations using SSFP (steady state free precession) cine MRI.

  • 34.
    Andersson, Christoffer R.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ström, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Comparisons between commercial salivary testosterone enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 77, no 8, p. 582-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Measuring testosterone concentrations is of interest both in clinical situations and for research, the latter expanding rapidly during recent years. An increased demand for convenient methods has prompted a number of companies to develop enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits to measure testosterone concentrations in saliva. However, the inter-comparability of kits from different manufacturers have yet to be determined. Aim of study: The aim of this study was to compare commercially available ELISA kits from four different manufacturers (Salimetrics, IBL, DRG and Demeditec). Methods: Saliva was collected from 50 participants (25 men and 25 women). Each sample was analysed by the four ELISA kits. Results: The correlations between the ELISA kits from Demeditec, DRG and Salimetrics were moderate to high with r-values amp;gt;.77; however, proportional errors between the methods calls for caution. The ELISA kit from IBL malfunctioned and no results from this kit was obtained. Conclusions: Results from studies using the ELISA kits from Demeditec, DRG and Salimetrics are generally comparable; however, translation using the formulae presented in the current study could increase the accuracy of these comparisons.

  • 35.
    Andersson, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jagervall, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Ctr Med Image Sci and Visualizat CMIV, Linkoping, Sweden; Linkoping Univ, Dept Radiol, Linkoping, Sweden; Linkoping Univ, Dept Med and Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Wang, Chunliang
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    How to measure renal artery stenosis - a retrospective comparison of morphological measurement approaches in relation to hemodynamic significance2015In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 15, no 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although it is well known that renal artery stenosis may cause renovascular hypertension, it is unclear how the degree of stenosis should best be measured in morphological images. The aim of this study was to determine which morphological measures from Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) and Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) are best in predicting whether a renal artery stenosis is hemodynamically significant or not. Methods: Forty-seven patients with hypertension and a clinical suspicion of renovascular hypertension were examined with CTA, MRA, captopril-enhanced renography (CER) and captopril test (Ctest). CTA and MRA images of the renal arteries were analyzed by two readers using interactive vessel segmentation software. The measures included minimum diameter, minimum area, diameter reduction and area reduction. In addition, two radiologists visually judged the diameter reduction without automated segmentation. The results were then compared using limits of agreement and intra-class correlation, and correlated with the results from CER combined with Ctest (which were used as standard of reference) using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Results: A total of 68 kidneys had all three investigations (CTA, MRA and CER + Ctest), where 11 kidneys (16.2 %) got a positive result on the CER + Ctest. The greatest area under ROC curve (AUROC) was found for the area reduction on MRA, with a value of 0.91 (95 % confidence interval 0.82-0.99), excluding accessory renal arteries. As comparison, the AUROC for the radiologists visual assessments on CTA and MRA were 0.90 (0.82-0.98) and 0.91 (0.83-0.99) respectively. None of the differences were statistically significant. Conclusions: No significant differences were found between the morphological measures in their ability to predict hemodynamically significant stenosis, but a tendency of MRA having higher AUROC than CTA. There was no significant difference between measurements made by the radiologists and measurements made with fuzzy connectedness segmentation. Further studies are required to definitely identify the optimal measurement approach.

