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  • 1.
    Aagaard, Lise
    et al.
    University of So Denmark, Denmark FKL Research Centre Qual Medical Use, Denmark Danish Pharmacovigilance Research Project DANPREP, Denmark .
    Strandell, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Melskens, Lars
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Petersen, Paw S. G.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Holme Hansen, Ebba
    FKL Research Centre Qual Medical Use, Denmark Danish Pharmacovigilance Research Project DANPREP, Denmark University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Global Patterns of Adverse Drug Reactions Over a Decade Analyses of Spontaneous Reports to VigiBase (TM)2012In: Drug Safety, ISSN 0114-5916, E-ISSN 1179-1942, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1171-1182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although systems to collect information about suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were established in many countries and by the WHO in the 1960s, few studies have examined reported ADRs related to national income. Objective: The aim of the study was to characterize ADRs reported to the WHO-ADR database, VigiBase (TM), and to relate data to national income. Methods: We analysed ADR reports submitted to VigiBase (TM) from 2000 to 2009 with respect to reporting rate, age and sex of patient, type, seriousness and medications. Reports were also analysed with respect to national income level, classified in accordance with the World Bank definition: low, lower-middle, upper-middle and high. Results: We analysed 1 359 067 ADR reports including 3 013 074 ADRs. Overall, 16% of reports were serious and 60% were reported for females. High-income countries had the highest ADR reporting rates (range 3-613 reports/million inhabitants/year) and low-income countries the lowest (range 0-21). Distribution of ADRs across income groups with respect to age group, seriousness and sex was non-significant. Overall, the majority of ADRs were reported for nervous system medications, followed by cardiovascular medicines. Low-income countries reported relatively more ADRs for antiinfectives for systemic use than high-income countries, and high-income countries reported more ADRs for antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents than lower-income groups. Conclusion: This study showed that high-income countries had the highest ADR reporting rates and low-income countries the lowest, with large variations across countries in each group. Significant differences in ADR reporting rates were only found for ADRs of the type skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders and for the therapeutic groups antiinfectives for systemic use and antineoplastic and immunomodulation agents. To strengthen ADR reporting rates, especially in low-income countries, more research is needed about the impact of organizational structures and economic resources of national pharmacovigilance centres and ADR reporting practices on the large variations in ADR reporting rates within income groups.

  • 2.
    Aalto, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaworski, M
    Gustavsson, M
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurosurgery UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of Betainterferon treatment in Multiple Sclerosis Studied by Quantitative 1H MRS2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Aalto, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sjoewall, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Davidsson, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Brain magnetic resonance imaging does not contribute to the diagnosis of chronic neuroborreliosis2007In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 755-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Borrelia infections, especially chronic neuroborreliosis ( NB), may cause considerable diagnostic problems. This diagnosis is based on symptoms and findings in the cerebrospinal fluid but is not always conclusive. Purpose: To evaluate brain magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI) in chronic NB, to compare the findings with healthy controls, and to correlate MRI findings with disease duration. Material and Methods: Sixteen well- characterized patients with chronic NB and 16 matched controls were examined in a 1.5T scanner with a standard head coil. T1- ( with and without gadolinium), T2-, and diffusion- weighted imaging plus fluid- attenuated inversion recovery ( FLAIR) imaging were used. Results: White matter lesions and lesions in the basal ganglia were seen in 12 patients and 10 controls ( no significant difference). Subependymal lesions were detected in patients down to the age of 25 and in the controls down to the age of 43. The number of lesions was correlated to age both in patients ( rho=0.83, P < 0.01) and in controls ( rho=0.61, P < 0.05), but not to the duration of disease. Most lesions were detected with FLAIR, but many also with T2- weighted imaging. Conclusion: A number of MRI findings were detected in patients with chronic NB, although the findings were unspecific when compared with matched controls and did not correlate with disease duration. However, subependymal lesions may constitute a potential finding in chronic NB.

  • 4.
    Aanaes, K
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Rasmussen, N
    Rigshosp, Denmark Statens Serum Institute, Denmark .
    Pressler, T
    Rigshosp, Denmark Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Johansen, H K
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Lindberg, U
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hoiby, N
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Carlsson, M
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Wieslander, J
    EuroDiagnostica AB, Sweden .
    Buchwald, C
    Rigshosp, Denmark .
    Extensive Endoscopic Image-Guided Sinus Surgery Decreases BPI-ANCA in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 573-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) directed against bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) are common in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and serum levels are correlated with lung colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the severity of lung damage. The production of BPI-ANCA may be due to the costimulation of BPI when mounting an immune response against P. aeruginosa. The effect of surgery aiming to eradicate bacteria and infected tissue on BPI-ANCA levels is sparsely described. A cohort of patients with CF were included: 53 patients having extensive image-guided sinus surgery (EIGSS) with topical postoperative antibiotic treatment, 131 non-operated controls and 36 who had double lung transplantation (LTX). In all 219 patients, serum samples before and after surgery or at similar intervals were analysed for IgG and IgA BPI-ANCA. The EIGSS group showed a highly significant decrease in both IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels compared with their own preoperative values and control group values (P andlt; 0.0010.02). The LTX patients also showed a highly significant decrease in both IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels (P andlt; 0.001). EIGSS and LTX decrease IgA and IgG BPI-ANCA levels in patients with CF, indicating that extensive removal of infected tissue influences the pathogenic process of autoantibody production. The results shown herein are in favour of applying EIGSS in selected patients with CF and for using BPI-ANCA as a surrogate marker for guiding further therapeutic interventions.

  • 5.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Det preoperativa informationssamtalets betydelse för patientens delaktighet i sin vård inom kolorektalkirurgi2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: ERAS (Enhanced Recovery After Surgery) är ett standardiserat multimodalt vårdprogram vid elektiv kolorektalkirurgi, som syftar till snabbare återhämtning och kortare vårdtider genom ett tvärprofessionellt samarbete.  En vecka innan planerad operation träffar sjuksköterskan patienten för ett samtal om vårdförloppet.

     

    Syfte: Att identifiera och beskriva patientens upplevelse av sjuksköterskans ERAS- samtal och dess betydelse för patientens delaktighet i sin vård. 

     

    Metod: Datainsamlingen skedde genom kvalitativa intervjuer. Tolv patienter, nio män och tre kvinnor har intervjuats. De ljudinspelade samtalen har transkriberats ordagrant och analyserats med hjälp av tolkande fenomenologisk analys (Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis).

     

    Resultat: Analysarbetet resulterade i fem olika teman; bli sedd, trygghet, tillit, ansvar samt delaktighet. Alla teman relaterar till varandra och illustrerar en positiv och en negativ sida av den upplevda erfarenheten. Tillsammans bildar en helhet av upplevelsen; ERAS- samtalet och dess betydelse för patientens delaktighet.

     

    Konklusion: Resultatet visar att patienterna känner sig sedda under informationssamtalet. Det är viktigt att bekräfta patienten och knyta an mer till informationssamtalet under vårdtiden för att patienterna ska vara delaktiga och ta eget ansvar. Tilliten till vårdpersonalen har betydelse för att patienterna ska känna trygghet. Studien visar att ERAS- samtalet upplevs strukturerat och individuellt men informationen måste följa patienterna under hela vårdtillfället.

  • 6.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of preoperative information for patient participation in colorectal surgery care2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, p. 1604-1612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe patients' experiences of a preoperative information session with a nurse, as part of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) concept, and its impact on patient participation in their own care.

    Background

    Enhanced recovery after surgery is a standardised, multimodal treatment programme for elective colorectal surgery, leading to faster recovery and shorter hospital stays via interprofessional collaboration. The ERAS concept is initiated for patients a week before surgery when the patient receives detailed information about the care process during a meeting with a nurse.

    Design

    The study is a qualitative interpretive study based on interviews.

    Methods

    Twelve patients, nine men and three women, were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA).

    Results

    The analysis identified and formulated five themes: being seen, security, trust, responsibility and participation. All themes are closely related and illustrate positive and negative sides of the patient's experience. They hang together and form a complete set of experiences: ERAS conversation and its impact on patients' participation.

    Conclusions

    The results show that patients feel confirmed in the ERAS conversation. Healthcare professionals need to be bonding more information call during hospitalisation. It is important to confirm the patient in order for them to participate and take responsibility. Reliance on caregivers is important for patients to feel safe and to participate in their own care. This study shows that the ERAS conversation was experienced as being structured and individually tailored, but the information must apply to the patients throughout the period of care.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Some shortcomings have been revealed, which should enable improvement in the care of patients. Healthcare professionals need to raise awareness of patients' responsibilities for participation in their own recovery and care. Healthcare professionals and patients need to be aware of each other's responsibilities.

  • 7.
    Aasa, Mikael
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Gothenburg University.
    Grip, Lars
    Gothenburg University.
    Herlitz, Johan
    Gothenburg University.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Leif
    Stockholm Prehospital Centre.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Cost and health outcome of primary percutaneous coronary intervention versus thrombolysis in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction-Results of the Swedish Early Decision reperfusion Study (SWEDES) trial2010In: AMERICAN HEART JOURNAL, ISSN 0002-8703, Vol. 160, no 2, p. 322-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background In ST-elevation myocardial infarction, primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has a superior clinical outcome, but it may increase costs in comparison to thrombolysis. The aim of the study was to compare costs, clinical outcome, and quality-adjusted survival between primary PCI and thrombolysis. Methods Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction were randomized to primary PCI with adjunctive enoxaparin and abciximab (n = 101), or to enoxaparin followed by reteplase (n = 104). Data on the use of health care resources, work loss, and health-related quality of life were collected during a 1-year period. Cost-effectiveness was determined by comparing costs and quality-adjusted survival. The joint distribution of incremental costs and quality-adjusted survival was analyzed using a nonparametric bootstrap approach. Results Clinical outcome did not differ significantly between the groups. Compared with the group treated with thrombolysis, the cost of interventions was higher in the PCI-treated group ($4,602 vs $3,807; P = .047), as well as the cost of drugs ($1,309 vs $1,202; P = .001), whereas the cost of hospitalization was lower ($7,344 vs $9,278; P = .025). The cost of investigations, outpatient care, and loss of production did not differ significantly between the 2 treatment arms. Total cost and quality-adjusted survival were $25,315 and 0.759 vs $27,819 and 0.728 (both not significant) for the primary PCI and thrombolysis groups, respectively. Based on the 1-year follow-up, bootstrap analysis revealed that in 80%, 88%, and 89% of the replications, the cost per health outcome gained for PCI will be andlt;$0, $50,000, and $100,000 respectively. Conclusion In a 1-year perspective, there was a tendency toward lower costs and better health outcome after primary PCI, resulting in costs for PCI in comparison to thrombolysis that will be below the conventional threshold for cost-effectiveness in 88% of bootstrap replications.

