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  • 1.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Newcastle University, England.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Heinen, Maud
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Coulton, Simon
    University of Kent, England.
    Gual, Toni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Improving the delivery of brief interventions for heavy drinking in primary health care: outcome results of the Optimizing Delivery of Health Care Intervention (ODHIN) five-country cluster randomized factorial trial2016In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 111, no 11, p. 1935-1945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo test if training and support, financial reimbursement and option of referring screen-positive patients to an internet-based method of giving advice (eBI) can increase primary health-care providers delivery of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)-C-based screening and advice to heavy drinkers. DesignCluster randomized factorial trial with 12-week implementation and measurement period. SettingPrimary health-care units (PHCU) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. ParticipantsA total of 120 PHCU, 24 in each of Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden. InterventionsPHCUs were randomized to one of eight groups: care as usual, training and support (TS), financial reimbursement (FR) and eBI; paired combinations of TS, FR and eBI, and all of FR, TS and eBI. MeasurementsThe primary outcome measure was the proportion of eligible adult (age 18+ years) patients screened during a 12-week implementation period. Secondary outcome measures were proportion of screen-positive patients advised; and proportion of consulting adult patients given an intervention (screening and advice to screen-positives) during the same 12-week implementation period. FindingsDuring a 4-week baseline measurement period, the proportion of consulting adult patients who were screened for their alcohol consumption was 0.059 per PHCU (95% CI 0.034 to 0.084). Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the logged proportion screened during the 12-week implementation period was 1.48 (95% CI=1.13-1.95) in PHCU that received TS versus PHCU that did not receive TS; for FR, the ratio was 2.00 (95% CI=1.56-2.56). The option of referral to eBI did not lead to a higher proportion of patients screened. The ratio for TS plus FR was 2.34 (95% CI=1.77-3.10), and the ratio for TS plus FR plus eBI was1.68 (95% CI=1.11-2.53). ConclusionsProviding primary health-care units with training, support and financial reimbursement for delivering Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-C-based screening and advice to heavy drinkers increases screening for alcohol consumption. Providing primary health-care units with the option of referring screen-positive patients to an internet-based method of giving advice does not appear to increase screening for alcohol consumption.

  • 2.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Coulton, Simon
    University of Kent, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Delivery of Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Care: Outcomes of the ODHIN 5-Country Cluster Randomized Trial2017In: Annals of family medicine (online), ISSN 1544-1709, E-ISSN 1544-1717, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 335-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE We aimed to test whether 3 strategies-training and support, financial reimbursement, and an option to direct screen-positive patients to an Internet-based method of giving brief advice-have a longer-term effect on primary care clinicians delivery of screening and advice to heavy drinkers operationalized with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) tool. METHODS We undertook a cluster randomized factorial trial with a 12-week implementation period in 120 primary health care units throughout Catalonia, England, Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Units were randomized to 8 groups: care as usual (control); training and support alone; financial reimbursement alone; electronic brief advice alone; paired combinations of these conditions; and all 3 combined. The primary outcome was the proportion of consulting adult patients (aged 18 years and older) receiving intervention-screening and, if screen-positive, advice-at 9 months. RESULTS Based on the factorial design, the ratio of the log of the proportion of patients given intervention at the 9-month follow-up was 1.39 (95% CI, 1.03-1.88) in units that received training and support as compared with units that did not. Neither financial reimbursement nor directing screen-positive patients to electronic brief advice led to a higher proportion of patients receiving intervention. CONCLUSIONS Training and support of primary health care units has a lasting, albeit small, impact on the proportion of adult patients given an alcohol intervention at 9 months.

  • 3.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Keurhorst, Myrna
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Laurant, Miranda
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Gual, Antoni
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Attitudes and Learning through Practice Are Key to Delivering Brief Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Primary Health Care: Analyses from the ODHIN Five Country Cluster Randomized Factorial Trial2017In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 2, article id 121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we test path models that study the interrelations between primary health care provider attitudes towards working with drinkers, their screening and brief advice activity, and their receipt of training and support and financial reimbursement. Study participants were 756 primary health care providers from 120 primary health care units (PHCUs) in different locations throughout Catalonia, England, The Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Our interventions were training and support and financial reimbursement to providers. Our design was a randomized factorial trial with baseline measurement period, 12-week implementation period, and 9-month follow-up measurement period. Our outcome measures were: attitudes of individual providers in working with drinkers as measured by the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire; and the proportion of consulting adult patients (age 18+ years) who screened positive and were given advice to reduce their alcohol consumption (intervention activity). We found that more positive attitudes were associated with higher intervention activity, and higher intervention activity was then associated with more positive attitudes. Training and support was associated with both positive changes in attitudes and higher intervention activity. Financial reimbursement was associated with more positive attitudes through its impact on higher intervention activity. We conclude that improving primary health care providers screening and brief advice activity for heavy drinking requires a combination of training and support and on-the-job experience of actually delivering screening and brief advice activity.