  • 36.
    Andersson, Marine L.
    et al.
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Bastholm-Rahmner, Pia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ovesjo, Marie-Louise
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Veg, Aniko
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Eiermann, Birgit
    Karolinska University, Sweden.
    Evaluation of usage patterns and user perception of the drug-drug interaction database SFINX2015In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 327-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate how prescribers and pharmacists use and perceive the drug-drug interaction database SFINX in their clinical work. Methods: A questionnaire was developed with questions aimed at the usage of SFINX, and the perceptions of the database. The questionnaire was sent out to all registered users of the web application of SFINX. The anonymous answers from the target users, prescribers and pharmacists were summarized using descriptive statistics. Statistical analysis was performed on age and gender differences for some questions regarding different usage patterns. Results: The questionnaire was sent to 11,763 registered SFINX users. The response rate was 23%, including 1871 answers from prescribers or pharmacists. SFINX was reported to be used at least weekly or more often by 45% of the prescribers and 51% of the pharmacists. Many prescribers reported using the database during the patient consultation (60%) or directly before or after (56%). Among the prescribers, 74% reported that the information received made them change their action at least sometimes. About 20% of the prescribers and 25% of the pharmacists considered the information as irrelevant sometimes or more often. Conclusion: Most prescribers and pharmacists reported using SFINX in direct association with a patient consultation. Information received by using SFINX makes prescribers and pharmacists change their handling of patients. DDI databases with relevant information about patient handling might improve drug treatment outcome. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Andersson, Marine L
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm,.
    Böttiger, Ylva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Kockum, Henrik
    3Department of.
    Eiermann, Birgit
    Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm,.
    High Prevalence of Drug-Drug Interactions in Primary Health Care is Caused by Prescriptions from other Healthcare Units.2018In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 122, no 5, p. 512-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drug-drug interactions are increasingly common, as patients are getting older and the number of drugs per patient is increasing. In this study, we investigated to which extent potential drug-drug interactions originated from single or multiple prescribers. All patients attending any of 20 primary healthcare centres were included in a retrospective observational cohort study. Data on all prescriptions to these patients, irrespectively of the prescriber, were collected for two 4-month periods. Potential drug interactions were identified using the drug-drug interaction database SFINX. Interactions were classified with respect to the workplace of the prescriber, and the prevalence of interactions according to origin was analysed. We found that the drug interactions were significantly more common when the drugs were prescribed from different healthcare centres, compared with drugs prescribed from the patients' primary healthcare centre only. One explanation for this increased risk of drug interactions could be that the prescribers at different primary healthcare centres do not share the same information concerning the total medication list of the patient.

  • 38.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, County Council of Jönköping, Jönköping.
    Landberg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrköping, Sweden.
    Consequences of high-sensitivity troponin T testing applied in a primary care population with chest pain compared with a commercially available point-of-care troponin T analysis: an observational prospective study2015In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:There is a demand for a highly sensitive and specific point-of care test to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is unclear if a high-sensitivity troponin assay will have enough discriminative power to become a decision support in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate a high-sensitivity troponin T assay performed in three primary health care centres in southeast Sweden and to compare the outcome with a point-of-care troponin T test.METHODS:This study included 115 patients who consulted their general practitioner for chest pain, dyspnoea on exertion, unexplained weakness and/or fatigue in the last 7days. Troponin T was analysed by a point-of-care test and a high-sensitivity method together with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and creatinine. All patients were checked for AMI or unstable angina (UA) within 30days of study enrolment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine possible connections between troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L, clinical variables and laboratory findings at baseline. In addition, 21 patients with troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L and no signs of AMI or UA were followed up for 2-3years.RESULTS:Three patients were diagnosed with AMI and three with UA. At the [greater than or equal to]15ng/L cut-off, the troponin T method had 100% sensitivity, 75% specificity for AMI and a positive predictive value of 10%. The troponin T point-of-care test missed one case of AMI and the detection limit was 50ng/L. Troponin T[greater than or equal to]15ng/L was correlated to age [greater than or equal to]65years (odds ratio (OR), 10.9 95% CI 2.28-51.8) and NT-proBNP in accordance with heart failure (OR 8.62 95% CI 1.61-46.1). Fourteen of the 21 patients, without signs of AMI or UA at baseline, still had increased troponin T at follow-up after 2-3years.CONCLUSIONS:A high-sensitivity troponin T assay could become useful in primary care as a point-of-care test for patients <65years. For patients older than 65-70years, a higher decision limit than [greater than or equal to]15ng/L should be considered and used in conjunction with clinical parameters and possibly with NT-proBNP.