  • 8.
    Aaseth, Jan
    et al.
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Science NMBU, Norway.
    Bjorklund, Geir
    Council Nutr and Environm Med, Norway.
    Hestad, Knut
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Dusek, Petr
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Gen University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.
    Roos, Per M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; St Goran Hospital, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Treatment strategies in Alzheimers disease: a review with focus on selenium supplementation2016In: Biometals, ISSN 0966-0844, E-ISSN 1572-8773, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 827-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimers disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder presenting one of the biggest healthcare challenges in developed countries. No effective treatment exists. In recent years the main focus of AD research has been on the amyloid hypothesis, which postulates that extracellular precipitates of beta amyloid (A beta) derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) are responsible for the cognitive impairment seen in AD. Treatment strategies have been to reduce A beta production through inhibition of enzymes responsible for its formation, or to promote resolution of existing cerebral A beta plaques. However, these approaches have failed to demonstrate significant cognitive improvements. Intracellular rather than extracellular events may be fundamental in AD pathogenesis. Selenate is a potent inhibitor of tau hyperphosphorylation, a critical step in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Some selenium (Se) compounds e.g. selenoprotein P also appear to protect APP against excessive copper and iron deposition. Selenoproteins show anti-inflammatory properties, and protect microtubules in the neuronal cytoskeleton. Optimal function of these selenoenzymes requires higher Se intake than what is common in Europe and also higher intake than traditionally recommended. Supplementary treatment with N-acetylcysteine increases levels of the antioxidative cofactor glutathione and can mediate adjuvant protection. The present review discusses the role of Se in AD treatment and suggests strategies for AD prevention by optimizing selenium intake, in accordance with the metal dysregulation hypothesis. This includes in particular secondary prevention by selenium supplementation to elderly with mild cognitive impairment.

  • 9.
    Aasland, Olaf G.
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Nygaard, Peter
    Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The long and winding road to widespread implementation of screening and brief intervention for alcohol problems: A historical overview with special attention to the WHO initiatives2008In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 469-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before 1970, special institutions, often prison-like, were built for the severely dependent. The effect of this type of treatment, often lasting for months or even years, was hard to document scientifically. During the 1970s several steps were taken towards a more preventive strategy that involved delivery of alcohol interventions in general health care settings, particularly within primary health care. The World Health Organization's (WHO) introduction of the concepts of hazardous and harmful drinking represented a shift from the traditional dichotomous view of individuals being alcoholic-or-not to a continuum where, in line with Rose's "prevention paradox", a large number of people with low risk may give rise to more cases of disease than the small number with high risk. The need for efficient methods to detect persons with various degrees of alcohol risk was evident, and a WHO multinational project that resulted in the publication of AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders identification Test) was carried out in the mid 1980s. The usefulness of this principle of case finding was then investigated in a subsequent multinational WHO project of brief intervention, as well as in several other similar projects. Many of these projects have proven quite efficient, but screening and brief intervention for alcohol problems is still not standard procedure in primary health care. The paper discusses some of the reasons why.

  • 10.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Evidence base and future research directions in the management of low back pain2016In: World Journal of Orthopedics, ISSN 2218-5836, E-ISSN 2218-5836, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 156-161Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. Awareness of valid and reliable patient history taking, physical examination and clinical testing is important for diagnostic accuracy. Stratified care which targets treatment to patient subgroups based on key characteristics is reliant upon accurate diagnostics. Models of stratified care that can potentially improve treatment effects include prognostic risk profiling for persistent LBP, likely response to specific treatment based on clinical prediction models or suspected underlying causal mechanisms. The focus of this editorial is to highlight current research status and future directions for LBP diagnostics and stratified care.

  • 11.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Bond University, Australia.
    Kjellman, Görel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Multidimensional assessment of pain related disability after surgery for cervical disc disease2013In: APA Conference 2013: New moves, Australian Physiotherapy Association , 2013, p. 2-2Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions: Given only 25% of patients, 10 year post-surgery for cervical disc disease report clinically meaningful improvements in functional disability, what are the biopsychosocial factors associated with continued long-term disability? What are the implications for physiotherapy practice?

    Design: Cross-sectional observational study.

    Participants: Ninety patients who had undergone anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery 10-13 years prior.

    Outcome Measures: The Neck Disability Index (NDI), ACDF surgery type, surgical fusion status, patient age and Part 1 of the West Haven-Yale multidimensional pain inventory Swedish version (MPI-S) were entered into a statistical model. Part 1 of the MPI-S contains 5 subscales: pain severity, interference, life control, affective distress and support.

    Results: Seventy-three patients answered the questionnaires. Non-linear categorical regression modeling (CATREG) of the selected predictive variables explained 76.1% of the variance in NDI outcomes 10-13 years post ACDF. Of these predictors, MPI-S affective distress subscale (β = 0.635, p = <0.001) and pain severity subscale (β = 0.354, p = <0.001) were significant individual predictors of NDI ratings.

    Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate potential factors associated with prolonged functional disability greater than 10 years post-surgery for cervical disc disease. The results suggest the importance of not only pain severity but also screening affective distress as a potential barrier to physical functioning in patients previously operated for cervical disc disease. Future research on the utility of affect-focused body awareness therapy and pain coping strategies for post-surgical patients with continuing pain and physical disability is indicated.

    Key Practice Points:

    •  The screening of pain severity and affective distress is of importance for patients presenting with continuing physical disability after previous surgery for cervical disc disorders

    •  Affect-focused body awareness therapies and pain coping strategies may be a potential treatment alternative for patients with continuing pain and physical disability.

  • 12.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schröder, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Effectiveness of implementing a best practice primary healthcare model for low back pain (BetterBack) compared with current routine care in the Swedish context: an internal pilot study informed protocol for an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e019906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem commonly requiring healthcare. In Sweden, there is a call from healthcare practitioners (HCPs) for the development, implementation and evaluation of a best practice primary healthcare model for LBP.

    Aims (1) To improve and understand the mechanisms underlying changes in HCP confidence, attitudes and beliefs for providing best practice coherent primary healthcare for patients with LBP; (2) to improve and understand the mechanisms underlying illness beliefs, self-care enablement, pain, disability and quality of life in patients with LBP; and (3) to evaluate a multifaceted and sustained implementation strategy and the cost-effectiveness of the BetterBack☺ model of care (MOC) for LBP from the perspective of the Swedish primary healthcare context.

    Methods This study is an effectiveness-implementation hybrid type 2 trial testing the hypothesised superiority of the BetterBack☺ MOC compared with current routine care. The trial involves simultaneous testing of MOC effects at the HCP, patient and implementation process levels. This involves a prospective cohort study investigating implementation at the HCP level and a patient-blinded, pragmatic, cluster, randomised controlled trial with longitudinal follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months post baseline for effectiveness at the patient level. A parallel process and economic analysis from a healthcare sector perspective will also be performed. Patients will be allocated to routine care (control group) or the BetterBack☺ MOC (intervention group) according to a stepped cluster dogleg structure with two assessments in routine care. Experimental conditions will be compared and causal mediation analysis investigated. Qualitative HCP and patient experiences of the BetterBack☺ MOC will also be investigated.

    Dissemination The findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Further national dissemination and implementation in Sweden and associated national quality register data collection are potential future developments of the project.

  • 13.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Orthopaedics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department for Orthopaedics, Institute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leg pain and psychological variables predict outcome 2-3 years after lumber fusion surgery2011In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1626-1634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prediction studies testing a thorough range of psychological variables in addition to demographic, work-related and clinical variables are lacking in lumbar fusion surgery research. This prospective cohort study aimed at examining predictions of functional disability, back pain and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) 2-3 years after lumbar fusion by regressing nonlinear relations in a multivariate predictive model of pre-surgical variables. Before and 2-3 years after lumbar fusion surgery, patients completed measures investigating demographics, work-related variables, clinical variables, functional self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, fear of movement/(re)injury, mental health and pain coping. Categorical regression with optimal scaling transformation, elastic net regularization and bootstrapping were used to investigate predictor variables and address predictive model validity. The most parsimonious and stable subset of pre-surgical predictor variables explained 41.6, 36.0 and 25.6% of the variance in functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL 2-3 years after lumbar fusion. Pre-surgical control over pain significantly predicted functional disability and HRQOL. Pre-surgical catastrophizing and leg pain intensity significantly predicted functional disability and back pain while the pre-surgical straight leg raise significantly predicted back pain. Post-operative psychomotor therapy also significantly predicted functional disability while pre-surgical outcome expectations significantly predicted HRQOL. For the median dichotomised classification of functional disability, back pain intensity and HRQOL levels 2-3 years post-surgery, the discriminative ability of the prediction models was of good quality. The results demonstrate the importance of pre-surgical psychological factors, leg pain intensity, straight leg raise and post-operative psychomotor therapy in the predictions of functional disability, back pain and HRQOL-related outcomes.