  • 4.
    Anderson, Peter
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Pelgrum-Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Deluca, Paolo
    King’s College London, London, UK.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Teesside Univ, England.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle Univ, England; State Agcy Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency for Prevention of Alcohol-Related Problems, Warsaw, Poland.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
    Gual, Antoni
    Neurosciences Institute, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain.
    Impact of practice, provider and patient characteristics on delivering screening and brief advice for heavy drinking in primary healthcare: Secondary analyses of data from the ODHIN five-country cluster randomized factorial trial2017In: European Journal of General Practice, ISSN 1381-4788, E-ISSN 1751-1402, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 241-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of primary healthcare-based screening and advice that is effective in reducing heavy drinking can be enhanced with training. Objectives: Undertaking secondary analysis of the five-country ODHIN study, we test: the extent to which practice, provider and patient characteristics affect the likelihood of patients being screened and advised; the extent to which such characteristics moderate the impact of training in increasing screening and advice; and the extent to which training mitigates any differences due to such characteristics found at baseline. Methods: A cluster randomized factorial trial involving 120 practices, 746 providers and 46 546 screened patients from Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Practices were randomized to receive training or not to receive training. The primary outcome measures were the proportion of adult patients screened, and the proportion of screen-positive patients advised. Results: Nurses tended to screen more patients than doctors (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.9, 4.9). Screenpositive patients were more likely to be advised by doctors than by nurses (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.1), and more liable to be advised the higher their risk status (OR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.7). Training increased screening and advice giving, with its impact largely unrelated to practice, provider or patient characteristics. Training diminished the differences between doctors and nurses and between patients with low or high-risk status. Conclusions: Training primary healthcare providers diminishes the negative impacts that some practice, provider and patient characteristics have on the likelihood of patients being screened and advised.

  • 5.
    Andersson, E Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effectiveness of a Text Messaging-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 6, no 6, article id e146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Excessive drinking among university students is a global challenge, leading to significant health risks. However, heavy drinking among students is widely accepted and socially normalized. Mobile phone interventions have attempted to reach students who engage in excessive drinking. A growing number of studies suggest that text message-based interventions could potentially reach many students and, if effective, such an intervention might help reduce heavy drinking in the student community. Objective: The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of a behavior change theory-based 6-week text message intervention among university students. Methods: This study was a two-arm, randomized controlled trial with an intervention group receiving a 6-week text message intervention and a control group that was referred to treatment as usual at the local student health care center. Outcome measures were collected at baseline and at 3 months after the initial invitation to participate in the intervention. The primary outcome was total weekly alcohol consumption. Secondary outcomes were frequency of heavy episodic drinking, highest estimated blood alcohol concentration, and number of negative consequences attributable to excessive drinking. Results: A total of 896 students were randomized to either the intervention or control group. The primary outcome analysis included 92.0% of the participants in the intervention group and 90.1% of the control group. At follow-up, total weekly alcohol consumption decreased in both groups, but no significant between-group difference was seen. Data on the secondary outcomes included 49.1% of the participants in the intervention group and 41.3% of the control group. No significant between-group difference was seen for any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusions: The present study was under-powered, which could partly explain the lack of significance. However, the intervention, although theory-based, needs to be re-assessed and refined to better support the target group. Apart from establishing which content forms an effective intervention, the optimal length of an alcohol intervention targeting students also needs to be addressed in future studies.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Implementing healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: a quasi-experimental cross-sectional study evaluating a team initiative2015In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 15, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Non-communicable diseases are a leading cause of death and can largely be prevented by healthy lifestyles. Health care organizations are encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. This study evaluates the impact of a team initiative on healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care.

    Methods: A quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design compared three intervention centres that had implemented lifestyle teams with three control centres that used a traditional model of care. Outcomes were defined using the RE-AIM framework: reach, the proportion of patients receiving lifestyle promotion; effectiveness, self-reported attitudes and competency among staff; adoption, proportion of staff reporting regular practice of lifestyle promotion; implementation, fidelity to the original lifestyle team protocol. Data collection methods included a patient questionnaire (n = 888), a staff questionnaire (n = 120) and structured interviews with all practice managers and, where applicable, team managers (n = 8). The chi square test and problem-driven content analysis was used to analyse the questionnaire and interview data, respectively.

    Results:Reach: patients at control centres (48%, n = 211) received lifestyle promotion significantly more often compared with patients at intervention centres (41%, n = 169). Effectiveness: intervention staff was significantly more positive towards the effectiveness of lifestyle promotion, shared competency and how lifestyle promotion was prioritized at their centre. Adoption: 47% of staff at intervention centres and 58% at control centres reported that they asked patients about their lifestyle on a daily basis. Implementation: all intervention centres had implemented multi-professional teams and team managers and held regular meetings but struggled to implement in-house referral structures for lifestyle promotion, which was used consistently among staff.