  • 39.
    Andersson Sundell, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Beliefs about medicines are strongly associated with medicine-use patterns among the general population2016In: International journal of clinical practice (Esher), ISSN 1368-5031, E-ISSN 1742-1241, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsTo investigate self-reported beliefs and perceived sensitivity to medicines and their effects in relation to self-reported use of medicines and herbal remedies. MethodsA survey sent to 13,931 randomly selected Swedish adults included the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-General (BMQ-General) Questionnaire and the Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines Scale (PSM). The survey also asked about individuals use of prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines and herbal remedies in the past month. We examined all associations between scores on the BMQ-General subscales and PSM in relation to the use of medicines and herbal remedies, using analysis of covariance adjusted for potential confounders. ResultsAmong 7099 respondents, those using herbal remedies exclusively believed strongly that prescription and OTC medicines are harmful and overprescribed. Respondents using prescription and OTC medicines reported more positive beliefs [coefficient 0.67 (95% CI 0.47-0.87) and 0.70 (95% CI 0.51-0.90)] on the benefits of medicines compared with those using herbal remedies [-0.18 (95% CI -0.57-0.20)]. Perceived sensitivity to medicines was higher among those using herbal remedies only [1.25 (95% CI 0.46-2.03)] compared with those using no medicines (reference 0) or prescription [-0.44 (95% CI -0.84 to -0.05)] or OTC [-0.27 (95% CI -0.66-0.12)] medicines alone. ConclusionRespondents using prescription and/or OTC medicines reported stronger positive beliefs about the benefits of medicines in general, supporting the hypothesis that beliefs influence medicine use. Therefore, addressing beliefs and concerns about medicines during patient counselling may influence medicine use, particularly regarding unintentional non-adherence.

  • 40.
    Andersson, Thord
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction in water–fat MRI2015In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the water-signal performance of the consistent intensity inhomogeneity correction (CIIC) method to correct for intensity inhomogeneities METHODS: Water-fat volumes were acquired using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T symmetrically sampled 2-point Dixon three-dimensional MRI. Two datasets: (i) 10 muscle tissue regions of interest (ROIs) from 10 subjects acquired with both 1.5T and 3.0T whole-body MRI. (ii) Seven liver tissue ROIs from 36 patients imaged using 1.5T MRI at six time points after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. The performance of CIIC was evaluated quantitatively by analyzing its impact on the dispersion and bias of the water image ROI intensities, and qualitatively using side-by-side image comparisons.

    RESULTS:

    CIIC significantly ( P1.5T≤2.3×10-4,P3.0T≤1.0×10-6) decreased the nonphysiological intensity variance while preserving the average intensity levels. The side-by-side comparisons showed improved intensity consistency ( Pint⁡≤10-6) while not introducing artifacts ( Part=0.024) nor changed appearances ( Papp≤10-6).

    CONCLUSION:

    CIIC improves the spatiotemporal intensity consistency in regions of a homogenous tissue type. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2014.

  • 41.
    Appelgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology. Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Marginal-Zone B-Cells Are Main Producers of IgM in Humans, and Are Reduced in Patients With Autoimmune Vasculitis2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 2242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mice, B1 and marginal zone (MZ) B-cells play an important role in prevention of autoimmunity through production of regulatory cytokines and natural antibodies. There is limited knowledge about the human counterparts of these cells. We therefore investigated functions of MZ-like B-cells and the frequency of circulating MZ-like and Bl-like B-cells in healthy controls (HC), as well as in patients with autoimmune vasculitis to learn more about the role of these cells in autoimmune disease. After stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) of class B in vitro, MZ-like B-cells were the main producers of IgM whereas switched memory B-cells primarily produced IgG and IgA. TNF and IL-10 were produced by both MZ-like and switched memory B-cells. Neither antibody nor TNF/IL-10 production by the B-cell subsets differed between patients and HC. Patients with autoimmune vasculitis, irrespective of disease activity, had lower percentage and absolute numbers of circulating MZ-like B-cells, and lower absolute numbers of B1-like B-cells. The percentage of B1-like B-cells was reduced during active disease. These findings remained significant when the analysis was confined to active treatment-naive patients (disease onset).Our results suggest that human innate-like B-cells might have a physiological role in prevention of autoimmunity.