  • 14.
    Abbott, Rebecca
    et al.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Elliott, James M.
    Northwestern Univ, IL 60611 USA; Univ Queensland, Australia; Zurich Univ Appl Sci, Switzerland.
    Åslund, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    The qualitative grading of muscle fat infiltration in whiplash using fat and water magnetic resonance imaging2018In: The spine journal, ISSN 1529-9430, E-ISSN 1878-1632, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 717-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: The development of muscle fat infiltration (MFI) in the neck muscles is associated with poor functional recovery following whiplash injury. Custom software and time-consuming manual segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is required for quantitative analysis and presents as a barrier for clinical translation. PURPOSE: The purpose of this work was to establish a qualitative MRI measure for MFI and evaluate its ability to differentiate between individuals with severe whiplash-associated disorder (WAD), mild or moderate WAD, and healthy controls. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This is a cross-sectional study. PATIENT SAMPLE: Thirty-one subjects with WAD and 31 age-and sex-matched controls were recruited from an ongoing randomized controlled trial. OUTCOME MEASURES: The cervical multifidus was visually identified and segmented into eighths in the axial fat/water images (C4-C7). Muscle fat infiltration was assessed on a visual scale: 0 for no or marginal MFI, 1 for light MFI, and 2 for distinct MFI. The participants with WAD were divided in two groups: mild or moderate and severe based on Neck Disability Index % scores. METHODS: The mean regional MFI was compared between the healthy controls and each of the WAD groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were carried out to evaluate the validity of the qualitative method. RESULTS: Twenty (65%) patients had mild or moderate disability and 11 (35%) were considered severe. Inter- and intra-rater reliability was excellent when grading was averaged by level or when frequency of grade II was considered. Statistically significant differences (pamp;lt;.05) in regional MFI were particularly notable between the severe WAD group and healthy controls. The ROC curve, based on detection of distinct MFI, showed an area-under-the curve of 0.768 (95% confidence interval 0.59-0.94) for discrimination of WAD participants. CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results suggest a qualitative MRI measure for MFI is reliable and valid, and may prove useful toward the classification of WAD in radiology practice. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Abbott, T. E. F.
    et al.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    Ahmad, T.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    Phull, M. K.
    Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Fowler, A. J.
    Guys and St Thomass NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Hewson, R.
    Barts Hlth NHS Trust, England.
    Biccard, B. M.
    Univ Cape Town, South Africa.
    Chew, Michelle
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Gillies, M.
    Univ Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Pearse, R. M.
    Queen Mary Univ London, England.
    The surgical safety checklist and patient outcomes after surgery: a prospective observational cohort study, systematic review and meta-analysis2018In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 120, no 1, p. 146-155Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The surgical safety checklist is widely used to improve the quality of perioperative care. However, clinicians continue to debate the clinical effectiveness of this tool. Methods: Prospective analysis of data from the International Surgical Outcomes Study (ISOS), an international observational study of elective in-patient surgery, accompanied by a systematic review and meta-analysis of published literature. The exposure was surgical safety checklist use. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and the secondary outcome was postoperative complications. In the ISOS cohort, a multivariable multi-level generalized linear model was used to test associations. To further contextualise these findings, we included the results from the ISOS cohort in a meta-analysis. Results are reported as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: We included 44 814 patients from 497 hospitals in 27 countries in the ISOS analysis. There were 40 245 (89.8%) patients exposed to the checklist, whilst 7508 (16.8%) sustained amp;gt;= 1 postoperative complications and 207 (0.5%) died before hospital discharge. Checklist exposure was associated with reduced mortality [odds ratio (OR) 0.49 (0.32-0.77); Pamp;lt;0.01], but no difference in complication rates [OR 1.02 (0.88-1.19); P = 0.75]. In a systematic review, we screened 3732 records and identified 11 eligible studies of 453 292 patients including the ISOS cohort. Checklist exposure was associated with both reduced postoperative mortality [OR 0.75 (0.62-0.92); Pamp;lt;0.01; I-2 = 87%] and reduced complication rates [OR 0.73 (0.61-0.88); Pamp;lt;0.01; I-2 = 89%). Conclusions: Patients exposed to a surgical safety checklist experience better postoperative outcomes, but this could simply reflect wider quality of care in hospitals where checklist use is routine.

  • 16.
    Abdgawad, Mohamed
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Pettersson, Asa
    Lund University.
    Gunnarsson, Lena
    Lund University.
    Bengtsson, Anders A
    Lund University.
    Geborek, Pierre
    Lund University.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Lund University.
    Segelmark, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Hellmark, Thomas
    Lund University.
    Decreased Neutrophil Apoptosis in Quiescent ANCA-Associated Systemic Vasculitis2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: ANCA-Associated Systemic Vasculitis (AASV) is characterized by leukocytoclasis, accumulation of unscavenged apoptotic and necrotic neutrophils in perivascular tissues. Dysregulation of neutrophil cell death may contribute directly to the pathogenesis of AASV. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Neutrophils from Healthy Blood Donors (HBD), patients with AASV most in complete remission, Polycythemia Vera (PV), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and renal transplant recipients (TP) were incubated in vitro, and the rate of spontaneous apoptosis was measured by FACS. Plasma levels of cytokines and sFAS were measured with cytometric bead array and ELISA. Expression of pro/anti-apoptotic factors, transcription factors C/EBP-alpha, C/EBP-beta and PU.1 and inhibitors of survival/JAK2-pathway were measured by real-time-PCR. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: AASV, PV and RA neutrophils had a significantly lower rate of apoptosis compared to HBD neutrophils (AASV 50 +/- 14% vs. HBD 64 +/- 11%, p andlt; 0.0001). In RA but not in AASV and PV, low apoptosis rate correlated with increased plasma levels of GM-CSF and high mRNA levels of anti-apoptotic factors Bcl-2A1 and Mcl-1. AASV patients had normal levels of G-CSF, GM-CSF and IL-3. Both C/EBP-alpha, C/EBP-beta were significantly higher in neutrophils from AASV patients than HBD. Levels of sFAS were significantly higher in AASV compared to HBD. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Neutrophil apoptosis rates in vitro are decreased in AASV, RA and PV but mechanisms seem to differ. Increased mRNA levels of granulopoiesis-associated transcription factors and increased levels of sFAS in plasma were observed in AASV. Additional studies are required to define the mechanisms behind the decreased apoptosis rates, and possible connections with accumulation of dying neutrophils in regions of vascular lesions in AASV patients.

  • 17.
    Abednazari, Hossin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. PEAS Institute, Linköping.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Nayeri, Fariba
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Hepatocyte growth factor is a reliable marker for efficient anti-bacterial therapy within the first day of treatment2014In: Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology, ISSN 2156-8456, E-ISSN 2156-8502, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 823-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid diagnosis and choice of appropriate antibiotic treatment might be life-saving in serious infectious diseases. Still the available markers that can evaluate and monitor the diagnosis and treatment are few. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been studied as a potent regenerative factor produced and released during injuries such as infectious diseases. Monitoring of HGF levels might predict therapy results better than C-reactive protein (CRP) within the first day of treatment in pneumonia. For further investigation of previous observations we aimed to study HGF as a first-day marker in over-representing infectious diseases in comparison to procalcitonin (PCT), CRP and body temperature. Fifty-one patients with community acquired infectious diseases were included consequently at admittance and the serum samples were collected before and within 18 - 24 hours of treatment. HGF levels decreased significantly in case of efficient antibiotic therapy and HGF was shown to be better than PCT, CRP and body temperature to evaluate treatment. In patients with pneumonia, monitoring of HGF was most reasonable. HGF might be used as a therapeutic marker within the first day of empiric antibiotic treatment during infection.

  • 18.
    Abidi, L.
    et al.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Oenema, A.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderson, P.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands; Newcastle University, England.
    van de Mheen, D.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands; IVO Addict Research Institute, Netherlands; Erasmus MC, Netherlands.
    Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Implementation of Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention in General Practice: a Delphi Study Among Healthcare Professionals and Addiction Prevention Experts2016In: Prevention Science, ISSN 1389-4986, E-ISSN 1573-6695, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 689-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the evidence base, alcohol screening and brief intervention (ASBI) have rarely been integrated into routine clinical practice. The aim of this study is to identify strategies that could tackle barriers to ASBI implementation in general practice by involving primary healthcare professionals and addiction prevention experts. A three-round online Delphi study was carried out in the Netherlands. The first-round questionnaire consisted of open-ended questions to generate ideas about strategies to overcome barriers. In the second round, participants were asked to indicate how applicable they found each strategy. Items without consensus were systematically fed back with group median ratings and interquartile range (IQR) scores in the third-round questionnaire. In total, 39 out of 69 (57 %) invited participants enrolled in the first round, 214 participants completed the second round, and 144 of these (67 %) completed the third-round questionnaire. Results show that participants reached consensus on 59 of 81 strategies, such as the following: (1) use of E-learning technology, (2) symptom-specific screening by general practitioners (GPs) and/or universal screening by practice nurses, (3) reimbursement incentives, (4) supportive materials, (5) clear guidelines, (6) service provision of addiction care centers, and (7) more publicity in the media. This exploratory study identified a broad set of strategies that could potentially be used for overcoming barriers to ASBI implementation in general practice and paves the way for future research to experimentally test the identified implementation strategies using multifaceted approaches.

  • 19.
    Aboyans, Victor
    et al.
    Dupuytren University Hospital.
    Criqui, Michael
    University of California, USA.
    Abraham, Pierre
    University Hospital of Angers, France.
    Allison, Matthew
    University of California, USA.
    Creager, Mark
    Brigham and Women’s Hospital, USA.
    Diehm, Curt
    Karlsbad Clinic/University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Fowkes, Gerry
    University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Hiatt, William
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Jönsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Lacroix, Philippe
    Limoges University, France.
    Marin, Benoit
    Limoges Teaching Hospital, France.
    McDermott, Mary
    Northwestern University,USA.
    Norgren, Lars
    University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pande, Reena
    Brigham and Women’s Hospital, USA.
    Preux, Pierre-Marie
    University of Limoges, France.
    Stoffers, H.E.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Treat-Jacobsson, Diane
    University of Minnesota, USA.
    Measurement and interpretation of the ankle-brachial index: a scientific statement from the Ammerican Heart Association2012In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Capodanno, Alessandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Downregulation of tumor suppressive microRNAs in vivo in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 54, p. 92134-92142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with dense breast tissue on mammography are at higher risk of developing breast cancer but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. De-regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been associated with the onset of breast cancer. miRNAs in the extracellular space participate in the regulation of the local tissue microenvironment. Here, we recruited 39 healthy postmenopausal women attending their mammography-screen that were assessed having extreme dense or entirely fatty breasts (nondense). Microdialysis was performed in breast tissue and a reference catheter was inserted in abdominal subcutaneous fat for local sampling of extracellular compounds. Three miRNAs, associated with tumor suppression, miR-193b, miR-365a, and miR-452 were significantly down-regulated in dense breast tissue compared with nondense breast tissue. In addition, miR-452 exhibited significant negative correlations with several pro-inflammatory cytokines in vivo, which was confirmed in vitro by overexpression of miR-452 in breast cancer cells. No differences were found of miR-21, -29a, -30c, 146a, -148a, -203, or -451 in breast tissue and no miRs were different in plasma. Extracellular miRNAs may be among factors that should be included in studies of novel prevention strategies for breast cancer.

