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  • 1.
    Andersen Helland, Wenche
    et al.
    Universitetet i Bergen, Norge.
    Biringer, Eva
    Helse Fonna HF, Norge.
    Helland, Turid
    Universitetet i Bergen, Norge.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Exploring language profiles for children with AD/HD and children with Asperger syndrome2012In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 34-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of the present study was to investigate communication impairments in a Norwegian sample of children with ADHD and children with Asperger syndrome (AS) and to explore whether children with ADHD can be differentiated from children with AS in terms of their language profiles on the Norwegian adaptation of the Children’s Communication Checklist Second Edition (CCC-2). Method: The CCC-2 was completed by the parents, and altogether, 77 children aged between 6 and 15 years participated in the study. Results: Communication impairments were as common in a group of children with ADHD as in a group of children with AS. Although a similar pattern appeared on most CCC-2 scales, children with ADHD and children with AS could be distinguished from each other in terms of their language profiles on the subscales assessing stereotyped language and nonverbal communication. Conclusion: Language abilities should be taken into account when standard assessments of ADHD and AS are performed and before therapies are initiated

  • 2.
    Andersen Helland, Wenche
    et al.
    Stord Hospital.
    Biringer, Eva
    Haugesund Hospital.
    Helland, Turid
    University of Bergen.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The usability of a Norwegian adaptation of the Childrens Communication Checklist Second Edition (CCC-2) in differentiating between language impaired and non-language impaired 6-to 12-year-olds2009In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 287-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The usability of a Norwegian adaptation of the Childrens Communication Checklist Second Edition (CCC-2) in differentiating between language impaired and non-language impaired 6- to 12-year-olds. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology.

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate if the Norwegian adaptation of the Childrens Communication Checklist-2 (CCC-2) differentiates between a language impaired and a non-language impaired population and to make a first evaluation of the psychometric qualities of the questionnaire on a Norwegian sample. A total of 153 children aged 6-12 years participated in the study (45 language impaired and 108 non-language impaired). The Norwegian adaptation of the CCC-2 distinguished language impaired from non-language impaired children and thus seems to provide a useful screening tool for communication impairments in Norwegian children. The reliability of the CCC-2 appeared to be reasonable with internal consistency values ranging from 0.73 to 0.89.

  • 3.
    Colnerud, Gunnel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Elvstrand, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology.
    Szklarski, Andrzej
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Skolans moraliska och demokratiska praktik: Värdepedagogiska texter I2004Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ekornas, Belinda
    et al.
    Uni Hlth, Bergen.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tjus, Tomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Heyerdahl, Sonja
    Centre Child and Adolescent Mental Hlth, Oslo.
    J. Lundervold, Astri
    Uni Hlth, Bergen.
    PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDRENS PEER RELATIONSHIPS: DISCREPANCIES IN SELF-PERCEIVED SOCIAL ACCEPTANCE IN CHILDREN WITH EMOTIONAL OR BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS2011In: Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0736-7236, E-ISSN 1943-2771, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 570-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This population-based study investigated self-perception of social acceptance in children with emotional or behavioral disorders, and whether their perceptions were in line with parent/teacher reports of peer relationship problems. Children with behavioral disorders (n = 145) emotional disorders (n = 118), and a comparison group (n = 4,344) were selected from an 11-13-years-old population (n = 5073). Children with emotional disorders reported poorer social acceptance than children with behavioral disorders, also when adjusted for parent/teacher ratings of peer problems, confirming the negative self-perception reported in previous clinical studies. Self-perceptions of children with behavioral disorders were lower than in the comparison group and not inflated according to parent/teacher reports. The results emphasize the importance of peer-relations in both disorder groups.