  • 42.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Hals Berglund, Maria
    University Hospital Norrland, Sweden.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Long-Term Risk of Stroke after Transient Ischemic Attack2017In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 43, no 1-2, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the absence of active management, the stroke risk after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) may be high. Almost 10 years ago, the results of the EXPRESS and SOS-TIA studies called for a more rapid management of TIA patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the other stroke risks in the longer term, after the implementation of a more active approach to TIA. We also wanted to assess the predictive value of the ABCD2 score in this context. Methods: Riksstroke is the national stroke registry in Sweden. Data from Riksstrokes TIA module, and the national cause-of-death register, for the years 2011 and 2012 were used in this study. Stroke occurrence was monitored via Riksstroke. Coxs regression was used for risk evaluation. The predictive value of the ABCD2 score was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve. Results: A total of 15,068 TIA episodes occurred in 14,102 patients. The follow-up time varied between 0 and 819 days, with an average of 417 days. The mortality for all TIA patients during the follow-up time was 7.1%. Of the unique patients, 545 had one or more strokes (3.9%), corresponding to 34 events per 1,000 person years. Significant risk factors for stroke were: age, previous TIA, atrial fibrillation (AF), oral anticoagulant (OAC) treatment, hypertension treatment, and the ABCD2 items speech impairment, unilateral weakness, and diabetes mellitus. The ABCD2 score correlated with a subsequent stroke, but its predictive value was low. Conclusion: The risk of stroke is low after the acute phase of a TIA, probably lower than in previous studies. This may be due to better secondary prevention in recent years. Several risk factors predict stroke, notably hypertensive treatment, which may be inadequate; and AF, where OACs may be under-used. It is difficult to identify the role of the ABCD2 score in clinical practice. (C) 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

  • 43.
    Aronsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Department Pharmacology, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Booth, Shirley
    Department Pedagogical, Curricular and Professional Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; School of Education, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zetterqvist, Ann
    Department Pedagogical, Curricular and Professional Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tobin, Gunnar
    Department Pharmacology, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reis, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The understanding of core pharmacological concepts among health care students in their final semester2015In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The overall aim of the study was to explore health care students´ understanding of core concepts in pharmacology.

    Method

    An interview study was conducted among twelve students in their final semester of the medical program (n = 4), the nursing program (n = 4), and the specialist nursing program in primary health care (n  = 4) from two Swedish universities. The participants were individually presented with two pharmacological clinically relevant written patient cases, which they were to analyze and propose a solution to. Participants were allowed to use the Swedish national drug formulary. Immediately thereafter the students were interviewed about their assessments. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis was used to identify units of meaning in each interview. The units were organized into three clusters: pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and drug interactions. Subsequent procedure consisted of scoring the quality of students´ understanding of core concepts. Non-parametric statistics were employed.

    Results

    The study participants were in general able to define pharmacological concepts, but showed less ability to discuss the meaning of the concepts in depth and to implement these in a clinical context. The participants found it easier to grasp concepts related to pharmacodynamics than pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Conclusion

    These results indicate that education aiming to prepare future health care professionals for understanding of more complex pharmacological reasoning and decision-making needs to be more focused and effective.