    Conclusions:Intervention centres did not show higher rates than control centres on reach of patients or adoption among staff at this stage. All intervention centres struggled to implement working referral structures for lifestyle promotion. Intervention centres were more positive on effectiveness outcomes, attitudes and competency among staff, however. Thus, lifestyle teams may facilitate lifestyle promotion practice in terms of increased responsiveness among staff, illustrated by positive attitudes and perceptions of shared competency. More research is needed on lifestyle promotion referral structures in primary care regarding their configuration and implementation.

  • 7.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland; University of Michigan, MI 48109 USA.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Newcastle University, England.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brzozka, Krzysztof
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Palacio, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Slodownik, Luiza
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Professionals Attitudes Do Not Influence Screening and Brief Interventions Rates for Hazardous and Harmful Drinkers: Results from ODHIN Study2015In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 430-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the relation between existing levels of alcohol screening and brief intervention rates in five European jurisdictions and role security and therapeutic commitment by the participating primary healthcare professionals. Health care professionals consisting of, 409 GPs, 282 nurses and 55 other staff including psychologists, social workers and nurse aids from 120 primary health care centres participated in a cross-sectional 4-week survey. The participants registered all screening and brief intervention activities as part of their normal routine. The participants also completed the Shortened Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (SAAPPQ), which measure role security and therapeutic commitment. The only significant but small relationship was found between role security and screening rate in a multilevel logistic regression analysis adjusted for occupation of the provider, number of eligible patients and the random effects of jurisdictions and primary health care units (PHCU). No significant relationship was found between role security and brief intervention rate nor between therapeutic commitment and screening rate/brief intervention rate. The proportion of patients screened varied across jurisdictions between 2 and 10%. The findings show that the studied factors (role security and therapeutic commitment) are not of great importance for alcohol screening and BI rates. Given the fact that screening and brief intervention implementation rate has not changed much in the last decade in spite of increased policy emphasis, training initiatives and more research being published, this raises a question about what else is needed to enhance implementation.

  • 8.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of York, England.
    Online Alcohol Assessment and Feedback for Hazardous and Harmful Drinkers: Findings From the AMADEUS-2 Randomized Controlled Trial of Routine Practice in Swedish Universities2015In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 17, no 7, p. e170-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research on the effectiveness of online alcohol interventions for college students has shown mixed results. Small benefits have been found in some studies and because online interventions are inexpensive and possible to implement on a large scale, there is a need for further study. Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of national provision of a brief online alcohol intervention for students in Sweden. Methods: Risky drinkers at 9 colleges and universities in Sweden were invited by mail and identified using a single screening question. These students (N=1605) gave consent and were randomized into a 2-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial consisting of immediate or delayed access to a fully automated online assessment and intervention with personalized feedback. Results: After 2 months, there was no strong evidence of effectiveness with no statistically significant differences in the planned analyses, although there were some indication of possible benefit in sensitivity analyses suggesting an intervention effect of a 10% reduction (95% CI -30% to 10%) in total weekly alcohol consumption. Also, differences in effect sizes between universities were seen with participants from a major university (n=365) reducing their weekly alcohol consumption by 14% (95% CI -23% to -4%). However, lower recruitment than planned and differential attrition in the intervention and control group (49% vs 68%) complicated interpretation of the outcome data. Conclusions: Any effects of current national provision are likely to be small and further research and development work is

  • 9.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lopez-Pelayo, Hugo
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Gual, Antoni
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    University of Barcelona, Spain.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Implementing referral to an electronic alcohol brief advice website in primary healthcare: results from the ODHIN implementation trial2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 6, article id e010271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The objective of the present study was to explore whether the possibility of offering facilitated access to an alcohol electronic brief intervention (eBI) instead of delivering brief face-to-face advice increased the proportion of consulting adults who were screened and given brief advice. Design The study was a 12-week implementation study. Sixty primary healthcare units (PHCUs) in 5 jurisdictions (Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Sweden) were asked to screen adults who attended the PHCU for risky drinking. Setting A total of 120 primary healthcare centres from 5 jurisdictions in Europe. Participants 746 individual providers (general practitioners, nurses or other professionals) participated in the study. Primary outcome Change in the proportion of patients screened and referred to eBI comparing a baseline 4-week preimplementation period with a 12-week implementation period. Results The possibility of referring patients to the eBI was not found to be associated with any increase in the proportion of patients screened. However, it was associated with an increase in the proportion of screen-positive patients receiving brief advice from 70% to 80% for the screen-positive sample as a whole (pamp;lt;0.05), mainly driven by a significant increase in brief intervention rates in England from 87% to 96% (pamp;lt;0.01). The study indicated that staff displayed a low level of engagement in this new technology. Staff continued to offer face-to-face advice to a larger proportion of patients (54%) than referral to eBI (38%). In addition, low engagement was seen among the referred patients; on average, 18% of the patients logged on to the website with a mean log-on rate across the different countries between 0.58% and 36.95%. Conclusions Referral to eBI takes nearly as much time as brief oral advice and might require more introduction and training before staff are comfortable with referring to eBI.