  • 5.
    Ekornas, Belinda
    et al.
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health,Bergen.
    Lundervold, Astri J
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health,Bergen.
    Tjus, Tomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anxiety disorders in 8-11-year-old children: Motor skill performance and self-perception of competence2010In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 271-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates motor skill performance and self-perceived competence in children with anxiety disorders compared with children without psychiatric disorders. Motor skills and self-perception were assessed in 329 children aged 8 to 11 years, from the Bergen Child Study. The Kiddie-SADS PL diagnostic interview was employed to define a group of children with an anxiety disorder without comorbid diagnosis, and a control group (no diagnosis) matched according to gender, age, and full-scale IQ. Children in the anxiety disorder group displayed impaired motor skills and poor self-perceived peer acceptance and physical competence compared with the control group. Two-thirds of the anxious boys scored on the Motor Assessment Battery for Children (MABC) as having motor problems. The present study demonstrated impaired motor skills in boys with "pure" anxiety disorders. Anxious children also perceived themselves as being less accepted by peers and less competent in physical activities compared with children in the control group.

  • 6.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Falth, Linda
    Vaxjo University.
    Svensson, Idor
    Vaxjo University.
    Tjus, Tomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of Three Interventions on the Reading Skills of Children With Reading Disabilities in Grade 22011In: JOURNAL OF LEARNING DISABILITIES, ISSN 0022-2194, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 123-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    disabilities in Grade 2 were analyzed. The interventions consisted of computerized training programs: One bottom-up intervention aimed at improving word decoding skills and phonological abilities, the second intervention focused on top-down processing on the word and sentence levels, and the third was a combination of these two training programs (n = 25 in each group). In addition, there were two comparison groups, 25 children with reading disabilities who received ordinary special instruction and 30 age-matched typical readers. All reading disabled participants completed 25 training sessions with special education teachers. All groups improved their reading skills. The group who received combined training showed higher improvements than the ordinary special instruction group and the typical readers. Different cognitive variables were related to treatment gains for different groups. Thus, a treatment combining bottom-up and top-down aspects of reading was the most effective in general, but individual differences among children need to be considered.

  • 7.
    Heiervang, E.
    et al.
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Bergen, Norway, Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, RBUP Vest, Unifob Helse, PO Box 7800, 5020 Bergen, Norway.
    Stormark, K.M.
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Bergen.
    Lundervold, A.J.
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology.
    Goodman, R.
    King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom.
    Posserud, M.-B.
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Bergen.
    Ullebo, A.K.
    Ullebø, A.K., Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Bergen.
    Plessen, K.J.
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Bergen, Norway, Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Bjelland, I.
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Bergen, Norway, Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
    Lie, S.A.
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Bergen.
    Gillberg, C.
    Queen Silvia's Children's Hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Psychiatric disorders in Norwegian 8- to 10-year-olds: An epidemiological survey of prevalence, risk factors, and service use2007In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 0890-8567, E-ISSN 1527-5418, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 438-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The Bergen Child Study is a longitudinal study of child mental health from the city of Bergen, Norway. We present methods and results from the first wave of the study, focusing on prevalence of disorders, associations with risk factors, and the use of services. METHOD: The target population included all 9,430 children attending grades 2 to 4 in Bergen schools during the academic year 2002/2003. The main screening instrument was the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, whereas diagnoses were based on the Development and Well-Being Assessment. Information about child and family risk factors and service use was also obtained in this second stage. RESULTS: In the first phase, the teacher Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was obtained for 9,155 (97%) of the target children and the matching parent Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire for 6,297 (67%), 1,011 children (11%) were assessed with the Development and Well-Being Assessment in the second phase. The weighted prevalence for any DSM-IV psychiatric disorder was 7.0% (95% confidence interval 5.6%-8.5%). Disorders were associated with age, gender, learning difficulties, family type, and poverty. Although 75% of children with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder had been in contact with specialist mental health services, this was true for only 13% of those with pure emotional disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The overall prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children is relatively low in this Norwegian sample, when assessed with the Development and Well-Being Assessment. Children with emotional disorders have limited access to specialist services. Copyright 2007 © American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