  • 44.
    Barde, Swapnali
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ruegg, Joelle
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden; Swedish Toxicol Science Research Centre Swetox, Sweden.
    Prudhomme, Jose
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada.
    Ekström, Tomas J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Centre Molecular Med, Sweden.
    Palkovits, Miklos
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Turecki, Gustavo
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Bagdy, Gyorgy
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ihnatko, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Juhasz, Gabriella
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; University of Manchester, England.
    Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mechawar, Naguib
    Douglas Mental Health University of Institute, Canada; McGill University, Canada.
    Hokfelt, Tomas G. M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Alterations in the neuropeptide galanin system in major depressive disorder involve levels of transcripts, methylation, and peptide2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISSN 0027-8424, Vol. 113, no 52, p. E8472-E8481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a substantial burden to patients, families, and society, but many patients cannot be treated adequately. Rodent experiments suggest that the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) and its three G protein-coupled receptors, GAL(1-3), are involved in mood regulation. To explore the translational potential of these results, we assessed the transcript levels (by quantitative PCR), DNA methylation status (by bisulfite pyrosequencing), and GAL peptide by RIA of the GAL system in postmortem brains from depressed persons who had committed suicide and controls. Transcripts for all four members were detected and showed marked regional variations, GAL and galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) being most abundant. Striking increases in GAL and GALR3 mRNA levels, especially in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dorsal raphe nucleus, in parallel with decreased DNA methylation, were found in both male and female suicide subjects as compared with controls. In contrast, GAL and GALR3 transcript levels were decreased, GALR1 was increased, and DNA methylation was increased in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of male suicide subjects, however, there were no changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. Thus, GAL and its receptor GALR3 are differentially methylated and expressed in brains of MDD subjects in a region- and sex-specific manner. Such an epigenetic modification in GALR3, a hyperpolarizing receptor, might contribute to the dysregulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD. Thus, one may speculate that a GAL(3) antagonist could have antidepressant properties by disinhibiting the firing of these neurons, resulting in increased release of noradrenaline and serotonin in forebrain areas involved in mood regulation.

  • 45.
    Bar-Sever, Zvi
    et al.
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Biassoni, Lorenzo
    Great Ormond St Hosp Children NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Shulkin, Barry
    St Jude Childrens Res Hosp, TN 38105 USA.
    Kong, Grace
    Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Australia.
    Hofman, Michael S.
    Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Australia.
    Lopci, Egesta
    Humanitas Clin and Res Hosp, Italy.
    Manea, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Koziorowski, Jacek
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Castellani, Rita
    Ist Nazl Tumori, Italy.
    Boubaker, Ariane
    Clin Source, Switzerland.
    Lambert, Bieke
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Pfluger, Thomas
    Ludwig Maximilian Univ Hosp, Germany.
    Nadel, Helen
    British Columbia Childrens Hosp, Canada.
    Sharp, Susan
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, OH 45229 USA.
    Giammarile, Francesco
    IAEA, Austria.
    Guidelines on nuclear medicine imaging in neuroblastoma2018In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 45, no 11, p. 2009-2024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nuclear medicine has a central role in the diagnosis, staging, response assessment and long-term follow-up of neuroblastoma, the most common solid extracranial tumour in children. These EANM guidelines include updated information on I-123-mIBG, the most common study in nuclear medicine for the evaluation of neuroblastoma, and on PET/CT imaging with F-18-FDG, F-18-DOPA and Ga-68-DOTA peptides. These PET/CT studies are increasingly employed in clinical practice. Indications, advantages and limitations are presented along with recommendations on study protocols, interpretation of findings and reporting results.