  • 21.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Equal Pro-inflammatory Profiles of CCLs, CXCLs, and Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Extracellular Microenvironment In Vivo in Human Dense Breast Tissue and Breast Cancer2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, article id 1994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inflammatory microenvironment affects breast cancer progression. Proteins that govern the inflammatory response are secreted into the extracellular space, but this compartment still needs to be characterized in human breast tissues in vivo. Dense breast tissue is a major risk factor for breast cancer by yet unknown mechanisms and no non-toxic prevention for these patients exists. Here, we used the minimal invasive technique of microdialysis for sampling of extracellular proteins in live tissues in situ in breast cancers of women before surgery and in healthy women having dense or non-dense breast tissue on mammography. Proteins were profiled using a proximity extension assay. Out of the 32 proteins assessed, 26 exhibited similar profiles in breast cancers and dense breast tissues; CCL-4, -7, -8, -11, -15, -16, -22, -23, and -25, CXCL-5, -8, -9, -16 as well as sIL-6R, IL-18, vascular endothelial growth factor, TGF-a, fibroblast growth factor 19, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -3, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator were all increased, whereas CCL-3, CX3CL1, hepatocyte growth factor, and MMP-9 were unaltered in the two tissues. CCL-19 and -24, CXCL-1 and -10, and IL-6 were increased in dense breast tissue only, whereas IL-18BP was increased in breast cancer only. Our results provide novel insights in the inflammatory microenvironment in human breast cancer in situ and define potential novel therapeutic targets. Additionally, we show previously unrecognized similarities of the pro-inflammatory microenvironment in dense breast tissue and breast cancer in vivo suggesting that anti-inflammatory breast cancer prevention trials for women with dense breast tissue may be feasible.

  • 22.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Increased nutrient availability in dense breast tissue of postmenopausal women in vivo2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 42733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Nutrient availability in the tissue microenvironment determines cellular events and may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. High mammographic density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. Whether nutrient availability differs in normal breast tissues with various densities is unknown. Therefore we investigated whether breast tissues with various densities exhibited differences in nutrient availability. Healthy postmenopausal women from the regular mammographic screening program who had either predominantly fatty breast tissue (nondense), n = 18, or extremely dense breast tissue (dense), n = 20, were included. Microdialysis was performed for the in vivo sampling of amino acids (AAs), analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectroscopy, glucose, lactate and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in breast tissues and, as a control, in abdominal subcutaneous (s.c.) fat. We found that dense breast tissue exhibited significantly increased levels of 20 proteinogenic AAs and that 18 of these AAs correlated significantly with VEGF. No differences were found in the s.c. fat, except for one AA, suggesting tissue-specific alterations in the breast. Glucose and lactate were unaltered. Our findings provide novel insights into the biology of dense breast tissue that may be explored for breast cancer prevention strategies.

  • 23.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Rzepecka, Anna
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment in vivo2016In: Oncoimmunology, ISSN 2162-4011, E-ISSN 2162-402X, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e1229723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammation is one of the hallmarks of carcinogenesis. High mammographic density has been associated with increased risk of breast cancer but the mechanisms behind are poorly understood. We evaluated whether breasts with different mammographic densities exhibited differences in the inflammatory microenvironment.Postmenopausal women attending the mammography-screening program were assessed having extreme dense, n = 20, or entirely fatty breasts (nondense), n = 19, on their regular mammograms. Thereafter, the women were invited for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), microdialysis for the collection of extracellular molecules in situ and a core tissue biopsy for research purposes. On the MRI, lean tissue fraction (LTF) was calculated for a continuous measurement of breast density. LTF confirmed the selection from the mammograms and gave a continuous measurement of breast density. Microdialysis revealed significantly increased extracellular in vivo levels of IL-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, and CCL5 in dense breast tissue as compared with nondense breasts. Moreover, the ratio IL-1Ra/IL-1 was decreased in dense breasts. No differences were found in levels of IL-1, IL-1Ra, CCL2, leptin, adiponectin, or leptin:adiponectin ratio between the two breast tissue types. Significant positive correlations between LTF and the pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as between the cytokines were detected. Stainings of the core biopsies exhibited increased levels of immune cells in dense breast tissue.Our data show that dense breast tissue in postmenopausal women is associated with a pro-inflammatory microenvironment and, if confirmed in a larger cohort, suggests novel targets for prevention therapies for women with dense breast tissue.

  • 24.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    I takt med framtiden: Utveckling av ett nytt interprofessionellt curriculum vid Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hälso- och sjukvårdsutbildningarnas ansvar att utbilda professionella som kan samarbetaoch förstå varandras kompetens, för att utföra och utveckla patientsäker vård, betonas alltmer i den globala debatten om framtidens hälso- och sjukvård. Modern professionsutbildning inom hälso- och sjukvården måste idag därför innehålla moment av god kvalitet där studenter lär med, av och om varandra för att utveckla interprofessionell kompetens. Hälsouniversitetet i Linköping är pionjär, både nationellt och internationellt, när det gäller interprofessionellt lärande tack vare satsningen på integrerade utbildningsmoment som funnits med sedan från starten 1986. Den här rapporten är en sammanställning av den interna process som har genomförts för att initiera ett pedagogiskt utvecklingsprojekt med avsikt att revidera och utveckla dessa gemensamma utbildningsmoment inriktade mot interprofessionellt lärande. Texten är upplagd kronologiskt och inleds med det direktiv som fakultetsledningen gav för att en utvald grupp lärare skulle kunna utarbeta ett förslag på hur de interprofessionella lärandemomenten vid Hälsouniversitetet skulle kunna förbättras. Härefter följer den rapport som utredningsgruppen lämnade, och som sedan skickades på remiss till olika intressenter. Rapporten följs av en sammanställning och bearbetning av de inkomna remissvaren och till sist följer fakultetsstyrelsens beslut om hur curriculum för interprofessionell utbildning inom Hälsouniversitetet ska utvecklas eller förändras. Det är vår förhoppning att dokumentationen av processen för att förnya fakultetens interprofessionella utbildning ska ge inspiration för fortsatt förändrings- och utvecklingsarbete både inom och utom Linköpings universitet.

  • 25.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning professional practice through education2012In: Practice, Learning and Change: Practice-theory perspectives on professional learning. / [ed] Paul Hager, Ann Reich & Alison Lee, Dordrecht: Springer Publishing Company, 2012, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The three concepts central to this volume--practice, learning and change--have received very different treatments in the educational literature, an oversight directly confronted here. While learning and change have been extensively theorised, their various contexts articulated and analysed, practice is notably underrepresented. Where much of the literature on learning and change takes the notion of 'practice' as an unexamined given, its co-location as a term with various classifiers, as in 'legal practice' and 'teaching practice', render it curiously devoid of semantic force. In this book, 'practice' is the super-ordinate organising idea. Drawing on what has been termed the 'practice turn in contemporary theory', the work develops a conceptual framework for researching learning in, and on, practice. It challenges received notions of practice, questioning the assumptions, elisions, conflations and silences on the subject. In so doing, it offers fresh insights into learning and change, and how they relate to practice. In tandem with this conceptual work, the book details site-ontological studies of practice and learning in diverse professional and workplace contexts, examining the work of occupations as various as doctors, chefs and orchestral musicians. It demonstrates the value of theorising practice, learning and change, as well as exploring the connections between them amid our evolving social and institutional structures.

  • 26.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyrdal Solbrekke, Tone
    Oslo universitet, Norway.
    Karseth, Berit
    Oslo Universitet, Norway.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    From university to professional practice: Students as journeymen between cultures of education and work2014In: International handbook of research in professional and practice-based learning, Volume 1 / [ed] Stephen Billett, Christian Harteis, Hans Gruber, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2014, 1, p. 461-484Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching research problem addressed in this chapter is the relationship between professional/higher education and professional work. The chapter will discuss the relevance of university education for professional practice with a particular focus on professional identity formation and formation of professional responsibility. We deiscuss how different professional programs and their traditions and culturs shape different curricula structures that have an impact on students professional identity formation and transition to work. We will also discuss ecperiences with and learning of professional responsibility in the web of commitments within educational settings and how new multiple expectations emerge and lead to new learning experiencies when entering work life. The argument of the chapter is based on the rationale and findings from an extensive international research program, conducted between 2001-2008.

  • 27.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fenwick, Tara
    University of Stirling, Scotland.
    Hopwood, Nick
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Theorising simulation in higher education: difficulty for learners as an emergent phenomenon2016In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 613-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the widespread interest in using and researching simulation in higher education, little discussion has yet to address a key pedagogical concern: difficulty. A sociomaterial view of learning, explained in this paper, goes beyond cognitive considerations to highlight dimensions of material, situational, representational and relational difficulty confronted by students in experiential learning activities such as simulation. In this paper we explore these dimensions of difficulty through three contrasting scenarios of simulation education. The scenarios are drawn from studies conducted in three international contexts: Australia, Sweden and the UK, which illustrate diverse approaches to simulation and associated differences in the forms of difficulty being produced. For educators using simulation, the key implications are the importance of noting and understanding (1) the effects on students of interaction among multiple forms of difficulty; (2) the emergent and unpredictable nature of difficulty; and (3) the need to teach students strategies for managing emergent difficulty.