  • 8.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Eksplisitte minner hos spedbarn – nye funn gir et nytt bilde2010In: Håndbok i sped- og småbarns psykiske helse / [ed] V. Moe, K Slinning & M. Bergum-Hansen, Oslo: Gyldendal , 2010, p. 195-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    Denne boken handler om barns utvikling og psykiske helse i de første leveårene.Psykisk helse hos sped- og småbarn er et ungt fagområde, men forskning har gitt oss økt forståelse for at spedbarnet har en langt større kapasitet for læring, hukommelse og sosialt samspill helt fra fødselen av enn tidligere antatt.Forskning omkring betydningen av prenatale forhold og den tidlige sentralnervøse utviklingen, og ikke minst betydningen av det tidlige samspillet, er noen av de viktige aspektene i så henseende, og som presenteres og diskuteres i denne håndboken.Boken består av 39 kapitler tematisk fordelt på fire bolker:? Grunnleggende teori og modeller for tidlig utvikling? Barn i risiko? Kartlegging og diagnostisering? Tiltak og behandling

  • 9.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ny kunnskap om spedbarns hukommelse2010In: Nordisk forening for spedbarns utvikling, årlig konferens, Oslo, 5-6 februari 2010, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Patterns of instability and change: Observations on regression periods in typically developing infants2010In: Nurturing Children and Families: Building on the Legacy of T.Berry Brazelton / [ed] B. Lester & J. Sparrow, New York: Blackwell Scientific-Wiley , 2010, p. 95-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume celebrates the work and influence of T. Berry Brazelton, one of the world's foremost pediatricians, by bringing together contributions from researchers and clinicians whose own pioneering work has been inspired by Brazelton's foundations in the field of child development. Includes contributions from experts influenced by the work of Brazelton from a wide range of fields, including pediatrics, psychology, nursing, early childhood education, occupational therapy, and public policy Provides an overview of the field of child development, from the explosion of infant research in the 1960s to contemporary studies Outlines the achievements and influence of T. Berry Brazelton, one of the world's foremost pediatricians, and his lasting influence in continuing research, practice, and public policy

  • 11.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lärande, läsning och multimodalitet2009In: Barn läser och skriver – specialpedagogiska perspektiv / [ed] L. Bjaar & A. Frylmark, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, 1, p. 193-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här boken handlar om de barn som av någon anledning inte lyckas med den första läs- och skrivinlärningen, de som tappar sugen och därmed tilltron till sin egen förmåga att lära. Boken är avsedd för blivande och verksamma lärare, speciallärare och specialpedagoger i grundskolans tidiga år inklusive förskoleklass. Den är också lämplig som kurslitteratur i fördjupningskurser för logopeder, psykologer och skolsköterskor samt andra som är verksamma inom elevhälsan.