  • 10.
    Berman, Anne H.
    et al.
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Kolaas, Karoline
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Gustavsberg Primary Care Clin, Sweden.
    Petersen, Elisabeth
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Hedman, Erik
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Gustavsberg Primary Care Clin, Sweden.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sinadinovic, Kristina
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Spak, Fredrik
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thurang, Anna
    Stockholm Cty Council, Sweden; Stockholm Ctr Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Clinician experiences of healthy lifestyle promotion and perceptions of digital interventions as complementary tools for lifestyle behavior change in primary care2018In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 19, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence-based practice for healthy lifestyle promotion in primary health care is supported internationally by national policies and guidelines but implementation in routine primary health care has been slow. Referral to digital interventions could lead to a larger proportion of patients accessing structured interventions for healthy lifestyle promotion, but such referral might have unknown implications for clinicians with patients accessing such interventions. This qualitative study aimed to explore the perceptions of clinicians in primary care on healthy lifestyle promotion with or without digital screening and intervention. Methods: Focus group interviews were conducted at 10 primary care clinics in Sweden with clinicians from different health professions. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using content analysis, with inspiration from a phenomenological-hermeneutic method involving naive understanding, structural analysis and comprehensive understanding. Results: Two major themes captured clinicians perceptions on healthy lifestyle promotion: 1) the need for structured professional practice and 2) deficient professional practice as a hinder for implementation. Sub-themes in theme 1 were striving towards professionalism, which for participants meant working in a standardized fashion, with replicable routines regardless of clinic, as well as being able to monitor statistics on individual patient and group levels; and embracing the future with critical optimism, meaning expecting to develop professionally but also being concerned about the consequences of integrating digital tools into primary care, particularly regarding the importance of personal interaction between patient and provider. For theme 2, sub-themes were being in an unmanageable situation, meaning not being able to do what is perceived as best for the patient due to lack of time and resources; and following ones perception, meaning working from a gut feeling, which for our participants also meant deviating from clinical routines. Conclusions: In efforts to increase evidence-based practice and lighten the burden of clinicians in primary care, decision-and policy-makers planning the introduction of digital tools for healthy lifestyle promotion will need to explicitly define their role as complements to face-to-face encounters. Our overriding hope is that this study will contribute to maintaining meaningfulness in the patient-clinician encounter, when digital tools are added to facilitate patient behavior change of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors.

  • 11.
    Bolin, K.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berggren, F.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Berling, P.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Morberg, S.
    UCB Pharma, Denmark.
    Gauffin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Patterns of antiepileptic drug prescription in Sweden: A register-based approach2017In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 521-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine drug utilization pathways from the incident healthcare visit due to epilepsy and three years onward. Material and methods: Anti-epileptic drug utilization was calculated using individual information on inpatient- and outpatient care utilization and drug sales. Throughout, we used national register information pertaining to pharmaceutical sales linked to diagnosis-related healthcare utilization. Information on pharmaceutical sales was collected for the 2007-2013 period. Results: For the entire studied period, a majority of new patients with epilepsy were initiated on anti-epileptic drug treatment with a monotherapy (98%); most of these patients remained on that first treatment (64%). The three most frequently prescribed drugs accounted for 72% of the initiated AED treatments. Patients with epilepsy (ICD-10: G40/41) were most commonly prescribed carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. The most common second-line monotherapy was levetiracetam. About 12% of new patients with epilepsy who were initiated on AED treatment during the period eventually switched to an add-on therapy. The proportion of patients who were initiated on treatment with carbamazepine or valproate decreased, and the proportion of patients who remained on their initial monotherapy increased between 2007 and 2013. Conclusions: A limited number of anti-epileptic drugs accounted for the treatment of a majority of new patients with epilepsy (carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate accounted for more than 70%). Add-on therapies showed the same pattern, as the most frequently prescribed add-on regimens were the same ones that accounted for most of the monotherapies. There was a tendency towards fewer patients being initiated on AED treatment with either carbamazepine or valproate.

  • 12.
    Gabrielsson-Järhult, Felicia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ, Institutet för gerontologi. Högskolan i Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan, HHJ. Åldrande - livsvillkor och hälsa.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Economou, Konstantin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society and Media Production - KSM. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Co-operative Care Planning in Theory and Practice2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comorbidity of Adult ADHD and Its Subtypes With Substance Use Disorder in a Large Population-Based Epidemiological Study.2016In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to explore the role and possible substance preference in ADHD and subtypes in substance use disorder (SUD).

    METHOD: Using self-report data on ADHD Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) symptoms and SUD (alcohol, illicit drugs, and nicotine) in 18,167 Swedish twins, aged 20 to 45 years, we obtained odds ratios (OR) from mixed effect logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, education, and nonindependence of twin data.

    RESULTS: Increased ADHD symptoms were significantly associated with increased odds for all SUD. ORs ranged between 1.33 for regular nicotine (95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.12, 1.59]); 2.54 for multiple drug use (95% CI = [2.00, 3.23]), and 3.58 for alcohol dependence (95% CI = [2.86, 4.49]).