  • 28.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, MariaLinköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.Fejes, AndreasLinköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Book of Abstracts: 3rd International ProPEL Conference 2017, 14-16 June 2017, Hosted by Linköping University, Sweden2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Professional practice, education and learning: A sociomaterial perspective2018In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 239-241Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hopwood, Nick
    University of Technology, Sydney.
    Lee, Alison
    University of Technology, Sydney.
    Researching Professional Learning and Practice: What does it mean to 'be there'?2012In: “Professions and Professional Learning in Troubling Times:Emerging Practices and Transgressive Knowledges. UNIVERSITY OF STIRLING, UK Wednesday 9thMay – Friday 11th May 2012, 2012, p. 11-11Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    If we aim to understand professional learning and practice in material, embodied and discursive terms,then one obvious place to turn methodologically is to ethnography and observation. Ethnographicmethods normally presuppose the physical presence of the researcher in the research setting. In thispaper we explore what it might mean to observe, document and represent practices throughethnographic work in contexts of (i) interdisciplinary collaboration; (ii) economic and time pressures,making extended periods of observation difficult; and (iii)multi-sited, including international, collaboration.As we conduct and plan projects that involve scholars from different national and disciplinarybackgrounds, and imagine the temporal and spatial opportunities and constraints within which ourresearch unfolds, we are forced to think through what it means to ‘be there’, observing, in the field, aspractices and learning unfold. The material contexts in which we now work challenge the notion of thesingle ethnographer whose embodied presence in the field underpins an embodied understanding of theworld. We have to rely on others’ experiences, read field notes we didn’t write ourselves, engage withsituations where we don’t share a common language with participants, and make sense of the differentways data, analysis and theory have meaning for us as collaborators from health, geography andeducation backgrounds, drawing on a range of theoretical frames in our research.In order to grapple more fully and tangibly with these issues, we undertook a piece of observational workin a health professional education setting in Linköping, Sweden. An experienced gynaecologist andeducator, ‘Birgit’, runs evening sessions for small groups of medical students. Central to these are the‘professional patients’ – women who make themselves, their bodies, available so that students can learnand practise pelvic examination. Two of us, Madeleine and Nick, were present at one evening’s session;Alison was not. In the paper we will present excerpts from Nick’s and then Madeleine’s account of thesame ‘moment’ during the session. These will be followed by reflections from Alison as a remote‘participant’, on the sorts of understandings and questions that arise for her in this different position. Wewill then develop a collective response to the ‘data’, foregrounding ways in which our personal,professional, and disciplinary backgrounds or ways of being shape our engagement with the world, thedifferent accounts, and our responses to each other. We complicate notions of ‘being there’ to exploremultiple ‘beings there’ and ‘beings apart’, highlighting important theoretical and methodological issuesaround observation, representation, and analysis, and reflecting on these in terms of theoreticalgroundings of our substantive analysis in practice theory.

  • 31.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Lee, Alison
    University of Technology, Sydney.
    Materialities of Professional Learning: Troubling the Urban/Rural Divide in Sites of Professional Knowledge Enactments: Professional learning within the frames of higher education. How is this possible?2011In: 'Urban Education'.  European Conference for Educational Research, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This symposium presents studies of different professional groups – educators, nurses, police and social workers in Italy, Norway, Scotland and Sweden - to address two main themes in professional learning and knowledge construction. First, it outlines ways of understanding professional learning as material enactments of knowledge. Second, it troubles the category of ‘urban’ spaces of professional knowledge, exploring the ways that professionals enact different forms of knowledge work and objectual relationships at different sites. These sites of practice may be more urban or more rural, but together form the machinery of professionals’ knowledge production.

     

    To the first theme, all four papers draw from theoretical perspectives that step aside from subject-centred, reflectivist orientations of professional learning to focus on the socio-material webs of practice. They explore the ways that professional knowledge is distributed and constructed or performed differently in different local sites. The paper authors, drawing from actor-network theory, science and technology studies, complexity science, Knorr-Cetina’s object-relations, and practice-based theory are all conceptualising professional learning as a matter of negotiating different knowledge resources to assemble and order strategies, objects, texts, technologies and values in moments of activity.

     

    To the second theme, the papers each show how professional knowledge seems intended to flow outwardly from urban-based centres of research and practice, where resources are concentrated to develop ‘evidence-based’ universalised best practices that are then incorporated into regulatory codes and professional development for all practitioners, including those operating in very different settings such as remote ‘rural’ and community-based sites. For example, paper one examines police work and knowledge in Scotland, showing how models of best practice for police work are often derived from large urban environments, but then become reconfigured and recoded in non-urban environments where professionals must draw from other knowledge strategies such as community relationships and local resources. In paper two, hospital nurses in Norway engage in validating and explicating knowledge-based procedures in some working sites, while other sites are dominated by application of these in the interaction with patients/clients. If we are to understand the knowledge production and knowledge relations comprising professional learning, we need to take into account these different sites.

     

    Furthermore, the papers show how professional practice and knowledge is difficult to conceive as bordered in particular static spaces designated as ‘urban’ or ‘rural’. The Scottish police case study shows that communities which some may describe as rural are in fact considered to be urban by many inhabitants, and also that certain ‘urban’ characteristics are enacted in more remote spaces. Professionals themselves can be highly mobile, transporting objects and texts embedding particular practices and knowledge across more rural or more urban sites of practice. The social workers case shows how professionals move across sites that encapsulate elements of both rurality and urbanity. All four cases show, in different ways, how professional knowledge is produced as professionals learn through combining very different, even conflicting, resources in everyday enactments of knowledge: local practices and values, organisational traditions and policies, disciplinary knowledge bases and commitments of their particular professions, regulatory standards for practice, transnational and web-based knowledge, improvised work-arounds, and so forth.

     

    These two themes – the materiality of professionals’ learning and the diverse but connected enactments of professional knowledge at different sites – have important implications for continuing professional development. Each paper shows why and how to reconceptualise notions of ‘developing’ professionals to focus instead on professionals’ attunement to the different knowledge resources available, the knowledge strategies that can be most productive for them, and the ways that knowledge is enacted differently across different sites of practice.

  • 32.
    Abrate, Alberto
    et al.
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Buono, Roberta
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Canu, Tamara
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Esposito, Antonio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Del Maschio, Alessandro
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Luciano, Roberta
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy; IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Bettiga, Arianna
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Colciago, Giorgia
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Guazzoni, Giorgio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Benigni, Fabio
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Hedlund, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Altaner, Cestmir
    Slovak Academic Science, Slovakia; St Elisabeth Cancer Institute, Slovakia.
    Montorsi, Francesco
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Cavarretta, Ilaria T. R.
    IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Italy.
    Mesenchymal stem cells expressing therapeutic genes induce autochthonous prostate tumour regression2014In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 50, no 14, p. 2478-2488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) as vehicles of therapeutic genes represent a unique tool to activate drugs within a neoplastic mass due to their property to home and engraft into tumours. In particular, MSC expressing the cytosine deaminase:: uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD-MSC) have been previously demonstrated to inhibit growth of subcutaneous prostate cancer xenografts thanks to their ability to convert the non-toxic 5-fluorocytosine into the antineoplastic 5-fluorouracil. Since both the immune system and the tumour microenvironment play a crucial role in directing cancer progression, in order to advance towards clinical applications, we tested the therapeutic potential of this approach on animal models that develop autochthonous prostate cancer and preserve an intact immune system. As cell vectors, we employed adipose-tissue and bone-marrow MSC. CD-MSC toxicity on murine prostate cancer cells and tumour tropism were verified in vitro and ex-vivo before starting the preclinical studies. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was utilised to follow orthotopic tumour progression. We demonstrated that intravenous injections of CD-MSC cells, followed by intraperitoneal administration of 5-fluorocytosine, caused tumour regression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model, which develops aggressive and spontaneous prostate cancer. These results add new insights to the therapeutic potential of specifically engineered MSC in prostate cancer disease.

  • 33.
    Addelyan Rasi, Hamideh
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Empowering Women in the Middle East by Psychosocial Interventions: Can provision of learning spaces in individual and group sessions and teaching of coping strategies improve women’s quality of life?2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study set out to construct a conceptual framework that can be used in social work with women in the Middle East and other settings where women have limited access to resources, which, as a result, limits their decision-making capacity. The framework has both an empirical and a theoretical base. The empirical base comprises data from two intervention projects among Iranian women: single mothers and newly married women. The theoretical base is drawn from relevant psychological and social work theories and is harmonized with the empirical data. Psychosocial intervention projects, based on learning spaces for coping strategies, were organized to assess if Iranian women could use a problemsolving model (i.e. focused on cognition and emotion simultaneously) to effectively and independently meet challenges in their own lives and improve their quality of life.

    Methods: Descriptive qualitative and quasi-experimental quantitative methods were used for data collection and analysis. Forty-four single mothers and newly married women from social welfare services were allocated to nonrandomized intervention and comparison groups. The intervention groups were invited to participate in a 7-month psychosocial intervention; the comparison groups were provided with treatment as usual by the social welfare services. The WHOQOL-BREF instrument was used to measure quality of life, comparing each intervention groups’ scores before and after the intervention and with respective comparison groups. In addition, content analysis and constant comparative analysis were performed on the qualitative data collected from the participants before, during and after the intervention.

    Results: The results of the quasi-experimental study show significant and large effect sizes among the women exposed to the intervention. Small and not statistically significant effect sizes were observed in the women provided with traditional social welfare services. Accordingly, teaching coping strategies can be a means to improve the quality of life of women in societies where gender discrimination is prevalent. The qualitative findings from the Iranian projects illustrate a process of change —socio-cognitive empowerment— with regard to thinking, feeling and acting among women during and after the intervention. The women developed a number of mental capacities essential to coping and life management. All women used the model effectively, and consequently, made more deliberate decisions to improve their life situations.