  • 12.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Moe, Vibeke
    National Network for Infant Mental Health, Norway.
    Tranaas-Vannebo, Unni
    National Network for Infant Mental Health, Norway.
    Slinning, Kari
    National Network for Infant Mental Health, Norway.
    Braarud, Hanne
    Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Bergen, Norway.
    Guedeney, Antoine
    Hôpital Bichat-Claude Bernard, AP/HP, Paris, France.
    Smith, Lars
    National Network for Infant Mental Health, Norway.
    Sustained withdrawal at 3-, 6-, and 9-months: A first analysis of a Norwegian validation study of the Alarm Distress Baby Scale2010In: Infant Mental Health Journal, Supplement to Volume 32, Issue 3, 2010, p. 107-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Alarm Distress Baby Scale (ADBB) is a clinical instrument developed for detecting non-optimal withdrawal reactions in infantsbelow 2 years of age. An infant's reluctance to partake in social encounters might be an early warning signal indicating an increasedrisk for non-optimal development. The scale has been used with promising results in several countries, although few longitudinalstudies have been presented to date. The current study reports the first findings from a longitudinal study with the aim to validate thescale in a Norwegian setting. Method: The study followed 238 typically developing children (126 boys) at four time points from 3 to12 months of age. Presented here are data from the three first observations. All children were assessed with the ADBB during regularvisits to well-baby clinics in Trondheim, Norway at 3, 6, and 9 months. In addition, the mothers filled out the Edinburg PostnatalDepression Scale (EPDS) at each visit. Results: The ten percent with the highest ADBB scores at 3 months received all a score of 3 orhigher (n= 25; range 3-9), only 4.6 percent (n=11) of the children received a score of 5 or more. The pattern was similar at both 6(10.6 percent scored 3, 2.1 percent 5 or more) and 9 months (9.8 percent scored 3, and 2.9 percent 5 or higher). The EPDS — using 10as a cut-off for depressive symptoms — identified 6 percent of the mothers at 3 months, 5.5 percent at 6 and 6.1 percent at 9 months.A correlational analysis revealed modest but significant correlations between ADBB and EPDS at 6 (r= .17) and 9 (r = .26) but not at3 months (r = .08). Furthermore, ADBB at 3 months correlated significantly with ADBB scores at 9 months (r = .30). Likewise, EPDSat 3 months correlated with EPDS at 9 months (r = .48). EPDS at both 6 and 9 months were modestly related to ADBB scores at 9months (r's = .14 and .20, respectively). Conclusion: Approximately 10 percent of the children were preliminary identified as highscorers on the ADBB using a lower cut-off score than what has been commonly reported in the literature (3 instead of 5). In addition,some interesting longitudinal correlations were observed for both the ADBB and the EPDS. More extensive assessments at 12 monthswill be made to validate the current results.

  • 13.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Emelie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lunds universitet.
    Behavioral and electrophysiological indices of learning in 14-month-old infants: Deferred imitation correlates with the Nc component2010In: Developmental Psychobiology, Volume 52, Issue 7, 2010, p. 702-702Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     Deferred imitation (DI) is an established memory paradigm that reflects early individual differences but the neural activity underlying DI is to a large extent uncharted. Thus, the present study investigated the relationship between event-related potentials (ERP) and behavioral (DI) indices of learning.

    Thirty 14-months-old children participated in the study, of which 15 (9 boys) had acceptable ERP data to be included in the analysis. DI was measured with the observation-only design using three actions and a 30 min delay. ERP was recorded with a High Density Net (128 electrodes) and the learning phase consisted of two pairs of pictures presented six times (PRES 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6) while the test phase consisted of two violations: Associating two familiar pictures in a new combination (ASSO) or associating one familiar picture with a novel picture (NOV).

    The mean score of DI was 1.87 (SD = 1.06) and ERP data revealed an Nc within 300-600 ms post stimuli. The mean amplitude was higher for ASSO compared with PRES 5 and 6 (p < .05) but not between NOV and PRES 5 (p = .055) and PRES 6 (ns). Larger Nc change scores (ASSO - PRES5) correlated with better DI performance, rs (15) = .57; p < .05.

    These findings, if upheld in further analyses, suggest that behavioral memory performance is related to attention processes as reflected in the observed Nc.

     

    (FUNDING: Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research # 2006-1040)

  • 14.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Emelie
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Institutionen för psykologi, Lunds universitet.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Institutionen för psykologi, Lunds universitet.
    Associative learning measured with ERP predicts deferred imitation using a strict observation only design in 14 to 15 month old children2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deferred imitation is an established procedure for behavioural measurement of early declarative-like memories in infancy and previous work has indicated a link between this type of memory and brain potentials in infants. The present study compared infants’ memory performance in this paradigm with electrophysiological indices of associative learning. Thirty children (mean age: 14.5 months) participated, of which 15 (9 boys) had acceptable ERP recordings that could be included in the final analysis. Deferred imitation was measured with an observation-only procedure using three actions and a 30 min delay. ERP was recorded with a High Density Net (128 electrodes) during associative learning. Change scores based on Nc, a middle latency component associated with attentional processes, predicted deferred imitation performance. Thus, associative learning measured with ERP predicts deferred imitation using a strict observation only design in 14 to15 month old children.