    CONCLUSION: ADHD symptoms and subtypes in the population are associated with increased risks for all SUD outcomes, with no difference between ADHD subtypes, no substance preference, and no sex differences for the comorbidity. Clinicians need to consider ADHD evaluation and treatment as part of management of SUD in adults.

  • 14.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine.
    Kuja-Halkola, R.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Viding, E.
    Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit, University College, London UK.
    McCrory, E.
    Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit, University College, London UK.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Larsson, H.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Childhood maltreatment and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in adults: a large twin study2016In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 2637-2646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Childhood maltreatment (CM) has been associated with increased risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. It is, however, unclear whether this association is causal or due to familial confounding.

    Method

    Data from 18 168 adult twins, aged 20–46 years, were drawn from the population-based Swedish twin registry. Retrospective self-ratings of CM (emotional and physical neglect, physical and sexual abuse and witnessing family violence), and self-ratings for DSM-IV ADHD symptoms in adulthood were analysed. Possible familial confounding was investigated using a within twin-pair design based on monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins.

    esults

    CM was significantly associated with increased levels of ADHD symptom scores in adults [regression coefficient: 0.40 standard deviations, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37–0.43]. Within twin-pair analyses showed attenuated but significant estimates within DZ (0.29, 95% CI 0.21–0.36) and MZ (0.18, 95% CI 0.10–0.25) twin pairs. Similar results emerged for hyperactive/impulsive and inattentive ADHD symptom scores separately in association with CM. We conducted sensitivity analyses for early maltreatment, before age 7, and for abuse and neglect separately, and found similarly reduced estimates in DZ and MZ pairs. Re-traumatization after age 7 did not significantly influence results.

    Conclusions

    CM was significantly associated with increased ADHD symptoms in adults. Associations were partly due to familial confounding, but also consistent with a causal interpretation. Our findings support cognitive neuroscience studies investigating neural pathways through which exposure to CM may influence ADHD. Clinicians treating adults with ADHD should be aware of the association with maltreatment.

  • 15.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Yao, S.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kuja-Halkola, R.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bulik, C. M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC USA; University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Thornton, L. M.
    University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden.
    Genetic and environmental aspects in the association between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms and binge-eating behavior in adults: a twin study2017In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 47, no 16, p. 2866-2878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Prior research demonstrated that attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with binge-eating behavior, binge-eating disorder (BED), and bulimia nervosa (BN). The aim of this study was to investigate these associations in an adult twin population, and to determine the extent to which ADHD symptoms and binge-eating behavior share genetic and environmental factors. Methods We used self-reports of current ADHD symptoms and lifetime binge-eating behavior and associated characteristics from a sample of over 18 000 adult twins aged 20-46 years, from the population-based Swedish Twin Registry. Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to examine the association between ADHD and lifetime binge-eating behavior, BED, and BN. Structural equation modeling was used in 13 773 female twins to determine the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the association between ADHD symptoms and binge-eating behavior in female adult twins. Results ADHD symptoms were significantly associated with lifetime binge-eating behavior, BED, and BN. The heritability estimate for current ADHD symptoms was 0.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.44], and for lifetime binge-eating behavior 0.65 (95% CI 0.54-0.74). The genetic correlation was estimated as 0.35 (95% CI 0.25-0.46) and the covariance between ADHD and binge-eating behavior was primarily explained by genetic factors (91%). Non-shared environmental factors explained the remaining part of the covariance. Conclusions The association between adult ADHD symptoms and binge-eating behavior in females is largely explained by shared genetic risk factors.

  • 16.
    Keurhorst, M.
    et al.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; Saxion University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Anderson, P.
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Heinen, M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Brzozka, Krzysztof
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    University of Teesside, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Palacio-Vieira, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Slodownik, Luiza
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Laurant, M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Wensing, M.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; University of Heidelberg Hospital, Germany.
    Impact of primary healthcare providers initial role security and therapeutic commitment on implementing brief interventions in managing risky alcohol consumption: a cluster randomised factorial trial2016In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 11, no 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Brief interventions in primary healthcare are cost-effective in reducing drinking problems but poorly implemented in routine practice. Although evidence about implementing brief interventions is growing, knowledge is limited with regard to impact of initial role security and therapeutic commitment on brief intervention implementation. Methods: In a cluster randomised factorial trial, 120 primary healthcare units (PHCUs) were randomised to eight groups: care as usual, training and support, financial reimbursement, and the opportunity to refer patients to an internet-based brief intervention (e-BI); paired combinations of these three strategies, and all three strategies combined. To explore the impact of initial role security and therapeutic commitment on implementing brief interventions, we performed multilevel linear regression analyses adapted to the factorial design. Results: Data from 746 providers from 120 PHCUs were included in the analyses. Baseline role security and therapeutic commitment were found not to influence implementation of brief interventions. Furthermore, there were no significant interactions between these characteristics and allocated implementation groups. Conclusions: The extent to which providers changed their brief intervention delivery following experience of different implementation strategies was not determined by their initial attitudes towards alcohol problems. In future research, more attention is needed to unravel the causal relation between practitioners attitudes, their actual behaviour and care improvement strategies to enhance implementation science.