    Conclusion: The practical lessons from the Iranian projects highlight the possibilities of empowering women through fostering mindfulness and deliberate decision making as well as achieving consciousness. This study provides provisional evidence that psychosocial intervention projects, based on learning spaces for coping strategies, can help many clients to achieve their goals and improve their quality of life, and that this psychosocial intervention project can be a useful model for social work practice with women in the Middle East. The conceptual framework can help social workers to bridge the gap between theory and practice: that is, to draw from existing social work theories and, through the psychosocial intervention model, better apply this knowledge in their practical work with women in challenging social environments.

    List of papers
    1. Empowering Single Mothers in Iran: Applying a Problem-Solving Model in Learning Groups to Develop Participants’ Capacity to Improve Their Lives
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Empowering Single Mothers in Iran: Applying a Problem-Solving Model in Learning Groups to Develop Participants’ Capacity to Improve Their Lives
    2013 (English)In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 833-852Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2000, a problem-solving model has been taught to the Society for Protecting the Rights of the Child, and teachers and students of social work in two universities in Iran. Since 2006, with the initiation of UNICEF, social workers, psychologists and even some psychiatrists in Iran have been learning this model. In 2008, a group of researchers created an empowerment-oriented psycho-social group and private intervention project to assess whether a group of Iranian single mothers could use this model, which was traditionally used by professionals only, to effectively and independently meet challenges in their own lives. Our results show that all women used the model effectively and, consequently, made more deliberate decisions to improve their life situations. Some of the women succeeded in finding a job and many improved their family relationships. This study suggests that empowerment-oriented social work can help many clients to achieve their goals, and that this psycho-social intervention project can be a useful model for social work in Iran and many other societies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford University Press, 2013
    Keywords
    Iranian single mothers, psycho-social intervention, empowerment, capacitydevelopment, the Rahyab problem-solving model
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88189 (URN)10.1093/bjsw/bcs009 (DOI)000322671100002 ()
    Available from: 2013-01-31 Created: 2013-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Empowering newly married women in Iran: A new method of social work intervention that uses a client-directed problem-solving model in both group and individual sessions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Empowering newly married women in Iran: A new method of social work intervention that uses a client-directed problem-solving model in both group and individual sessions
    2013 (English)In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 765-781Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We set out to assess the processes by which a personal empowerment-oriented intervention based on learning spaces and the Rahyab problem-solving model can help newly married women in Iran to gain more control over their life situations. Learning to use the problem-solving model independently was an important component of this seven months’ educational program. A descriptive field study design based on qualitative methods was employed for data collection and analysis. The analysis of these processes showed how, through group and individual interventions, these women could influence their intimate relationships by altering their thoughts, their management of emotions, and their overt behavior. We invite more research on how empowerment-oriented interventions can be used to support newly married women as a part of family educational programs.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2013
    Keywords
    Education, empowerment, Iran, problem-solving, Rahyab, women
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88191 (URN)10.1177/1473325012458310 (DOI)000330308200005 ()
    Available from: 2013-01-31 Created: 2013-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Towards a Conceptual Framework for the Socio-Cognitive Empowerment of Women in the Middle East Countries: empirical and theoretical foundations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a Conceptual Framework for the Socio-Cognitive Empowerment of Women in the Middle East Countries: empirical and theoretical foundations
    2012 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: This study set out to construct a conceptual framework that can be used in social work with women in the Middle East and other settings where women are consistently limited in their access to resources and, as a result, their decision-making capacity. We employed a qualitative secondary analysis of data from two intervention projects among Iranian women (n=25). Each intervention spanned over seven months, included individual and group sessions, and involved learning an empowerment-oriented problem-solving model. A constant comparative analysis was used to build the conceptual framework.

    Findings: The practical lessons from the Iranian projects highlight a process of change with regard to thinking, feeling and acting among women during and after the intervention. As the women developed a number of mental capacities essential to coping and life management, we constructed a theoretical proposition, which offers an explanation of their socio-cognitive empowerment. We supplement the basis for these concepts that emerged in this proposition by integrating them with psychological and social work theories into a broader conceptual framework for social work practice.

    Applications: A conceptual framework has been developed to provide structural support for social work practice with women in the Middle East. This framework can help social workers to bridge the gap between theory and practice; that is, to draw from existing social work theory and, through our model, better apply this knowledge in their practical work with women in challenging social environments.

    Keywords
    Women, empowerment, socio-cognitive mindfulness, problem-solving, Iran, Middle East
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88192 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-01-31 Created: 2013-01-31 Last updated: 2013-01-31Bibliographically approved
    4. Can a psychosocial intervention programme teaching coping strategies improve the quality of life of Iranian women? A non-randomised quasi-experimental study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can a psychosocial intervention programme teaching coping strategies improve the quality of life of Iranian women? A non-randomised quasi-experimental study
    2013 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 2407-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To assess whether a psychosocial intervention teaching coping strategies to women can improve quality of life (QOL) in groups of Iranian women exposed to social pressures.

    Design: Quasi-experimental nonrandomized group design involving two categories of Iranian women, each category represented by nonequivalent intervention and comparison groups.

    Setting: A large urban area in Iran.

    Participants: 44 women; 25 single mothers and 19 newly married women.

    Interventions: Seventh-month psychosocial intervention aimed at providing coping strategies.

    Primary outcome measures: Effect sizes in four specific health-related domains and two overall perceptions of QOL and health measured by the WHOQOL-BREF instrument.

    Results: Large effect sizes were observed among the women exposed to the intervention in the WHOQOL-BREF subdomains measuring physical health (r=0.68; p<0.001), psychological health (r=0.72; p<0.001), social relationships (r=0.52; p<0.01), environmental health (r=0.55; p<0.01), and in the overall perception of QOL (r=0.72; p<0.001); the effect size regarding overall perception of health was between small and medium (r=0.20; not significant). Small and not statistically significant effect sizes were observed in the women provided with traditional social welfare services.

    Conclusions: Teaching coping strategies can improve the QOL of women in societies where gender discrimination is prevalent. The findings require reproduction in studies with a more rigorous design before the intervention model can be recommended for widespread distribution.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMJ Open, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88193 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2012-002407 (DOI)000330560500053 ()
    Available from: 2013-04-05 Created: 2013-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
  • 34.
    Addelyan Rasi, Hamideh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Moula, Alireza
    Department of Sociology & Social Work, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Puddephatt, Antony J.
    Department of sociology, Lakehead University, Canada.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Empowering newly married women in Iran: A new method of social work intervention that uses a client-directed problem-solving model in both group and individual sessions2013In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 765-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We set out to assess the processes by which a personal empowerment-oriented intervention based on learning spaces and the Rahyab problem-solving model can help newly married women in Iran to gain more control over their life situations. Learning to use the problem-solving model independently was an important component of this seven months’ educational program. A descriptive field study design based on qualitative methods was employed for data collection and analysis. The analysis of these processes showed how, through group and individual interventions, these women could influence their intimate relationships by altering their thoughts, their management of emotions, and their overt behavior. We invite more research on how empowerment-oriented interventions can be used to support newly married women as a part of family educational programs.

  • 35.
    Addelyan Rasi, Hamideh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Moula, Alireza
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Puddephatt, Antony J.
    Department of sociology, Lakehead University, Canada.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Empowering Single Mothers in Iran: Applying a Problem-Solving Model in Learning Groups to Develop Participants’ Capacity to Improve Their Lives2013In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 833-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2000, a problem-solving model has been taught to the Society for Protecting the Rights of the Child, and teachers and students of social work in two universities in Iran. Since 2006, with the initiation of UNICEF, social workers, psychologists and even some psychiatrists in Iran have been learning this model. In 2008, a group of researchers created an empowerment-oriented psycho-social group and private intervention project to assess whether a group of Iranian single mothers could use this model, which was traditionally used by professionals only, to effectively and independently meet challenges in their own lives. Our results show that all women used the model effectively and, consequently, made more deliberate decisions to improve their life situations. Some of the women succeeded in finding a job and many improved their family relationships. This study suggests that empowerment-oriented social work can help many clients to achieve their goals, and that this psycho-social intervention project can be a useful model for social work in Iran and many other societies.

  • 36.
    Addelyan Rasi, Hamideh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Moula, Alireza
    Department of Sociology & Social Work, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Puddephatt, Antony J.
    Department of sociology, Lakehead University, Canada.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Towards a Conceptual Framework for the Socio-Cognitive Empowerment of Women in the Middle East Countries: empirical and theoretical foundations2012Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: This study set out to construct a conceptual framework that can be used in social work with women in the Middle East and other settings where women are consistently limited in their access to resources and, as a result, their decision-making capacity. We employed a qualitative secondary analysis of data from two intervention projects among Iranian women (n=25). Each intervention spanned over seven months, included individual and group sessions, and involved learning an empowerment-oriented problem-solving model. A constant comparative analysis was used to build the conceptual framework.

    Findings: The practical lessons from the Iranian projects highlight a process of change with regard to thinking, feeling and acting among women during and after the intervention. As the women developed a number of mental capacities essential to coping and life management, we constructed a theoretical proposition, which offers an explanation of their socio-cognitive empowerment. We supplement the basis for these concepts that emerged in this proposition by integrating them with psychological and social work theories into a broader conceptual framework for social work practice.

    Applications: A conceptual framework has been developed to provide structural support for social work practice with women in the Middle East. This framework can help social workers to bridge the gap between theory and practice; that is, to draw from existing social work theory and, through our model, better apply this knowledge in their practical work with women in challenging social environments.

  • 37.
    Addelyan Rasi, Hamideh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Moula, Alireza
    Department of Sociology & Social Work, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Can a psychosocial intervention programme teaching coping strategies improve the quality of life of Iranian women? A non-randomised quasi-experimental study2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 2407-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To assess whether a psychosocial intervention teaching coping strategies to women can improve quality of life (QOL) in groups of Iranian women exposed to social pressures.

    Design: Quasi-experimental nonrandomized group design involving two categories of Iranian women, each category represented by nonequivalent intervention and comparison groups.