  • 15.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Strid, Karin
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Attention in cognition and early learning2010In: International Encyclopedia of Education: 3rd Edition, Volume 5 / [ed] P. Peterson, E. Baker, & B. McGaw, Oxford: Elsevier , 2010, p. 165-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of education has experienced extraordinary technological, societal, and institutional change in recent years, making it one of the most fascinating yet complex fields of study in social science. Unequalled in its combination of authoritative scholarship and comprehensive coverage, International Encyclopedia of Education, Third Edition succeeds two highly successful previous editions (1985, 1994) in aiming to encapsulate research in this vibrant field for the twenty-first century reader. Under development for five years, this work encompasses over 1,000 articles across 24 individual areas of coverage, and is expected to become the dominant resource in the field. Education is a multidisciplinary and international field drawing on a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines, and this new edition comprehensively matches this diversity. The diverse background and multidisciplinary subject coverage of the Editorial Board ensure a balanced and objective academic framework, with 1,500 contributors representing over 100 countries, capturing a complete portrait of this evolving field.

    • A totally new work, revamped with a wholly new editorial board, structure and brand-new list of meta-sections and articles
    • Developed by an international panel of editors and authors drawn from senior academia
    • Web-enhanced with supplementary multimedia audio and video files, hotlinked to relevant references and sources for further study
    • Incorporates ca. 1,350 articles, with timely coverage of such topics as technology and learning, demography and social change, globalization, and adult learning, to name a few
    • Offers two content delivery options - print and online - the latter of which provides anytime, anywhere access for multiple users and superior search functionality via ScienceDirect, as well as multimedia content, including audio and video files
  • 16.
    Heimann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Strid, Karin
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Deferred Imitation among Speaking and Non-Speaking Children with Autism2010In: XVIIth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies Minneapolis, Baltimorg, April 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Helland, Turid
    et al.
    University of Bergen.
    Tjus, Tomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Hovden, Marit
    University of Bergen.
    Ofte, Sonja
    Statped Vest.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Intervention Principles in Emergent Literacy in Children at Risk of Developmental Dyslexia: A Longitudinal Study2011In: JOURNAL OF LEARNING DISABILITIES, ISSN 0022-2194, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 105-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This longitudinal study focused on the effects of two different principles of intervention in children at risk of developing dyslexia from 5 to 8 years old. The children were selected on the basis of a background questionnaire given to parents and preschool teachers, with cognitive and functional magnetic resonance imaging results substantiating group differences in neuropsychological processes associated with phonology, orthography, and phoneme-grapheme correspondence (i.e., alphabetic principle). The two principles of intervention were bottom-up (BU), "from sound to meaning", and top-down (TD), "from meaning to sound." Thus, four subgroups were established: risk/BU, risk/TD, control/BU, and control/TD. Computer-based training took place for 2 months every spring, and cognitive assessments were performed each fall of the project period. Measures of preliteracy skills for reading and spelling were phonological awareness, working memory, verbal learning, and letter knowledge. Literacy skills were assessed by word reading and spelling. At project end the control group scored significantly above age norm, whereas the risk group scored within the norm. In the at-risk group, training based on the BU principle had the strongest effects on phonological awareness and working memory scores, whereas training based on the TD principle had the strongest effects on verbal learning, letter knowledge, and literacy scores. It was concluded that appropriate, specific, data-based intervention starting in preschool can mitigate literacy impairment and that interventions should contain BU training for preliteracy skills and TD training for literacy training.

  • 18.
    Jungert, Tomas
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Birberg Thornberg, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alamaa, Rebecka
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Daud, Noor
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Psychopathy, morality, and bullying among pre-adolescents2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lundervold, A J
    et al.
    University of Bergen.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Manger , T
    University of Bergen.
    Behaviour-emotional characteristics of primary-school children rated as having language problems2008In: BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 0007-0998 , Vol. 78, p. 567-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Primary-school teachers are expected to detect problems related to language function, but the teachers evaluations may be heavily influenced by gender and classroom behaviour.