  • 17.
    Levin, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Forensic Psychiatry.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Bulow, Per
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Structured Risk Assessment Instruments: A Systematic Review of Implementation Determinants2016In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 602-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research-based structured risk assessment instruments (SRAIs) can improve violence risk assessment and clinical judgements in mental health and correctional services. Practical challenges of implementing SRAIs have led to calls for more research to understand the determinants influencing this process. Studies describing determinants for SRAI implementation in psychiatric, correctional, or community in-patient settings were systematically reviewed. Findings were analysed according to the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. A total of 11 studies were included. Four types of main implementation determinants were found: characteristics of the SRAI; users of the SRAI; inner setting; and process. Findings underscore the importance of applying a multifactorial approach to the implementation of SRAIs to address many different barriers and facilitators. More stringent research is needed to obtain more solid evidence of factors that impede or enable SRAI implementation, especially regarding patient perspectives and outer setting determinants. Constructing shared concepts of determinants across research fields could further aid information transferences.

  • 18.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England.
    Mccambridge, James
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of York, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Effectiveness of Short Message Service Text-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention Among University Students A Randomized Clinical Trial2016In: JAMA Internal Medicine, ISSN 2168-6106, E-ISSN 2168-6114, Vol. 176, no 3, p. 321-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Smoking is globally the most important preventable cause of ill health and death. Mobile telephone interventions and, in particular, short message service (SMS) text messaging, have the potential to overcome access barriers to traditional health services, not least among young people. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of a text-based smoking cessation intervention among young people. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A single-blind, 2-arm, randomized clinical trial (Nicotine Exit [NEXit]) was conducted from October 23, 2014, to April 17, 2015; data analysis was performed from April 23, 2014, to May 22, 2015. Participants included daily or weekly smokers willing to set a quit date within 1 month of enrollment. The study used email to invite all college and university students throughout Sweden to participate. INTERVENTIONS The NEXit core program is initiated with a 1- to 4-week motivational phase during which participants can choose to set a stop date. The intervention group then received 157 text messages based on components of effective smoking cessation interventions for 12 weeks. The control group received 1 text every 2 weeks thanking them for participating in the study, with delayed access to the intervention. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcomes were self-reported prolonged abstinence (not having smoked >5 cigarettes over the past 8 weeks) and 4-week point prevalence of complete smoking cessation shortly after the completion of the intervention (approximately 4 months after the quit date). RESULTS A total of 1590 participants, mainly between 21 and 30 years of age, were randomized into the study; 827 (573 [69.3%] women) were allocated to the intervention group and 763 (522 [68.4%] women) were included in the control group. Primary outcome data were available for 783 (94.7%) of the intervention group and 719 (94.2%) of the control group. At baseline, participants were smoking a median (range) of 63 (1-238) and 70 (2-280) cigarettes per week, respectively. Eight-week prolonged abstinence was reported by 203 participants (25.9%) in the intervention group and 105 (14.6%) in the control group; 4-week point prevalence of complete cessation was reported by 161 (20.6%) and 102 (14.2%) participants, respectively, a mean (SD) of 3.9 (0.37) months after the quit date. The adjusted odds ratios (95% CIs) for these findings were 2.05 (1.57-2.67) and 1.56 (1.19-2.05), respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE With the limitation of assessing only the short-term effect of the intervention, the effects observed in this trial are comparable with those for traditional smoking cessation interventions. The simple NEXit intervention has the potential to improve the uptake of effective smoking cessation interventions.

  • 19.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mccambridge, James
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of York, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    User satisfaction with the structure and content of the NEXit intervention, a text messaging-based smoking cessation programme2016In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 1179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Smoking is still the leading cause of preventable ill health and death. There is a limited amount of evidence for effective smoking cessation interventions among young people. To address this, a text messaging-based smoking cessation programme, the NEXit intervention, was developed. Short-term effectiveness, measured immediately after the 12-week intervention revealed that 26% of smokers in the intervention group had prolonged abstinence compared with 15% in the control group. The present study was performed to explore the users experiences of the structure and content of the intervention in order to further develop the intervention. Methods: Students participating in the main NEXit randomized controlled trial were invited to grade their experiences of the structure and content of the intervention after having completed follow-up. The participants received an e-mail with an electronic link to a short questionnaire. Descriptive analysis of the distribution of the responses to the questionnaire was performed. Free-text comments to 14 questions were analysed. Results: The response rate for the user feedback questionnaire was 35% (n = 289/827) and 428 free-text comments were collected. The first motivational phase of the intervention was appreciated by 55% (158/289) of the participants. Most participants wanted to quit smoking immediately and only 124/289 (43%) agreed to have to decide a quit-date in the future. Most participants 199/289 (69%) found the content of the messages in the core programme to be very good or good, and the variability between content types was appreciated by 78% (224/289). Only 34% (97/289) of the participants thought that all or nearly all messages were valuable, and some mentioned that it was not really the content that mattered, but that the messages served as a reminder about the decision to quit smoking. Conclusions: The programme was largely perceived satisfactory in most aspects concerning structure and content by young people and most participants stated that they would recommend it to a friend who wants to quit smoking. The motivational phase might be worth shortening and the number of messages around the quit date itself reduced. Shorter messages seemed to be more acceptable.