  • 46.
    Bausch, Birke
    et al.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Schiavi, Francesca
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Ni, Ying
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patocs, Attila
    Semmelweis University, Hungary; Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Ngeow, Joanne
    National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore; Nanyang Technology University, Singapore.
    Wellner, Ulrich
    University of Lubeck, Germany.
    Malinoc, Angelica
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Taschin, Elisa
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Barbon, Giovanni
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Lanza, Virginia
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stenman, Adam
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Catharina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svahn, Fredrika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Chen, Jin-Lian
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Marquard, Jessica
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Fraenkel, Merav
    Hadassah Hebrew University, Israel.
    Walter, Martin A.
    University Hospital, Switzerland.
    Peczkowska, Mariola
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Prejbisz, Aleksander
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Jarzab, Barbara
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Mem Cancer Centre and Institute Oncol, Poland.
    Petersenn, Stephan
    Centre Endocrine Tumors, Germany.
    Moeller, Lars C.
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Meyer, Almuth
    HELIOS Klin, Germany.
    Reisch, Nicole
    Ludwigs Maximilians University of Munich, Germany.
    Trupka, Arnold
    City Hospital, Germany.
    Brase, Christoph
    University of Erlangen Nurnberg, Germany.
    Galiano, Matthias
    University Hospital Erlangen, Germany.
    Preuss, Simon F.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Kwok, Pingling
    University of Regensburg, Germany.
    Lendvai, Nikoletta
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Berisha, Gani
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Makay, Ozer
    Ege University, Turkey.
    Boedeker, Carsten C.
    HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Germany.
    Weryha, Georges
    University of Nancy, France.
    Racz, Karoly
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Januszewicz, Andrzej
    Institute Cardiol, Poland.
    Walz, Martin K.
    Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany; Kliniken Essen Mitte, Germany.
    Gimm, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Opocher, Giuseppe
    Ist Ricovero and Cura Carattere Science, Italy.
    Eng, Charis
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA; Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Neumann, Hartmut P. H.
    Albert Ludwigs University, Germany.
    Clinical Characterization of the Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Susceptibility Genes SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 for Gene-Informed Prevention2017In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 1204-1212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Effective cancer prevention is based on accurate molecular diagnosis and results of genetic family screening, genotype-informed risk assessment, and tailored strategies for early diagnosis. The expanding etiology for hereditary pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas has recently included SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 as susceptibility genes. Clinical management guidelines for patients with germline mutations in these 4 newly included genes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To study the clinical spectra and age-related penetrance of individuals with mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS This study analyzed the prospective, longitudinally followed up European-American-Asian Pheochromocytoma-Paraganglioma Registry for prevalence of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 germline mutation carriers from 1993 to 2016. Genetic predictive testing and clinical investigation by imaging from neck to pelvis was offered to mutation-positive registrants and their relatives to clinically characterize the pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma diseases associated with mutations of the 4 new genes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence and spectra of germline mutations in the SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes were assessed. The clinical features of SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 disease were characterized. RESULTS Of 972 unrelated registrants without mutations in the classic pheochromocytoma- and paraganglioma-associated genes (632 female [65.0%] and 340 male [35.0%]; age range, 8-80; mean [SD] age, 41.0 [13.3] years), 58 (6.0%) carried germline mutations of interest, including 29 SDHA, 20 TMEM127, 8 MAX, and 1 SDHAF2. Fifty-three of 58 patients (91%) had familial, multiple, extra-adrenal, and/or malignant tumors and/or were younger than 40 years. Newly uncovered are 7 of 63 (11%) malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas in SDHA and TMEM127 disease. SDHA disease occurred as early as 8 years of age. Extra-adrenal tumors occurred in 28 mutation carriers (48%) and in 23 of 29 SDHA mutation carriers (79%), particularly with head and neck paraganglioma. MAX disease occurred almost exclusively in the adrenal glands with frequently bilateral tumors. Penetrance in the largest subset, SDHA carriers, was 39% at 40 years of age and is statistically different in index patients (45%) vs mutation-carrying relatives (13%; P amp;lt; .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The SDHA, TMEM127, MAX, and SDHAF2 genes may contribute to hereditary pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Genetic testing is recommended in patients at clinically high risk if the classic genes are mutation negative. Gene-specific prevention and/or early detection requires regular, systematic whole-body investigation.