    Aim. To investigate the relationship between language problems (LPs) and behaviour-emotional problems as rated by primary-school teachers.<

    Methods. All participants participated in a population-based study, the Bergen Child Study (BCS). Teachers of 9,072 children and parents of 6,234 children completed forms containing questions pertaining to language function and the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ) to screen for behaviour-emotional problems. LP was defined as a score above the 95th percentile on the sum score of five language items. Children achieving a total SDQ score above the 90th percentile were defined as high scorers, indicating a high risk for behavioural-emotional problems.

    Results. Based on teacher reports, 540 children were defined as having LP, more boys (N=366) than girls. Children defined as having LP were reported to have significantly higher scores on all SDQ subscales, and a higher total difficulty score than children without language problems (NLP). More LP boys than LP girls were defined as high scorers on the SDQ, with the highest effect size on the hyperactivity-inattention subscore. The agreement between teachers and parents was moderate to low, with the highest consensus of behaviour-emotional problems in children with LP.

    Conclusions. Primary-school children defined as having LP according to their teachers are frequently characterized by behavioural-emotional problems. Further assessment is warranted for primary-school children defined as having LP by their teachers.

  • 20.
    Nordqvist, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lunds universitet.
    An associative learning procedure measured by Event-Related Potentials correlates with event memory in 14 month old children2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deferred imitation (DI) reflects an early form of event memory but the underlying neural processes is to a large degree unknown. Thus, the present study examines how associative learning observed through event-related potentials (ERP) relates to DI as measured with an observation- only design.

    Thirty children participated in the study and acceptable ERP data was collected from 15 (9 boys). DI was measured with a thirty minutes delay and ERP was recorded with a Geodesic High Density Net with 128 electrodes. The ERP procedure consisted of two pairs of pictures presented six times (= the learning phase) and a test phase introducing two violations: Two familiar pictures in a new combination (ASSO) or a combination of one familiar and one novel picture (NOV). In addition, visual recognition memory was also measured.

    ERP revealed an Nc within 300-600 ms post stimuli. A higher mean amplitude was observed for ASSO (p < .05) and a marginal effect was noted for NOV (p = .055). Better DI performance correlated with larger Nc change scores between ASSO and the last presentation in the learning phase (rs (15) = .57; p < .05). Preliminary analyses of slow waves revealed no further relationship between ERP and DI and no significant correlation between DI and novelty preference. These findings indicate that electrophysiological indices of associative learning can be related to behavioral observations of early memory processes in young infants.

     

  • 21.
    Stormark, Kjell Morten
    et al.
    University of Bergen.
    Heiervang, Einar
    Haukeland University Hospital.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundervold, Astri
    University of Bergen.
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Sahlgren University Hospital.
    Predicting Nonresponse Bias from Teacher Ratings of Mental Health Problems in Primary School Children2008In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 411-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of nonresponse on estimates of mental health problems was examined in a prospective teacher screen in a community survey of 9,155 7–9 year olds. For 6,611 of the children, parents consented to participation in the actual study (Responders), while for 2,544 children parental consent was not obtained (Nonresponders). The teacher screen involved assessment of a broad set of symptoms of mental health problems and functional impairment. Calculations of non-response coefficients, a function of effect sizes and non-response proportion, revealed only ignorable nonresponse bias for both mean scores and correlations. However, the results from binary logistic regressions revealed that children ascribed signs of mental health problems by their teachers were less likely to participate. This was most frequent among children with only moderate symptoms. However, it also involved children with high symptom scores related to inattention, hyperactivity, emotions and peer relationship problems. These findings suggest that measures based on effect size can underestimate the magnitude of non-response bias and that a logistic regression approach may be more appropriate for studies geared at estimating prevalence of mental health problems in children.