    Setting: A large urban area in Iran.

    Participants: 44 women; 25 single mothers and 19 newly married women.

    Interventions: Seventh-month psychosocial intervention aimed at providing coping strategies.

    Primary outcome measures: Effect sizes in four specific health-related domains and two overall perceptions of QOL and health measured by the WHOQOL-BREF instrument.

    Results: Large effect sizes were observed among the women exposed to the intervention in the WHOQOL-BREF subdomains measuring physical health (r=0.68; p<0.001), psychological health (r=0.72; p<0.001), social relationships (r=0.52; p<0.01), environmental health (r=0.55; p<0.01), and in the overall perception of QOL (r=0.72; p<0.001); the effect size regarding overall perception of health was between small and medium (r=0.20; not significant). Small and not statistically significant effect sizes were observed in the women provided with traditional social welfare services.

    Conclusions: Teaching coping strategies can improve the QOL of women in societies where gender discrimination is prevalent. The findings require reproduction in studies with a more rigorous design before the intervention model can be recommended for widespread distribution.

  • 38.
    Adlam, David
    et al.
    Univ Leicester, England; Glenfield Hosp, England.
    Alfonso, Fernando
    Hosp Univ La Princess, Spain.
    Maas, Angela
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Vrints, Christiaan
    Univ Antwerp, Belgium.
    al-Hussaini, Abtehale
    Univ Leicester, England; Glenfield Hosp, England.
    Bueno, Hector
    CNIC, Spain; Hosp Univ 12 Octubre, Spain.
    Capranzano, Piera
    Univ Catania, Italy.
    Gevaert, Sofie
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Belgium.
    Hoole, Stephen P.
    Papworth Hosp, England.
    Johnson, Tom
    Univ Hosp Bristol NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Lettieri, Corrado
    ASST Mantova Osped Carlo Poma, Italy.
    Maeder, Micha T.
    Kantonsspital St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Motreff, Pascal
    Univ Clermont Auvergne, France.
    Ong, Peter
    Robert Bosch Krankenhaus, Germany.
    Persu, Alexandre
    Catholic Univ Louvain, Belgium.
    Rickli, Hans
    Kantonsspital St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Schiele, Francois
    Univ Burgundy Franche Comte, France.
    Sheppard, Mary N.
    St Georges Univ London, England; St Georges Hosp NHS Trust, England.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    European Society of Cardiology, acute cardiovascular care association, SCAD study group: a position paper on spontaneous coronary artery dissection ESC-ACCA Position Paper on spontaneous coronary artery dissection2018In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 39, no 36, p. 3353-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 39.
    Admyre, Lena
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Norgren, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Rehabilitering i primärvård av patienter med besvär från rörelseorganen : slutrapport från samverkansprojektet Linköpingsmodellen. Del 2, Utvärdering och slutsatser2001Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Admyre, Lena
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Wåhlin-Norgren, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Rehabilitering i primärvård av patienter med besvär från rörelseorganen: slutrapport från samverkansprojektet Linköpingsmodellen. Del. 1, Bakgrund och projektbeskrivning.2001Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Admyre, Lena
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Norgren, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Perers, Lars
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Teamarbete på vårdcentral - en viktig grund för rehabilitering av patienter med besvär från rörelseorganen i primärvården: Team work as a method for rehabilitation of patients with musculoskeletal diseases2003In: Allmänmedicin, ISSN 0281-3513, Vol. 24, p. 76-80Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: A randomized study2006In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 330-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Women's grief after miscarriage is substantial and important. Women who experience early miscarriage do not constitute a homogenous group. The aim of this study is to measure whether a structured follow-up visit to a midwife (group 1) at 21-28 days after early miscarriage could reduce the women's grief, measured using the perinatal grief scale Swedish short version (PGS) after a further 3 months (i.e. 4 months after the miscarriage), compared to a regular follow-up visit to a midwife (group 2). Methods. We performed an open randomized study of women who experienced early miscarriage (n = 88). The midwife's attitude in group 1 came from Swanson science theory of midwifery. In group 2, the women were offered only the ordinary type of consultation at a regular visit. A questionnaire with the PGS was used in both groups. Four months after the miscarriage, a second questionnaire with the same perinatal grief scale was sent by post. Results. There was a 30% greater reduction in grief in group 1 than that in group 2, when comparing the first and second measurements (not significant). The biggest differences were in the subscales active grief and difficulty in coping. Women with the subdiagnosis missed abortions had, as a group, significantly higher PGS scores at both visits, especially in active grief and difficulty in coping, regardless of the type of follow-up visit. Conclusions. A structured follow-up visit did not, in comparison with a regular follow-up visit, imply any significant reduction in grief as measured using the PGS scale. However, the subgroup missed abortion had more extensive grief than the other women with miscarriage. Structured follow-up visits are not imperative for all women with early miscarriage.

  • 43.
    Adolfsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Guilt and emptiness: Women’s experiences of miscarriage2004In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women who lose an early pregnancy are shocked when they are first given the information that they have miscarried. Later they feel guilt and emptiness. Heideggerian interpretive phenomenology has been used with 13 women from southwest Sweden to uncover their lived experience of miscarriage. Women plan their future with a child during early pregnancy. When miscarriage occurs it is not a gore, an embryo, or a fetus they lose, it is their child. They feel that they are the cause of the miscarriage through something they have done, eaten, or thought. They feel abandonment and they grieve for their profound loss; they are actually in bereavement.

  • 44.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lithium formate EPR dosimetry for accurate measurements of absorbed dose in radiotherapy2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium formate has shown to be a material with properties suitable for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry, among them up to 7 times higher sensitivity compared to alanine, which is a well-established EPR detector material for dose determinations in radiotherapy.

    The aim of this thesis was to further investigate the properties of lithium formate and develop the dosimetry system towards applications in radiotherapy. The intrinsic efficiency for energies of relevance to brachytherapy and the signal stability were investigated. The dosimetry system was expanded to include a smaller dosimeter model, suitable for measurements in dose gradient regions. An individual sensitivity correction method was applied to the smaller dosimeters to be able to perform dose determinations with the same precision as for the larger ones. EPR dosimetry in general is time consuming and effort was spent to optimize the signal readout procedure regarding measurement time and measurement precision.

    The system was applied in two clinical applications chosen for their high demands on the dosimetry system: 1) a dosimetry audit for external photon beam therapy and 2) dose verification measurements around a low energy HDR brachytherapy source.

    The conclusions drawn from this thesis were: dose determinations can be performed with a standard uncertainty of 1.8-2.5% using both the original size dosimeters and the new developed smaller ones. The dosimetry system is robust and useful for applications when high measurement precision and accuracy is prioritized. It is a good candidate for dosimetry audits, both in external beam therapy and brachytherapy.

    List of papers
    1. Response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 4946-4959Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To investigate experimentally the energy dependence of the detector response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to that at 60Co energies. High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since the absorbed dose to water can be determined with high accuracy in such beams using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. In addition to any differences in mass-energy absorption properties between water and detector, variations in radiation yield (detector response) with radiation quality, caused by differences in the density of ionization in the energy imparted (LET), may exist. Knowledge of an eventual deviation in detector response with photon energy is important for attaining high accuracy in measured brachytherapy dose distributions.

    METHODS:

    Lithium formate EPR dosimeters were irradiated to known levels of air kerma in 25-250 kV x-ray beams and in 137Cs and 60Co beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free in air into values of mean absorbed dose to the detectors were made using EGSnrc MC simulations and x-ray energy spectra measured or calculated for the actual beams. The signals from the detectors were measured using EPR spectrometry. Detector response (the EPR signal per mean absorbed dose to the detector) relative to that for 60Co was determined for each beam quality.

    RESULTS:

    Significant decreases in the relative response ranging from 5% to 6% were seen for x-ray beams at tube voltages < or = 180 kV. No significant reduction in the relative response was seen for 137Cs and 250 kV x rays.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    When calibrated in 60Co or MV photon beams, corrections for the photon energy dependence of detector response are needed to achieve the highest accuracy when using lithium formate EPR dosimeters for measuring absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources emitting photons in the energy range of 20-150 keV such as 169Yb and electronic sources.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Association of Physicists in Medicine, 2010
    Keywords
    lithium formate EPR, brachytherapy, dosimetry, detector response, kV x rays
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59955 (URN)10.1118/1.3475938 (DOI)000281906000046 ()20964214 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-10-01 Created: 2010-10-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Investigation of signal fading in lithium formate EPR dosimeters using a new sensitive method
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation of signal fading in lithium formate EPR dosimeters using a new sensitive method
    Show others...
    2012 (English)In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 2209-2217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate signal fading in lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters used for clinical applications in radiotherapy. A new experimental method for determination of signal fading, designed to resolve small changes in signal from slowly decaying unstable radicals, was used. Possible signal fading in lithium formate due to different storage temperatures was also tested. Air humidity was kept at a constant level of 33% throughout the experiments. The conclusion drawn from the investigations was that the EPR signal from lithium formate is stable during at least 1 month after irradiation and is not sensitive to variations in storage temperature andlt;40 degrees C when kept at a relative air humidity of 33%. This makes lithium formate a suitable dosimeter for transfer dosimetry in clinical audits.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institute of Physics (IOP), 2012
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77095 (URN)10.1088/0031-9155/57/8/2209 (DOI)000302567100008 ()22456424 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Cancer foundation (CF)|100443|FORSS|86231|

