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  • 1.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Tegelström, Valerie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekblad, Erik
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Usability of RemindMe – An Interactive Web-Based Mobile Reminder Calendar:: A Professional's Perspective2015In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics / [ed] Cecilia Sik-Lányi, Evert-Jan Hoogerwerf, Klaus Miesenberger, Peter Cudd, IOS Press, 2015, 217, Vol. 217, p. 1083p. 247-254Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the usability of an interactive web-based mobile reminder calendar (RemindMe) developed for supporting individuals in organizing, planning and executing activities in everyday life, from the perspectives of professionals.

    Methods and material: Eleven professionals working in community services evaluated the usability of RemindMe in their clinical practice. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and analysed with inductive qualitative analysis.

    Results: The professionals perceived that RemindMe was useful, easy to use, and intuitive. There was a need among professionals for a web-based reminder calendar that requires the active acknowledgement of reminders. RemindMe's feedback system offering self-monitored information based on the user's interaction with the system supported the professionals in discussions, evaluation, and follow-up based on the needs of the persons with cognitive impairments.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that RemindMe may be potentially useful to professionals who provide support to individuals with cognitive impairments. However, further research is needed to evaluate experience of using RemindMe from the perspective of individuals with cognitive impairments.

  • 2.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Sandberg, Klas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kleist, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Enheten för forskningsstöd, Region Östergötland Research and Development Unit in Region Östergötland.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    The exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise in the sub-acute phase after stroke is not affected by aerobic exercise.2018In: The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, ISSN 1524-6175, E-ISSN 1751-7176, Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Vol. 20, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of an exaggerated exercise blood pressure (BP) response is unknown in patients with subacute stroke, and it is not known whether an aerobic exercise program modulates this response. The authors randomized 53 patients (27 women) with subacute stroke to 12 weeks of twice-weekly aerobic exercise (n = 29) or to usual care without scheduled physical exercise (n = 24). At baseline, 66% of the patients exhibited an exaggerated exercise BP response (peak systolic BP ≥210 mm Hg in men and ≥190 mm Hg in women) during a symptom-limited ergometer exercise test. At follow-up, patients who had been randomized to the exercise program achieved higher peak work rate, but peak systolic BP remained unaltered. Among patients with a recent stroke, it was common to have an exaggerated systolic BP response during exercise. This response was not altered by participation in a 12-week program of aerobic exercise.

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