  • 22.
    Strid, Karin
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Gothenburg University.
    Heimann , Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Parents verbal comments in relation to their childs diagnosis and language level: Comparing children with Down syndrome, autism and typical development2008In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY,ISSN 0020-7594: Volume 43, Issue 3-4, 2008, Vol. 43, no 3-4, p. 698-698Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Strid, Karin
    et al.
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Tjus, Tomas
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deferred imitation in children with autism2010In: IX International Congress Autism-Europe, Catania, Italy, 8-10 October 2010, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Deferred imitation (DI) is a non-verbal measure of recall memory, which has been extensively used in studies of typically developing infants. The role of DI in children with autism has been less investigated but research indicates that DI is less frequent in this group. The aim of the study was to compare DI performance in children with autism to other groups of children (Down syndrome and typical). The study also investigated the relationship between DI and other forms of imitation.

     

    Method: 20 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (CA = 66.8 months, LA = 29.7, MA = 45.2), 18 children with Down syndrome (DS) (CA = 63.7 months, LA = 25.44, MA = 29.5) and 23 children with no known disability (typical) (CA = 35.0 months, LA = 35.6, MA = 37.5) participated in the study. Five DI tasks were administered to all children, with a two-day delay. All children were also tested for spontaneous and elicited imitation in a play situation with an adult.

     

    Result: A one-way ANOVA revealed a group difference (F = 10.77, p < .001) for the performance on DI. Post-hoc test (Scheffe) showed significant differences between ASD and typical (p < .01) and DS and typical (p < .001). Deferred imitation was not related to spontaneous or elicited imitation for any group.

     

    Conclusions: Children with autism do not show DI difficulties when compared to DS children (matched on language age). However, both groups showed reduced performance when compared to children with typical development. The finding that performance on DI had no relation to other forms of imitation might indicate that DI relies more on memory capacity than imitation skills.

  • 24.
    Sundqvist, Anett
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Koch, Felix-Sebastian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Maternal Mind-mindedness and the relation to preverbal language development2013In: 16th European Conference on Developmental Psychology, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Sundqvist, Annette
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Jönsson, Radoslava
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Heimann, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Understanding minds: Early cochlear implantation and the development of theory of mind in children with profound hearing impairment2014In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 538-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The present study investigates how auditory stimulation from cochlear implants (CI) is associated with the development of Theory of Mind (ToM) in severely and profoundly hearing impaired children with hearing parents. Previous research has shown that deaf children of hearing parents have a delayed ToM development. This is, however, not always the case with deaf children of deaf parents, who presumably are immersed in a more vivid signing environment.

    Methods

    Sixteen children with CI (4.25 to 9.5 years of age) were tested on measures of cognitive and emotional ToM, language and cognition. Eight of the children received their first implant relatively early (before 27 months) and half of them late (after 27 months). The two groups did not differ in age, gender, language or cognition at entry of the study. ToM tests included the unexpected location task and a newly developed Swedish social–emotional ToM test. The tests aimed to test both cognitive and emotional ToM. A comparison group of typically developing hearing age matched children was also added (n = 18).

    Results

    Compared to the comparison group, the early CI-group did not differ in emotional ToM. The late CI-group differed significantly from the comparison group on both the cognitive and emotional ToM tests.

    Conclusion

    The results revealed that children with early cochlear implants solved ToM problems to a significantly higher degree than children with late implants, although the groups did not differ on language or cognitive measures at baseline. The outcome suggests that early cochlear implantation for deaf children in hearing families, in conjunction with early social and communicative stimulation in a language that is native to the parents, can provide a foundation for a more normalized ToM development.

  • 26.
    Thornberg, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Birberg Thornberg, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Developmental Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Daud, Noor
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Alamaa, Rebecka
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Schoolchildren's judgements and reasoning about bullying and repeated conventional transgressions in school settings2014Conference paper (Refereed)
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