    Available from: 2012-05-04 Created: 2012-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Optimisation of an EPR dosimetry system for robust and high precision dosimetry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optimisation of an EPR dosimetry system for robust and high precision dosimetry
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Radiation Measurements, ISSN 1350-4487, E-ISSN 1879-0925, Vol. 70, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry systems demand high accuracy causing time consuming analysis. The need for high spatial resolution dose measurements in regions with steep dose gradients demands small sized dosimeters. An optimization of the analysis was therefore needed to limit the time consumption. The aim of this work was to introduce a new smaller lithium formate dosimeter model (diameter reduced from standard diameter 4.5 mm to 3 mm and height from 4.8 mm to 3 mm). To compensate for reduced homogeneity in a batch of the smaller dosimeters, a method for individual sensitivity correction suitable for EPR dosimetry was tested. Sensitivity and repeatability was also tested for a standard EPR resonator and a super high Q (SHQE) one. The aim was also to optimize the performance of the dosimetry system for better efficiency regarding measurement time and precision. A systematic investigation of the relationship between measurement uncertainty and number of readouts per dosimeter was performed. The conclusions drawn from this work were that it is possible to decrease the dosimeter size with maintained measurement precision by using the SHQE resonator and introducing individual calibration factors for dosimeter batches. It was also shown that it is possible reduce the number of readouts per dosimeter without significantly decreasing the accuracy in measurements.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    EPR; ESR; Lithium formate; High precision dosimetry; High spatial resolution dosimetry
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111088 (URN)10.1016/j.radmeas.2014.08.013 (DOI)000345110700005 ()
    Available from: 2014-10-07 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    4. A system for remote dosimetry audit of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT based on lithium formate dosimetry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A system for remote dosimetry audit of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT based on lithium formate dosimetry
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 279-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to develop and test a remote end-to-end audit system using lithium formate EPR dosimeters. Four clinics were included in a pilot study, absorbed doses determined in the PTV agreed with TPS calculated doses within ±5% for 3D-CRT and ±7% (k=1) for IMRT/VMAT dose plans.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Dosimetry audit; remote audit; end-to-end; EPR; ESR; lithium formate
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111089 (URN)10.1016/j.radonc.2014.11.027 (DOI)000347657200021 ()
    Available from: 2014-10-07 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    5. Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source: Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source: Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 3869-3882Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in high dose rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy operating at 50 kV is increasing. For quality assurance it is important to identify dosimetry systems that can measure the absorbed doses in absolute terms which is difficult in this energy region. In this work a comparison is made between two dosimetry systems, EPR lithium formate dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film.

    Both types of dosimeters were irradiated simultaneously in a PMMA phantom using the Axxent EBS. Absorbed dose to water was determined at distances of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm from the EBS. Results were traceable to different primary standards as regards to absorbed dose to water (EPR) and air kerma (EBT2). Monte Carlo simulations were used in absolute terms as a third estimate of absorbed dose to water.

    Agreement within the estimated expanded (k = 2) uncertainties (5% (EPR), 7% (EBT2)) was found between the results at 30 mm and 50 mm from the x-ray source. The same result was obtained in 4 repetitions of irradiation, indicating high precision in the measurements with both systems. At all distances, agreement between EPR and Monte Carlo simulations was shown as was also the case for the film measurements at 30mm and 50mm. At 10mm the geometry for the film measurements caused too large uncertainty in measured values depending on the exact position (within sub-mm distances) of the EBS and the 10 mm film results were exculded from comparison.

    This work has demonstrated good performance of the lithium formate EPR dosimetry system in accordance with earlier experiments at higher photon energies (192Ir HDR brachytherapy). It was also highlighted that there might be issues regarding the energy dependence and intrinsic efficiency of the EBT2 film that need to be considered for measurements using low energy sources.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2015
    Keywords
    Electronic brachytherapy, EPR, lithium formate, radiochromic film, intrinsic efficiency
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111090 (URN)10.1088/0031-9155/60/9/3869 (DOI)000354104700030 ()
    Available from: 2014-10-07 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
  • 45.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Grindborg, Jan-Erik
    Statens Strålskyddsinstitut, Stockholm.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Response of Lithium Formate EPR Dosimeters at Photon Energies Relelvant to Brachytherapy2009In: IFMBE Proceedings, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg , 2009, p. 236-239Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After development of sensitive dosimeter materials Electron Paramagnetic Resonance EPR dosimetry has been successfully used also in radiation therapy. The intensity of the EPR-signal is a measure of the amount of free radicals created by ionizing radiation which is proportional to the absorbed dose in the dosimeter. Lithium formate monohydrate is a dosimeter material with 2-6 times higher sensitivity than alanine, a linear dose response over a wide dose range and mass-energy absorption properties similar to water. These properties make lithium formate promising for verification of absorbed doses around high dose rate brachytherapy sources where the dose gradient is steep and the photon energy distribution changing with distance from the source. Calibration of the dosimeters is performed in 60Co or MV photon beams where high dosimetric accuracy is feasible. The use in brachytherapy field relies on the assumption that the production of free radicals per mean absorbed dose in the dosimeter is similar at the lower photon energies present there. The aim of this work was to test that assumption. The response of the dosimeters as a function of photon energy was determined by irradiations with four x-ray qualities in the range 100-250 kV and 137Cs, relative to the response when irradiated with 60Co, all photon beams with well-known air kerma rates at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Monte Carlo simulations were used to convert air kerma free in air to mean absorbed dose to the dosimeter. The measured response relative 60Co as a function of photon energy was below unity for all qualities. The maximum deviation from unity was 2.5% (100 kV, 135 kV) with a relative standard deviation of 1.5% (k = 1).

  • 46.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Grindborg, Jan-Erik
    Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy2010In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 4946-4959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To investigate experimentally the energy dependence of the detector response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to that at 60Co energies. High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since the absorbed dose to water can be determined with high accuracy in such beams using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. In addition to any differences in mass-energy absorption properties between water and detector, variations in radiation yield (detector response) with radiation quality, caused by differences in the density of ionization in the energy imparted (LET), may exist. Knowledge of an eventual deviation in detector response with photon energy is important for attaining high accuracy in measured brachytherapy dose distributions.

    METHODS:

    Lithium formate EPR dosimeters were irradiated to known levels of air kerma in 25-250 kV x-ray beams and in 137Cs and 60Co beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free in air into values of mean absorbed dose to the detectors were made using EGSnrc MC simulations and x-ray energy spectra measured or calculated for the actual beams. The signals from the detectors were measured using EPR spectrometry. Detector response (the EPR signal per mean absorbed dose to the detector) relative to that for 60Co was determined for each beam quality.

    RESULTS:

    Significant decreases in the relative response ranging from 5% to 6% were seen for x-ray beams at tube voltages < or = 180 kV. No significant reduction in the relative response was seen for 137Cs and 250 kV x rays.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    When calibrated in 60Co or MV photon beams, corrections for the photon energy dependence of detector response are needed to achieve the highest accuracy when using lithium formate EPR dosimeters for measuring absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources emitting photons in the energy range of 20-150 keV such as 169Yb and electronic sources.

  • 47.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Optimisation of an EPR dosimetry system for robust and high precision dosimetry2014In: Radiation Measurements, ISSN 1350-4487, E-ISSN 1879-0925, Vol. 70, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry systems demand high accuracy causing time consuming analysis. The need for high spatial resolution dose measurements in regions with steep dose gradients demands small sized dosimeters. An optimization of the analysis was therefore needed to limit the time consumption. The aim of this work was to introduce a new smaller lithium formate dosimeter model (diameter reduced from standard diameter 4.5 mm to 3 mm and height from 4.8 mm to 3 mm). To compensate for reduced homogeneity in a batch of the smaller dosimeters, a method for individual sensitivity correction suitable for EPR dosimetry was tested. Sensitivity and repeatability was also tested for a standard EPR resonator and a super high Q (SHQE) one. The aim was also to optimize the performance of the dosimetry system for better efficiency regarding measurement time and precision. A systematic investigation of the relationship between measurement uncertainty and number of readouts per dosimeter was performed. The conclusions drawn from this work were that it is possible to decrease the dosimeter size with maintained measurement precision by using the SHQE resonator and introducing individual calibration factors for dosimeter batches. It was also shown that it is possible reduce the number of readouts per dosimeter without significantly decreasing the accuracy in measurements.

  • 48.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Olsson, Sara
    Medical Physics and Technology, Växjö Central Hospital, Växjö, Sweden.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    A system for remote dosimetry audit of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT based on lithium formate dosimetry2014In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 279-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to develop and test a remote end-to-end audit system using lithium formate EPR dosimeters. Four clinics were included in a pilot study, absorbed doses determined in the PTV agreed with TPS calculated doses within ±5% for 3D-CRT and ±7% (k=1) for IMRT/VMAT dose plans.

  • 49.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Sara
    Central Hospital Växjö, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Investigation of signal fading in lithium formate EPR dosimeters using a new sensitive method2012In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 2209-2217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate signal fading in lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters used for clinical applications in radiotherapy. A new experimental method for determination of signal fading, designed to resolve small changes in signal from slowly decaying unstable radicals, was used. Possible signal fading in lithium formate due to different storage temperatures was also tested. Air humidity was kept at a constant level of 33% throughout the experiments. The conclusion drawn from the investigations was that the EPR signal from lithium formate is stable during at least 1 month after irradiation and is not sensitive to variations in storage temperature andlt;40 degrees C when kept at a relative air humidity of 33%. This makes lithium formate a suitable dosimeter for transfer dosimetry in clinical audits.

  • 50.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Smide, B.
    Dept. of Pub. Hlth. and Caring Sci., Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gregeby, E.
    Köping Hospital, Köping, Sweden.
    Fernstrom, L.
    Fernström, L., Diabet. Educ. and Research Centre, Karolinska Hospital, Karolinska, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning.
    Implementing empowerment group education in diabetes2004In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 319-324Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim was to gain insight into and understand how physicians and nurses view the implementation of empowerment group education (EGE) in diabetes. Prior to the study the physicians and nurses attended a 2-day empowerment workshop. Further, they had implemented the empowerment approach in two groups of patients with type II diabetes. Three to 9 months later they (five physicians and 11 nurses from six family practices) participated in focus group interviews to evaluate the implementation of the EGE. The interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method. The main result showed a conflict in roles. The physicians and nurses knew their role in the traditional approach but not with respect to the empowerment approach, which they needed to grow into. At the same time as they started a new way of working, their role had changed from being an expert to being a facilitator. As experts they felt secure, as facilitators they needed support in their educational process. To implement EGE they required support both from the family practice and from a supervisor in direct connection with the EGE. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

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