  • 20.
    Palacio-Vieira, J.
    et al.
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Segura, L.
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Anderson, P.
    Newcastle Univ, England; Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, A.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Drummond, C.
    Kings Coll London, England; South London and Maudsley NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Wojnar, M.
    Med Univ Warsaw, Poland.
    Kaner, E.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Keurhorst, M. N.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    van Steenkiste, B.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Kloda, K.
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Mierzecki, A.
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Poland.
    Parkinson, K.
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Newbury-Birch, D.
    Teesside Univ, England.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, K.
    State Agcy Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Deluca, P.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Colom, J.
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Gual, A.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Spain; IDIBAPS, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Improving screening and brief intervention activities in primary health care: Secondary analysis of professional accuracy based on the AUDIT-C2018In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 369-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and objectiveThe ODHIN trial found that training and support and financial reimbursement increased the proportion of patients that were screened and given advice for their heavy drinking in primary health care. However, the impact of these strategies on professional accuracy in delivering screening and brief advice is underresearched and is the focus of this paper. MethodFrom 120 primary health care units (24 in each jurisdiction: Catalonia, England, the Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden), 746 providers participated in the baseline and the 12-week implementation periods. Accuracy was measured in 2 ways: correctness in completing and scoring the screening instrument, AUDIT-C; the proportion of screen-negative patients given advice, and the proportion of screen-positive patients not given advice. Odds ratios of accuracy were calculated for type of profession and for intervention group: training and support, financial reimbursement, and internet-based counselling. ResultsThirty-two of 36711 questionnaires were incorrectly completed, and 65 of 29641 screen-negative patients were falsely classified. At baseline, 27% of screen-negative patients were given advice, and 22.5% screen-positive patients were not given advice. These proportions halved during the 12-week implementation period, unaffected by training. Financial reimbursement reduced the proportion of screen-positive patients not given advice (OR=0.56; 95% CI, 0.31-0.99; Pamp;lt;.05). ConclusionAlthough the use of AUDIT-C as a screening tool was accurate, a considerable proportion of risky drinkers did not receive advice, which was reduced with financial incentives.

  • 21.
    Reinholdz, Hanna
    et al.
    Unit of Social Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Spak, Fredrik
    Unit of Social Medicine, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Impact of an Implementation Project on Primary Care Staff Perceptions of Delivering Brief Alcohol Advice.2016In: Journal Of Addiction, ISSN 2090-7834, Vol. 2016, article id 4731571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To explore how the perceptions and experiences of working with risky drinkers change over time among primary health care staff during a systematic implementation project. Methods. Qualitative focus group interviews took place before and after the implementation of the project. Results. The staff displayed a positive change during the implementation period with regard to awareness, knowledge, and confidence that led to a change in routine practice. Throughout the project, staff were committed to engaging with risky drinkers and appeared to have been learning-by-doing. Conclusions. The results indicated a positive attitude to alcohol prevention work but staff lack knowledge and confidence in the area. The more practical experience during the study is, the more confidence seems to have been gained. This adds new knowledge to the science of implementation studies concerning alcohol prevention measures, which have otherwise shown disappointing results, emphasizing the importance of learning in practice.

  • 22.
    Skoglund, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Richter, Johan
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olsson-Stromberg, Ulla
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Aluthgedara, Warunika
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ubhayasekera, S. J. Kumari A.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderlund, Stina
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sandstedt, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Johnsson, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Aagesen, Jesper
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Alsenhed, Jonas
    Vastervik Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Västervik, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Peterson, Curt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lotfi, Kourosh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Haematology.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National Board Forens Med, Department Forens Genet and Forens Toxicol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    In Vivo Cytochrome P450 3A Isoenzyme Activity and Pharmacokinetics of Imatinib in Relation to Therapeutic Outcome in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia2016In: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, ISSN 0163-4356, E-ISSN 1536-3694, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 230-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) isoenzyme metabolic activity varies between individuals and is therefore a possible candidate of influence on the therapeutic outcome of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of CYP3A metabolic activity on the plasma concentration and outcome of imatinib in patients with CML. Methods: Forty-three patients with CML were phenotyped for CYP3A activity using quinine as a probe drug and evaluated for clinical response parameters. Plasma concentrations of imatinib and its main metabolite, CGP74588, were determined using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: Patients with optimal response to imatinib after 12 months of therapy did not differ in CYP3A activity compared to nonoptimal responders (quinine metabolic ratio of 14.69 and 14.70, respectively; P = 0.966). Neither the imatinib plasma concentration nor the CGP74588/imatinib ratio was significantly associated with CYP3A activity. Conclusions: The CYP3A activity does not influence imatinib plasma concentrations or the therapeutic outcome. These results indicate that although imatinib is metabolized by CYP3A enzymes, this activity is not the rate-limiting step in imatinib metabolism and excretion. Future studies should focus on other pharmacokinetic processes so as to identify the major contributor to patient variability in imatinib plasma concentrations.