  • 47.
    Bengtsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Joost, Patrick
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Aravidis, Christos
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Clinical genetics. Off Medical Serv, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Backman, Ann-Sofie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    von Salome, Jenny
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Zagoras, Theofanis
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gebre-Medhin, Samuel
    Lund University, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Burman, Pia
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Corticotroph Pituitary Carcinoma in a Patient With Lynch Syndrome (LS) and Pituitary Tumors in a Nationwide LS Cohort2017In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 102, no 11, p. 3928-3932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Lynch syndrome (LS) is a cancer-predisposing syndrome caused by germline mutations in genes involved in DNA mismatch repair (MMR). Patients are at high risk for several types of cancer, but pituitary tumors have not previously been reported. Case: A 51-year-old man with LS (MSH2 mutation) and a history of colon carcinoma presented with severe Cushing disease and a locally aggressive pituitary tumor. The tumor harbored a mutation consistent with the patients germline mutation and displayed defect MMR function. Sixteen months later, the tumor had developed into a carcinoma with widespread liver metastases. The patient prompted us to perform a nationwide study in LS. Nationwide Study: A diagnosis consistent with a pituitary tumor was sought for in the Swedish National Patient Registry. In 910 patients with LS, representing all known cases in Sweden, another two clinically relevant pituitary tumors were found: an invasive nonsecreting macroadenoma and a microprolactinoma (i.e., in total three tumors vs. one expected). Conclusion: Germline mutations in MMR genes may contribute to the development and/or the clinical course of pituitary tumors. Because tumors with MMR mutations are susceptible to treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors, we suggest to actively ask for a family history of LS in the workup of patients with aggressive pituitary tumors.

  • 48.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bich Hoang, Ngoc Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kien Le, Ngai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Svartström, Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Khanh Khu, Dung Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thanh Le, Hai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olson, Linus
    TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Larsson, Mattias
    TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases. TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam.
    Insertion sequence transpositions and point mutations in mgrB causing colistin resistance in a clinical strain of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from Vietnam2018In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, ISSN 0924-8579, E-ISSN 1872-7913, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 789-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistance among Klebsiella pneumoniae to the last-resort antibiotics carbapenems and colistin is increasing worldwide. In this study, whole-genome sequencing was used to determine the colistin resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of carbapenem-and colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae from Vietnam. Alterations in the regulatory gene mgrB, via mutations and insertion sequence transpositions, were found in 30 of 31 isolates, emphasising the importance of this resistance mechanism in colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae. (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  • 49.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hoang, Ngoc Thi Bich
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Le, Ngai Kien
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Khu, Dung Thi Khanh
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Nilsson, Lennart E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olson, Linus
    The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Le, Hai Thanh
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Larsson, Mattias
    The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Colistin- and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying mcr-1 and bla(OXA-48) isolated at a paediatric hospital in Vietnam2018In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 1100-1102Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 50.
    Bergström, G
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg / Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Berglund, G
    Lund University.
    Blomberg, A
    Umeå University.
    Brandberg, J
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital / University of Gothenburg.
    Engström, G
    Lund University.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Eriksson, M
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    de Faire, U
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm / Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Flinck, A
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Stockholm / University of Gothenburg.
    Hansson, M G
    Uppsala University.
    Hedblad, B
    Lund University.
    Hjelmgren, O
    University of Gothenburg / Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Janson, C
    Uppsala University.
    Jernberg, T
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm / Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Johnsson, Å
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg / University of Gothenburg.
    Johansson, L
    Unit of Radiology.
    Lind, L
    Uppsala University.
    Löfdahl, C-G
    Lund University / Lund University Hospital.
    Melander, O
    Lund University / Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, M
    Lund University / Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Sandström, A
    Umeå University.
    Schmidt, C
    University of Gothenburg.
    Söderberg, S
    Umeå University.
    Sundström, J
    Uppsala University / Uppsala Clinical Resarch Centre.
    Toren, K
    University of Gothenburg.
    Waldenström, A
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Wedel, H
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg.
    Vikgren, J
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg / University of Gothenburg.
    Fagerberg, B
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rosengren, A
    University of Gothenburg.
    The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design2015In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 278, no 6, p. 645-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiopulmonary diseases are major causes of death worldwide, but currently recommended strategies for diagnosis and prevention may be outdated because of recent changes in risk factor patterns. The Swedish CArdioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) combines the use of new imaging technologies, advances in large-scale 'omics' and epidemiological analyses to extensively characterize a Swedish cohort of 30 000 men and women aged between 50 and 64 years. The information obtained will be used to improve risk prediction of cardiopulmonary diseases and optimize the ability to study disease mechanisms. A comprehensive pilot study in 1111 individuals, which was completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility and financial and ethical consequences of SCAPIS. Recruitment to the national, multicentre study has recently started.

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