  • 23.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Short message service (SMS)-based intervention targeting alcohol consumption among university students: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial2017In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 18, article id 156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite significant health risks, heavy drinking of alcohol among university students is a widespread problem; excessive drinking is part of the social norm. A growing number of studies indicate that short message service (SMS)-based interventions are cost-effective, accessible, require limited effort by users, and can enable continuous, real-time, brief support in real-world settings. Although there is emerging evidence for the effect of SMS-based interventions in reducing alcohol consumption, more research is needed. This study aims to test the effectiveness of a newly developed SMS-based intervention targeting excessive alcohol consumption among university and college students in Sweden. Methods: The study is a two-arm randomized controlled trial with an intervention (SMS programme) and a control (treatment as usual) group. Outcome measures will be investigated at baseline and at 3-month follow up. The primary outcome is total weekly alcohol consumption. Secondary outcomes are frequency of heavy episodic drinking, highest estimated blood alcohol concentration and number of negative consequences due to excessive drinking. Discussion: This study contributes knowledge on the effect of automatized SMS support to reduce excessive drinking among students compared with existing support such as Student Health Centres.

  • 24.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Towards implementing coordinated healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: a mixed method study2015In: International Journal of Integrated Care, ISSN 1568-4156, E-ISSN 1568-4156, Vol. 15, article id e030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Primary care is increasingly being encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. However, implementation has been suboptimal. Coordinated care could facilitate lifestyle promotion practice but more empirical knowledge is needed about the implementation process of coordinated care initiatives. This study aimed to evaluate the implementation of a coordinated healthy lifestyle promotion initiative in a primary care setting.

    Methods: A mixed method, convergent, parallel design was used. Three primary care centres took part in a two-year research project. Data collection methods included individual interviews, document data and questionnaires. The General Theory of Implementation was used as a framework in the analysis to integrate the data sources.

    Results: Multi-disciplinary teams were implemented in the centres although the role of the teams as a resource for coordinated lifestyle promotion was not fully embedded at the centres. Embedding of the teams was challenged by differences among the staff, patients and team members on resources, commitment, social norms and roles.

    Conclusions: The study highlights the importance of identifying and engaging key stakeholders early in an implementation process. The findings showed how the development phase influenced the implementation and embedding processes, which add aspects to the General Theory of Implementation.

  • 25.
    Thomas, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Linderoth, Catharina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Text Message-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Consumption Among University Students: Findings From a Formative Development Study2016In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 4, no 4, article id e119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Drinking of alcohol among university students is a global phenomenon; heavy episodic drinking is accepted despite several potential negative consequences. There is emerging evidence that short message service (SMS) text messaging interventions are effective to promote behavior change among students. However, it is still unclear how effectiveness can be optimized through intervention design or how user interest and adherence can be maximized. Objective: The objective of this study was to develop an SMS text message-based intervention targeting alcohol drinking among university students using formative research. Methods: A formative research design was used including an iterative revision process based on input from end users and experts. Data were collected via seven focus groups with students and a panel evaluation involving students (n= 15) and experts (n= 5). Student participants were recruited from five universities in Sweden. A semistructured interview guide was used in the focus groups and included questions on alcohol culture, message content, and intervention format. The panel evaluation asked participants to rate to what degree preliminary messages were understandable, usable, and had a good tone on a scale from 1 (very low degree) to 4 (very high degree). Participants could also write their own comments for each message. Qualitative data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The SMS text messages and the intervention format were revised continuously in parallel with data collection. A behavior change technique (BCT) analysis was conducted on the final version of the program. Results: Overall, students were positive toward the SMS text message intervention. Messages that were neutral, motivated, clear, and tangible engaged students. Students expressed that they preferred short, concise messages and confirmed that a 6-week intervention was an appropriate duration. However, there was limited consensus regarding SMS text message frequency, personalization of messages, and timing. Overall, messages scored high on understanding (mean 3.86, SD 0.43), usability (mean 3.70, SD 0.61), and tone (mean 3.78, SD 0.53). Participants added comments to 67 of 70 messages, including suggestions for change in wording, order of messages, and feedback on why a message was unclear or needed major revision. Comments also included positive feedback that confirmed the value of the messages. Twenty-three BCTs aimed at addressing self-regulatory skills, for example, were identified in the final program. Conclusions: The formative research design was valuable and resulted in significant changes to the intervention. All the original SMS text messages were changed and new messages were added. Overall, the findings showed that students were positive toward receiving support through SMS text message and that neutral, motivated, clear, and tangible messages promoted engagement. However, limited consensus was found on the timing, frequency, and tailoring of messages.

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